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Encyclopedia > Steve Goodman
Steve Goodman
Background information
Born July 25, 1948
Chicago, Illinois
Died September 20, 1984 (age 36)
Seattle, Washington
Genre(s) Folk, country, rock, pop
Occupation(s) Singer-songwriter
Instrument(s) Singer, guitarist
Years active 1968-1984
Label(s) Buddah, Asylum, Red Pajamas, Oh Boy
Associated
acts
John Prine, Kenneth C. "Jethro" Burns, Jimmy Buffett, Bonnie Koloc, Steve Martin, Tom Paxton
Website www.stevegoodman.net

Steve Goodman (July 25, 1948September 20, 1984) was an American folk music singer-songwriter from Chicago, Illinois. The writer of "City of New Orleans", made popular by Arlo Guthrie and many other artists, Goodman won two Grammy Awards. is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... “Seattle” redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Folk music can have a number of different meanings, including: Traditional music: The original meaning of the term folk music was synonymous with the term Traditional music, also often including World Music and Roots music; the term Traditional music was given its more specific meaning to distinguish it from the... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Pop music (disambiguation). ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... Harry Belafonte singing, photograph by C. van Vechten Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice, which is often contrasted with speech. ... For the UK magazine, see Guitarist (magazine). ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Buddah Records (now known as Buddha Records for spelling corrections of Buddha) was founded in 1967 by promotor Neil Bogart in New York City. ... Asylum Records is an American record label owned by Warner Music Group, which currently is geared primarily in hip-hop music. ... John Prine (born October 10, 1946 in Maywood, Illinois) is an American country/folk singer-songwriter who has achieved widespread critical (and some commercial) success since the early 1970s. ... Kenneth C. Burns (Conasaga, Tennessee March 10, 1920 - Evanston, Illinois February 4, 1989) was a country musician, comedian, and highly-influential mandolin player. ... Jimmy Buffett (born James William Buffett on December 25, 1946, in Pascagoula, Mississippi) is a singer, songwriter, author, businessman, and recently a film producer best known for his island escapism lifestyle and music including hits such as Margaritaville (No. ... Bonnie Koloc (born in Waterloo, Iowa) is an American folk singer/songwriter, actress, and artist who was considered one of the three main Illinois-based folk singers in the 1970s, along with Steve Goodman and John Prine. ... For the football player of the same name see Steve Martin (football player). ... Thomas R. Paxton was born October 31, 1937 in Chicago, Illinois, the youngest child of Burton and Esther Paxton. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Folk music can have a number of different meanings, including: Traditional music: The original meaning of the term folk music was synonymous with the term Traditional music, also often including World Music and Roots music; the term Traditional music was given its more specific meaning to distinguish it from the... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... City of New Orleans is a folk song written by Steve Goodman. ... Arlo Davy Guthrie (born July 10, 1947) is an American folk singer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Contents

Personal life

Born on Chicago's North Side to a middle-class Jewish family, Goodman began writing and performing songs as a teenager, after his family had moved to the near north suburbs. He graduated from Maine East High School in Park Ridge, Illinois in 1965.[1] In 1968 Goodman began performing at the Earl of Old Town in Chicago and attracted a following.[2] By 1969, after a brief sojourn in New York City's Washington Square, Goodman was a regular performer in Chicago, while attending Lake Forest College. During this time Goodman supported himself by singing advertising jingles. A monument to the working and supporting classes along Market Street in the heart of San Franciscos Financial District, home to tens-of-thousands of professional and managerial middle class workers each day. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... Maine East High School, or Maine East, and officially Maine Township High School East, is a public four-year high school located at the corner of Dempster Street and Potter Road in Park Ridge, Illinois, a north-west suburb of Chicago, Illinois, in the United States. ... The City of Park Ridge The city of Park Ridge is an affluent suburb of Chicago in Cook County in the United States. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Washington Square North. ... Lake Forest College, founded in 1857, is a liberal arts college located in Lake Forest, Illinois. ...


It was also in early 1969 that Goodman was diagnosed with leukemia, the disease that would be present during the entirety of his recording career, until his death in 1984. In September of 1969 he met Nancy Pruter, who was attending college while supporting herself as a waitress. They were married in February, 1970. Though he experienced periods of remission, Goodman never felt that he was living on anything other than borrowed time, and some critics, listeners and friends have said that his music reflects this sentiment. His wife, writing in the liner notes to the posthumous collection No Big Surprise, characterized him this way: Leukemia or leukaemia (see spelling differences) is a cancer of the blood or bone marrow and is characterized by an abnormal proliferation (production by multiplication) of blood cells, usually white blood cells (leukocytes). ...

“Basically, Steve was exactly who he appeared to be: an ambitious, well-adjusted man from a loving, middle-class Jewish home in the Chicago suburbs, whose life and talent were directed by the physical pain and time constraints of a fatal disease which he kept at bay, at times, seemingly by willpower alone . . . Steve wanted to live as normal a life as possible, only he had to live it as fast as he could . . . He extracted meaning from the mundane.”

Music career

Goodman's songs first appeared on a locally-produced record, Gathering at The Earl of Old Town, in 1971. As a close friend of Earl Pionke, the owner of the folk music bar, Goodman performed at The Earl dozens of times, including customary New Year's Eve concerts. He also remained closely involved with Chicago's Old Town School of Folk Music, where he had met and mentored his good friend, John Prine. The Old Town School of Folk Music is a Chicago teaching and performing institution that launched the careers of many notable folk music artists. ... John Prine (born October 10, 1946 in Maywood, Illinois) is an American country/folk singer-songwriter who has achieved widespread critical (and some commercial) success since the early 1970s. ...


Later in 1971, Goodman was playing at a Chicago bar called the Quiet Knight as the opening act for Kris Kristofferson. Kristofferson, impressed with Goodman, introduced him to Paul Anka, who brought Goodman to New York to record some demos. These resulted in Goodman signing a contract with Buddah Records. Kristoffer Kris Kristofferson (born June 22, 1936) is an influential American country music songwriter, singer and actor. ... Paul Albert Anka, OC (born July 30, 1941, in Ottawa, Ontario) is a Canadian singer, songwriter and actor. ... Buddah Records (now known as Buddha Records for spelling corrections of Buddha) was founded in 1967 by promotor Neil Bogart in New York City. ...


All this time, Goodman had been busy writing many of his most enduring songs, and this avid songwriting would lead to an important break for him. While at the Quiet Knight, Goodman saw Arlo Guthrie, and asked to be allowed to play a song for him. Guthrie grudgingly agreed, on the condition that Goodman buy him a beer first; Guthrie would listen to Goodman for as long as it took Guthrie to drink the beer. Goodman played "City of New Orleans", (original lyrics) which Guthrie liked enough that he asked to record it. Guthrie's version of the song became a hit in 1972, and provided Goodman with enough financial and artistic success to make his music a full-time career. The song, about the Illinois Central's City of New Orleans train, would become an American standard, covered by such musicians as Johnny Cash, Judy Collins, and Willie Nelson, whose recording earned Goodman a posthumous Grammy Award for Best Country Song in 1985. A French translation of the song, "Salut Les Amoureux", was recorded by Joe Dassin in 1979. For a song that (according to his wife) began as Goodman in his imagination wandered all the way to New Orleans while on a train from Chicago to visit her elderly grandmother in Mattoon, Illinois, it has itself taken quite a ride. Arlo Davy Guthrie (born July 10, 1947) is an American folk singer. ... City of New Orleans is a folk song written by Steve Goodman. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Amtraks City of New Orleans stops at the Memphis, Tennessee station in 2005. ... For the song of the same name, recorded by Tracy Byrd and later by Jason Aldean, see Johnny Cash (song). ... Judy Collins Judith Marjorie Collins (born May 1, 1939 in Seattle, Washington) is an American folk and standards singer. ... Willie Nelson (born Willie Hugh Nelson, April 30, 1933) is an American entertainer and songwriter, born and raised in Abbott, Texas. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Grammy Award for Best Country Song (sometimes known as the Country Songwriters Award) has been awarded since 1965. ... The 27th Grammy Awards were held February 26, 1985, and were broadcast live on American television. ... Joe Dassin Joseph Ira Dassin (November 5, 1938 – August 20, 1980) was a French-speaking American musician. ... Mattoon is a city in Coles County, Illinois, United States. ...


In 1974, singer David Allan Coe achieved considerable success on the country charts with Goodman's and Prine's "You Never Even Call Me By My Name", a song which good-naturedly spoofed stereotypical country music lyrics. Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... “If That Aint Country” redirects here. ...


Goodman's success as a recording artist was more limited. Although he was known in folk circles as an excellent and influential songwriter, his albums received more critical than commercial success. Ironically, one of Goodman's biggest hits was a song he didn't write – "The Dutchman", written by Michael Peter Smith. The Dutchman is a European folk song. ... Michael Peter Smith is a Chicago based singer/songwriter. ...


During the mid- and late-seventies, Goodman became a regular guest on Easter Day on Vin Scelsa’s radio show in New York City. Scelsa’s personal recordings of these sessions eventually led to an album of selections from these appearances, The Easter Tapes. Easter is the most important religious holiday of the Christian liturgical year, observed in March, April, or May to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus, which Christians believe occurred after his death by crucifixion in AD 27-33 (see Good Friday). ... Vin Scelsa (born December 12, 1947) is the host of a free-form radio show known as Idiots Delight. ...


In 1977, Goodman performed on the Tom Paxton live album "New Songs From the Briarpatch" (Vanguard Records), which contained some of Paxton's topical songs of the 1970s, including "Talking Watergate" and "White Bones of Allende", as well as a song dedicated to Mississippi John Hurt entitled "Did You Hear John Hurt?" Thomas R. Paxton was born October 31, 1937 in Chicago, Illinois, the youngest child of Burton and Esther Paxton. ... Mississippi John Smith Hurt (March 8, 1892 , Teoc, Carroll County, Mississippi - November 2, 1966, Grenada, Mississippi) was an influential blues singer and guitarist. ...


Goodman wrote and performed many humorous songs about Chicago, including two about the Chicago Cubs: "A Dying Cub Fan's Last Request" and "Go, Cubs, Go" (which has frequently been played on Cubs' broadcasts and at Wrigley Field after Cubs wins.) The Cubs songs grew out of his fanatical devotion to the team, which included many clubhouse and on-field visits with Cub players. Other songs about Chicago included "The Lincoln Park Pirates", about the notorious Lincoln Towing Company, and "Daley's Gone", about Mayor Richard J. Daley. Another comic highlight is "Vegematic", about a man who falls asleep while watching late-night TV and dreams he ordered many products that he saw on infomercials. He could also write serious songs, most notably "My Old Man", a tribute to Goodman's father, Bud Goodman, a used car salesman and World War II veteran. Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1871, 1874-1889) (a. ... Richard Joseph Daley (May 15, 1902 – December 20, 1976) was the longest-serving mayor of Chicago. ... Infomercials are television commercials that run as long as a typical television program (roughly thirty minutes or an hour). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Goodman won his second Grammy, for Best Contemporary Folk Album in 1988 for his album, Unfinished Business. The Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Folk Album was first awarded in 1987. ... The 30th Grammy Awards were held March 2, 1988. ...


Death

On September 20, 1984, Goodman died at University of Washington Hospital in Seattle, Washington, his life finally taken by the leukemia from which he had anointed himself with the tongue-in-cheek nickname “Cool Hand Leuk” (others nicknames included “Chicago Shorty” and “The Little Prince”). He was only 36. Eleven days later, the Chicago Cubs played their first post-season game since 1945; Goodman had been asked to sing "The Star-Spangled Banner" before it; Jimmy Buffett filled in, and dedicated the song to Goodman. Some of Goodman's ashes were scattered at Wrigley Field, the home of the Chicago Cubs. He is survived by his wife and three daughters.[3] The University of Washington, founded in 1861, is a public research university in Seattle, Washington. ... “Seattle” redirects here. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Jimmy Buffett (born James William Buffett on December 25, 1946, in Pascagoula, Mississippi) is a singer, songwriter, author, businessman, and recently a film producer best known for his island escapism lifestyle and music including hits such as Margaritaville (No. ... For the former ballpark in Los Angeles, see Wrigley Field (Los Angeles). ...


Legacy

In 2006, Goodman's daughter, Rosanna, issued "My Old Man," an album of a variety of artists covering her father's songs.


Interest in Goodman's career had a resurgence in 2007 with the publication of a massive biography by Clay Eals, Steve Goodman: Facing the Music. The same year, the Chicago Cubs began playing Goodman's 1984 song "Go, Cubs, Go" after each home game win. When the Cubs made it to the playoffs, interest in the song and Goodman resulted in several newspaper articles about Goodman. Illinois Lt. Governor Pat Quinn declared October 5, 2007 Steve Goodman Day in Illinois. Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1871, 1874-1889) (a. ...


Discography

  1. Steve Goodman (1972)
  2. Somebody Else's Troubles (1972)
  3. Jessie's Jig and Other Favorites (1975)
  4. Words We Can Dance To (1976)
  5. The Essential Steve Goodman (1976)
  6. Say It In Private (1977)
  7. High and Outside (1979)
  8. Hot Spot (1980)
  9. Affordable Art (1983)
  10. Artistic Hair (1983)
  11. Santa Ana Winds (1984)
  12. Unfinished Business (1987) posthumous
  13. The Best of the Asylum Years, Volume One (compilation) (1988) posthumous
  14. The Best of the Asylum Years, Volume Two (compilation) (1988) posthumous
  15. City of New Orleans (1989) posthumous
  16. The Original Steve Goodman (1989) posthumous
  17. No Big Surprise (compilation) (1994) posthumous
  18. The Easter Tapes (1996) posthumous
  19. Live Wire (live) (2000) posthumous
  20. Live at the Earl of Old Town (2006) posthumous

Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Hilary Rodham Clinton and Goodman were in the same high school graduating class.
  2. ^ http://www.cobo.org/goodman/sg.html#stobit
  3. ^ http://www.berkshiresweek.com/011503/default.asp?filename=page_15&adfile=ads1

Hillary Rodham Clinton (born Hillary Diane Rodham on October 26, 1947) is the junior United States Senator from New York. ...

Further reading

  • Eals, Clay. Steve Goodman: Facing the Music. ECW Press, 2007. ISBN 978-1550227321.

External links


 
 

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