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Encyclopedia > Steve Harley

Steve Harley and Cockney Rebel were a UK rock band from the early 1970s. Their music covers a range of styles from pop to progressive rock, and while they were contemporary with the glam rock period, their music is not truly classifiable as such. Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Events and trends Although in the United States and in many other Western societies the 1970s are often seen as a period of transition between the turbulent 1960s and the more conservative 1980s and 1990s, many of the trends that are associated widely with the Sixties, from the Sexual Revolution... Depending on context, pop music is either an abbreviation of popular music or, more recently, a term for a sub-genre of it. ... The progressive rock band Yes performing in 1977. ... Glam rock is a style of rock music popularised in the 1970s, and was mostly a British phenomenon. ...


Steve Harley was born as Steve Nice in February 1951 in London. His musical career began in the late 1960s when he was busking, performing his own songs, some of which were later recorded by him and the band. The original Cockney Rebel were put together in 1972, consisting of drummer Stuart Elliot, bassist Paul Jefferies, violinist Jean Paul Croker, and keyboard player Milton Reames James. They were signed to EMI after playing just 5 gigs. Their first single Sebastian, a soaring rock epic, was an immediate success in Europe, though failed to chart in the UK. Their first album, The Human Menagerie, was released in 1973. 1951 was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... Greater London and the Regions of England. ... Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... 1973 was a common year starting on Monday. ...


Harley managed to irritate a significant part of the music press with his self-aggrandisement, even as the music itself was getting rave reviews and gaining a wide audience. It was becoming clear that Harley regarded the band as little more than accompaniment to his own agenda, and already there were signs that things would not last, despite having a big hit with their second single, Judy Teen. There then followed the album The Psychomodo, an adventurous and ambitious production which showed that there was real talent in the group. A second single from the album, Mr. Soft, was also a big hit. The band were voted the "Most Outstanding New Act" of 1974. By this time the problems within the band had already reached a head, and most of the band with the exception of Stuart Elliot quit. An appearance on Top of the Pops by the group in fact largely consisted of session musicians drafted in for the show. See also: 1973 in music, other events of 1974, 1975 in music, 1970s in music and the list of years in music Events February 10 - record producer Phil Spector is badly injured in a car accident. ... Top of the Pops is a long-running British music chart television programme shown each week on BBC ONE and now on BBC Kids in Canada. ...


From then on, the band was a band in name only, being more or less a Steve Harley solo project. In 1974, a further album, The Best Years of Our Lives was made, produced by Beatles producer Alan Parsons. This included the track Make Me Smile (Come Up and See Me) which would go on to be a number one single and the band's biggest hit. From then on, Steve Harley struggled to match that success, and the band faded away. He made a minor comeback in 1979 as a solo artist in the UK singles chart with the Tamla Motown-inspired Freedom's Prisoner which bubbled under the Top 50. After a brief appearance in the 1980s with a song from Andrew Lloyd-Webber's The Phantom of the Opera, Steve began touring again with his old Cockney rebel songs in the late 80s and 90s. 1974 is a common year starting on Tuesday (click on link for calendar). ... The Beatles (L-R, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Ringo Starr, John Lennon), in 1964, performing on The Ed Sullivan Show during their first United States tour, promoting their first U.S. hit song, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ... Alan Parsons (born December 20, 1949) is a British record producer. ... See also: 1978 in music, other events of 1979, 1980 in music, 1970s in music and the list of years in music Events Disco reigned supreme in 1979, with several #1 hits from The Bee Gees and Donna Summer that year. ... Motown, also known as Tamla-Motown outside the U.S., is a record label founded on December 14, 1959 by Berry Gordy, Jr. ... Events and trends The 1980s marked an abrupt shift towards more conservative lifestyles after the momentous cultural revolutions which took place in the 1960s and 1970s and the definition of the AIDS virus in 1981. ... Andrew Lloyd Webber, Baron Lloyd-Webber (born March 22, 1948) is a highly successful British composer of musical theatre. ...


Harley now presents a show on BBC Radio 2 called The Sounds of the Seventies Radio 2 is one of the BBCs national radio stations. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
BBC- Radio 2 - Steve Harley Biography (742 words)
Steve Harley was born in Deptford, south London, on February 27th 1951, the second of five children.
Steve's first guitar was a Christmas gift from his parents when he was ten-years-old.
During the eighties, Steve took time out from the rock world as his two children were going through their formative years but did perform on stage, albeit the legitimate stage.
Steve Harley and Cockney Rebel (491 words)
Steve Harley was born as Steve Nice in February 1951 in London.
Harley managed to irritate a significant part of the music press with his self-aggrandisement, even as the music itself was getting rave reviews and gaining a wide audience.
It was becoming clear that Harley regarded the band as little more than accompaniment to his own agenda, and already there were signs that things would not last, despite having a big hit with their second single, ''Judy Teen''.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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