FACTOID # 29: 73.3% of America's gross operating surplus in motion picture and sound recording industries comes from California.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Sternum" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Sternum
Bone: Sternum
Anterior surface of sternum and costal cartilages.
Posterior surface of sternum.
Gray's subject #27 119
MeSH Sternum
Dorlands/Elsevier s_23/12758288

The sternum (from Greek στέρνον, sternon, "chest") or breastbone is a long, flat bone located in the center of the thorax (chest). It connects to the rib bones via cartilage, forming the rib cage with them, and thus helps to protect the lungs, heart and major blood vessels from physical trauma. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (526x650, 34 KB)From Grays Anatomy Anterior surface of sternum and costa cartilages. ... The costal cartilages are bars of hyaline cartilage which serve to prolong the ribs forward and contribute very materially to the elasticity of the walls of the thorax. ... Image File history File links Gray116. ... Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) is a huge controlled vocabulary (or metadata system) for the purpose of indexing journal articles and books in the life sciences. ... Elseviers logo. ... Grays Anatomy illustration of a human femur. ... Chest of a human male The chest is a part of the anatomy of humans and various other animals. ... The human rib cage. ... Cartilage is a type of dense connective tissue. ... This article is about the bones called ribs. ... The heart and lungs (from an older edition of Grays Anatomy) The lung is an organ belonging to the respiratory system and interfacing to the circulatory system of air-breathing vertebrates. ... The heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ... In medicine, a trauma patient has suffered serious and life-threatening physical injury resulting in secondary complications such as shock, respiratory failure and death. ...


The sternum is sometimes cut open (a median sternotomy) to gain access to the thoracic contents when performing cardiothoracic surgery. Median sternotomy is a surgical procedure in which a vertical inline incision is made along the sternum, after which the sternum itself is divided, or cracked. This procedure provides access to the heart and lungs for surgical procedures such as heart transplant, corrective surgery for congenital heart defects (CHDs...

Contents

Overview

The sternum is an elongated, flattened bone, forming the middle portion of the anterior wall of the thorax. Its upper end supports the clavicles (Collar bones), and its margins articulate with the cartilages of the first seven pairs of ribs. Its top is also connected to the Sternocleidomastoid muscle. It consists of three parts, from above downward: In anatomy, the clavicle or collar bone is a bone that makes up part of the shoulder girdle. ... In human anatomy, the sternocleidomastoid (pronounced ) muscles are muscles in the neck that act to flex and rotate the head. ...

In early life, the body of sternum consists of four segments or sternebrœ. Sternum or breastbone is a long, flat bone located in the center of the thorax (chest). ... The body of the sternum (gladiolus), considerably lengthier, narrower, and thinner than the manubrium, attains its greatest breadth close to the lower end. ... The xiphoid process is a small cartilaginous extension to the lower part of the sternum which is usually ossified in the adult human. ...


In its natural position, the inclination of the bone is oblique from above, downward and forward. It is slightly convex in front and concave behind; broad above, becoming narrowed at the point where the manubrium joins the body, after which it again widens a little to below the middle of the body, and then narrows to its lower extremity. Its average length in the adult is about 17 cm, and is rather longer in the male than in the female. A centimetre (American spelling centimeter, symbol cm) is a unit of length that is equal to one hundredth of a metre, the current SI base unit of length. ...


Structure

The sternum is composed of highly vascular cancellous tissue, covered by a thin layer of compact bone which is thickest in the manubrium between the articular facets for the clavicles.


Articulations

The sternum articulates on either side with the clavicle and upper seven costal cartilages. The costal cartilages are bars of hyaline cartilage which serve to prolong the ribs forward and contribute very materially to the elasticity of the walls of the thorax. ...


Fractures of the sternum

Fractures of the sternum are not common. However, they may result from trauma, such as when a driver's chest is forced into the steering column of a car in a car accident. A fracture of the sternum is usually a comminuted fracture, meaning it is broken into pieces. The most common site of sternal fractures is at the sternal angle. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Minor collisions such as this one are the most common type of crash. ... A bone fracture is a medical condition in which a bone becomes cracked, splintered, or bisected as a result of physical trauma. ... The sternal angle is the angle formed by the junction of the manubrium and the body of the sternum. ...


Additional images

References

This article was originally based on an entry from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy. As such, some of the information contained herein may be outdated. Please edit the article if this is the case, and feel free to remove this notice when it is no longer relevant. The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy after Henry Gray, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...

  • Clinically Oriented Anatomy, 4th ed. Keith L. Moore and Arthur F. Dalley. pp. 66-68.

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Sternum at AllExperts (1453 words)
Sternum or breastbone is a long, flat bone located in the center of the thorax (chest).
The sternum is composed of highly vascular cancellous tissue, covered by a thin layer of compact bone which is thickest in the manubrium between the articular facets for the clavicles.
The sternum originally consists of two cartilaginous bars, situated one on either side of the median plane and connected with the cartilages of the upper nine ribs of its own side.
Sternum - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (402 words)
The sternum or ';l'l'lone is a long, flat bone located in the center of the thorax (chest).
The sternum is sometimes cut open (a median sternotomy) to gain access to the thoracic contents when performing cardiothoracic surgery.
The sternum is an elongated, flattened bone, forming the middle portion of the anterior wall of the thorax.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m