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Encyclopedia > Steve Ditko
Steve Ditko

Steve Ditko, circa 1965.
Birth name Stephen Ditko
Born November 2, 1927 (1927-11-02) (age 79)
Johnstown, Pennsylvania
Nationality American
Area(s) Penciller, Inker, Writer
Notable works Spider-Man
Doctor Strange
The Question
Mister A

Stephen Ditko (born 2 November 1927) is a renowned American comic book artist and writer best known as the co-creator of Spider-Man and Doctor Strange. He was inducted into the comics industry's Jack Kirby Hall of Fame in 1990. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Location of Pennsylvania within the USA Johnstown, Cambria County, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. Coordinates: , Country State County Cambria Government  - Mayor Tom Trigona Area  - City  6. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... This article is about the Marvel comics superhero. ... The Harvey Awards are given for achievement in comic books. ...

Contents

Biography

Early life and career

Space Adventures #10 (Spring 1954), Steve Ditko's first comic-book cover art
Space Adventures #10 (Spring 1954), Steve Ditko's first comic-book cover art

Ditko was born in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, the son of Ukrainians immigrants who settled in Western Pennsylvania.[citation needed] Ditko grew up the son of a Depression-era mill-worker, with a sister named either Rita[citation needed] or Annamarie[citation needed], and a younger brother, Pat. (U.S. Census records of 1930 indicate that both his parents, Stephen and Anna Ditko, were born in Pennsylvania, and his grandparents were all from Czechoslovakia. He had only one sister at that time, Anna M., who was about two years older.) Good with his hands, Ditko in junior high school crafted wooden models of German airplanes to aid civilian World War II aircraft-spotters. He was influenced by the work of newspaper cartoonists, particularly Will Eisner, writer-artist of The Spirit, and read Batman comic books. Ditko graduated from Johnstown High School in 1945, afterward doing military service in post-war Germany, where he produced hand-made comics as letters to his family. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Nickname: Location of Pennsylvania within the USA Johnstown, Cambria County, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. Coordinates: , Country State County Cambria Government  - Mayor Tom Trigona Area  - City  6. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... A factory (previously manufactory) is a large industrial building where goods or products are manufactured. ... This article refers to the tool of travel. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... A cartoonist at work. ... William Erwin Eisner (March 6, 1917 – January 3, 2005) was an acclaimed American comics writer, artist and entrepreneur. ... For the religious or spiritual meaning of The Spirit, see Spirit. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


After his discharge, Ditko studied at the Cartoonists and Illustrators School (later the School of Visual Arts) in New York City, under Batman inker Jerry Robinson and others, and began professionally illustrating comic books in 1953. He broke in almost simultaneously at the Crestwood Publications' imprint Prize Comics (penciling and inking "A Hole in the Head" in Black Magic Vol. 4, #3, Dec. 1953) and at Harvey Comics (assisting inker Mort Meskin on the Jack Kirby pencil work of Captain 3-D #1, Dec. 1953). Much of Ditko's early work, starting with the cover of Space Adventures #10 (Spring 1954) and the five-page story "Homecoming" in that issue, was for Charlton Comics, for which he continued to work intermittently until the company's demise in 1986, producing science fiction, horror and mystery stories, as well as co-creating Captain Atom, with writer Joe Gill, in 1960. The School of Visual Arts Main Building, circa 1992. ... The School of Visual Arts Main Building, circa 1992. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Detective Comics #38 (May 1940), the first appearance of Robin. ... Crestwood Publications, also known as Prize Comics and Feature Publications, was comic book publisher from the 1940s thru the 1960s, tho most of their titles were published in the 1950s. ... Casper the Friendly Ghost in Theres Good Boos To-Night (1948). ... Morton Meskin (May 1916 - May 1995) was a prolific comic book artist who worked on many recognizable characters through the Golden Age of Comics, well into the Silver Age of Comics. ... Jack Kirby (August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds of others stretching... Captain 3-D was a Harvey Comics character who first appeared in the Silver Age. ... Big C logo, used from Sept. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... “Horror story” redirects here. ... Mystery fiction is a distinct subgenre of detective fiction that entails the occurrence of an unknown event which requires the protagonist to make known (or solve). ... Captain Atom is a fictional comic book superhero. ... Joe Gill was a writer who worked in the comics industry. ...


Ditko also drew for Atlas Comics, the 1950s precursor of Marvel Comics, beginning with the four-page "There'll Be Some Changes Made" in Journey into Mystery #33 (April 1956); this debut tale would be reprinted in Marvel's Curse of the Weird #4 (March 1994). Ditko would go on to contribute a large number of stories, many considered classic, to Atlas/Marvel's Strange Tales and the newly launched Amazing Adventures, Strange Worlds, Tales of Suspense and Tales to Astonish, issues of which would typically open with a Kirby-drawn monster story, followed by one or two twist-ending thrillers or sci-fi tales drawn by Don Heck, Paul Reinman, or Joe Sinnott, all capped by an often-surreal, sometimes self-reflexive short by Ditko and writer-editor Stan Lee. These bagatelles proved so popular that Amazing Adventures was reformatted to feature such stories exclusively beginning with issue #7 (Dec. 1961), when the comic was rechristened Amazing Adult Fantasy — a name intended to reflect its more "sophisticated" nature, as likewise the new tagline "The magazine that respects your intelligence". Atlas Comics is the 1950s comic book publishing company that would evolve into Marvel Comics. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... Journey into Mystery is a comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ... Strange Tales was the name of several comic book anthology series that have been published by Marvel Comics. ... Amazing Adventures is the name of several anthology-format comic book series, all but one published by Marvel Comics. ... - ==References== - *Tales of Suspense #1-99 (Marvel Comics, January 1959 - March 1968) - *Marvel Select: Tales of Suspense #1 (1996) - - - - - - - - - Categories: | | ... Tales to Astonish #44 Tales to Astonish is the name of several comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ... Don Heck (January 2, 1929-1995) was a comic book artist best known for co-creating the character Iron Man, and for his long run penciling The Avengers in the 1960s. ... Paul Reinman is an American comic book artist (born 1910, Germany) best known as one of Jack Kirbys Silver Age inkers, including on the first issues of The Incredible Hulk and The Uncanny X-Men. ... Joe Sinnott (born October 16, 1926, Saugerties, New York, United States) is an American comic book artist. ... Editing may also refer to audio editing or film editing. ... For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ...


From 1958 to either 1966 or 1968 (accounts differ), Ditko shared a Manhattan studio at 43rd Street and Eighth Avenue with noted fetish artist Eric Stanton, an art-school classmate. When either artist was under deadline pressure, it was not uncommon for them to pitch in and help the other with his assignment.[1][2] For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... Book cover for The Art of Eric Stanton: For the Man Who Knows His Place Eric Stanton (September 30, 1926 - March 17, 1999 - born Ernest Stanzoni) was a 20th century bondage and fetish artist. ...


Marvel Comics

The Amazing Spider-Man Annual #1 (1964): Cover art by Ditko.
The Amazing Spider-Man Annual #1 (1964): Cover art by Ditko.

Image File history File links Cover to Amazing Spider-Man Annual #1, 1964. ... Image File history File links Cover to Amazing Spider-Man Annual #1, 1964. ...

Creation of Spider-Man

After Marvel Comics editor-in-chief Stan Lee obtained permission from publisher Martin Goodman to create a new "ordinary teen" superhero named "Spider-Man",[3] Lee originally approached his leading artist, Jack Kirby. Kirby told Lee about his own 1950s character conception, variously called the Silver Spider and Spiderman, in which an orphaned boy finds a magic ring that gives him superpowers. Comics historian Greg Theakston says Lee and Kirby "immediately sat down for a story conference" and Lee afterward directed Kirby to flesh out the character and draw some pages. "A day or two later", Kirby showed Lee the first six pages, and, as Lee recalled, "I hated the way he was doing it. Not that he did it badly — it just wasn't the character I wanted; it was too heroic".[4] Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... Martin Goodman (born 1910, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States; died June 6, 1992, Palm Beach, Florida) was an American publisher of pulp magazines, paperback books, mens adventure magazines, and comic books, launching the company that would become Marvel Comics. ... Jack Kirby (August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds of others stretching... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Lee turned to Ditko, who developed a visual motif Lee found satisfactory, although Lee would later replace Ditko's original cover with one penciled by Kirby. Ditko said,

"The Spider-Man pages Stan showed me were nothing like the (eventually) published character. In fact, the only drawings of Spider-Man were on the splash [i.e., page 1] and at the end [where] Kirby had the guy leaping at you with a web gun... Anyway, the first five pages took place in the home, and the kid finds a ring and turns into Spider-Man.[5]

Ditko also recalled that, This page includes English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations such as . ...

One of the first things I did was to work up a costume. A vital, visual part of the character. I had to know how he looked ... before I did any breakdowns. For example: A clinging power so he wouldn't have hard shoes or boots, a hidden wrist-shooter versus a web gun and holster, etc. ... I wasn't sure Stan would like the idea of covering the character's face but I did it because it hid an obviously boyish face. It would also add mystery to the character....[6]

Much earlier, in a rare contemporaneous account, Ditko described his and Lee's contributions in a mail interview with Gary Martin published in Comic Fan #2 (Summer 1965): "Stan Lee thought the name up. I did costume, web gimmick on wrist & spider signal".[7] Additionally, Ditko shared a Manhattan studio with noted fetish artist Eric Stanton, an art-school classmate[8] who, in a 1988 interview with Theakston, recalled that although his contribution to Spider-Man was "almost nil", he and Ditko had "worked on storyboards together and I added a few ideas. But the whole thing was created by Steve on his own... I think I added the business about the webs coming out of his hands".[9] For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... Look up fetish in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Book cover for The Art of Eric Stanton: For the Man Who Knows His Place Eric Stanton (September 30, 1926 - March 17, 1999 - born Ernest Stanzoni) was a 20th century bondage and fetish artist. ...


Doctor Strange and other characters

Dormammu attacks Eternity in a Ditko "Dr. Strange" panel from Strange Tales #146 (July 1966).
Dormammu attacks Eternity in a Ditko "Dr. Strange" panel from Strange Tales #146 (July 1966).

After drawing the final issue of The Incredible Hulk (#6, March 1963), Ditko co-created with Lee the supernatural hero Doctor Strange, in Strange Tales #110 (July 1963). Ditko and Lee shortly thereafter relaunched a Hulk series as a short feature in the anthology Tales to Astonish, beginning with issue #60 (Oct. 1964). Ditko, inked by George Roussos, penciled the feature through #67 (May 1965). Ditko designed the Hulk's primary antagonist, the Leader, in #62 (Dec. 1964). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (650x729, 126 KB) Summary Panel, Eternity attacked by Dormammu, Strange Tales (1960s), art by Steve Ditko Source: http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (650x729, 126 KB) Summary Panel, Eternity attacked by Dormammu, Strange Tales (1960s), art by Steve Ditko Source: http://www. ... The Incredible Hulk The Hulk, often called The Incredible Hulk, is a Marvel Comics superhero. ... Look up Supernatural in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the Marvel comics superhero. ... Strange Tales was the name of several comic book anthology series that have been published by Marvel Comics. ... An anthology, literally a garland or collection of flowers, is a collection of literary works, originally of poems. ... Tales to Astonish #44 Tales to Astonish is the name of several comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ... George Roussos a. ... The Leader (Samuel Sterns) is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics supervillain and the archenemy of the Hulk. ...


Ditko also penciled the Iron Man feature in Tales of Suspense #47-49 (Nov. 1963 - Jan. 1964), with various inkers. The first of these debuted the initial version of Iron Man's modern red-and-golden armor, though whether Ditko or cover-penciler and principal character designer Jack Kirby designed the costume is uncertain. For the film, see Iron Man (film). ... - ==References== - *Tales of Suspense #1-99 (Marvel Comics, January 1959 - March 1968) - *Marvel Select: Tales of Suspense #1 (1996) - - - - - - - - - Categories: | | ... Jack Kirby (August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds of others stretching...


Though often overshadowed by his Amazing Spider-Man work, Ditko's "Doctor Strange" stories have been equally acclaimed,[citation needed] showcasing surrealistic mystical landscapes and increasingly head-trippy visuals that helped make the feature a favorite of college students, according to contemporaneous accounts. Eventually, as co-plotter and later sole plotter, in the "Marvel Method", Ditko would take Strange into ever-more-abstract realms, which yet remained well-grounded thanks to Lee's reliably humanistic, adventure/soap opera dialog. Ditko's tenure on "Dr. Strange" culminated in the introduction, in Strange Tales #146 (July 1966), of Ditko's grand and enduring conception of Eternity, the personification of the universe, depicted as a majestic silhouette whose outlines are filled with the cosmos. Max Ernst. ... The Marvel Method, pioneered by and exemplified in the works of Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, is a method of comic book creation wherein the author (in this case, Stan Lee) would plot out the rough outline of a story, and the artist (Kirby), while drawing it, would help fill... For Philippine soap opera, see Teleserye. ... Eternity is a fictional cosmic entity appearing in the Marvel Universe. ...


Whichever feature he drew, Ditko's idiosyncratic, cleanly detailed, instantly recognizable art style, emphasizing mood and anxiety, found great favor with readers. The character of Spider-Man and his troubled personal life meshed well with Ditko's own interests, which Lee eventually acknowledged by giving the artist plotting credits on the latter part of their 38-issue run. But after four years on the title, Ditko left Marvel; he and Lee had not been on speaking terms for some time, though the details remain uncertain. The last straw is often alleged to have been a disagreement as to the secret identity of the Green Goblin, but Ditko himself has stated in print that this was not the case. [citation needed] This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... For other uses of this term, please see Secret identity (disambiguation). ... The Green Goblin is a Marvel Comics supervillain and an archenemy of Spider-Man. ...


Writer and future Marvel editor Roy Thomas said in a 1998 interview that, "I'll never forget the day I walked into one Marvel office not long after Ditko quit, and here's John Romita, Sr. drawing Amazing Spider-Man and Larry [Lieber] drawing the Spider-Man Annual and Marie Severin drawing 'Dr. Strange', and I joked, 'This is the Steve Ditko Room; it takes three of you to do what Steve Ditko used to do' "[10] Roy Thomas (born November 22, 1940, Missouri, United States) is a comic book writer and editor, and Stan Lees first successor as editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics. ... John Romita, Sr. ... Larry Lieber (born October 26, 1931) is a comic book artist and writer and is the younger brother of Marvel Comics writer/editor Stan Lee. ... Cover to Sub-Mariner #9 . ...


Charlton and DC Comics

The Creeper in Showcase #73 (April 1968). Cover art by Ditko.
The Creeper in Showcase #73 (April 1968). Cover art by Ditko.

Back at Charlton — where the page rate was low but creators were allowed greater freedom — Ditko worked on such characters as Blue Beetle (1967-68), The Question (1967-68), Captain Atom (1965-1967, returning to the character he'd co-created in 1960), and in 1974 backup stories E-Man, writer Joe Gill's Liberty Belle and Ditko's own Killjoy. With The Question and Killjoy, Ditko freely expressed his personal ideology, based on Ayn Rand's Objectivism and the writings of Greek philosopher Aristotle. Ditko also produced much work for Charlton's science-fiction and horror titles. In addition, in 1966-1967, he drew 16 stories for Warren Publishing's horror-comic magazines, most of which were done using ink-wash. These were written by the late Archie Goodwin. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (515x757, 137 KB)Cover to Showcase #73, April, 1968. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (515x757, 137 KB)Cover to Showcase #73, April, 1968. ... Blue Beetle is the name of three fictional comic book superheroes. ... The Question is an American comic book superhero. ... Captain Atom is a fictional comic book superhero. ... E-Man is a fictional comic book superhero created by writer Nicola Cuti and artist Joe Staton for Charlton Comics in 1973. ... Joe Gill was a writer who worked in the comics industry. ... For other Liberty Belle, see Liberty Belle (disambiguation). ... Aristotle (Greek: AristotélÄ“s) (384 BC – 322 BC) was a Greek philosopher, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great. ... Warren Publishing is a magazine firm founded by James Warren, who published his first magazines in 1957 and continued in the business for decades. ... “Horror story” redirects here. ... This article is about the magazine as a published medium. ... Archie Goodwin (September 8, 1937 – March 1, 1998) was an American comic book writer, editor, and artist. ...


In 1967, Ditko gave his ideas ultimate expression in the form of Mr. A, published in Wally Wood's independent title witzend #3. Ditko's hard line against criminals was controversial and alienated many fans, but he continued to produce Mr. A stories and one-pagers until the end of the 1970s. Ditko returned to Mr. A once more in 2000. Mr. ... Wallace Wally Wood (born June 17, 1927, Menahga, Minnesota, United States; died November 2, 1981), was an American writer-artist best known for his work in EC Comics and Mad. ... Edited and published by Bill Pearson on an irregular schedule spanning decades, the alternative comic book witzend featured contributions by both newcomers to comics, leading comic book artists and professional illustrators. ...


In 1968, Ditko moved to DC Comics. Dick Giordano and several other artists and writers in Giordano's stable moved soon after. Ditko created the Creeper (in Showcase #73, March-April 1968, with scripter Don Segall); and with writer Steve Skeates, co-created the The Hawk and the Dove in Showcase #75, working on the first two issues of their ongoing series (Sept.-Nov. 1968) before it was turned over to artist Gil Kane. Unusually for the time, plotter and penciller Ditko used these fondly remembered superhero features to explore complicated ethical issues. DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Richard Joseph Dick Giordano (born July 20, 1932) is an American comic book artist and editor best known for introducing Charlton Comics Action Heroes stable of superheroes, and serving as editor of then industry-leader DC Comics. ... The Creeper is a DC Comics superhero created by Steve Ditko. ... Showcase has been the title of several anthology series published by DC Comics. ... Steve Skeates is a writer who has worked in the comics industry. ... Hawk and Dove are the titles of a number of DC Comics superhero duos who fight crime together despite the partners typically sharply differing methods and attitudes about violence. ... Showcase #22 (Oct. ... A penciller (or penciler) is one of a number of artists working within the comic industry. ... Batman and Superman, two of the most recognizable and iconic superheroes. ...


Ditko's stay at DC was short — he would work on all six issues of the Creeper's own title Beware the Creeper (June 1968 - April 1969), though leaving midway through the final one — and again, the reasons for his departure are uncertain. From this time up through the mid-1970s, he worked exclusively for Charlton and various small press/independent publishers. For the publisher Alternative Comics, see Alternative Comics (publisher). ...


Latter-day Ditko

Ditko returned to DC in 1975, creating one short-lived title, Shade, the Changing Man (1977-78). Shade was later successfully revived, without Ditko's involvement, and was one of the longer-running titles in the DC Vertigo line. With Paul Levitz (writer) and Wally Wood (inker), he co-created Stalker (1975-76) which ran for four issues. He also revived the Creeper and did such various other jobs as a short Demon backup series in 1979, work on Legion of Superheroes in 1980-81, and stories in DC's horror and science-fiction anthologies. He also did the artwork for the Prince Gavin Starman in Adventure Comics #467-478 (1980). After decamping for Marvel around this time, his last DC work came in 1986, with four pinups of his characters for Who's Who in the DC Universe and a pinup for Superman #400 and its companion portfolio. Shade, the Changing Man is a fictional comic book character created by Steve Ditko for DC Comics in 1977. ... Vertigo logo Vertigo is an imprint of comic book and graphic novel publisher DC Comics. ... Paul Levitz (born 21 October 1956) is an American comic book writer, editor and executive. ... Wallace Wally Wood (born June 17, 1927, Menahga, Minnesota, United States; died November 2, 1981), was an American writer-artist best known for his work in EC Comics and Mad. ... Stalker is a 4 issues comic-book limited series created in 1975 by Paul Levitz (writer), Steve Ditko (penciller) and Wally Wood (inker), and published by DC Comics. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Legion of Super-Heroes is a team of comic book superheroes in the future. ... Several incarnations of Starman. ... Adventure Comics #296 Adventure Comics is a comic book series published by DC Comics from 1935 to 1983. ... Whos Who in the DC Universe (usually referred to as Whos Who) is a guide that DC Comics published to catalogue the wide variety of fictional characters in their imaginary universe, the DC Universe. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ...


Ditko returned to Marvel in 1979, taking over Jack Kirby's Machine Man and continuing to freelance for the company into the late 1990s. In 1982, he also began freelancing for Pacific Comics, beginning with Captain Victory and the Galactic Rangers #6 (Sept. 1982), in which he introduced the superhero Missing Man (with Mark Evanier scripting for Ditko's plot and art). Subsequent Missing Man stories appeared in Pacific Presents #1-3 (Oct. 1982 - Marcy 1984), with Ditko scripting the former and collaborating with Robin Snyder on the script for the latter two. Ditko also created the Mocker for Pacific, in Silver Star #2 (April 1983). For Eclipse Comics, he contributed a story featuring his character Static (no relation to the later Milestone Comics character) in Eclipse Monthly #1 & #3 (Aug. 1983 & Oct. 1983), and created the Exploder in #2 (Sept. 1983). With writer Jack C. Harris, Ditko drew the backup feature "The Faceless Ones" in First Comics' Warp #2-4 (April-June 1983). Working with that same writer and others, Ditko drew a handful of The Fly, Fly-Girl and Jaguar stories for The Fly #2-8 (July 1983 - Aug. 1984), for Archie Comics' short-lived 1980s superhero line; in a rare, possibly unique latter-day instance of Ditko inking another artist, he inked penciler Dick Ayers on the Jaguar story in The Fly #9 (Oct. 1984) Machine Man (X-51) is a fictional character created by writer/artist Jack Kirby for Marvel Comics. ... Pacific Comics was one of the independent comic book publishers that flourished in the early 1980s. ... Captain Victory#1, art by Jack Kirby. ... Mark Evanier (born March 2, 1952 in Santa Monica, California) is an American writer. ... The Mocker is a fictional character by artist Steve Ditko. ... Eclipse Comics was an American comic book publisher, one of several influential indendent publishers during the 1980s. ... Milestone Media is a company best known for creating the Milestone comics imprint (that was published through DC Comics) and the Static Shock cartoon series. ... For other uses, see Torpedo (disambiguation). ... First Comics was an American publisher of comic books. ... In the medium of comics, The Fly can refer to: The Fly, a superhero affiliated with Archie Comics Mighty Crusaders The Fly, a Marvel Comics supervillain Rick Rojatt, a stuntman better known as The Human Fly, who had a comic book from Marvel Comics This is a disambiguation page &#8212... The Jaguar is a superhero published by Archie Comics. ... Archie Comics is an American comic book publisher known for its many series featuring the fictional teenage Archie Andrews, Betty Cooper, Veronica Lodge, Reggie Mantle and Forsythe Jughead Jones characters created by Bob Montana. ... The inker is one of the two line artists in a traditional comic book, or graphic novel. ... In producing a comic book, the penciller (or penciler) draws the comic based on the script created by the writer. ... Richard Dick Ayers is a comic book artist and cartoonist, born April 28th, 1924, in Ossining, New York. ...


In 1993, he did the Dark Horse Comics one-shot The Safest Place in the World. He later an issue #0, released as a set of trading cards, for the Defiant Comics series Dark Dominion. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In the American comic book industry, the term one-shot is used to denote a pilot comic or a stand-alone story created to last as one issue. ... A trading card (or collectible card) is a small card which is intended for trading and collecting. ... Defiant Comics was a comicbook publishing imprint of Enlightment Entertainment Partners, LP. It was established in 1993. ... The logo for Dark Dominion Dark Dominion is a comic book series that was published monthly by DEFIANT from October of 1993 until July of 1994. ...


In 1995, he pencilled a four-issue series for Marvel based on the Phantom 2040 animated TV-series. This included a poster that was inked by John Romita Sr. Phantom 2040 is an animated science fiction television series loosely based on the comic strip hero The Phantom, created by Lee Falk. ... The Amazing Spider-Man #50. ...


An aborted series at Fantagraphics Books, Steve Ditko's Strange Avenging Tales ran one issue, in 1997. Fantagraphics Books is an American publisher of alternative comics, classic comic strip anthologies, magazines, graphic novels, and the adult-oriented Eros Comix imprint. ...


Ditko retired from mainstream comics in 1998, having worked in his latter years both on such established superheroes as the Sub-Mariner (in Marvel Comics Presents) to newer, licensed characters such as the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers. The last mainstream character he created was Marvel's Squirrel Girl in Marvel Super-Heroes vol. 2, #8 (Jan. 1992). Namor the Sub-Mariner is a fictional character, featured in Marvel Comics. ... Marvel Comics Presents is a comic book anthology series published by Marvel Comics from 1989 to 1995. ... Mighty Morphin Power Rangers (MMPR) is an American live-action television series, created for the American market based on the sixteenth installment of the Japanese Super Sentai franchise, Kyōryū Sentai Zyuranger. ... Squirrel Girl (Doreen Green) is a fictional superhero in the Marvel Universe. ... Marvel Super-Heroes is the name of several comic book series and specials published by Marvel Comics: Marvel Super-Heroes #22 (Sept. ...


Since then, Ditko's solo work has been published intermittently by independent publisher and long-time friend Robin Snyder, his former editor at Charlton, Archie Comics, and Renegade Press in the 1980s. The Snyder-published books have included Static, The Missing Man, The Mocker and, in 2002, Avenging World, a collection of stories and essays spanning 30 years. Renegade Press was an originally Canadian based comic book company that operated from 1984 to 1988, founded by Deni Loubert. ...


Ditko's final original works for mainstream comics have been: for Marvel, the self-inked, 12-page Iron Man story "A Man's Reach....", by writer Len Wein, in the black-and-white comic book Shadows & Light #1 (Feb. 1998); and, for DC, the 10-page Spectre story "The Depths Of Despair", by writers Bill Mumy and Peter David, inked by Kevin Nowlan in Legends of the DC Universe 80-Page Giant #1 (Sept. 1998). For the film, see Iron Man (film). ... Len Wein (born June 12, 1948, New York City, New York) is an American comic book writer and editor best known for co-creating DC Comics Swamp Thing and for reviving Marvel Comics X-Men. ... The Spectre is a fictional cosmic entity and superhero who has appeared in numerous comic books published by DC Comics. ... Charles William Mumy, Jr. ... Peter Allen David (often abbreviated PAD) (born September 23, 1956) is an American writer, best known for his work in comic books and Star Trek novels. ... Cover by Kevin Nowlan for Powerline #3 Kevin Nowlan is an American comic-book artist. ...


Personal life

Ditko resides in New York City as of 2006. He has refused to give interviews or make public appearances since the 1960s, explaining, "When I do a job, it’s not my personality that I’m offering the readers but my artwork. It’s not what I'm like that counts; it’s what I did and how well it was done.... I produce a product, a comic art story. Steve Ditko is the brand name".[11] He has, however, contributed numerous essays to Synder's fanzine The Comics.


Ditko is an outspoken supporter and follower of Ayn Rand's philosophy, Objectivism.[12] [13] Ayn Rand (IPA: , February 2 [O.S. January 20] 1905 – March 6, 1982), born Alisa Zinovyevna Rosenbaum (Russian: ), was a Russian-born American novelist and philosopher,[1] best known for developing Objectivism and for writing the novels We the Living, The Fountainhead, Atlas Shrugged and the novella Anthem. ... Objectivism is a philosophy [1][2] developed by Ayn Rand that encompasses positions on metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, politics, and aesthetics[3]. Objectivism holds that there is a mind-independent reality; that individuals are in contact with this reality through sensory perception; that humans gain objective knowledge from perception by measurement...


Awards

Ditko was inducted into the Jack Kirby Hall of Fame in 1990. The Harvey Awards are given for achievement in comic books. ...


Selected bibliography

Strange Suspense Stories #75 (June 1965), reprinting Captain Atom stories from Space Adventures #33, 34 & 36. Cover art by Ditko.
Strange Suspense Stories #75 (June 1965), reprinting Captain Atom stories from Space Adventures #33, 34 & 36. Cover art by Ditko.
Amazing Adult Fantasy #8 (Jan. 1962). Cover art by Ditko.
Amazing Adult Fantasy #8 (Jan. 1962). Cover art by Ditko.

As penciler (generally but not exclusively self-inked), unless otherwise noted

Marvel Image File history File linksMetadata StrangeSuspenseStories75. ... Image File history File linksMetadata StrangeSuspenseStories75. ... Image File history File links AmazingAF8-Ditko. ... Image File history File links AmazingAF8-Ditko. ...

Amazing Adult Fantasy #7-14; becomes
Amazing Fantasy #15

DC Amazing Adventures is the name of several anthology-format comic book series, all but one published by Marvel Comics. ... Spider-Man was introduced in Amazing Fantasy issue #15 (1962). ... The introduction of Spider-Man: Amazing Fantasy #15 (Aug. ... The Amazing Spider-Man is the title of a comic book published by Marvel Comics, a television program and a daily newspaper comic strip featuring the adventures of the superhero Spider-Man. ... Strange Tales was the name of several comic book anthology series that have been published by Marvel Comics. ... This article is about the Marvel comics superhero. ... The Fantastic Four is Marvel Comics flagship superhero team, created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby and debuting in The Fantastic Four #1 (Nov. ... Jack Kirby (August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds of others stretching... The Incredible Hulk The Hulk, often called The Incredible Hulk, is a Marvel Comics superhero. ... Phantom 2040 is an animated science fiction television series loosely based on the comic strip hero The Phantom, created by Lee Falk. ... For other uses, see Phantom. ... - ==References== - *Tales of Suspense #1-99 (Marvel Comics, January 1959 - March 1968) - *Marvel Select: Tales of Suspense #1 (1996) - - - - - - - - - Categories: | | ... For the film, see Iron Man (film). ... Tales to Astonish #44 Tales to Astonish is the name of several comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ... Speedball (Robert Robbie Baldwin) is a fictional superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Rom the Spaceknight is a fictional cyborg space hero. ...

Charlton The Creeper is a DC Comics superhero created by Steve Ditko. ... Hawk and Dove are the titles of a number of DC Comics superhero duos who fight crime together despite the partners typically sharply differing methods and attitudes about violence. ... Shade, the Changing Man is a fictional comic book character created by Steve Ditko for DC Comics in 1977. ... Worlds Finest Comics was a comic book series published by DC Comics from 1941 to 1986. ...

Warren Blue Beetle is the name of three fictional comic book superheroes. ... The Question is an American comic book superhero. ... Captain Atom is a fictional comic book superhero. ... The Many Ghosts of Doctor Graves #1 (May 1967). ...

Look up eerie in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For a definition of the word creepy, see the Wiktionary entry creepy. ...

Legacy

Spider-Man is a 2002 superhero film based on the fictional Marvel Comics character Spider-Man. ... This article is about the 2004 film. ... Spider-Man 3 is a 2007 superhero film written and directed by Sam Raimi, with a screenplay by Ivan Raimi and Alvin Sargent. ... Elya Baskin (born 24 January 1951, Riga, Latvia) attended Moscows prestigious Theatre and Variety Arts College. ... An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) was the name of an American animated television series that was produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... Reggie Miller taking a curtain call during his last NBA game. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A television network is a distribution network for television content whereby a central operation provides programming for many television stations. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... Jonathan Ross in Search of Steve Ditko is BBC Four documentary first shown on Sunday 16 September 2007. ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 4. ... Detective Comics #38 (May 1940), the first appearance of Robin. ... John Romita, Sr. ... Neil Richard Gaiman () (born November 10, 1960) is an English author of science fiction and fantasy short stories and novels, graphic novels, comics, and films. ... Paul Levitz (born 21 October 1956) is an American comic book writer, editor and executive. ... Ralph Macchio is a comic book editor. ... Flo Steinberg was one of the earliest publishers of independent comic books, with her underground / alternative hybrid Big Apple Comix in 1975. ... For other persons named Alan Moore, see Alan Moore (disambiguation). ... Mark Millar (born December 24, 1969) is a Scottish comic book writer born in Coatbridge. ... For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ... cat yronwode (born Catherine Manfredi in San Francisco, May 12, 1947 - ) is a writer and editor notable for her extensive career in comic books, in particular for her role as an editor for Kitchen Sink Press and the now-defunct Eclipse Comics company; she now works for Claypool Comics. ... For other persons named Alan Moore, see Alan Moore (disambiguation). ... Dave Gibbons (born April 14, 1949) is a British writer and artist of comics. ... For the 2009 film based on the comic book, see Watchmen (film). ... A miniseries (sometimes mini-series), in a serial storytelling medium, is a production which tells a story in a limited number of episodes. ... Alternate uses: Rorschach (superhero), Rorschach inkblot test, Hermann Rorschach Rorschach is a city in the canton of St. ...

Quotes

Ditko

On artist Mort Meskin: "Meskin was fabulous, I couldn't believe the ease with which he drew: strong compositions, loose pencils, yet complete; detail without clutter. I loved his stuff".[18]

Excerpt from Comic Fan #2, Summer 1965, Ditko interview conducted by mail with Gary Martin; punctuation verbatim: Morton Meskin (May 1916 - May 1995) was a prolific comic book artist who worked on many recognizable characters through the Golden Age of Comics, well into the Silver Age of Comics. ...

GARY - Who originated Spider-Man?
STEVE - Stan Lee thought the name up. I did costume, web gimmick on wrist & spider signal.
GARY - Would you enjoy continuing on him?
STEVE - If nothing better comes along.[19]


Voice of Comicdom #4 (April 1965): Comment on this fanzine's reader-poll to determine which "Best Liked" fan strips would continue to be published; punctuation verbatim:

It seems a shame, since comics themselves have so little variety of stories and styles that you would deliberately restrict your own creative efforts to professional comics shallow range. What is 'Best Liked' by most readers is what they are most familiar in seeing and any policy based on readers likes has to end up with a lot of look-a-like strips. You have a great opportunity to show everyone a whole new range of ideas, unlimited types of stories and styles---why FLUB it!"[20]

Other creators on Ditko

Dick Giordano, editor at Charlton and later DC Comics: "He was suffering from a lung ailment all his life from, I think, tuberculosis when he was younger. He was younger then and needed to exercise, so Steve and I used to spend a lot of time playing ping-pong. They had a table in the cafeteria, and we'd work up a sweat — that's how I learned to play, with Steve — and I had to defend myself when we started. By the time we finished playing, we were fairly equal, I think, but he'd still beat me more often than not".[21] Richard Joseph Dick Giordano (born July 20, 1932) is an American comic book artist and editor best known for introducing Charlton Comics Action Heroes stable of superheroes, and serving as editor of then industry-leader DC Comics. ...


Frank McLaughlin, Charlton art director: "Ditko lived in a local hotel in Derby for a while. He was a very happy-go-lucky guy with a great sense of humor at that time, and always supplied the [female] color separators with candy and other little gifts".[21] Frank McLaughlin is an American comic book artist who co-created the character Judomaster; a comic strip illustrator who served as a successor artist on such popular strips as Nancy and Brenda Starr; and an author of books about cartooning and comic art. ... Derby is a town located in New Haven County, Connecticut. ...


Characters created

The Hawk and the Dove #1 (Sept. 1968). Cover art by Ditko.
The Hawk and the Dove #1 (Sept. 1968). Cover art by Ditko.

Image File history File links Hawk&Dove-DitkoV1n1. ... Image File history File links Hawk&Dove-DitkoV1n1. ... The Creeper is a DC Comics superhero created by Steve Ditko. ... For other uses, see Hawk and dove (disambiguation). ... Shade, the Changing Man is a fictional comic book character created by Steve Ditko for DC Comics in 1977. ... The Odd Man was the first of a trilogy of police series produced in the 1960s by Granada TV, linked by the presence of pompous but increasingly genial police Chief Inspector Charles Rose (William Mervyn). ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... The Green Goblin is a Marvel Comics supervillain and an archenemy of Spider-Man. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the Marvel comics superhero. ... Electro is the name of several fictional comic book characters in the Marvel Comics universe, including two from Marvels predecessors, Timely Comics and Atlas Comics. ... Underworld films, see Kraven (Underworld). ... The Lizard is a comic book supervillain in the Marvel Comics universe, and an enemy of Spider-Man. ... The Mocker is a fictional character by artist Steve Ditko. ... For the professional wrestler known by his stage name, Rey Mysterio, see Oscar Gutierrez. ... The Question is an American comic book superhero. ... Blue Beetle is the name of three fictional comic book superheroes. ... Mr. ... Captain Atom is a fictional comic book superhero. ... E-Man is a fictional comic book superhero created by writer Nicola Cuti and artist Joe Staton for Charlton Comics in 1973. ... Sandman (a. ... Speedball (Robert Robbie Baldwin) is a fictional superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Squirrel Girl (Doreen Green) is a fictional superhero in the Marvel Universe. ... Scorpion is the name that two separate fiction characters have used in stories published by Marvel Comics. ... Stalker is a 4 issues comic-book limited series created in 1975 by Paul Levitz (writer), Steve Ditko (penciller) and Wally Wood (inker), and published by DC Comics. ... The Vulture is the name of three comic book supervillains in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Dormammu is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ Ditko Looked Up: "Ditko & Stanton"
  2. ^ Theakston, Greg. The Steve Ditko Reader (Pure Imagination, Brooklyn, NY, 2002; ISBN 1-56685-011-8), pp. 13-15 (unnumbered, pp. 14-15 misordered as pp. 16 & 14)
  3. ^ Lee, Stan, and Mair, George. Excelsior!: The Amazing Life of Stan Lee (Fireside, 2002), p.130. ISBN 0-684-87305-2
  4. ^ Theakston, Greg. The Steve Ditko Reader (Pure Imagination, Brooklyn, NY, 2002; ISBN 1-56685-011-8), p. 12 (unnumbered)
  5. ^ Theakston, Ibid., page 13
  6. ^ Ditko, Robin Snyder's History of Comics, Ibid.
  7. ^ "Steve Ditko - A Portrait of the Master." Comic Fan #2, Summer 1965. Published by Larry Herndon
  8. ^ Ditko Looked Up: "Ditko & Stanton"
  9. ^ Theakston, Ibid., p. 14 (unnumbered, misordered as page 16)
  10. ^ "Stan the Man & Roy the Boy: A Conversation Between Stan Lee and Roy Thomas", Comic Book Artist #2 (Summer 1998)
  11. ^ Ditko interview in Masters of Imagination: The Comic Book Artists Hall of Fame by Mike Benton (Taylor Publishing, 1994) ISBN-10 0878338594, ISBN-13 978-0878338597), quoting from fanzine Marvel Main #4 (1969), published by Mike Howell and Richard Howell
  12. ^ "The Amazing Steve Ditko" by Douglas Wolk, Salon.com, June 3, 2005, p. 2
  13. ^ Ditko Shrugged. A four part essay on Rand's influence on Ditko: Part 1: Ayn Rand’s Influence on Steve Ditko’s Craft, Commerce, and Creeper, Part 2: Apollonian and Dionysian Conflicts in The Hawk and the Dove and Beware the Creeper, Part 3: Did Neal Adams Work on Beware the Creeper #5?, Silver Bullet Comic Books, September 11-14, 2007
  14. ^ IMDb credits
  15. ^ Jonathan Ross in Search of Steve Ditko details at the BBC
  16. ^ BestOfMostOf.com (April 28, 2007): "Ditko Documentary from the BBC", by Blake Bell
  17. ^ BestOfMostOf.com (May 1, 2007): "More Ditko BBC Documentary News", by Blake Bell .
  18. ^ Theakston, Ibid., p. 3 (unnumbered)
  19. ^ Comic Fan #2 (Summer 1965), published by Larry Herndon: "Steve Ditko: A Portrait of the Master"
  20. ^ Voice of Comicdom #4 (April 1965): Letter-to-the-editor
  21. ^ a b Comic Book Artist #9 (Aug. 2000): "The Charlton Empire: A Brief History of the Derby, Connecticut Publisher", by Jon B. Cooke & Christopher Irving

A fanzine (see also: zine) is a nonprofessional publication produced by fans of a particular subject for the pleasure of others who share their interest. ... Salon. ... Ibid (Latin, short for ibidem, the same place) is the term used to provide an endnote or footnote citation or reference for a source that was cited in the last endnote or footnote. ...

References

  • Ditko Looked Up
  • Theakston, Greg. The Steve Ditko Reader (Pure Imagination, NY, 2002) ISBN 1-56685-011-8)
  • The Unofficial Handbook of Marvel Comics Creators
  • The Grand Comic-Book Database

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Pure Imagination is a comic book, magazine, and comics-related book publisher run by Greg Theakston since 1975. ...

External links

  • Steve Ditko discussion group
  • Toonerville Theme Comics: More Ditko Covers — Short Lived Series
  • OddBall Comics article on Blue Beetle #5
  • Blake Bell's Ditko Looked Up homepage
Preceded by
None
Amazing Spider-Man artist
1962–1966
Succeeded by
John Romita, Sr.
Preceded by
None
Doctor Strange artist
1963–1968
Succeeded by
Bill Everett

  Results from FactBites:
 
Steve Ditko - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1567 words)
Steve Ditko (born 2 November 1927 in Johnstown, Pennsylvania) is a renowned American comic book artist and writer best known as the co-creator of Spider-Man.
Ditko's tenure on "Dr. Strange" culminated in the introduction, in Strange Tales #146 (July 1966), of Ditko's grand and enduring conception of Eternity, the personification of the universe, depicted as a majestic silhouette whose outlines are filled with the cosmos.
Ditko was a finalist for induction into the Jack Kirby Hall of Fame in 1989, and formally inducted in 1990.
Steve Ditko - Free Encyclopedia (319 words)
Steve Ditko (born 2 November 1927 in Johnstown, Pennsylvania) is a renowned comic book artist and writer best known for being the co-creator of Spider-Man.
By 1968, Ditko was producing work for DC Comics where he created characters such as The Creeper and The Hawk and the Dove.
Ditko used these tales, ostensibly in the superhero genre, to espouse and explore various ethical issues.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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