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Encyclopedia > Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
Birth name Stephen John Fry
Born 24 August 1957 (1957-08-24) (age 50)
London, England
Official site StephenFry.com

Stephen John Fry (born 24 August 1957) is an English comedian, writer, actor, humourist, novelist, columnist, filmmaker and television personality. As one half of the Fry and Laurie double act he has appeared in A Bit of Fry and Laurie and Jeeves and Wooster; famous also for his roles in Blackadder and Wilde, and as the host of QI. In addition to writing for stage, screen, television and radio he has contributed columns and articles for numerous newspapers and magazines, also having written four successful novels and an autobiography, Moab is My Washpot. is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... An Emmy Award. ... An Emmy Award. ... Stephen John Fry (born 24 August 1957) is an English comedian, writer, actor, humourist, novelist, columnist, filmmaker and television personality. ... The Actor: The Screen Actors Guild Award Statue The Screen Actors Guild Awards are an annual award given by the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) to recognize outstanding performances by members. ... The Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture is an award given by the Screen Actors Guild to honor the finest acting achievements in film. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For the documentary about Jerry Seinfeld, see Comedian (film). ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... A humorist is an author who specializes in short, humorous articles or essays. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... A columnist is a journalist who produces a specific form of writing for publication called a column. Columns appear in newspapers, magazines and the Internet. ... A film being made in Warsaw, Bracka street Filmmaking is the process of making a film, from an initial story idea or commission through scriptwriting, shooting, editing and finally distribution to an audience. ... A celebrity is a person who is widely recognized in a society. ... Hugh Laurie (left) & Stephen Fry on the set of A Bit of Fry and Laurie Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie are a successful British comedy double act of the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s. ... This article is about the television series. ... Jeeves and Wooster is a humorous television series adapted by Clive Exton from P.G. Wodehouses Jeeves stories, and produced by Carnival Films for Granada Television, and screened on the United Kingdoms ITV network from 1990 to 1993. ... For other uses, see Blackadder (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see QI (disambiguation). ... Stephen Fry on the cover of his autobiography (US Edition) Moab is My Washpot (published 1997) is Stephen Fry’s humorous autobiography, covering the first twenty years of his life. ...

Contents

Childhood and education

Fry was born in Hampstead, London, the son of Alan Fry, an English physicist with a 1st class degree, and Marianne Newman, of Austrian-Jewish parentage.[1] He has an older brother, Roger, and a younger sister, Joanna. Fry grew up in the village of Booton near Reepham, Norfolk, having moved from Chesham when very young. For other places with the same name, see Hampstead (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... Booton is a village and civil parish in the Broadland district of Norfolk, England, just east of Reepham and seven miles west of Aylsham. ... The Twin Reepham Churches Reepham is a small town in North Norfolk and has had market town status since 1277; a sign to mark this has recently been erected. ... Norfolk (IPA: //) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England. ... , Chesham is a market town in the Chiltern Hills, Buckinghamshire, England. ...


Fry briefly attended Cawston Primary School, Cawston, Norfolk, described later in his 1999 book Moab is my Washpot[2] before going on to Stouts Hill Preparatory School, and then to Uppingham School, Rutland, where he joined Fircroft house. He was expelled from Uppingham when he was fifteen, and subsequently from the Paston School. At seventeen, following his failure at Norfolk College of Arts and Technology, Fry absconded with a credit card stolen from a family friend, and as a result spent three months in Pucklechurch Prison on grounds of fraud. Following his release he resumed education at Norwich City College, promising administrators that he would study rigorously to sit the Cambridge Entrance Exams. He passed well enough to gain a scholarship to Queens' College, Cambridge. Stouts Hill is an 18th Century Gothic revival manor house situated in the Cotswolds just outside the village of Uley. ... Uppingham School is a co-educational public school situated in the small town of Uppingham in Rutland, England. ... Oakham Castle Rutland is traditionally Englands smallest county and is bounded on the west and north by Leicestershire, northeast by Lincolnshire, and southeast by Northamptonshire. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Uppingham School. ... After World War II terms, expulsion was a euphemism for ethnic cleansing of territories settled by Germans. ... Uppingham School is a co-educational public school situated in the small town of Uppingham in Rutland, England. ... Look up credit card in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... City College Norwich (CCN) is a college which is located on Ipswich Road, in Norwich, Norfolk, UK. It was founded in 1891 and has been situated in its current location since 1953. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... Full name The Queens College of Saint Margaret and Saint Bernard in the University of Cambridge Motto Floreat Domus May this House Flourish Named after - Previous names - Established 1448 Sister College(s) Pembroke College President Lord Eatwell Location Silver Street Undergraduates 490 Postgraduates 270 Homepage Boatclub The Gatehouse, as...


At Cambridge, Fry gained a 2:1 in English literature, joined the Cambridge Footlights, and appeared on University Challenge.[3] As a member of the Footlights he also met his future comedy collaborator, Hugh Laurie. The term English literature refers to literature written in the English language, including literature composed in English by writers not necessarily from England; Joseph Conrad was Polish, Robert Burns was Scottish, James Joyce was Irish, Dylan Thomas was Welsh, Edgar Allan Poe was American, Salman Rushdie is Indian, V.S... The ADC Theatre is the home of the Footlights. ... University Challenge is a long-running British television quiz show, licensed and produced by Granada Television. ... James Hugh Calum Laurie, OBE (born June 11, 1959) is an English actor, comedian, writer, and musician. ...


Career

Television

Fry's career in television began with the 1982 broadcasting of The Cellar Tapes, the 1981 Cambridge Footlights Revue written by himself, Hugh Laurie, Emma Thompson and Tony Slattery. The revue caught the attention of Granada Television, who, keen to replicate the success of the BBC's Not The Nine O'Clock News, hired Fry, Laurie and Thompson to star alongside Ben Elton in There's Nothing To Worry About!. A second series, re-titled Alfresco, was broadcast in 1983; a third in 1984. Alfresco established Fry and Laurie's reputation as a comedy double act. In 1983 the BBC offered them their own show, which became The Crystal Cube, a mixture of science fiction and mock documentary that was axed after the first episode. Undeterred, Fry and Laurie appeared in an episode of The Young Ones in 1984, and Fry in Ben Elton's 1985 series, Happy Families. Emma Thompson (born 15 April 1959) is an Emmy-, BAFTA- and Academy Award-winning English actress, comedian, and screenwriter. ... Anthony Declan James Slattery (born 9 November 1959) is an English actor and comedian. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Not the Nine OClock News is a comedy television programme that was shown on the BBC, broadcast from 1979 to 1982. ... Benjamin Charles Elton (born 3 May 1959) is an English comedian, writer and director. ... Alfresco was a British television series starring Robbie Coltrane, Ben Elton, Stephen Fry, Hugh Laurie, Siobhan Redmond and Emma Thompson, broadcast by ITV (produced by Granada Television) between 1983 and 1984. ... Hugh Laurie (left) & Stephen Fry on the set of A Bit of Fry and Laurie Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie are a successful British comedy double act of the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s. ... The Young Ones was a popular British sitcom, first seen in 1982, which aired on BBC2. ... Happy Families was a rural comedy drama written by Ben Elton which appeared on the BBC in 1985 and told the story of the dysfunctional Fuddle family. ...


Forgiving Fry and Laurie for The Crystal Cube, the BBC commissioned a sketch show in 1986 that was to become A Bit of Fry and Laurie. The programme ran for 26 episodes spanning four series between 1986 and 1995, and was greatly successful. At the same time Fry was starring in Blackadder II, as Lord Melchett, Blackadder the Third, as the Duke of Wellington, and notably in Blackadder Goes Forth, as General Melchett. In 1988 he became a regular contestant on the popular improvisational comedy programme Whose Line Is It Anyway?. This article is about the television series. ... Blackadder II was the second series of the BBC situation comedy Blackadder, written by Richard Curtis and Ben Elton, which aired from 9 January 1986 to 20 February 1986. ... For other uses, see Blackadder (disambiguation). ... Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (c. ... Blackadder Goes Forth was the fourth and final series of the BBC situation comedy Blackadder, written by Richard Curtis and Ben Elton, which aired from 28 September to 2 November 1989. ... Improvisational comedy (also called improv) is comedy that is performed with a little to no predetermination of subject matter and structure. ... Whose Line Is It Anyway? (sometimes abbreviated to Whose Line? or WLIIA?) is a short-form improvisational comedy show. ...


Between 1990 and 1993, Fry starred as Jeeves (alongside Hugh Laurie's Bertie Wooster) in Jeeves and Wooster, 23, hour-long adaptations of P.G. Wodehouse's novels and short stories. Jeeves, here portrayed by Stephen Fry in ITVs Jeeves and Wooster series, is P.G. Wodehouses most famous character. ... Bertie Wooster portrayed by Hugh Laurie in ITVs Jeeves and Wooster series Bertram Wilberforce Bertie Wooster is the wealthy, good-natured co-protagonist and narrator of P. G. Wodehouses Jeeves stories. ... Jeeves and Wooster is a humorous television series adapted by Clive Exton from P.G. Wodehouses Jeeves stories, and produced by Carnival Films for Granada Television, and screened on the United Kingdoms ITV network from 1990 to 1993. ... Called English literatures performing flea, P. G. Wodehouse, pictured in 1904, became famous for his complex plots, ingenious wordplay, and prolific output. ...


In 2001 he began hosting QI, an intellectual panel game that has become one of the most-watched entertainment programmes on British television.[4] In 2006 he won the Rose d'Or award for Best Game Show Host for his work on the series.[5] For other uses, see QI (disambiguation). ... The Rose dOr (or Golden Rose) is a highly prestigious television award, given annually since 1961 at the Festival Rose dOr in spring each year. ...


A recent foray into documentary-making has seen Fry fronting The Secret Life of the Manic Depressive, an emmy award winning 2006 programme about bipolar disorder (from which he suffers), and this year a documentary on the subject of HIV and AIDS, HIV and Me. He is currently filming a six-part travel series entitled Stephen Fry in America.[6] In 2006 he appeared on the genealogy series Who Do You Think You Are?, tracing his family tree to discover his Slovakian Jewish ancestry. For other uses, see Bipolar. ... Who Do You Think You Are? was a ten part television series shown on the UKs BBC2, in 2004, in which various celebrities go on a journey, in order to try and trace their family tree. ... Slovakia (Slovak: Slovensko) is a landlocked republic in Central Europe. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination...


This year Fry appeared in, and was executive producer for, a six-part legal drama entitled Kingdom, a second series of which is currently in production. He has also taken up a recurring guest role as a psychiatrist in the popular American drama, Bones. Kingdom is a British television series produced by Parallel Film and Television Productions and Sprout for ITV1. ... Bones is an American drama television series that premiered on the Fox Network on September 13, 2005. ...


Film

Having made his film debut in the 1988 movie A Fish Called Wanda, Fry appeared in the lead role for Kenneth Branagh's Peter's Friends in 1992. Portraying Oscar Wilde (a man of whom he had been a fan since 13) in the 1997 film Wilde, he fulfilled to critical acclaim a role that he has said he was "born to play". In 2001 he played the detective in Robert Altman's period costume drama, Gosford Park. A Fish Called Wanda is a movie released in 1988 by MGM. It was written by John Cleese and directed by Charles Crichton. ... Kenneth Charles Branagh (born December 10, 1960) is an Emmy Award-winning, Academy Award-nominated Northern Irish-born actor and film director. ... Peters Friends (1992) is a British comedy-drama film written by Rita Rudner and her husband Martin Bergman, and directed and produced by Kenneth Branagh. ... Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and author of short stories. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


In 2003, Fry made his directorial debut with Bright Young Things, adapted himself from Evelyn Waugh's Vile Bodies. In 2001 he had begun hosting the BAFTA Film Awards, a role from which he stepped down in 2006.[7] Later that same year he wrote the English libretto and dialogue for Kenneth Branagh's film adaptation of The Magic Flute. Bright Young Things is a 2003 movie directed by Stephen Fry; the film represents the directorial debut for the British actor and presenter. ... Evelyn Waugh, as photographed in 1940 by Carl Van Vechten Arthur Evelyn St. ... Vile Bodies is a novel by Evelyn Waugh. ... BAFTA Award The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organisation that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... Antonio Ghislanzoni, nineteenth century Italian librettist. ... The Magic Flute is a Kenneth Branagh film adaptation of Mozarts opera of the same name. ...


Fry continues to make regular film appearances.[8]


Radio

Fry became famous to radio listeners with the creation of his supposed alter-ego - Donald Trefusis - whose "wireless essays" were broadcast on the Radio 4 programme Loose Ends. In 1988 Fry wrote and presented a renowned six-part comedy series entitled Saturday Night Fry, following which frequent radio appearances have ensued (notably on radio panel games Just a Minute and I'm Sorry I Haven't a Clue). In 2000 he began starring as Charles Prentiss in the Radio 4 comedy Absolute Power, reprising the role for three further series on radio and two on television. Professor Donald Trefusis is a Senior Tutor and professor of philology at the University of Cambridge in several of Stephen Frys works, including his novel The Liar and twenty-two radio broadcasts, published as essays in Paperweight. ... Loose Ends is a British radio programme broadcast on BBC Radio 4. ... Saturday Night Fry was a six part comedy series on BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 1988. ... Just a Minute is a BBC Radio 4 radio comedy panel game which has been running continuously since its first broadcast on December 22, 1967. ... Im Sorry I Havent a Clue, sometimes abbreviated to ISIHAC or simply Clue, is a BBC radio comedy which has run since 1972-04-11. ... Absolute Power is a British comedy series, set in the offices of Prentiss McCabe, a fictional public relations company (or government-media relations consultancy) in London, run by Charles Prentiss (Stephen Fry), and Martin McCabe (John Bird). ...


This year he has hosted Current Puns, an exploration into wordplay, and Radio 4: This Is Your Life, to celebrate the radio station's 40th anniversary. He has also interviewed Tony Blair as part of a series of podcasts released by 10 Downing Street.[9] For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... Prime Minister Tony Blair and U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney stand in front of the famous main door to Number 10. ...


Theatre

Fry wrote a play - Latin! (or Tobacco and Boys) - for the 1980 Edinburgh Festival, at which it won the "Fringe First" prize. The Cellar Tapes, the Footlights Revue of the following year, won the Perrier Comedy Award. In 1984 Fry adapted the hugely successful 1930s musical Me and My Girl for the West End, where it ran for eight years. He also famously starred in Simon Gray's 1995 play Cell Mates, from which he left three days into the West End run, pleading stage fright. He later recalled the incident as a hypomanic episode in his documentary on bipolar disorder. This year Fry has written the Old Vic Christmas pantomime, Cinderella.[10] The Perrier Comedy Award is a prestigious award for comedy, awarded to the best comedy show at the Edinburgh Fringe sponsored by the Perrier brand of bottled water. ... Me and My Girl is a popular British stage musical, with book and lyrics by Douglas Furber and L. Arthur Rose and music by Noel Gay. ... Cell Mates is a play by Simon Gray. ... The exterior of the Old Vic from the corner of Baylis Road and Waterloo Road. ... Gustave Dorés illustration for Cendrillon Cinderella (French: Cendrillon) is a popular fairy tale embodying a classic folk tale myth-element of unjust oppression/triumphant reward. ...


Literature

Since the publication of his first novel, The Liar, Fry has written three further novels, several non-fiction works and an autobiography, all of which have been much acclaimed by critics. His most recent book, The Ode Less Travelled: Unlocking The Poet Within, is a guide to writing poetry. In the United Kingdom he is a well-known narrator of audiobooks, notably the Harry Potter series. He has recorded audio versions of works by Roald Dahl, Michael Bond, A. A. Milne, Anthony Buckeridge and Douglas Adams, as well as several of his own books. The Liar (1992) was the first novel by Stephen Fry, recording the life of Adrian Healey, a student at Cambridge University. ... This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ... Roald Dahl (IPA: ) (13 September 1916 – 23 November 1990) was a British novelist, short story author and screenwriter of Norwegian parentage, famous as a writer for both children and adults. ... Michael Bond, OBE, (born January 13, 1926 in Newbury, Berkshire) is an English childrens author. ... Alan Alexander Milne (IPA pronunciation: ) (January 18, 1882 – January 31, 1956), also known as A. A. Milne, was an English author, best known for his books about the teddy bear Winnie-the-Pooh and for various childrens poems. ... Anthony Malcolm Buckeridge OBE (June 20, 1912 - June 28, 2004) was an English author, best known for his Jennings and Rex Milligan series of childrens books. ... Douglas Noël Adams (11 March 1952 – 11 May 2001) was an English author, comic radio dramatist, and musician. ...


When writing a book review for the Tatler, Fry wrote under an alias, Williver Hendry, editor of A Most Peculiar Friendship: The Correspondence of Lord Alfred Douglas and Jack Dempsey, a field close to Fry's heart as an Oscar Wilde enthusiast. Once a columnist in The Listener and The Daily Telegraph, he now writes a weekly technology column in the Saturday Guardian. His blog attracted over 300,000 visitors in its first two weeks of its existence.[11] The Listener was a weekly magazine established by the BBC under Lord Reith in January 1929. ... This article concerns the British newspaper. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ...


Personal life

Fry struggled to keep his homosexuality secret during his teenage years at public school, and was celibate for 16 years. When asked about when he knew he was homosexual he quotes an old friend and says, "I suppose it all began when I came out of the womb. I looked back up at my mother and thought to myself, 'That's the last time I'm going up one of those'". Fry currently lives in London with his partner, Daniel Cohen, whom he met in 1995. There Fry famously drives a former 1988 London black cab. He also has a second home in West Bilney, near King's Lynn, Norfolk. Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... A public school, in current English, Welsh and Northern Ireland usage, is a (usually) prestigious independent school, for children usually between the ages of 11 or 13 and 18, which charges fees and is not financed by the state. ... Celibacy refers either to being unmarried or to sexual abstinence. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Kings Lynn is a town and port in the English county of Norfolk. ...


Fry suffered a nervous breakdown in 1995, during a time in which he was appearing in Cell Mates, a West End play. Fry was also suffering from clinical depression and cyclothymia,[12] a form of bipolar disorder. He subsequently walked out of the production, prompting its early closure and incurring the displeasure of co-star Rik Mayall and playwright Simon Gray. Fry went missing for several days while contemplating suicide. He abandoned the idea and left the United Kingdom by ferry, eventually resurfacing in Belgium.[13] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Cell Mates is a play by Simon Gray. ... West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, England, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre... On the Threshold of Eternity. ... Cyclothymia is a mood disorder. ... For other uses, see Bipolar. ... Richard Michael Rik Mayall (born 7 March 1958) is an English comedian and actor. ... Simon James Holliday Gray CBE (born October 21, 1936) is an English playwright. ... For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ...


Fry has spoken publicly about his experience with bipolar disorder and has presented his documentary about it, Stephen Fry: The Secret Life of the Manic-Depressive.[14] In the documentary he interviewed sufferers of the illness including celebrities Carrie Fisher, Richard Dreyfuss, and Tony Slattery. Also interviewed were chef Rick Stein, whose father committed suicide, Robbie Williams, who talks of his experience with unipolar depression, and comedian Jo Brand. The two-part series was broadcast on BBC Two in September 2006, repeated in March 2007 as part of the BBC's programming in aid of Comic Relief, and repeated in August 2007 as a celebration of Fry's 50th birthday. Carrie Frances Fisher (born October 21, 1956) is an American actress, screenwriter and novelist. ... Richard Stephen Dreyfuss (born October 29, 1947) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Anthony Declan James Slattery (born 9 November 1959) is an English actor and comedian. ... Christopher Richard (Rick) Stein OBE (born January 4, 1947) is an English chef, restaurateur and television presenter. ... For other people with the same name, see Robbie Williams (disambiguation). ... It is common to feel sad, discouraged , or down once in a while, and anyone in this state might say they are suffering from depression. ... Jo Brand (born Josephine Grace Brand 3 May 1957, Hastings, East Sussex) is an English comedienne. ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 2. ... For the origin of the term, see comic relief. ...


Fry was an active supporter of the British Labour Party for many years, and appeared in a party political broadcast on its behalf with Hugh Laurie and Michelle Collins in November 1993. Despite this, he did not vote in the 2005 General Election because of the stance of both the Labour and Conservative parties with regard to the Iraq War. Despite his praising of the current government for social reform, Fry has been critical of the Labour Party's "Third Way" concept. He is on cordial terms with Prince Charles (despite satirising him heavily as King Charles I in the comedy programme Blackadder: The Cavalier Years), through his work with the Prince's Trust. He attended the wedding of the Prince of Wales to Camilla Parker-Bowles in 2005. The Labour Party is a centre-left or social democratic political party in Britain (see British politics), and one of the United Kingdoms three main political parties. ... James Hugh Calum Laurie, OBE (born June 11, 1959) is an English actor, comedian, writer, and musician. ... Michelle A. Collins (born May 28, 1963 in Hackney, East London) is a British actress best known for her roles on television in the BBC soap opera EastEnders, as Cindy Beale, and BBC drama Sunburn. ... A general election is an election in which all or most members of a given political body are up for election. ... The new logo of the Conservative Party The Conservative Party is the largest centre right political party in the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Bill Clinton and Tony Blair, adherents of the Third Way The Third Way, or Radical center, is a centrist political philosophy of governance that embraces a mix of market and interventionist philosophies. ... “Prince Charles” redirects here. ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... The second series of Blackadder was set in Elizabethan England, starring (left to right) Tony Robinson as Baldrick, Rowan Atkinson as Edmund, Lord Blackadder, and Tim McInnerny as Lord Percy Percy. ... The Princes Trust is a UK based charity headed by HRH The Prince of Wales. ... Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall (Camilla Rosemary; formerly Parker Bowles; née Shand, born 17 July 1947) is the second wife of Charles, Prince of Wales, heir apparent to the thrones of the United Kingdom and the other 15 Commonwealth Realms. ...


Fry is a friend of British comedian and actor Rowan Atkinson and was best man at Atkinson's wedding to Sunetra Sastry at the Russian Tea Room in New York City. He was also a friend of British actor John Mills.[15] He was best man at the wedding of Hugh Laurie and is godfather to all three of Laurie's children. Rowan Sebastian Atkinson (born 6 January 1955) is an English comedian, actor and writer, famous for his title roles in the British television comedies Blackadder and Mr. ... Sydney Pollack and Dustin Hoffman at the Russian Tea Room in Tootsie The Russian Tea Room between the Metropolitan and Carnegie Hall Towers The Russian Tea Room is a restaurant in New York City, located at 150 West 57th Street between Carnegie Hall Tower and Metropolitan Tower. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... John Mills as Professor Bernard Quatermass in the Thames Television science-fiction serial Quatermass (1979). ... James Hugh Calum Laurie, OBE (born June 11, 1959) is an English actor, comedian, writer, and musician. ...


A great fan of cricket (he is related to legendary England cricketer and jack of all trades C.B. Fry[citation needed]), he was recently interviewed for the Ashes Fever DVD, reporting on England's victory against Australia in the 2005 Ashes series. In football he is a supporter of Norwich City (as mentioned in Ashes Fever). This article is about the sport. ... Charles Burgess Fry (born 25 April 1872 in Croydon, died 7 September 1956 in Hampstead) was an English sportsman. ... The logo of the England Cricket Team which shows the three Lions of England below a five-pointed crown The England cricket team is a cricket team which represents England and Wales, operating under the auspices of the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB). ... The 2005 Ashes series started on 21 July 2005. ... A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... Norwich City Football Club (also known as The Canaries) is an English professional football club based in Norwich, Norfolk. ...


Acclaim

  • In 1995, Fry was presented with an honorary doctorate from the University of Dundee, which named their main Students' Association bar after one of his novels (The Liar Bar). Fry is patron of its Lip Theatre Company.[16] He served two consecutive terms (1992-1995 and 1995-1998) as the student-elected Rector of the University (only the second Rector of the University to be elected twice, the first being Clement Freud); coincidentally, this post is currently held by his secondary school classmate, controversial former diplomat Craig Murray.
  • In 2005, Fry was made honorary president of the Cambridge University Quiz Society and honorary fellow of Queens' College, Cambridge.
  • In a 2005 poll to find The Comedian's Comedian, Fry was voted amongst the top 50 comedy acts ever by fellow comedians and business insiders, and, in September 2006, number 9 in a poll of TV's Greatest Stars as voted for by the general public.
  • In December 2006 he was ranked 6th for the BBC's Top Living Icon Award,[17] was featured on The Culture Show, and was voted most intelligent man on television by readers of Radio Times.
  • 23rd on the previous year's list, the Independent on Sunday Pink List named Fry the second most influential gay person in Britain in May 2007.[18]
  • Later the same month he was announced as the 2007 BT Mind Champion of the Year[19] in recognition of the awareness raised by his documentary on bipolar disorder, and was also nominated for Best Entertainment Performance (QI) and Best Factual Series (Secret Life of the Manic Depressive) at the 2007 British Academy Television Awards.
  • BBC Four dedicated two nights of programming to Fry on 17th and 18th August 2007, in celebration of his 50th birthday. The first night, comprising programmes featuring Fry, began with a 60-minute documentary entitled Stephen Fry: 50 Not Out. The second night was composed of programmes selected by Fry, as well as a 60-minute interview with Mark Lawson and half-hour special, Stephen Fry: Guilty Pleasures. Stephen Fry Weekend proved such a ratings hit for BBC Four that it was repeated on BBC Two for 16th and 17th September.
  • Fry was the last person to be named Pipe Smoker of the Year before the award was discontinued for legal reasons.
  • He is a Patron of the Norwich Playhouse theatre and a Vice President of the Noël Coward Society.[20]

An Honorary degree (Latin: honoris causa ad gradum) is a degree awarded to someone by an institution that he or she may have never attended, it may be a bachelors, masters or doctorate degree - however, the latter is most common. ... The University of Dundee is the principal university in the city and Royal burgh of Dundee, Scotland. ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something. ... Sir Clement Freud Sir Clement Raphael Freud (born April 24, 1924) is a British writer, broadcaster, and politician. ... Craig Murray (born October, 1958)[1] is a British political activist, university rector and former ambassador to Uzbekistan. ... Full name The Queens College of Saint Margaret and Saint Bernard in the University of Cambridge Motto Floreat Domus May this House Flourish Named after - Previous names - Established 1448 Sister College(s) Pembroke College President Lord Eatwell Location Silver Street Undergraduates 490 Postgraduates 270 Homepage Boatclub The Gatehouse, as... The Culture Show is a weekly magazine show broadcast on Saturday nights on BBC Two, focussing on the latest developments in the worlds of film, music, art, fashion and the performing arts. ... Current Radio Times logo Radio Times is the BBCs weekly television and radio programme listings magazine. ... The Independents old (pre-compact) masthead. ... The British Academy Television Awards, also known as the BAFTAs or, to differentiate them from the BAFTA Film Awards, the BAFTA Television Awards, are the most prestigious awards given in the British television industry, analogous to the Emmy Awards in the United States. ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 4. ... Mark Lawson (born April 11, 1962) is a British journalist, broadcaster and author. ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 2. ... Pipe Smoker of the Year was an award given out annually by the British Pipesmokers Council, to honour a famous pipe-smoking individual. ...

List of works

Written works

Bright Young Things is a 2003 movie directed by Stephen Fry; the film represents the directorial debut for the British actor and presenter. ... The Magic Flute is a Kenneth Branagh film adaptation of Mozarts opera of the same name. ... Antonio Ghislanzoni, nineteenth century Italian librettist. ... Dambusters is a war film to be produced by Peter Jackson and directed by first-time director Christian Rivers. ... Me and My Girl is a popular British stage musical, with book and lyrics by Douglas Furber and L. Arthur Rose and music by Noel Gay. ... British actor (of Italian extraction) who was born Henry George Lupino on June 16, 1892, in London, England, UK. He appeared as an actor between 1915 and 1940. ... The Liar (1992) was the first novel by Stephen Fry, recording the life of Adrian Healey, a student at Cambridge University. ... Professor Donald Trefusis is a Senior Tutor and professor of philology at the University of Cambridge in several of Stephen Frys works, including his novel The Liar and twenty-two radio broadcasts, published as essays in Paperweight. ... The Hippopotamus is a novel by Stephen Fry. ... Making History (1997) is the third novel by Stephen Fry. ... Alternate history (fiction) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The Sidewise Award for Alternate history was established in 1995 to recognize the best alternate history stories and novels of the year. ... The Stars Tennis Balls is a novel by Stephen Fry, first published in 2000; in the U.S., the title was changed to Revenge:A Novel. ... The Count of Monte Cristo (French: Le Comte de Monte-Cristo) is an adventure novel by Alexandre Dumas, père. ... Paperweight is a collection of writings by Stephen Fry, first published in the United Kingdom in 1992. ... Professor Donald Trefusis is a Senior Tutor and professor of philology at the University of Cambridge in several of Stephen Frys works, including his novel The Liar and twenty-two radio broadcasts, published as essays in Paperweight. ... Stephen Fry on the cover of his autobiography (US Edition) Moab is My Washpot (published 1997) is Stephen Fry’s humorous autobiography, covering the first twenty years of his life. ... The current version of the article or section reads like an advertisement. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Paperweight is a collection of writings by Stephen Fry, first published in the United Kingdom in 1992. ... There is no one Edinburgh Festival but those using the term are usually referring to the collection of various festivals in August and early September of each year in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... For other uses, see Pantomime (disambiguation). ... Gustave Dorés illustration for Cendrillon Cinderella (French: Cendrillon) is a popular fairy tale embodying a classic folk tale myth-element of unjust oppression/triumphant reward. ... The exterior of the Old Vic from the corner of Baylis Road and Waterloo Road. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... A Bit of Fry and Laurie was a British television series starring Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie, broadcast by the BBC between 1989 and 1995. ... A Bit of Fry and Laurie was a British television series starring Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie, broadcast by the BBC between 1989 and 1995. ... A Bit of Fry and Laurie was a British television series starring Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie, broadcast by the BBC between 1989 and 1995. ... A Bit of Fry and Laurie was a British television series starring Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie, broadcast by the BBC between 1989 and 1995. ...

Performances

  • Plays

A Fish Called Wanda is a movie released in 1988 by MGM. It was written by John Cleese and directed by Charles Crichton. ... Peters Friends (1992) is a British comedy-drama film written by Rita Rudner and her husband Martin Bergman, and directed and produced by Kenneth Branagh. ... I.Q. is a 1994 romantic comedy film directed by Fred Schepisi, starring Tim Robbins, Meg Ryan and Walter Matthau. ... The Wind in the Willows, released on video in the U.S. as Mr. ... Spiceworld: The Movie is the debut feature film by British pop act The Spice Girls. ... A Civil Action is a 1998 film, starring John Travolta (as plaintiffs attorney Jan Schlichtmann) and Robert Duvall, based on the book of the same name by Jonathan Harr. ... Whatever Happened to Harold Smith? is a film written by Ben Steiner, directed by Peter Hewitt and released in 1999. ... Relative Values is a play by Noel Coward and a 2000 film adaptation of that play. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Discovery of Heaven is a 1992 novel by the famous Dutch author Harry Mulisch. ... Thunderpants is a 2002 family film about a boy whose incredible capacity for flatulence gets him a job as an astronaut. ... Le Divorce is a 2003 motion picture that tells a story of an American woman who married a French man and her sister visiting her in Paris. ... The Life and Death of Peter Sellers (DVD) The Life and Death of Peter Sellers was a 2004 film about the life of Peter Sellers, based on Roger Lewiss book of the same name. ... The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy is a science fiction comedy film based on the book of the same name by Douglas Adams. ... MirrorMask is a 2005 film from the Jim Henson Company, Samuel Goldwyn Films, and Destination Films. ... For the novel by Will Self see Cock and Bull, for the expression, see Cock and Bull. ... V for Vendetta is a 2006 action-thriller film set in London, England in a near-future dystopian society. ... This article is about the 2006 film. ... Valkyrie is a 2008 historical thriller film directed by Bryan Singer and starring Tom Cruise. ... Cell Mates is a play by Simon Gray. ... The terms Tertiary Phase, Quandary Phase and Quintessential Phase describe the radio adaptations of the books Life, the Universe and Everything, So Long, and Thanks For All the Fish and Mostly Harmless recorded in 2003 and 2004 by Above the Title Productions for BBC Radio 4. ... old Radio 4 logo BBC Radio 4 is a UK domestic radio station which broadcasts a wide variety of spoken-word programmes including news, drama, comedy, science and history. ... Saturday Night Fry was a six part comedy series on BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in 1988. ... This article is about the television series. ... Absolute Power is a British comedy series, set in the offices of Prentiss McCabe, a fictional public relations company (or government-media relations consultancy) in London, run by Charles Prentiss (Stephen Fry), and Martin McCabe (John Bird). ... Im Sorry I Havent a Clue, sometimes abbreviated to ISIHAC or simply Clue, is a BBC radio comedy which has run since 1972-04-11. ... Just a Minute is a BBC Radio 4 radio comedy panel game which has been running continuously since its first broadcast on December 22, 1967. ... Classic FM is the United Kingdoms first national commercial radio station, broadcasting classical music in a popular and accessible style. ... Delve Special was a UK Radio 4 comedy starring Stephen Fry as investigative reporter David Lander. ... Philology, etymologically, is the love of words. It is most accurately defined as an affinity toward the learning of the backgrounds as well as the current usages of spoken or written methods of human communication. The commonality of studied languages is more important than their origin or age (that is... Professor Donald Trefusis is a Senior Tutor and professor of philology at the University of Cambridge in several of Stephen Frys works, including his novel The Liar and twenty-two radio broadcasts, published as essays in Paperweight. ... Loose Ends can refer to: Carl McIntosh Jane Eugene Steve Nichol In The mid 80s gems like Hanging on a string and Slow Down brought Loose Ends the kind of stateside recognition Britisch soul acts dream of. ... Edward George Sherrin (18 February 1931 – 1 October 2007) was an English broadcaster, author and stage director. ... Newsbeat is the name of the twice-daily flagship news programme on BBC Radio 1. ... Alfresco was a British television series starring Robbie Coltrane, Ben Elton, Stephen Fry, Hugh Laurie, Siobhan Redmond and Emma Thompson, broadcast by ITV (produced by Granada Television) between 1983 and 1984. ... The Young Ones was a popular British sitcom, first seen in 1982, which aired on BBC2. ... This page is about the card game. ... Filthy Rich & Catflap was a BBC sitcom produced in 1986 and broadcast early the next year. ... For other uses, see Blackadder (disambiguation). ... Blackadder II was the second series of the BBC situation comedy Blackadder, written by Richard Curtis and Ben Elton, which aired from 9 January 1986 to 20 February 1986. ... Blackadder the Third was the third series of the BBC situation comedy Blackadder, written by Richard Curtis and Ben Elton, which aired from 17 September 1987 to 22 October 1987. ... The second series of Blackadder was set in Elizabethan England, starring (left to right) Tony Robinson as Baldrick, Rowan Atkinson as Edmund, Lord Blackadder, and Tim McInnerny as Lord Percy Percy. ... Blackadder in Blackadders Christmas Carol Blackadders Christmas Carol (1988) is a one-off episode of Blackadder, a parody of Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol. ... Blackadder Goes Forth was the fourth and final series of the BBC situation comedy Blackadder, written by Richard Curtis and Ben Elton, which aired from 28 September to 2 November 1989. ... Blackadder: Back & Forth (1999) was created for showing during 2000 in a cinema built near the Millennium Dome, by Sky Television and the BBC, with sponsorship from—among others—Tesco PLC. Spoiler warning: Blackadder is entertaining guests on New Years Eve, 1999. ... Whose Line Is It Anyway? (sometimes abbreviated to Whose Line? or WLIIA?) is a short-form improvisational comedy show. ... This article is about the television series. ... It has been suggested that This is David Harper be merged into this article or section. ... The New Statesman was an award-winning British sitcom of the late 1980s and early 1990s satirising the Conservative government of the time. ... Jeeves and Wooster is a humorous television series adapted by Clive Exton from P.G. Wodehouses Jeeves stories, and produced by Carnival Films for Granada Television, and screened on the United Kingdoms ITV network from 1990 to 1993. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Cold Comfort Farm is a comic novel by Stella Gibbons, published in 1932. ... In the Red is a 1989 novel by Mark Tavener, a black comedy revolving around murder, finance, and intrigue in the halls of the BBC. Ironically, it has been successfully adapted for both radio and television by the BBC. In 1995, it was adapted for radio by Taverner and Peter... Watership Down is an animated adaptation for television of the novel of the same name by Richard Adams, co-produced by Alltime Entertainment of the United Kingdom and Decode Entertainment of Canada. ... For other uses, see QI (disambiguation). ... Absolute Power is a British comedy series, set in the offices of Prentiss McCabe, a fictional public relations company (or government-media relations consultancy) in London, run by Charles Prentiss (Stephen Fry), and Martin McCabe (John Bird). ... Cover of 1999 re-issue by Oxford Worlds Classics Tom Browns Schooldays, first published in 1857, is a novel by Thomas Hughes, set at a public school, Rugby School for Boys, in the 1830s when Hughes himself had been a student there. ... Pocoyo is a pre-school animated cartoon series about a young boy who dresses in blue and who is full of curiosity. ... Not to be confused with Extra (TV series). ... Bones is an American drama television series that premiered on the Fox Network on September 13, 2005. ... Kingdom is a British television series produced by Parallel Film and Television Productions and Sprout for ITV1. ... Pamela Stephenson also known as Pamela Stephenson Connolly, (born December 4, 1949 in Takapuna, Auckland) is a New Zealand-Australian clinical psychologist and former actress and comedian, now resident in New York, New York, USA. // After attending the University of New South Wales and then Australias National Institute of... Stephen Fry on the cover of his autobiography (US Edition) Moab is My Washpot (published 1997) is Stephen Fry’s humorous autobiography, covering the first twenty years of his life. ... The Hippopotamus is a novel by Stephen Fry. ... This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ... The cover of The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy, from a late 1990s US printing. ... The Higher Ground Project was a worldwide campaign to celebrate the lives of children who survived the Boxing Day 2004 Tsunami. ... The Ode Less Travelled: Unlocking The Poet Within is a book by author, actor, comedian and director Stephen Fry about writing poetry. ... Montmorency, or Scarper, is the dual identity of a former convict turned gentleman in the Montmorency series of books. ... This article is about the television series. ... Death Comes to Time is a webcast audio drama based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who, produced by the BBC and first broadcast in five episodes on the BBCi Cult website from 12 July 2001. ... This article is about the Time Lords from Doctor Who. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in Greece. ... Twinings is a brand of tea, primarily operating in the United Kingdom. ... The title Earl Grey was created in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1806 for the 1st Baron Grey, a General in the British Army. ... For other uses, see Tea (disambiguation). ...

Directorial filmography

Bright Young Things is a 2003 movie directed by Stephen Fry; the film represents the directorial debut for the British actor and presenter. ...

References

  1. ^ "Who Do You Think You Are?", British National Archives website.
  2. ^ Cawston Parish in Norfolk
  3. ^ University Challenge page at UK Game Shows.
  4. ^ QI Audience Statistics.
  5. ^ IMDB: Stephen Fry — Awards
  6. ^ StephenFry.com - Blog Entry - I Give Up.
  7. ^ BBC: "Fry quits as host of film Baftas"
  8. ^ IMDB: Stephen Fry.
  9. ^ Stephen Fry interviews Tony Blair.
  10. ^ Old Vic Theatre - Cinderella.
  11. ^ StephenFry.com - Blog Entry - I Give Up.
  12. ^ BBC Health: The Secret Life of the Manic Depressive
  13. ^ BBC News: Comedian Fry reveals suicide bid
  14. ^ Cardiff University: Genetic research into mood disorders
  15. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/film/4476875.stm
  16. ^ Lip Theatre: History
  17. ^ BBC: Living Icons
  18. ^ Independent on Sunday Pink List 2007
  19. ^ Mind - Press Release
  20. ^ http://www.noelcoward.net/html/committee2007.html
  21. ^ Branagh to make Mozart opera film
  22. ^ Douglas Adams Continuum Forum: webchat

See also

Hugh Laurie (left) & Stephen Fry on the set of A Bit of Fry and Laurie Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie are a successful British comedy double act of the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s. ... This article is about the television series. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:


Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ...

Academic offices
Preceded by
Paul Henderson Scott
Rector of the University of Dundee
1992–1998
Succeeded by
Tony Slattery
Persondata
NAME Fry, Stephen John
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Fry, Stephen
SHORT DESCRIPTION English comedian
DATE OF BIRTH 1957-08-24
PLACE OF BIRTH Hampstead, England
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
Stephen: Information from Answers.com (610 words)
Stephen was among the English nobles who in 1127, and again in 1131 and 1133, swore fealty to Henry's daughter, Matilda, as Henry's successor to the throne.
Stephen defeated the Scots in the Battle of the Standard (although the ensuing treaty was entirely favorable to Scotland) and managed to wage an effective campaign against the insurrection in S and W England.
Stephen was a courageous soldier and a generous man, but he had neither the ability nor the strength of character necessary to deal with the turmoil of his reign.
Stephen Fry - Biography - Moviefone (698 words)
Born in London on August 24, 1957, Fry was the second of three children born to a homemaker mother and physicist/investor father.
Fry and Laurie began their collaboration in 1981, performing Footlights revues at various venues around Great Britain, including the Edinburgh Festival, and doing a three month tour of Australia.
Meanwhile, Fry was also gaining recognition for his columns for The Daily Telegraph, as well as a certain amount of notoriety for various well-publicized statements he made in the press.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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