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Encyclopedia > Stereotypical behavior
Animals kept in small, unadorned enclosures are likely to develop stereotypical behaviors.
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Animals kept in small, unadorned enclosures are likely to develop stereotypical behaviors.

Stereotypical behavior in animals refers to repetitive motor behavior without obvious purpose or function. It is considered an abnormal behavior and is sometimes seen in captive animals, particularly those held in small enclosures with little opportunity to engage in more normal behaviors. They may be maladaptive, involving self-injury or reduced reproductive success.[1] Animals in which are situated in the esscence of humans are in captivity. ...


Examples of stereotypical behaviors include pacing, rocking, swimming in circles, excessive sleeping, self-mutilation (including feather picking and excessive grooming), and mouthing cage bars. Stereotypies are seen in many species, including primates, birds, and carnivores. Up to 40% of elephants in zoos display stereotypical behaviors.[2] Families 15, See classification A primate (L. prima, first) is any member of the biological order Primates, the group that contains all the species commonly related to the lemurs, monkeys, and apes, with the latter category including humans. ... Orders Many - see section below. ... Families Ailuridae Amphicyonidae† Canidae Felidae Herpestidae Hyaenidae Mephitidae Miacidae† Mustelidae Nandiniidae Nimravidae† Odobenidae Otariidae Phocidae Procyonidae Ursidae Viverravidae† Viverridae The diverse order Carnivora pronounced: (from Latin caro flesh, + vorare to devour) includes over 260 placental mammals. ... Genera and Species Elephantidae (the elephants) is a family of pachyderm, and the only remaining family in the order Proboscidea. ... Giraffes in Sydneys Taronga Zoo Free monkeys islands at the São Paulo Zoo Panda enclosure at Chiang Mai Zoo Visitors feeding and petting tamed marmots at the Parc Animalier des Pyrenées Sea lions at the Melbourne Zoo For other uses of the term Zoo, see Zoo...


Stereotypical behaviors are thought to be caused ultimately by artificial environments that do not allow animals to satisfy their normal behavioral needs. Rather than refer to the behavior as abnormal, it has been suggested that it be described as "behavior indicative of an abnormal environment."[3] Stereotypies are correlated with altered behavioral response selection in the basal ganglia.[1] To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Stereotypical behavior in laboratory animals can confound behavioral research. [1] It is also seen as a sign of psychological distress in animals, and therefore is an animal welfare issue. Animal welfare is the viewpoint that animals, especially those under human care, should not suffer unnecessarily, including where the animals are used for food, work, companionship, or research. ...


Stereotypical behavior can sometimes be reduced or eliminated by environmental enrichment, including larger and more stimulationg enclosures, training, and introductions of stimuli (such as objects, sounds, or scents) to the animal's environment. The enrichment must be varied to remain effective for any length of time. Housing social animals such as primates with other members of their species is also helpful. However, once the behavior is established, it is sometimes impossible to eliminate due to alterations in the brain.[3] Families 15, See classification A primate (L. prima, first) is any member of the biological order Primates, the group that contains all the species commonly related to the lemurs, monkeys, and apes, with the latter category including humans. ...


Notes & References

  1. ^ a b c Garner, Joseph; and Mason, Georgia (2005-04). "Evidence for a relationship between cage stereotypies and behavioural disinhibition in laboratory rodents". Retrieved on 2006-05-30.
  2. ^ Andrew Stern. "Elephant Deaths at Zoos Reignite Animal Debate", Reuters, 2005-02-28. Retrieved on 2006-05-30.
  3. ^ a b "Stereotypical Behavior: A LAREF Discussion", Laboratory Primate Newsletter, 2004-11-06. Retrieved on 2006-05-30.

 
 

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