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Encyclopedia > Stephen Sondheim
Stephen Joshua Sondheim
Birth name Stephen Joshua Sondheim
Born March 22, 1930 (1930-03-22) (age 77)
New York City, NY, U.S.
Genre(s) Musical theatre
Occupation(s) Composer, lyricist
Years active 1954  – Present

Stephen Joshua Sondheim (b. March 22, 1930) is an American stage musical and film composer and lyricist, one of the few people to win an Academy Award, multiple Tony Awards (seven, more than any other composer), multiple Grammy Awards, and a Pulitzer Prize. He has been described by Frank Rich in the The New York Times as "the greatest and perhaps best-known artist in the American musical theater." [1] His most famous scores include (as composer/lyricist) A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, Company, Follies, A Little Night Music, Sweeney Todd, Sunday in the Park with George, Into the Woods, and Assassins, as well as the lyrics for West Side Story and Gypsy. He was president of the Dramatists Guild from 1973 to 1981. is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the state. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Black Crook (1866), considered by some historians to be the first musical[1] Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, spoken dialogue and dance. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Black Crook (1866), considered by some historians to be the first musical[1] Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, spoken dialogue and dance. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award® but is formally the Antoinette Perry Award is an annual American award celebrating achievements in theater, including musical theater. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Frank Rich (born June 2, 1949 in Washington, D.C.) is a columnist for The New York Times who focuses on American politics and popular culture. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Hi! Youre car can speak <a href=http://immobilizer. ... Company is a musical with a book by George Furth and music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. ... Follies is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and a book by James Goldman. ... A Little Night Music is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by Hugh Wheeler. ... Sweeney Todd, the Demon Barber of Fleet Street is a Tony Award-winning musical with a book by Hugh Wheeler and music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. ... Sunday in the Park with George is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by James Lapine. ... Into the Woods is an award-winning musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by James Lapine. ... Assassins is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by John Weidman and was based on an idea by Charles Gilbert, Jr. ... This article is about the musical. ... Gypsy: A Musical Fable is a musical with music by Jule Styne, lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. ...

Contents

Early life

Stephen Sondheim was born to Herbert and Janet ("Foxy") Sondheim, in New York City, New York, and grew up on the Upper West Side of Manhattan and later on a farm in Pennsylvania. Herbert was a dress manufacturer and Foxy designed the dresses. While his mother had grown up in an Orthodox Jewish family, Sondheim had no formal religious education or association, did not become a Bar Mitzvah, and reportedly did not set foot in a synagogue until he was nineteen[citation needed]. An only child of well-to-do parents living in a high-rise apartment on Central Park West, Sondheim's childhood has been portrayed as isolated and emotionally neglected in Meryl Secrest's biography, Sondheim: A Life. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the state. ... The Upper West Side is a neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City that lies between Central Park and the Hudson River above West 59th Street. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Orthodox Judaism is the formulation of Judaism that adheres to a relatively strict interpretation and application of the laws and ethics first canonised in the Talmudic texts (Oral Torah) and as subsequently developed and applied by the later authorities known as the Gaonim, Rishonim, and Acharonim. ... Religious education teaches the doctrines of a religion. ... When a Jewish child reaches the age of maturity (12 years and one day for girls, 13 years and one day for boys) that child becomes responsible for him/herself under Jewish law; at this point a boy is said to become Bar Mitzvah (&#1489;&#1512; &#1502;&#1510;&#1493;&#1493... A synagogue (from , transliterated synagogē, assembly; beit knesset, house of assembly; or beit tefila, house of prayer, shul; , esnoga) is a Jewish house of worship. ... An only child is a child with no siblings, either biological or adopted. ... High-rise is a 1975 novel by J. G. Ballard. ... Central Park West is an avenue in New York City. ...


Sondheim traces his interest in theater to Very Warm for May, a Broadway musical he saw at the age of nine. "The curtain went up and revealed a piano," Sondheim recalled. "A butler took a duster and brushed it up, tinkling the keys. I thought that was thrilling."[2] Very Warm for May opened at the Alvin Theatre on November 17, 1939 and was Jerome Kerns last score for Broadway before relocating to Hollywood and writing music for movies until his death in 1945. ...


When Stephen was ten years old, his father Herbert, a distant figure in Stephen's life, abandoned him and his mother. Under the laws of the day, Sondheim's mother retained full custody. Unfortunately for young Stephen, he saw his mother "Foxy Sondheim" as narcissistic, emotionally abusive, and a hypochondriac.[citation needed] Stephen "famously despised" Foxy;[1] he once wrote a thank-you note to close friend Mary Rodgers that read, "Dear Mary and Hank, Thanks for the plate, but where was my mother's head? Love, Steve."[2] When Foxy died on September 15, 1993, Sondheim refused to attend her funeral. Hypochondria (sometimes hypochondriasis) is the unfounded belief that one is suffering from a serious illness. ... Mary Rodgers (born January 11, 1931) is a composer of musicals, an author of childrens books, and daughter of Richard Rodgers. ...


Career

Mentorship under Oscar Hammerstein II

At about the age of ten, around the time of his parents' divorce, Sondheim became friends with Jimmy Hammerstein, son of the well-known lyricist and playwright Oscar Hammerstein II. The elder Hammerstein became a surrogate father to Sondheim, as the young man attempted to stay away from home as much as possible. Hammerstein had a profound influence on the young Sondheim, especially in his development of love for musical theater. Indeed, it was at the opening of Hammerstein's hit show South Pacific that Sondheim met Harold Prince, who would later direct many of Sondheim's most famous shows. During high school, Sondheim attended George School, a private Quaker preparatory school in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. He had the chance to write a comic musical based on the goings-on of his school, entitled By George. It was a major success among his peers, and it inflated the young songwriter's ego considerably; he took it to Hammerstein, and asked him to evaluate it as though he had no knowledge of its author. Hammerstein hated it. "But if you want to know why it's terrible," Hammerstein consoled the young man, "I'll tell you." The rest of the day was spent going over the musical, and Sondheim would later say that "in that afternoon I learned more about songwriting and the musical theater than most people learn in a lifetime." [3] For work done with Richard Rodgers, see Rodgers and Hammerstein Oscar Hammerstein II (July 12, 1895 – August 23, 1960) was a New-York born writer, producer, and (usually uncredited) director of musicals for almost forty years. ... This article is about the stage musical. ... Hal Prince (born January 30, 1928), full name Harold Smith Prince, is a theatre producer and director associated with many of the best-known Broadway musical (and less notably, dramatic) productions of the past half-century. ... George School is a private Quaker boarding and day high school near Newtown, Pennsylvania, USA. // George School was founded in 1891 and opened in 1893 as a school for Hicksite members of the Society of Friends (Quakers) who wanted an alternative to Orthodox Westtown School; Although most of the early... A university-preparatory school or college-preparatory school (usually abbreviated to preparatory school, college prep school, or prep school) is a private secondary school designed to prepare a student for higher education. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Thus began one of the most famous apprenticeships in the musical theatre, as Hammerstein designed a kind of course for Sondheim to take on the construction of a musical. This training centered around four assignments, which Sondheim was to write. These were:

None of these "assignment" musicals was ever produced professionally. High Tor and Mary Poppins have never been produced at all, because the rights holders for the original works refused to grant permission for a musical to be made. All That Glitters was the name of a 1977 series by producer Norman Lear. ... High Tor was a made-for-television musical fantasy broadcast March 10, 1956 on the CBS network. ... This article is in need of attention. ... This article is about the Mary Poppins series of childrens books. ... For the 2004 stage musical, see Mary Poppins (musical). ... For the 1964 Academy Award winning motion picture, see Mary Poppins (film). ... Robert B. Sherman & Richard M. Sherman at the London Palladium in 2002 during the premiere of Chitty Chitty Bang Bang: The Stage Musical. ...


In 1950, Sondheim graduated magna cum laude from Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts, where he was a member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity. He went on to study composition with the composer Milton Babbitt. In Mark Eden Horowitz's Sondheim on Music, Sondheim says that when he asked Babbitt if he could study atonality, Babbitt replied "No, I don't think you've exhausted your tonal resources yet." Sondheim agreed, and despite frequent dissonance and a highly chromatic style, his music remains resolutely tonal. Latin honors are Latin phrases used to indicate the level of academic distinction with which an academic degree was earned. ... Williams College is a private, liberal arts college located in Williamstown, Massachusetts. ... Williamstown is a town located in Berkshire County, Massachusetts. ... Beta Theta Pi (ΒΘΠ) is a social collegiate fraternity that was founded at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, USA, where it is part of the Miami Triad which includes Phi Delta Theta and Sigma Chi. ... Milton Byron Babbitt (born May 10, 1916) is an American composer. ... Atonality describes music not conforming to the system of tonal hierarchies, which characterizes the sound of classical European music between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries. ... Tonality is a system of writing music according to certain hierarchical pitch relationships around a key center or tonic. ... Dissonance has several meanings, all related to conflict or incongruity. ... In Music theory, the diatonic major scale (also known as the Guido scale), from the Greek diatonikos or to stretch out, is a fundamental building block of the European-influenced musical tradition. ...


Move to Broadway and work as lyricist

"A few painful years of struggle" followed for Sondheim, during which he conditionally auditioned songs and lived in his father's dining room to save money. He also spent some time in Hollywood writing for the television series Topper.[2] Though, to date, Sondheim has only dabbled in movie musicals, he devoured the film of the forties and fifties and has called cinema his "basic language."[1] In the fifties, his knowledge of film got him through The $64,000 Question contestant tryouts. Though his favorite movies include classics like Citizen Kane, The Grapes of Wrath, and Stairway to Heaven, Sondheim says he dislikes movie musicals. He added that "studio directors like Michael Curtiz and Raoul Walsh....were heroes of mine. They went from movie to movie to movie, and every third movie was good and every fifth movie was great. There wasn't any cultural pressure to make art."[4] Topper was a television situation comedy series based on the 1930s film series Topper. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Citizen Kane is a 1941 mystery/drama film released by RKO Pictures and directed by Orson Welles, his first feature film. ... This article is about the film. ... A Matter of Life and Death (1946) is a film by the British writer-director-producer team of Powell and Pressburger. ... Michael Curtiz (December 24, 1886 - April 10, 1962) was an Academy Award-winning Hungarian-American film director. ... Raoul Walsh as John Wilkes Booth in Birth of a Nation Raoul Walsh (March 11, 1887 – December 31, 1980) was an American film director, actor, founding member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) and the brother of silent screen actor George Walsh. ...


In 1954, Sondheim wrote both music and lyrics for Saturday Night, which was never produced on Broadway and was shelved until a 1997 production at London's Bridewell Theatre. In 1998 Saturday Night received a professional recording, followed by an Off-Broadway run at Second Stage Theatre in 2000. Saturday Night is a 1950s Broadway musical by Stephen Sondheim. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Second Stage Theatre // Director Carole Rothman and actress Robyn Goodman founded Second Stage Theatre in 1979 to give second stagings to contemporary American plays that originally failed to find an audience due to scheduling problems, inappropriate venues or limited performance runs. ...


Sondheim's big break came when he wrote the lyrics to West Side Story, accompanying Leonard Bernstein's music and Arthur Laurents's book. The 1957 show, directed by Jerome Robbins, ran for 732 performances. While this may be the best-known show Sondheim ever worked on, he has expressed some dissatisfaction with his lyrics, stating they don't always fit the characters and are sometimes too consciously poetic. This article is about the musical. ... Leonard Bernstein in 1971 Leonard Bernstein (IPA pronunciation: )[1] (August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, and pianist. ... Arthur Laurents (born July 14, 1918) is an American playwright, novelist, screenwriter, librettist and stage director. ... Jerome Robbins (October 11, 1918 - July 29, 1998) was an American choreographer whose work has included everything from classical ballet to contemporary musical theater. ...


In 1959, he wrote the lyrics for another hit musical, Gypsy. Sondheim would have liked to write the music as well, but Ethel Merman, the star, insisted on a composer with a track record - thus Jule Styne was hired. [5] Sondheim questioned if he should write only the lyrics for yet another show, but his mentor Oscar Hammerstein told him it would be valuable experience to write for a star. Sondheim worked closely with book writer Arthur Laurents to create the show. It ran 702 performances. Gypsy: A Musical Fable is a musical with music by Jule Styne, lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. ... Ethel Merman (January 16, 1908 – February 15, 1984) was a Tony Award winning star of stage and film musicals, well known for her powerful voice and vocal range. ... Jule Styne (December 31, 1905 – September 20, 1994) was a British-born American songwriter, especially famous for a series of Broadway Musicals, which included several very well known and frequently revived shows. ... There were two notable Oscar Hammersteins: Oscar Hammerstein I, cigar manufacturer, opera impresario, and theatre builder Oscar Hammerstein II, Broadway lyricist, songwriting partner of Jerome Kern and Richard Rodgers This is a disambiguation page &#8212; a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Finally, Sondheim participated in a musical for which he wrote both the music and lyrics, A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum. It opened in 1962 and ran 964 performances. The book, based on the farces of Plautus, was by Burt Shevelove and Larry Gelbart. Sondheim's score was not especially well-received at the time - the show won several Tony Awards, including best musical, but Sondheim did not even receive a nomination. In addition, some critics felt the songs were not properly integrated into the farcical action. Hi! Youre car can speak <a href=http://immobilizer. ... Titus Macchius Plautus, generally referred to simply as Plautus, was a playwright of Ancient Rome. ... Burt Shevelove (1915 - 8 April 1981) was an American musical theater writer, lyricist, librettist, and director. ... Larry Gelbart (b. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award® but is formally the Antoinette Perry Award is an annual American award celebrating achievements in theater, including musical theater. ...


At this point, Sondheim had participated in three straight hits - he'd yet to taste failure on Broadway. His next show ended the streak. Anyone Can Whistle (1964) was a 9-performance flop, although it introduced Angela Lansbury to musical theatre and has developed a cult following. Anyone Can Whistle is a musical with a book by Arthur Laurents and music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. ... Angela Lansbury CBE (born October 16, 1925) is a four-time Tony-winning, six-time Golden Globe-winning, three-time Oscar-nominated, and eighteen-time Emmy-nominated English actress. ... This article does not discuss cultist groups, personality cults, or cult in its original sense of religious practice. See cult (disambiguation) for more meanings of the term cult. A cult following is a group of fans devoted to a specific area of pop culture. ...


In 1965 he donned his lyricist-for-hire hat for one last show, Do I Hear a Waltz?, with music by Richard Rodgers - the one project he has since openly regretted working on. [1] In 1966, he semi-anonymously provided the lyric for "The Boy From...", a parody of "The Girl from Ipanema" that was a highlight of the off-Broadway revue The Mad Show. (The official songwriting credit went to the linguistically-minded pseudonym "Esteban Rio Nido," which translates from the Spanish to "Stephen River Nest." In the show's Playbill, the lyric was credited to "Nom De Plume"). Do I Hear A Waltz? is a musical play with music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by Arthur Laurents. ... This article is about the American composer. ... The Boy From. ... The Girl from Ipanema (Garota de Ipanema) is a well known bossa nova song, and was a worldwide hit in the mid-1960s. ... The Mad Show is a successful off-Broadway musical revue based on Mad Magazine. ... The cover of the Playbill issue about The Producers. ... A pen name or nom de plume is a pseudonym adopted by an author. ...


Maturity as composer/lyricist in the 70s

Since then Sondheim has devoted himself to both composing and writing lyrics for a series of varied and adventuresome musicals, beginning with the innovative "concept musical" Company in 1970. Company is a musical with a book by George Furth and music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. ...


Sondheim's work is notable for his use of complex polyphony in the vocal parts, such as the chorus of five minor characters who function as a sort of Greek chorus in 1973's A Little Night Music. He also displays a penchant for angular harmonies and intricate melodies reminiscent of Bach (Sondheim has claimed that he "loves Bach" but his favorite period is Brahms to Stravinsky).[6] To aficionados, Sondheim's musical sophistication is considered to be greater than that of many of his musical theater peers, and his lyrics are likewise renowned for their ambiguity, wit, and urbanity. Polyphony is a musical texture consisting of two or more independent melodic voices, as opposed to music with just one voice (monophony) or music with one dominant melodic voice accompanied by chords (homophony). ... The Greek chorus (choros) is believed to have grown out of the Greek dithyrambs and tragikon drama in tragic plays of the ancient Greek theatre. ... A Little Night Music is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by Hugh Wheeler. ... “Bach” redirects here. ... Johannes Brahms Johannes Brahms (May 7, 1833 &#8211; April 3, 1897) was a German composer of classical music. ... Igor Fyodorovitch Stravinsky () (June 17, 1882 &#8211; April 6, 1971) was a composer of modern classical music. ... For an alternate meaning, see Fan (implement). ... Look up ambiguity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Sondheim collaborated with producer/director Harold Prince on six distinctive musicals between 1970 and 1981. Company (1970) was a "concept musical", a show centered around a set of characters and themes rather than a straightforward plot. Follies (1971) was a similarly-structured show filled with pastiche songs echoing styles of composers from earlier decades. A Little Night Music (1973), a more traditionally plotted show based on an Ingmar Bergman film, was one of his greatest successes, with Time magazine calling it "Sondheim's most brilliant accomplishment to date."[7] Notably, the score was mostly composed in waltz time (either ¾ time, or multiples thereof.) Further success was accorded to A Little Night Music when "Send in the Clowns" became a hit for Judy Collins. Although it was Sondheim's only Top 40 hit, his songs are frequently performed and recorded by cabaret artists and theatre singers in their solo careers. Hal Prince (born January 30, 1928), full name Harold Smith Prince, is a theatre producer and director associated with many of the best-known Broadway musical (and less notably, dramatic) productions of the past half-century. ... Company is a musical with a book by George Furth and music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. ... Follies is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and a book by James Goldman. ... A Little Night Music is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by Hugh Wheeler. ...   (IPA: in Swedish; usually IPA: in English) (July 14, 1918 – July 30, 2007) was a Swedish film, stage, and opera director. ... Look up time in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The time signature (also known as meter signature) is a notational convention used in Western musical notation to specify how many beats are in each bar and what note value constitutes one beat. ... Judith Marjorie Collins (born May 1, 1939 in Seattle, Washington) is an American folk and standards singer and songwriter, known for the stunning purity of her soprano; for her eclectic tastes in the material she records (which has included folk, showtunes, pop, and rock and roll); and for her social...


Pacific Overtures (1976) was the most non-traditional of the Sondheim-Prince collaborations, an intellectual exploration of the westernization of Japan. Sweeney Todd (1979), Sondheim's most operatic score (and his only show to find a definite foothold in opera houses), once again explores an unlikely topic, this time murderous revenge and cannibalism. The libretto, by Hugh Wheeler, is based on Christopher Bond's 1973 stage version of the Victorian original. Pacific Overtures was an ambitious 1976 musical by Stephen Sondheim, with a libretto by John Weidman, and additional material by Hugh Wheeler, set in 1853 Japan. ... Sweeney Todd, the Demon Barber of Fleet Street is a Tony Award-winning musical with a book by Hugh Wheeler and music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. ... Cannibal redirects here. ... Hugh Callingham Wheeler (19 March 1912 - 26 July 1987) was an English-born playwright, librettist, poet, and translator who resided in America from 1946 until his death. ... Christopher Bond (fl. ...


Later work

Merrily We Roll Along (1981), with a book by Furth, is one of Sondheim's more "traditional" scores and was thought to hold potential to generate some hit songs (Frank Sinatra and Carly Simon each recorded a different song from the show). Sondheim's music director, Paul Gemignani, said, “Part of Steve’s ability is this extraordinary versatility.” Merrily, however, was a 16-performance flop. "Merrily did not succeed, but its score endures thanks to subsequent productions and recordings. According to Martin Gottfried, "Sondheim had set out to write traditional songs… But [despite] that there is nothing ordinary about the music." [8] Sondheim and Furth have extensively revised the show since its initial opening. Merrily We Roll Along is a musical with a book by George Furth and lyrics and music by Stephen Sondheim. ... Sinatra redirects here. ... Carly Elisabeth Simon (born June 25, 1945 in New York City) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe and two-time Grammy Award winning American musician who emerged as one of the leading lights of the early 1970s singer-songwriter movement. ... The title of music director is used by many symphony orchestras to designate the primary conductor and artistic leader of the orchestra. ...


The failure of Merrily greatly affected Sondheim; he was ready to quit theater and do movies or create video games or write mysteries. He was later quoted as saying, "I wanted to find something to satisfy myself that does not involve Broadway and dealing with all those people who hate me and hate Hal." [9] The collaboration between Sondheim and Prince would largely end after Merrily. Computer and video games redirects here. ...


Instead of quitting the theater following the failure of Merrily, however, Sondheim decided "that there are better places to start a show", and found a new collaborator in the "artsy" James Lapine. Lapine has a taste "for the avant-garde and for visually oriented theater in particular." Sunday in the Park with George (1984), their first collaboration, was very much the avant-garde, but they had blended it together with the professionalism of the commercial theater to make a different kind of musical. Sondheim again was able to show his versatility and his adaptability. His music took on the style of the artist Georges Seurat's painting techniques. In doing so, Sondheim was able to bring his work to another level. "Sondheim’s work has such reach, there is so much emotional resonance, that many observers take it personally and become as fascinated with the artist as with the art; they see him in his work."[citation needed] James Lapine (born January 10, 1949 in Mansfield, Ohio) is an American theatrical director and librettist. ... A work similar to Marcel Duchamps Fountain Avant garde (written avant-garde) is a French phrase, one of many French phrases used by English speakers. ... Sunday in the Park with George is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by James Lapine. ... Le Chahut was painted by Seurat from 1889 to 1890. ...


In 1985, he and Lapine won the Pulitzer Prize in Drama for Sunday in the Park with George. It is one of the only seven musicals that have taken this prestigious award. The Sondheim-Lapine collaboration also produced the popular fairy-tale show Into the Woods (1987) and the rhapsodic Passion (1994). The Pulitzer Prize for Drama was first awarded in 1918. ... Sunday in the Park with George is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by James Lapine. ... A fairy tale is a story, either told to children or as if told to children, concerning the adventures of mythical characters such as fairies, goblins, elves, trolls, giants, and others. ... Into the Woods is an award-winning musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by James Lapine. ... Pasión es una obra musical que se estreno en Broadway en 1994, adaptada de la película de Ettore Scola Passione dAmore que, a su vez , se basa en la novela de Igino Tarchetti Fosca. Con libreto de James Lapine y música y letras de Stephen Sondheim. ...


Despite a popularity among musical theater insiders that continues to grow, it was noted in 2002 that "Sondheim has never quite escaped the ghetto of cult enthusiasm....[he] has always been an acquired taste. He's never achieved the sort of popularity of Andrew Lloyd Webber or had a megahit on the order of a Cats."[10] Andrew Lloyd Webber, Baron Lloyd-Webber (born 22 March 1948) is a highly successful English composer of musical theatre, and also the elder brother of cellist Julian Lloyd Webber. ... Cats is an award-winning musical composed by Andrew Lloyd Webber based on Old Possums Book of Practical Cats and other poems by T. S. Eliot. ...


In the late nineties, Sondheim reunited with Hal Prince for Wise Guys, a long-in-the-works musical comedy about Addison and Wilson Mizner. Though a Broadway production starring Nathan Lane and Victor Garber and directed by Sam Mendes was announced for Spring 2000,[11] the New York debut of the musical was delayed. Rechristened Bounce in 2003, the show was mounted at the Goodman Theatre in Chicago, and at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C.. Bounce received disappointing reviews and never reached Broadway. Sondheim has continued to work on Bounce. Addison Mizner (1872-1933) was a resort architect born in Benicia, California. ... Wilson Mizner (May 19, 1876, Benicia, California - April 3, 1933, Los Angeles, California) was an American playwright, raconteur, and entrepreneur. ... Nathan Lane (born February 3, 1956) is a Tony Award and Emmy Award-winning actor of the stage and screen. ... Victor Joseph Garber (born on March 16, 1949 in London, Ontario, Canada) is a six-time Emmy Award-nominated Canadian film, stage and television actor and singer. ... Sam Mendes Samuel Alexander Mendes, CBE (born August 1, 1965) is an English stage and film director born in Reading, Berkshire, England. ... Bounce is a musical by Stephen Sondheim with a libretto by John Weidman. ... The Goodman Theatre The Goodman Theatre is a theater in Chicagos Loop, and part of Chicago theatre. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City 234. ... The Kennedy Center as seen from the Potomac River. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...


Regarding whether he had any interest in writing new work, Sondheim was quoted in a 2006 Time Out London interview as saying:

No... It’s age. It’s a diminution of energy and the worry that there are no new ideas. It’s also an increasing lack of confidence. I’m not the only one. I’ve checked with other people. People expect more of you and you’re aware of it and you shouldn’t be.[12]

Work away from Broadway

Sondheim's mature career has been varied, encompassing much beyond composition of musicals.


An avid fan of games, in 1968 and 1969 Sondheim published a series of word puzzles in New York magazine. (In 1987, Time referred to his love of puzzlemaking as "legendary in theater circles," adding that the central character in Anthony Shaffer's hit play Sleuth was inspired by Sondheim, and the show was even given the working title Who's Afraid of Stephen Sondheim?)[2] He parlayed this talent into a film script, written with longtime friend Anthony Perkins, called The Last of Sheila. The 1973 film, directed by Herbert Ross, starred Dyan Cannon, Raquel Welch, Richard Benjamin, and others. This article or section needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... “TIME” redirects here. ... Alice, a fictional character based on a real character from the work of Lewis Carroll. ... Anthony Joshua Shaffer, (May 15, 1926 &#8211; November 6, 2001), was a English dramatist. ... Sleuth is a 1970 Tony Award-winning play by Anthony Shaffer. ... Anthony Perkins (April 4, 1932 – September 12, 1992) was an Academy Award-nominated American stage and screen actor best known for his role as Norman Bates in Alfred Hitchcocks Psycho and its three sequels, Psycho II, Psycho III and Psycho IV: The Beginning. ... Herbert David Ross (May 13, 1927 in Brooklyn, New York - October 9, 2001 in New York City), also known as Herb Ross, was a prolific film director, producer, choreographer and actor from the 1950s to the 1990s. ... Dyan Cannon (born Samille Diane Freisen on January 4, 1937) is a three-time Academy Award-nominated American film and television actress, director, screenwriter, editor, and producer. ... Jo Raquel Tejada (born September 5, 1940), best known by her stage name Raquel Welch, is an American actress who reached fame during the 1960s. ... Richard Benjamin in July 1986. ...


He tried his hand at writing one more time - in 1996 he collaborated on a play called Getting Away with Murder. It was not a success, and opened and closed in a few days on Broadway.


His compositional efforts have included a number of film scores, notably a set of songs written for Warren Beatty's 1990 film version of Dick Tracy; one song, "Sooner or Later (I Always Get My Man)", won Sondheim an Academy Award. Henry Warren Beatty (born March 30, 1937), better known as Warren Beatty, is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American actor, producer, screenwriter, and director. ... Dick Tracy is a 1990 movie based upon the Dick Tracy character created by Chester Gould. ... Sooner or Later (I Always Get My Man) is a song recorded by American pop superstar Madonna and written by American composer Stephen Sondheim for the 1990 film Dick Tracy. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ...


Major works

Unless otherwise noted, music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim.

Side by Side by Sondheim (1976), Marry Me A Little (1980), You're Gonna Love Tomorrow and Putting It Together (1993) are anthologies or revues of Sondheim's work as composer and lyricist. Saturday Night is a 1950s Broadway musical by Stephen Sondheim. ... Julius J. Epstein (born August 22, 1909, New York, New York; died December 30, 2000, Los Angeles, California) was an American screenwriter, who had a long career, most noted for the adaptation -— in partnership with his twin brother, Philip, and others —- of the unproduced play Everybody Comes to Ricks... Philip G. Epstein (August 22, 1909 - February 7, 1952) was an American screenwriter most known for his adaptation in partnership with his twin brother, Julius, and others of the unproduced play Everybody Comes to Ricks that became the screenplay for the Academy Award-winning film Casablanca (1942). ... This article is about the musical. ... Leonard Bernstein in 1971 Leonard Bernstein (IPA pronunciation: )[1] (August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, and pianist. ... Arthur Laurents (born July 14, 1918) is an American playwright, novelist, screenwriter, librettist and stage director. ... Jerome Robbins (October 11, 1918 - July 29, 1998) was an American choreographer whose work has included everything from classical ballet to contemporary musical theater. ... Gypsy: A Musical Fable is a musical with music by Jule Styne, lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. ... Jule Styne (December 31, 1905 – September 20, 1994) was a British-born American songwriter, especially famous for a series of Broadway Musicals, which included several very well known and frequently revived shows. ... Arthur Laurents (born July 14, 1918) is an American playwright, novelist, screenwriter, librettist and stage director. ... Jerome Robbins (October 11, 1918 - July 29, 1998) was an American choreographer whose work has included everything from classical ballet to contemporary musical theater. ... Hi! Youre car can speak <a href=http://immobilizer. ... Burt Shevelove (1915 - 8 April 1981) was an American musical theater writer, lyricist, librettist, and director. ... Larry Gelbart (b. ... George Abbott (June 25, 1887 - January 31, 1995) was a theatre producer and director, playwright, screenwriter, and film director and producer whose career spanned more than seven decades. ... Anyone Can Whistle is a musical with a book by Arthur Laurents and music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. ... Arthur Laurents (born July 14, 1918) is an American playwright, novelist, screenwriter, librettist and stage director. ... Arthur Laurents (born July 14, 1918) is an American playwright, novelist, screenwriter, librettist and stage director. ... Do I Hear A Waltz? is a musical play with music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by Arthur Laurents. ... This article is about the American composer. ... Arthur Laurents (born July 14, 1918) is an American playwright, novelist, screenwriter, librettist and stage director. ... John Dexter (born 2 August 1925 in Derby, England - died 23 March 1990 in London) was an English theatre, opera and film director. ... Company is a musical with a book by George Furth and music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. ... George Furth (b. ... Hal Prince (born January 30, 1928), full name Harold Smith Prince, is a American theatrical producer and director associated with many of the best-known Broadway musical productions of the past half-century. ... Follies is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and a book by James Goldman. ... James Goldman (June 30, 1929 - October 28, 1998) was an American playwright, and screenwriter, and brother of William Goldman. ... Hal Prince (born January 30, 1928), full name Harold Smith Prince, is a American theatrical producer and director associated with many of the best-known Broadway musical productions of the past half-century. ... A Little Night Music is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by Hugh Wheeler. ... Hugh Callingham Wheeler (19 March 1912 - 26 July 1987) was an English-born playwright, librettist, poet, and translator who resided in America from 1946 until his death. ... Hal Prince (born January 30, 1928), full name Harold Smith Prince, is a American theatrical producer and director associated with many of the best-known Broadway musical productions of the past half-century. ... Pacific Overtures was an ambitious 1976 musical by Stephen Sondheim, with a libretto by John Weidman, and additional material by Hugh Wheeler, set in 1853 Japan. ... John Weidman is an American librettist. ... Hal Prince (born January 30, 1928), full name Harold Smith Prince, is a American theatrical producer and director associated with many of the best-known Broadway musical productions of the past half-century. ... Sweeney Todd, the Demon Barber of Fleet Street is a Tony Award-winning musical with a book by Hugh Wheeler and music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. ... Hugh Callingham Wheeler (19 March 1912 - 26 July 1987) was an English-born playwright, librettist, poet, and translator who resided in America from 1946 until his death. ... Hal Prince (born January 30, 1928), full name Harold Smith Prince, is a American theatrical producer and director associated with many of the best-known Broadway musical productions of the past half-century. ... Merrily We Roll Along is a musical with a book by George Furth and lyrics and music by Stephen Sondheim. ... George Furth (b. ... Hal Prince (born January 30, 1928), full name Harold Smith Prince, is a American theatrical producer and director associated with many of the best-known Broadway musical productions of the past half-century. ... Sunday in the Park with George is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by James Lapine. ... James Lapine (born January 10, 1949 in Mansfield, Ohio) is an American theatrical director and librettist. ... James Lapine (born January 10, 1949 in Mansfield, Ohio) is an American theatrical director and librettist. ... Into the Woods is an award-winning musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by James Lapine. ... James Lapine (born January 10, 1949 in Mansfield, Ohio) is an American theatrical director and librettist. ... James Lapine (born January 10, 1949 in Mansfield, Ohio) is an American theatrical director and librettist. ... Assassins is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by John Weidman and was based on an idea by Charles Gilbert, Jr. ... John Weidman is an American librettist. ... Jerry Zaks is a director and actor born in Stuttgart, Germany on 7 September, 1946. ... Pasión es una obra musical que se estreno en Broadway en 1994, adaptada de la película de Ettore Scola Passione dAmore que, a su vez , se basa en la novela de Igino Tarchetti Fosca. Con libreto de James Lapine y música y letras de Stephen Sondheim. ... James Lapine (born January 10, 1949 in Mansfield, Ohio) is an American theatrical director and librettist. ... James Lapine (born January 10, 1949 in Mansfield, Ohio) is an American theatrical director and librettist. ... Bounce is a musical by Stephen Sondheim with a libretto by John Weidman. ... John Weidman is an American librettist. ... Hal Prince (born January 30, 1928), full name Harold Smith Prince, is a American theatrical producer and director associated with many of the best-known Broadway musical productions of the past half-century. ... Theatrical poster for the 2004 Broadway production of The Frogs. ... Nathan Lane (born February 3, 1956) is a Tony Award and Emmy Award-winning actor of the stage and screen. ... Burt Shevelove (1915 - 8 April 1981) was an American musical theater writer, lyricist, librettist, and director. ... Poster for the original Broadway production Side by Side by Sondheim is a musical revue featuring the songs of prolific Broadway and film composer Stephen Sondheim. ... Marry Me A Little is a musical with lyrics and music by Stephen Sondheim. ... Putting it Together is a medley of Stephen Sondheims work including songs cut fom shows. ...


Minor works

Stage

N. Richard Nash (June 8, 1913 - December 11, 2000) was a successful playwright and screenwriter probably best known for writing The Rainmaker. ... Arthur Laurents (born July 14, 1918) is an American playwright, novelist, screenwriter, librettist and stage director. ... Jules Feiffer (1958) Jules Feiffer (born January 26, 1929) is an American syndicated comic-strip cartoonist and author. ... Hot Spot is a musical with book by Jack Weinstock and Willie Gilbert, lyrics by Martin Charnin, and music by Mary Rodgers. ... Mary Rodgers (born January 11, 1931) is a composer of musicals, an author of childrens books, and daughter of Richard Rodgers. ... Martin Charnin (b. ... The Enclave is a three-part series about the fall of Srebrenica and the Dutch governments failure to protect the town from attackers. ... Arthur Laurents (born July 14, 1918) is an American playwright, novelist, screenwriter, librettist and stage director. ... The Mad Show is a successful off-Broadway musical revue based on Mad Magazine. ... Mary Rodgers (born January 11, 1931) is a composer of musicals, an author of childrens books, and daughter of Richard Rodgers. ... The Boy From. ... The Girl from Ipanema (Garota de Ipanema) is a well known bossa nova song, and was a worldwide hit in the mid-1960s. ... For the Bernstein operetta based on the book, see Candide (operetta). ... Richard Purdy Wilbur (born March 1, 1921), is a United States poet. ... Leonard Bernstein in 1971 Leonard Bernstein (IPA pronunciation: )[1] (August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, and pianist. ... Hugh Callingham Wheeler (19 March 1912 - 26 July 1987) was an English-born playwright, librettist, poet, and translator who resided in America from 1946 until his death. ... Theatrical poster for the 2004 Broadway production of The Frogs. ... This article is about the 5-4th century BC dramatist. ... Burt Shevelove (1915 - 8 April 1981) was an American musical theater writer, lyricist, librettist, and director. ... Yale redirects here. ... King Lear and the Fool in the Storm by William Dyce (1806-1864) King Lear is a play by William Shakespeare, considered one of his greatest tragedies, based on the legend of King Lear of Britain. ... The Public Theater is a New York City arts organization. ... Shakespeare redirects here. ... James Lapine (born January 10, 1949 in Mansfield, Ohio) is an American theatrical director and librettist. ... Kevin Delaney Kline (born October 24, 1947) is an Academy Award- and Tony Award-winning American stage and film actor. ...

Film and TV

Topper was a television situation comedy series based on the 1930s film series Topper. ... Television comedy had a presence from the earliest days of broadcasting. ... Evening Primrose was a television musical written in 1966 by Stephen Sondheim and James Goldman for ABC Televisions Stage 67. ... “Telefilm” redirects here. ... For the Europe album, see Secret Society (Europe album). ... The interior of a typical Macys department store. ... The Last of Sheila is a 1973 film directed by Herbert Ross, written by Anthony Perkins and Stephen Sondheim, and starring Richard Benjamin, Dyan Cannon, James Coburn, James Mason, and Raquel Welch. ... Anthony Perkins (April 4, 1932 – September 12, 1992) was an Academy Award-nominated American stage and screen actor best known for his role as Norman Bates in Alfred Hitchcocks Psycho and its three sequels, Psycho II, Psycho III and Psycho IV: The Beginning. ... The Edgar Allan Poe Awards (popularly called the Edgars), named after Edgar Allan Poe, are presented every year by the Mystery Writers of America. ... Mystery Writers of America is an organization for mystery writers, based in New York. ... The Seven-Per-Cent Solution (1976) is a Sherlock Holmes pastiche by Nicholas Meyer. ... Alain Resnais (born June 3, 1922 ) is a French film director whose early works are often grouped within the New Wave or Nouvelle Vague film movement. ... The Stavisky affair was a 1934 financial scandal with deep political ramifications for the French government. ... Reds is a 1981 film starring Warren Beatty and Diane Keaton. ... Henry Warren Beatty (born March 30, 1937), better known as Warren Beatty, is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-winning American actor, producer, screenwriter, and director. ... Dick Tracy is a 1990 film based upon the Dick Tracy comic strip character created by Chester Gould. ... Sooner or Later (I Always Get My Man) is a song recorded by American pop superstar Madonna and written by American composer Stephen Sondheim for the 1990 film Dick Tracy. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Award for Best Song is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are songwriters and composers. ... The Birdcage is a 1996 comedy film directed by Mike Nichols, and stars Robin Williams, Nathan Lane, Gene Hackman, Dianne Wiest, Dan Futterman, Calista Flockhart, Hank Azaria and Christine Baranski. ...

Awards and recognition

  • Tony Awards
    • Company (1971, Best Score, Best Lyrics)
    • Follies (1972, Best Score)
    • A Little Night Music (1973 Best Score)
    • Sweeney Todd (1979, Best Score)
    • Into The Woods (1988, Best Score)
    • Passion (1994 Best Score)

Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... For other uses, see Sweeney Todd (disambiguation). ... Send in the Clowns is a song by Stephen Sondheim, from the 1973 musical A Little Night Music. ... American Academy of Arts and Letters is an organization whose goal is to foster, assist, and sustain an interest in American literature, music, and art. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Sunday in the Park with George is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by James Lapine. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Sooner or Later (I Always Get My Man) is a song recorded by American pop superstar Madonna and written by American composer Stephen Sondheim for the 1990 film Dick Tracy. ... The Kennedy Center as seen from the Potomac River. ... The Drama Desk Awards are awards given by the organization Drama Desk to honor New York City theater performers, both in Broadway shows but also off-Broadway as well. ... Off-Broadway plays or musicals are performed in New York City in smaller theatres than Broadway, but larger than Off-Off-Broadway, productions. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award® but is formally the Antoinette Perry Award is an annual American award celebrating achievements in theater, including musical theater. ...

See also

The Sondheim Review is a quarterly magazine published in the United States since 1994 and, per its tagline, is Dedicated to the work of the Musical Theatres foremost composer and lyricist, Stephen Sondheim. ... // This is a list of fictional stories in which assassinations feature as an important plot element. ...

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d Rich, Frank. "Conversations With Sondheim", The New York Times, 2000-03-12. Retrieved on 2007-01-17. 
  2. ^ a b c d Henry, William A, III. "Master of the Musical; Stephen Sondheim Applies a Relentless", Time, 1987-12-07. Retrieved on 2007-03-19. 
  3. ^ Sondheim & Co.", Craig Zadan, p. 4, 1974, 1986, Harper & Row, ISBN 0-06-015649-X
  4. ^ Mitchell, Elvis. "Sondheim, Film Aficionado; Choices for Telluride Festival Show Nonmusical Side" (fee required), The New York Times, 2003-08-28. Retrieved on 2007-01-19. 
  5. ^ Sondheim & Co.", Craig Zadan, p. 38, 1974, 1986, Harper & Row, ISBN 0-06-015649-X
  6. ^ interview on Sunday Arts, ABC (Australia) TV August 5, 2007 An Audience With Stephen Sondheim2007 ABC Australia TV interview downloadable ("Episode 26")
  7. ^ "A Precious Fancy", Time, 1973-03-19. Retrieved on 2007-03-19. 
  8. ^ Gottfried, Martin. Sondheim. New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1993, pgs. 146-147
  9. ^ Gottfried, Martin. Sondheim. New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1993, pg. 153
  10. ^ Brown, Chip. "Sondheim!", Smithsonian, Aug. 2002, 33(5).
  11. ^ Bahr, David. "Everything's coming up Sondheim", The Advocate, 1999-10-12. Retrieved on 2007-03-19. 
  12. ^ quote from Timeout.com London

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

Harry N. Abrams, Inc. ... Alfred A. Knopf (September 12, 1892 _ August 11, 1984) was a leading American publisher of the 20th century. ... Harper & Row is an imprint of HarperCollins. ...

External links

  • MusicalTalk Podcast discussing the concert production of Sweeney Todd held at the Royal Festival Hall in the summer of 2007 in London. This episode features Emma Williams who along with being a MusicalTalk presenter, also starred as Joanna for this concert.
  • MusicalTalk Podcast with an in depth introduction to the work of Stephen Sondheim
  • The Quotable Stephen Sondheim Page
  • Simply Sondheim discussion forums
  • Sondheim Review magazine
  • Stephen Sondheim online-with Finishing The Chat
  • Fresh Air NPR radio interview with Sondheim from 2000 (20 minutes, streaming audio)
  • Kennedy Center interview with Sondheim, conducted by Frank Rich in 2002 (90 minutes, streaming video)
  • Stage and Screen Online interview with Stephen Sondheim

  Results from FactBites:
 
Great Performances . Artists . Stephen Sondheim | PBS (394 words)
Sondheim's partnership with the director/producer Hal Prince resulted in Tony Awards for Best Musical Scores for three consecutive years (1971-1973), and "Pacific Overtures" (1976) was hailed as a landmark in American musical theater because of its masterful use of traditional Japanese theater elements.
Sondheim was born into a prosperous business family on March 22, 1930.
Sondheim's parents divorced in 1942 and his mother took up residence in Doylestown, Pennsylvania, close to the summertime residence of Oscar Hammerstein II.
Stephen Sondheim - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2056 words)
Stephen Sondheim was born to a Jewish family in New York City and grew up on the Upper West Side of Manhattan and later on a farm in Pennsylvania.
Sondheim's work is most notable for his use of complex polyphony in the vocal parts, such as the chorus of five minor characters who function as a sort of "Greek Chorus" in A Little Night Music.
Sondheim yearned to be popular and the next and last collaboration with Harold Prince, until many years later, was a stab to try and reach that success.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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