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Encyclopedia > Steve Carlton

Steven Norman Carlton (born December 22, 1944 in Miami, Florida) is a former left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball, from 1965 to 1988, who retired as one of the most successful pitchers to ever play the game. Affectionitly known to Philadelphia fans as "lefty". December 22 is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Magic City, The American Riviera, The Sixth Borough Location of Miami in Miami-Dade County, Florida. ... A baseball pitcher delivers the ball to home plate In baseball, the pitcher is the player who throws the baseball from the pitchers mound toward the catcher to begin each play, with the goal of retiring a batter who attempts to either make contact with it or draw a... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in the world. ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link goes to calendar). ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on a Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Carlton debuted with the St. Louis Cardinals as a 20-year old in 1965 and by 1967 was a regular in the Cardinals rotation. An imposing (6'4"/1.93 m) man with a hard fastball and slider, Carlton was soon known as an intimidating and dominant pitcher. Carlton enjoyed immediate success in St. Louis, posting winning records and reaching the World Series in 1967 and 1968. On September 15, 1969, Carlton, struck out 19 New York Mets, tying the all time record at that time for strikeouts in a nine inning game. Major league affiliations National League (1892-present) Central Division (1994-present) Eastern Division (1969-1993) American Association (1882-1891) Major league titles World Series titles (9) 1982 â€¢1967 â€¢ 1964 â€¢ 1946 1944 â€¢ 1942 â€¢ 1934 â€¢ 1931 1926 NL Pennants (16) 2004 â€¢ 1987 â€¢ 1985 â€¢ 1982 1968 â€¢ 1967 â€¢ 1964 â€¢ 1946 1944 â€¢ 1943 â€¢ 1942 â€¢ 1934... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The fastball is the most common type of pitch in baseball. ... In baseball, a slider (also known as a nickel curve) is a pitch halfway between a curveball and a fastball, with less break but more speed than the curve. ... The World Series is the championship series of Major League Baseball in the United States and Canada, the culmination of the sports postseason each October. ... The 1967 World Series matched the St. ... The 1968 World Series featured the defending champion St. ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday For other uses, see Number 1969. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962-present) East Division (1969-present) Major league titles World Series titles (2) 1986 â€¢ 1969 NL Pennants (4) 2000 â€¢ 1986 â€¢ 1973 â€¢ 1969 East Division titles (4) 1988 â€¢ 1986 â€¢ 1973 â€¢ 1969 Wild card berths (2) 2000 â€¢ 1999 Major league nicknames New York Mets (1962-present) Major...

This person is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame.
This person is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Following a salary dispute, Carlton was traded to the Philadelphia Phillies before the 1972 season for pitcher Rick Wise. Carlton's first season with the Phillies was among the greatest seasons a pitcher has ever had. He led the league in wins (27), complete games (30), strikeouts (310) and ERA (1.97) despite playing for a team whose final record was 59-97. His 1972 performance earned him the Hickok Belt as top professional athlete of the year. His having won 46% of his team's victories is a record in modern major league history. Carlton attributed his success to his grueling training regime, which included Eastern martial arts techniques, the most famous of which was twisting his fist to the bottom of a 5 gallon bucket of rice. He was perhaps the most physically fit baseball player of his time. National Baseball Hall of Fame logo This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... National Baseball Hall of Fame logo This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, United States, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests that serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display... Major league affiliations National League (1883-present) East Division (1969-present) Major league titles World Series titles (1) 1980 NL Pennants (5) 1993 â€¢ 1983 â€¢ 1980 â€¢ 1950 1915 East Division titles (6) [1] 1993 â€¢ 1983 â€¢ 1980 â€¢ 1978 1977 â€¢ 1976 Wild card berths (0) None [1] - In 1981, a players strike in... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year that started on a Tuesday. ... Richard Charles Wise (born September 13, 1945 in Jackson, Michigan) was a right-handed pitcher in American Major League Baseball for 18 seasons (1964; 1965-82). ... The S. Ray Hickok Belt was a trophy awarded to the top professional athlete of the year. ... Hawaiian State Grappling Championships. ... Species Oryza glaberrima Oryza sativa Rice refers to two species (Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima) of grass, native to tropical and subtropical southeastern Asia and to Africa, which together provide more than one fifth of the calories consumed by humans. ...


Carlton slumped in 1973, losing 20 games. The media's open questioning of his unusual training techniques led to an acrimonious relationship between them and Carlton, and he severed all ties with the media, refusing to answer press questions for the rest of his career with the Phillies. This reached a point where, in 1981, while the Mexican rookie Fernando Valenzuela was achieving stardom with the Los Angeles Dodgers, a reporter remarked, "The two best pitchers in the National League don't speak English: Fernando Valenzuela and Steve Carlton." 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fernando Valenzuela Anguamea (b. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890-present) West Division (1969-present) American Association (1884-1889) Major league titles World Series titles (6) 1988 â€¢ 1981 â€¢ 1965 â€¢ 1963 1959 â€¢ 1955 NL Pennants (21) 1988 â€¢ 1981 â€¢ 1978 â€¢ 1977 1974 â€¢ 1966 â€¢ 1965 â€¢ 1963 1959 â€¢ 1956 â€¢ 1955 â€¢ 1953 1952 â€¢ 1949 â€¢ 1947 â€¢ 1941 1920 â€¢ 1916 â€¢ 1900... This article refers to the American baseball league. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


Carlton continued to enjoy many years of success with the Phillies, winning the Cy Young Award in 1972, 1977, 1980, and 1982, and pitching the Phillies to the best string of postseason appearances in club history. Carlton was the first pitcher to win four Cy Young Awards, a mark later matched by several pitchers. In 1980, Carlton helped the Phillies win their only World Series, personally winning the final game. Carlton also won a Gold Glove Award for his fielding in 1981. In baseball, the Cy Young Award is an honor given annually to the best pitchers in the Major Leagues. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In American baseball, the Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to simply as the Gold Glove, is the award annually given to the Major League player judged to be the most superior individual fielding performance at each position (in each league), as voted by the managers and coaches in each... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Over a three year period between 1982-1984, Carlton was involved in an interesting pitching duel with Nolan Ryan, then of the Houston Astros, in which they often traded places at the top of the all-time strikeout list. At the start of the 1982 season, pitching great Walter Johnson was the all time strikeout with 3,508, a record he has held since passing Cy Young in 1921. After 61 years, there were suddenly 3 pitchers who would start the season within 100 strikeouts of Johnson, Nolan Ryan 3,494, Gaylord Perry, 3,452, and Carlton 3,434. Ryan would be the first to surpass Johnson on April 22, 1983 against the Montreal Expos. However a stint on the DL shortly after setting the record combined with a spectacular season by Carlton allowed him to make up ground rather quickly and on June 7, 1982 Carlton passed Ryan as the all time strikeout king with 3,526 to Ryan's 3,524. There would be a total of 14 lead changes and one tie that season, often after each of their respective starts before the season ended with Carlton leading 3,709-3,677. Gaylord Perry, aging and in his final season was never a factor, although he did eventually pass Johnson to finish his career with 3,534 strikeouts. There would be five more lead changes and a tie in 1984 before Carlton ran out of gas. His last ever lead in the all time strikeout race was after his start on September 4, 1984 when he struck out four Cubs to lead Ryan by three (3,857-3,854). Although the season ended with a mere two strikeout lead for Nolan (3,874-3,872), Carlton had a terrible season in 1985 and an even worse season in 1986 before being released by the Phillies in 1986 just 18 strikeouts short of 4,000. Nolan Ryan Lynn Nolan Ryan, Jr. ... Walter Johnson on a 1909-1911 American Tobacco Company baseball card (White Borders (T206)). Walter Perry Johnson (November 6, 1887-December 10, 1946), American professional baseball pitcher. ... Nolan Ryan Lynn Nolan Ryan, Jr. ... Gaylord Jackson Perry (born September 15, 1938 in Williamston, North Carolina) is a All-Star Major League Baseball pitcher and member of the United States Baseball Hall of Fame. ... The Montreal Expos were a Major League Baseball team located in Montreal, Quebec, Canada from 1969 to 2004. ...


He caught on with the San Francisco Giants, but pitched ineffectively save for seven shutout innings in a game against the Pittsburgh Pirates in which he also hit a 3-run homer for his only win as a Giant. He would hang around just long enough to collect his 4,000th strikeout against Eric Davis before retiring. Major league affiliations National League (1887-present) Central Division (1994-present) East Division (1969-1993) American Association (1882-1886) Major league titles World Series titles (5) 1979 â€¢ 1971 â€¢ 1960 â€¢ 1925 1909 NL Pennants (9) 1979 â€¢ 1971 â€¢ 1960 â€¢ 1927 1925 â€¢ 1909 â€¢ 1903 â€¢ 1902 1901 Central Division titles (0) None East Division... Eric Davis hit for the cycle in 1989 Eric Keith Davis (born May 29, 1962 in Los Angeles, California) is a former center fielder for several Major League Baseball teams, most remembered for the years he spent with the Cincinnati Reds. ...


His retiriment was brief, as he almost immediately signed on with the Chicago White Sox for the remainder of the 1986 season, where he would be surprisingly effective, going 4-3 with a respectable 3.69 ERA, but not be offered a contract for 1987. He caught on with the lowly Cleveland Indians where his most notable achievement was teaming up with Phil Niekro in a game against the New York Yankees at Yankee Stadium (his first and only pitching appearance at "The House that Ruth Built") where they became the first teammates and 300 game winners to appear in the same game. Both were ineffective in a 10-6 Yankee victory. He was traded to the Minnseota Twins where he was yet again ineffective, however the Twins would go on to win in a very weak Western Division, and with Carlton off the postseason roster, upset both the Detroit Tigers and St. Louis Cardnails in one of the most improbable World Series victories ever to earn himself a World Series Ring and a trip to the White House to meet President Reagan along with his teammates. The Twins brought him back in 1988 but lasted only a month before the Twins released him. He attempted to find work in 1989 but found no takers. The closest thing to an offer was the New York Yankees offering him the use of their facilities for training purposes but no spot on the spring training team. Nolan Ryan would pitch until 1993 and would extend his strikeout lead to almost 1,600 before retiring.


A ten-time All-Star, Carlton led the league in many pitching categories. He struck out 4,136 batters in his career, then a record for a lefthanded pitcher (since surpassed by Randy Johnson), and holds many other records for lefthanded pitchers and Phillies pitchers. His 329 career wins are the tenth most in baseball history, and rank third to Roger Clemens' 341 (and counting) and Warren Spahn's 363 among pitchers of the live-ball era (post-1920). He never threw a no hitter, but pitched a complete game one hitter six times. The Major League Baseball All-Star Game, also popularly known as the Midsummer Classic, is an annual exhibition baseball game between players from the National League and the American League, currently selected by fan vote for the position players and by the manager for pitchers. ... In baseball, a strikeout or strike out (denoted by K, K-S, or SO) occurs when the batter receives three strikes during his time at bat. ... Johnson tossing out a pitch against the Milwaukee Brewers at Miller Park Randall David Randy Johnson (born September 10, 1963 in Walnut Creek, California), also known as The Big Unit, is a left-handed starting pitcher for the New York Yankees. ... In Major League Baseball, a win refers to a pitcher leaving his game with a lead, not there when he began pitching, and the team holding this lead. ... William Roger Clemens (born August 4, 1962 in Dayton, Ohio), nicknamed The Rocket, is among the preeminent Major League baseball pitchers of the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s. ... Warren Spahn as a member of the Boston Braves Warren Edward Spahn (April 23, 1921 – November 24, 2003) was an American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for 21 seasons, all in the National League. ... The Live Ball Era, also referred to as the Lively Ball Era, is the period in Major League Baseball beginning in 1920. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January January 7 - Forces of Russian White admiral Kolchak surrender in Krasnoyarsk. ... In baseball and softball, a no-hit game (more commonly known as a no-hitter) refers to a contest in which one of the teams has prevented the other from getting an official hit during the entire length of the game, which must be at least 9 innings by the...


Carlton was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1994 with 96% of the vote, one of the highest percentages ever for approval. The Phillies retired his number 32, and honored him with a statue outside Citizens Bank Park. In 1999, he ranked number 30 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players, and was a nominee for the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, United States, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests that serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display... See also: 1993 in sports, other events of 1994, 1995 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto Racing Stock car racing: Sterling Marlin won the Daytona 500 Jeff Gordon wins the Coca Cola 600 Jeff Gordon wins the first Brickyard 400 NASCAR Championship - Dale Earnhardt CART Racing... Citizens Bank Park is a 43,500-seat baseball-only stadium in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania that opened on April 3, 2004 and hosted its first regular season baseball game on April 12. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... The Sporting News (TSN) is an American-based sports newspaper. ... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in the world. ...


Carlton appeared in an episode of Married with Children, playing himself in an episode where former athletes humiliate Al Bundy while filming a shoe commercial. Married. ...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Steve Carlton - definition of Steve Carlton in Encyclopedia (503 words)
Carlton's first season with the Phillies was among the greatest seasons a pitcher has ever had, as he won 27 games despite playing for a team whose final record was 59-97.
Carlton attributed his success to his grueling training regime, which included Eastern martial arts techniques, the most famous of which was doing exercises while immersed in a vat of rice.
Carlton was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1994 with 96% of the vote, one of the highest percentages ever for approval.
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