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Encyclopedia > Stephen Decatur
Stephen Decatur, Jr.
January 5, 1779March 22, 1820

Place of birth Sinepuxent, Maryland
Place of death Washington, D.C.
Allegiance United States of America
Years of service 1798 – 1820
Rank Commodore (USN)
Commands USS Enterprise,
USS Chesapeake,
USS United States,
USS President,
USS Constitution,
USS Guerriere
Other work Board of Navy Commissioners

Commodore Stephen Decatur, Jr (5 January 177922 March 1820) was an American naval officer notable for his heroism in the Barbary Wars and in the War of 1812. He was the youngest man to reach the rank of captain in the history of the U.S. Navy, and the first American celebrated as a national military hero who had not played a role in the American Revolution. January 5 is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... March 22 is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Public domain from [1] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Sinepuxent was a town on the Eastern Shore of Maryland, on the mainland across from Assateague Island. ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - D.C. Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2... Commodore is a rank of the United States Navy with a somewhat complicated history. ... The third USS Enterprise, a schooner, was built by Henry Spencer at Baltimore, Maryland, in 1799, and placed under the command of Lieutenant John Shaw. ... The USS Chesapeake was a 36-gun sailing frigate of the United States Navy during the Quasi-War with France and the War of 1812. ... USS United States was the first frigate in the United States Navy in 1797. ... The first USS President of the United States Navy was a 44-gun sailing frigate built by Christian Bergh, East River, New York. ... “ Old Ironsides ” redirects here. ... The first USS Guerriere was the first frigate built in the United States since 1801. ... The Board of Naval Commissioners was created February 7, 1815, as part of an expansion of the U.S. Navy Department, but its authority was generally confined to procuring stores and materials and to constructing, arming, and equipping vessels of war. ... January 5 is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... March 22 is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... USN redirects here. ... The Barbary Wars (or Tripolitan Wars) were two wars between the United States of America and Barbary States in North Africa in the early 19th century. ... Combatants United States Great Britain Canada Bermuda Eastern Woodland Indians Commanders James Madison Henry Dearborn Jacob Brown Winfield Scott Andrew Jackson George Prevost Isaac Brock† Tecumseh† Strength •United States Regular Army: 35,800 •Rangers: 3,049 •Militia: 458,463* •US Navy & US Marines: (at start of war): •Frigates:6 •Other... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen Colonies that...

Contents

Early civilian life

Decatur was born on January 5 1779, in Sinepuxent, Maryland to Stephen Decatur, Sr. and Ann Pine.[1] He attended the Abercrombie School in Philadelphia at Dr Abercrombie's Academy with future naval heroes Richard Somers and Charles Stewart. His father was also a Naval officer, having commanded several ships. Another Stephen Decatur (1815–76) claimed to be his nephew and was an incorporator of Decatur, Nebraska. Sinepuxent was a town on the Eastern Shore of Maryland, on the mainland across from Assateague Island. ... Stephen Decatur, Sr. ... Richard Somers (1778 or 1779 - 4 September 1804) was an officer of the United States Navy, killed during a daring assault on Tripoli. ... Charles Stewart was a variant spelling of the name of the two Stuart dynasty Kings of Britain, namely Charles I and Charles II, as well as of Bonnie Prince Charlie, the Young Pretender. ... Stephen A. Decatur (1815 – 1876) was a nephew of Commdore Stephen Decatur, Jr. ... Decatur is a village located in Burt County, Nebraska. ...


He married Susan Wheeler, the daughter of the Mayor of Norfolk, Virginia, on March 8, 1806. Motto: Crescas (Latin for, Thou shalt grow. ...


Military career

Pre-commission

Decatur was employed at the age of 17 in the firm of Gurney and Smith, acting as the company's supervisor to the early construction of the frigate United States. Was one of Preble's Boys and friends with Charles Stewart and Richard Rush. USS United States was the first frigate in the United States Navy in 1797. ...


Quasi-War

Decatur saw service throughout the Quasi-War, an undeclared naval war with France. In 1798, Decatur secured commission as a midshipman aboard the United States. He was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant in 1799. For a brief period, Decatur served aboard the sloop Norfolk but soon transferred back to the United States. Following the Quasi-War, the US Navy underwent a significant reduction of active ships and officers; Decatur was one of the few selected to remain commissioned. The Quasi-War was an undeclared war fought entirely at sea between the United States and France from 1798 to 1801. ... Lieutenant is a military, naval, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. ... The first USS Norfolk was a brig in the United States Navy during the Quasi-War with France. ...


First Barbary War

"Decatur's Conflict with the Algerine at Tripoli. Reuben James Interposing His Head to Save the Life of His Commander" Copy of engraving by Alonzo Chappel, August, 1804.
"Decatur's Conflict with the Algerine at Tripoli. Reuben James Interposing His Head to Save the Life of His Commander" Copy of engraving by Alonzo Chappel, August, 1804.

Given command of the brig Argus in 1803, he took it to the Mediterranean for service in the First Barbary War against Tripoli. Once in the combat zone, Lieutenant Decatur commanded the schooner Enterprise and, on 23 December 1803, captured the enemy ketch Mastico. That vessel, taken into the U.S. Navy under the name Intrepid, was used by Decatur on 16 February 1804 to execute a night raid into Tripoli harbor to destroy the former U.S. frigate Philadelphia, which had been captured after running aground at the end of October 1803. Admiral Lord Nelson is said to have called this "the most bold and daring act of the age". Image File history File links Download high resolution version (929x1201, 299 KB) Summary http://teachpol. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (929x1201, 299 KB) Summary http://teachpol. ... Reuben James saving the life of Stephen Decatur Reuben James (c. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Brigantine. ... The first USS Argus was a brig in the United States Navy during the First Barbary War and the War of 1812. ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... Combatants United States Barbary States (Ottoman Empire regencies) Commanders Richard Dale William Eaton Edward Preble Hassan Bey Murad Reis Strength 7 Ships 10 US Marines and Soldiers Christian Mercenaries Arab Mercenaries 4000 Casualties 2 Ships destroyed 2 Marines killed, 3 wounded Christian/Arab Mercenaries killed and wounded uncertain Unknown The... Tripoli (Arabic: طرابلس Tarābulus) is the capital city of Libya. ... Two-masted fishing schooner A schooner (IPA: ) is a type of sailing vessel characterized by the use of fore-and-aft sails on two or more masts. ... The third USS Enterprise, a schooner, was built by Henry Spencer at Baltimore, Maryland, in 1799, and placed under the command of Lieutenant John Shaw. ... December 23 is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Square Topsl Gaff Ketch Hawaiian Chieftain on San Francisco Bay A ketch is a sailing craft with two masts: A main mast, and a mizzen mast abaft the main mast. ... The first USS Intrepid was a captured ketch in the United States Navy during the First Barbary War. ... February 16 is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The second USS Philadelphia of the United States Navy was a 36 gun sailing frigate. ... Lord Nelson Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson (September 29, 1758 – October 21, 1805) was a British admiral who won fame as a leading naval commander. ...


This daring and extremely successful operation made Lieutenant Decatur an immediate national hero, a status that was enhanced by his courageous conduct during the 3 August 1804 bombardment of Tripoli. In that action, he led his men in hand-to-hand fighting while boarding and capturing an enemy gunboat. Decatur was subsequently promoted to the rank of Captain, and over the next eight years had command of several frigates. is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Captain is a rank or title with various meanings. ... For the bird, see Frigatebird. ...


War of 1812

The United States declared war on Great Britain on 14 June 1812. United States, commanded by Decatur, the frigate Congress (36), and the brig Argus (18) joined Commodore John Rodgers' squadron at New York City and put to sea immediately, cruising off the east coast until the end of August. The squadron again sailed on 8 October 1812, this time from Boston. Three days later, after capturing Mandarin, United States parted company and continued to cruise eastward. At dawn on 25 October, five hundred miles south of the Azores, lookouts on board United States reported seeing a sail 12 miles (19 km) to windward. As the ship rose over the horizon, Captain Decatur made out the fine, familiar lines of HMS Macedonian. In 1810, the two vessels were berthed next to one another in port at Norfolk, Virginia. The British captain John Carden wagered a beaver hat that if the two ever met in battle, the Macedonian would emerge victorious. However, the engagement in a heavy swell proved otherwise as the United States pounded the Macedonian into a dismasted wreck from long range. The Macedonian had no option but surrender, and thus was taken as a prize by Decatur. Eager to present the nation with a prize, Decatur spent a fortnight refitting the captured British frigate so as to make it able to travel back across the Atlantic. Combatants United States Great Britain Canada Bermuda Eastern Woodland Indians Commanders James Madison Henry Dearborn Jacob Brown Winfield Scott Andrew Jackson George Prevost Isaac Brock† Tecumseh† Strength •United States Regular Army: 35,800 •Rangers: 3,049 •Militia: 458,463* •US Navy & US Marines: (at start of war): •Frigates:6 •Other... June 14 is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting... The third USS Congress of the United States Navy was a 36-gun sailing frigate. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Brigantine. ... The first USS Argus was a brig in the United States Navy during the First Barbary War and the War of 1812. ... John Rodgers (11 July 1772 - 1 August 1838), American naval officer, was born near present Havre de Grace, Maryland. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting... October 25 is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Motto (Portuguese for Rather die free than in peace subjugated) Anthem  (national)  (local) Capital Ponta Delgada1 Angra do Heroísmo2 Horta3 Largest city Ponta Delgada Official languages Portuguese Government Autonomous region  -  President Carlos César Establishment  -  Settled 1439   -  Autonomy 1976  Area  -  Total 2,333 km² (n/a) 911 sq mi...


After repairs, United States—accompanied by USS Macedonian and the brig Hornet—sailed from New York on 24 May 1813. On 1 June, the three vessels were driven into New London, Connecticut, by a powerful British squadron, and United States and Macedonian were kept blocked there until the end of the war. The first USS Macedonian was a United States Navy 38-gun sailing frigate, originally the HMS Macedonian of the Royal Navy, captured by Stephen Decatur in the War of 1812. ... The third USS Hornet was a brig-rigged sloop of war was launched on 28 July 1805 in Baltimore and commissioned on 18 October. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... June 1 is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Motto: MARE LIBERUM Coordinates: , NECTA Norwich-New London Region Southeastern Connecticut Settled 1646 (Pequot Plantation) Named 1658 (New London) Incorporated (city) 1784 Government  - Type Council-manager  - City council Margaret Mary Curtin, Mayor Kevin J. Cavanagh, Dep. ...


American frigates under Stephen Decatur prepared to run out of the harbor of New London, Connecticut, during the War of 1812. Decatur saw blue lights burning near the mouth of the river in sight of the British blockaders. Convinced that these were signals to betray his plans he abandoned the project. Suspicion was directed against the peace men and the odious epithet of "Bluelight Federalists" long was applied to extreme Federalists.[1] In the spring of 1814, Decatur transferred his commodore's pennant to the President (44), flagship of his new squadron consisting of Hornet (20), Peacock (22), and Tom Bowline (12). However, the British had established a strict blockade in the squadron's port of New York, therefore restricting any cruises. Nickname: Motto: MARE LIBERUM Coordinates: , NECTA Norwich-New London Region Southeastern Connecticut Settled 1646 (Pequot Plantation) Named 1658 (New London) Incorporated (city) 1784 Government  - Type Council-manager  - City council Margaret Mary Curtin, Mayor Kevin J. Cavanagh, Dep. ... Combatants United States Great Britain Canada Bermuda Eastern Woodland Indians Commanders James Madison Henry Dearborn Jacob Brown Winfield Scott Andrew Jackson George Prevost Isaac Brock† Tecumseh† Strength •United States Regular Army: 35,800 •Rangers: 3,049 •Militia: 458,463* •US Navy & US Marines: (at start of war): •Frigates:6 •Other... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The first USS President of the United States Navy was a 44-gun sailing frigate built by Christian Bergh, East River, New York. ... The third USS Hornet was a brig-rigged sloop of war was launched on 28 July 1805 in Baltimore and commissioned on 18 October. ... The first USS Peacock was a sloop-of-war in the United States Navy during the War of 1812. ... Tom Bowline was a schooner in the United States Navy during the War of 1812. ...


In January 1815, Decatur's squadron was assigned a mission in the East Indies. Shortly thereafter, Decatur attempted to break through the blockade alone in the President and make for the appointed rendezvous at Tristan da Cunha. On January 15, a day after setting sail from New York, he encountered the British West Indies Squadron comprised of Razee HMS Majestic (56 guns, Captain John Hayes) and the frigates HMS Endymion (40 guns, Captain Henry Hope), HMS Pomone (38 guns, Captain John Richard Lumley) and HMS Tenedos (38 guns, Captain Hyde Parker). After the President was accidentally run aground, Decatur continued to attempt to evade his pursuers. Endymion was the first to come up and after a fierce fight, he managed to disable the British frigate. But due to the damage sustained by Endymion, Decatur's frigate was finally overhauled by Pomone and Tenedos, causing him to surrender his command. However, his hail of surrender was not heard by Pomone, firing two broadsides into the President until she hauled down a light to signify surrender. As Decatur himself termed it, "my ship crippled, and more than a four-fold force opposed to me, without a chance of escape left, I deemed it my duty to surrender". Decatur's command suffered 24 men killed and 55 wounded, including Decatur himself who was wounded by a large flying splinter. Motto Our faith is our strength Anthem God Save the Queen Capital (and largest city) Edinburgh of the Seven Seas Official languages English Government Dependency of St. ... A razee is a sailing ship that has been cut down (razeed) to one with fewer decks. ... For other ships with the same name, see HMS Majestic. ... John Hayes could be John Hayes the harness racer John Hayes the British politician John Hayes of the British East India Company John Hayes (USA) winner of the olympic marathon in 1908. ... This article is about the british frigate Endymion, launched in 1797. ... Henry Hope in 1788 Henry Hope (1735 - 1811) was an Amsterdam merchant banker born in Boston, New England. ... The HMS Pomone was a 38-gun, fifth-rate frigate of the Royal Navy during the Napoleonic wars and the War of 1812. ... Three admirals of the Royal Navy, father, son, and grandson, were named Hyde Parker. ...


Decatur and his men were transported as prisoners to Bermuda until February 1815. On February 8, with news of the cessation of hostilities, Decatur traveled aboard HMS Narcissus (32), landing in New London, Connecticut. On February 26, Decatur arrived in New York City, where he convalesced in a boarding house. is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Second Barbary War

In May 1815, Commodore Decatur sailed his squadron of nine ships to the Mediterranean Sea to conduct the Second Barbary War, which put an end to the international practice of paying tribute to pirate states. Decatur was dispatched to Algiers to secure the release of American slaves, to obtain an end to tribute, and finally, to procure favorable prize agreements. The Second Barbary War (1815, also known as the Algerian War) was the second of two wars fought between the United States of America and the semi-autonomous North African city-states of Algiers, Tunis, and Tripoli, known collectively as the Barbary States. ... “Alger” redirects here. ...


Capturing the Algerian fleet flagship Mashouda as well as the Algerian brig Estedio in route to Algeria, Decatur secured an amount of levying power with which to bargain with the Dey of Algiers. Upon arrival, Decatur exhibited an early use of Gunboat Diplomacy on behalf of American interests. A new treaty was agreed to within 48 hours of his arrival, confirming the success of his objectives. The American Captain William Bainbridge paying tribute to the Dey, circa 1800. ... In international politics, gunboat diplomacy refers to the pursuit of foreign policy objectives with the aid of conspicuous displays of military power—implying or constituting a direct threat of warfare, should terms not be agreeable to the superior force. ...


After resolving the disputes in Algiers, Decatur sailed his squadron to Tunis and Tripoli to demand reimbursement for proceeds withheld by those governments in the War of 1812. In a similar fashion, Decatur received all of the demands he asked of them, and promptly sailed home victorious. Tripoli (Arabic: طرابلس Tarābulus) is the capital city of Libya. ...


For this campaign, he became known as "the Conqueror of the Barbary Pirates". This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Domestic service

Between 1816 and 1820, Decatur served as a Navy Commissioner. During his tenure as a Commissioner, Decatur became active in the Washington social scene. At one of his social gatherings, Decatur uttered an after-dinner toast that would become famous: "Our Country! In her intercourse with foreign nations may she always be in the right; but right or wrong, our country!" This toast is often misquoted as "My country, right or wrong!" and then attacked as a straw man by those who believe it to be an enduring and official statement of US foreign policy. The Board of Naval Commissioners was created February 7, 1815, as part of an expansion of the U.S. Navy Department, but its authority was generally confined to procuring stores and materials and to constructing, arming, and equipping vessels of war. ... A straw man argument is a logical fallacy based on misrepresentation of an opponents position. ... President of the United States, George W. Bush (right) at Camp David in March 2003, hosting the British Prime Minister Tony Blair. ...


In 1818, in Washington, D.C., he built a house designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe. The Decatur House, now a museum, was located on President's Square (Lafayette Square). Benjamin Henry Latrobe (May 1, 1764 - September 3, 1820) was an architect best known for his design of the United States Capitol. ... Decatur House is one of the oldest surviving homes in Washington, D.C. and one of only three remaining houses in the country designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, the father of American architecture. ... Presidents Park is a unit of the National Park Service, located in Washington, D.C., USA at 38° 53′ 42″ N 77° 02′ 11″ W. It includes the White House, a visitor center, Lafeyette Square, and the Ellipse. ...


Death

In 1820, Commodore James Barron challenged Decatur to a duel, relating in part to comments Decatur had made over what he considered Barron's poor conduct in the Chesapeake-Leopard Affair of 1807. Decatur had served as one of the members of the Court Martial that had found Barron guilty of unpreparedness in the affair, and had barred him from a command for the next five years. James Barron (1769- 21 april 1851) is in the us navy. ... A duel is a formalized type of combat. ... HMS Leopard (right) fires upon the USS Chesapeake In the Chesapeake-Leopard Affair, also referred to as the Chesapeake Affair, which occurred on June 22, 1807, the British frigate HMS Leopard attacked and boarded the American frigate USS Chesapeake. ...


Barron's second was Captain Jesse Elliott, known for his antagonism to Decatur. Decatur asked his supposed friend Commodore William Bainbridge to be his second, to which Bainbridge consented. However, Decatur unknowingly had selected a man who had harbored a long-standing jealousy of Decatur. Jesse Duncan Elliot (July 14, 1782-December 10, 1845) was a United States naval officer and commander of American naval forces in Lake Erie during the War of 1812, especially noted for his controversial actions during the Battle of Lake Erie. ... William Bainbridge (1774-1833). ...


The two officers fought at Bladensburg Duelling Field in Bladensburg, Maryland (now in Colmar Manor, Maryland), on 22 March 1820. Before the duel, Barron spoke to Decatur in words of suggestive conciliation, but the seconds did nothing to halt the altercation. Decatur, an expert marksman with a pistol, intended only to wound Barron. However, Decatur was mortally wounded by a shot in the abdomen. (Decatur had likewise inflicted a severe, though not mortal, wound to Barron's hip.) As Decatur lay slowly dying in his home on Lafayette Square, he is said to have cried out, "I did not know that any man could suffer such pain!" He died childless. Though he left his widow $75,000, a considerable sum in 1820, she died penniless in 1860. was 5 miles from Washington, DC but in the jurisdiction of the state of Maryland, where statutes against duelling were more lax than in the District of Columbia. ... Bladensburg is a town in Prince Georges County, Maryland, United States. ... Colmar Manor is a town located in Prince Georges County, Maryland. ... March 22 is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Decatur's funeral was attended by the Washington political elite, including the President and Supreme Court, as well as most of Congress. More than 10,000 citizens of Washington attended to pay respects to a national hero.


His remains were temporarily deposited in the tomb of Joel Barlow at Washington, but later removed to Philadelphia, where he was interred at St. Peter's Church. Nickname: Motto: Philadelphia maneto - Let brotherly love continue Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: , Country United States Commonwealth Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Government  - Mayor John F. Street (D) Area  - City 369. ... Image Of St. ...


Legacy

Stephen Decatur as depicted on an 1886 Silver Certificate
Stephen Decatur as depicted on an 1886 Silver Certificate

Five U.S. Navy ships have been named USS Decatur in his honor, along with numerous locations. Numerous schools also bear his name. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Several ships of the United States Navy have been named USS Decatur, after the early hero Stephen Decatur. ...


An engraved portrait of Decatur appears on U.S. paper money on series 1886 $20 silver certificates.


Forty-six communities in the United States have been named after Stephen Decatur, including:

2 schools on Marylands eastern shore have been named for him: Decatur, Alabama is a city in Morgan County, Alabama, with a small portion in southern Limestone County. ... The Decatur Transfer House in the background with a newly completed fountain in the foreground. ... Decatur is a city in Adams County, Indiana, United States. ... Map of the city in 1890 Decatur is a city located in the Wise County, Texas. ... For the south-western Georgia county, see Decatur County, Georgia. ... Decatur County is a county located in the state of Georgia. ... Decatur County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. ... Decatur County is a county located in the state of Iowa. ... Decatur County (standard abbreviation: DC) is a county located in the state of Kansas. ... Decatur County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... Decatur Township is the smallest in geographic size and in population of the nine townships in Marion County, Indiana. ...

  • Stephen Decatur High in Berlin (formerly Sinepuxent), MD
  • Stephen Decatur Middle in Clinton, MD

References

  1. ^ [Dictionary of American History by James Truslow Adams, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1940]
  • Frederick C. Leiner, The End of Barbary Terror (New York: Oxford University Press, 2006)
  • Nathan Miller, The US Navy: An Illustrated History (New York: American Heritage, 1977)

Further reading

  • De Kay, James Tertius. A Rage for Glory: The Life of Commodore Stephen Decatur, USN. Free Press, 2004. ISBN 0-7432-4245-9.
  • London, Joshua E. Victory in Tripoli: How America's War with the Barbary Pirates Established the U.S. Navy and Shaped a Nation. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2005. ISBN 0-471-44415-4

External links

This article includes text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Find A Grave is an online database of seventeen million cemeteries and burial records. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships (DANFS for short) is the primary reference work for the basic facts about every ship ever used by the United States Navy. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Stephen Decatur - definition of Stephen Decatur in Encyclopedia (470 words)
This daring and extremely successful operation made Lieutenant Decatur an immediate national hero, a status that was enhanced by his courageous conduct during the 3 August 1804 bombardment of Tripoli.
Decatur was subsequently promoted to the rank of Captain, and over the next eight years had command of several frigates.
Decatur was mortally wounded and died shortly afterwards.
Decatur, Stephen - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about Decatur, Stephen (213 words)
During the war with the Barbary pirates at Tripoli 1801–05, he succeeded in burning the Philadelphia, a US frigate captured by the enemy.
He was born in Newport, Rhode Island and was the father of Stephen Decatur (1779–1820).
This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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