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Encyclopedia > Stele
Stela N, depicting King K'ac Yipyaj Chan K'awiil ("Smoke Shell"), as drawn by Frederick Catherwood in 1839
Stela N, depicting King K'ac Yipyaj Chan K'awiil ("Smoke Shell"), as drawn by Frederick Catherwood in 1839

A stele (from Greek: στήλη, stēlē, IPA: /ˈstiːli/; plural: stelae, στῆλαι, stēlai, IPA: /ˈstiːlaɪ/; also found: Latinised singular stela and Anglicised plural steles) is a stone or wooden slab, generally taller than it is wide, erected for funerary or commemorative purposes, most usually decorated with the names and titles of the deceased or living—inscribed, carved in relief (bas-relief, sunken-relief, high-relief, etc), or painted onto the slab. Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... In a vascular plant, the stele is the central part of the root or stem containing the vascular tissue and occasionally a pith. ... Download high resolution version (365x630, 68 KB)Copan Stela N, South Face, engraving, as drawn by Frederick Catherwood, 1839 This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... Download high resolution version (365x630, 68 KB)Copan Stela N, South Face, engraving, as drawn by Frederick Catherwood, 1839 This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Underwater funeral in Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea A funeral is a ceremony marking a persons death. ... Bas relief is a method of sculpting which entails carving or etching away the surface of a flat piece of stone or metal. ... Sunken-relief depiction of Pharoah Ankhenaten with his wife Nefertiti and daughters. ... Greek figure Alto-relievo are figures carved out of a tablet that project at least one half of cross-section from the tablets surface. ...


Stelae were also used as territorial markers, as the boundary stelae of Akhenaton at Amarna,[1] or to commemorate military victories.[2] They were widely used in the Ancient Near East, Greece, Egypt, Ethiopia, and, quite independently, in China and some Buddhist cultures (see the Nestorian Stele), and, more surely independently, by Mesoamerican civilisations, notably the Olmec[3] and Maya.[4] The huge number of stelae surviving from ancient Egypt and in Central America constitute one of the largest and most significant sources of information on those civilisations. An informative stele of Tiglath-Pileser III is preserved in the British Museum. Two stelae built into the walls of a church are major documents relating to the Etruscan language. Amarna The site of Amarna (commonly known as el-Amarna or incorrectly as Tel el-Amarna; see below) (Arabic: العمارنة al-‘amārnä) is located on the east bank of the Nile River in the modern Egyptian province of al-Minya, some 58 km (38 miles) south of the city of... Overview map of the Ancient Near East The term Ancient Near East or Ancient Orient encompasses the early civilizations predating Classical Antiquity in the region roughly corresponding to that described by the modern term Middle East (Egypt, Iraq, Turkey), during the time roughly spanning the Bronze Age from the rise... A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE. It had subsequently been accepted by... Detail of the stele The Nestorian Stele, Nestorian Stone, formally the Memorial of the Propagation in China of the Luminous Religion from Daqin (大秦景教流行中國碑; pinyin: Dàqín Jǐngjiào liúxíng Zhōngguó béi, abbreviated 大秦景教碑), and also known as the Hsi-an Monument, is a Tang Chinese... Mesoamerica is the region extending from central Mexico south to the northwestern border of Costa Rica that gave rise to a group of stratified, culturally related agrarian civilizations spanning an approximately 3,000-year period before the European discovery of the New World by Columbus. ... Monument 1, one of the four Olmec colossal heads at La Venta. ... This article is about the pre-Columbian Maya civilization. ... Khafres Pyramid and the Great Sphinx of Giza, built about 2550 BC during the Fourth Dynasty of the Old Kingdom,[1] are enduring symbols of the civilization of ancient Egypt Ancient Egypt was a civilization in Northeastern Africa concentrated along the middle to lower reaches of the Nile River... Tiglath-Pileser III — stela from the walls of his palace (British Museum, London) Tiglath-Pileser III (Akkadian: Tukultī-Apil-Ešarra) was a prominent king of Assyria in the 8th century BC (ruled 745–727 BC) and is widely regarded as the founder of the Neo-Assyrian Empire. ... The British Museum in London, England is one of the worlds greatest museums of human history and culture. ... Languages in Iron Age Italy, 6th century BC Etruscan was a language spoken and written in the ancient region of Etruria (current Tuscany plus western Umbria and northern Latium) and in parts of what are now Lombardy, Veneto, and Emilia-Romagna (where the Etruscans were displaced by Gauls), in Italy. ...


Unfinished standing stones, set up without inscriptions from Libya in North Africa to Scotland were monuments of pre-literate Megalithic cultures in the Late Stone Age. Standing stones, orthostats, liths or more commonly, megaliths because of their large and cumbersome size, are solitary stones set vertically in the ground. ... This article is about the country. ... Megalithic tomb, Mane Braz, Brittany Bronze age wedge tomb in the Burren area of Ireland For the record label, see Megalith Records. ... An array of Neolithic artifacts, including bracelets, axe heads, chisels, and polishing tools. ...


In 1489, 1512, and 1663 CE, the Kaifeng Jews of China left these stone monuments to preserve their origin and history. Despite repeated flooding of the Yellow River, destroying their synagogue time and time again, these stelae survived to tell their tale. Events March 14 - The Queen of Cyprus, Catherine Cornaro, sells her kingdom to Venice. ... Year 1512 (MDXII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1663 (MDCLXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... “BCE” redirects here. ... The Kaifeng Jews comprise the best documented Jewish community in China. ... For other Yellow Rivers, see Yellow River (disambiguation). ...


An obelisk is a specialized kind of stele. The Celtic high crosses of Ireland, Scotland, and Wales are specialized stelae. Gravestones with inscribed epitaph are also kinds of stelae. The Luxor obelisk in the Place de la Concorde in Paris Obelisk outside Santa Maria sopra Minerva in Rome. ... This article is about the European people. ... High Cross, Dysert, Co. ... This article is about the country. ... This article is about the country. ... Headstones in the Japanese Cemetry in Broome, Western Australia A cemetery in rural Spain A typical late 20th century headstone in the United States A headstone, tombstone or gravestone is a marker, normally carved from stone, placed over or next to the site of a burial. ... An epitaph ( literally: on the gravestone in ancient Greek) is text honoring the deceased, most commonly inscribed on a tombstone or plaque. ...


Most recently, in the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe in Berlin, the architect Peter Eisenman created a field of some 2,700 blank stelae.[5] The memorial is meant to be read not only as the field, but also as an erasure of data that refer to memory of the Holocaust. Holocaust-Memorial (Spring 2004) The Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, also known as Holocaust memorial for short, is a memorial in Berlin a block to the south of the Brandenburg Gate. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... Installation art by Peter Eisenman in the courtyard of Castelvecchio Museum in Verona, Italy, Entitled: Il giardino dei passi perduti, (The garden of the lost steps) Peter Eisenman (born August 11, 1932 in Newark, New Jersey) is one of the foremost practitioners of deconstructivism in American architecture. ...

Contents

Notable individual stelae

The Kingdom of Aksum (or Axum, Geez አክሱም), was an important trading nation in northeastern Africa, growing from the proto-Aksumite period ca. ... An inscription of the Code of Hammurabi. ... The stele of King Gwanggaeto of Goguryeo was erected in 414 by King Jangsu as a memorial to his deceased father. ... Detail of the stele The Nestorian Stele, Nestorian Stone, formally the Memorial of the Propagation in China of the Luminous Religion from Daqin (大秦景教流行中國碑; pinyin: Dàqín Jǐngjiào liúxíng Zhōngguó béi, abbreviated 大秦景教碑), and also known as the Hsi-an Monument, is a Tang Chinese... The anthropomorphic stone stelae found in the Ukrainian steppe, with some finds extending the area to Moldavia, the northern Caucasus (Southern Federal District) and and the area north of the Caspian (western Kazakhstan), date from the Copper Age (ca. ... The Lemnian language is the language of a 6th century BC inscription found on a funerary stela on the island of Lemnos (termed the Lemnos stele, discovered in 1885 near Kaminia). ... Drawing of the excavated Lapis Niger, by Christian Hülsen, 1906 The Lapis Niger (trans. ... The Merneptah Stele is the reverse of a stela erected by Amenhotep III written by Merneptah. ... The stele as photographed circa 1891 The Mesha Stele (popularized in the 19th century as the Moabite Stone) is a black basalt stone, bearing an inscription by the 9th century BC Moabite King Mesha, discovered in 1868. ... This article is about the ancient Rosetta Stone found in Egypt. ... The Boundary Stelae of Akhenaten map out the boundaries of the city of Akhetaten. ... The Palermo Stone is an ancient Egyptian stone of black [basalt] engraved toward the end of the 5th dynasty (twenty-fifth century BC) and is probably the earliest Egyptian historical text. ... The Raimondi Stela is a major piece of art of the Chavín culture of the central Andes. ... Tres Zapotes is a Mesoamerican archaeological site located in the south-central Gulf Lowlands of Mexico in the Papaloapan river plain. ... Izapa Stela 5 is one of a number of large, carved stelae found in the ancient Mesoamerican city of Izapa in 1941 by Smithsonian archaeologist Matthew W. Stirling. ...

Gallery

See also

Inscriptions are words or letters written, engraved, painted, or otherwise traced on a surface and can appear in contexts both small and monumental. ... Stele Forest (碑林; pinyin: Bēilín), aka Xian Stele Forest Museum or Xian Beilin Museum, is a museum for steles and stone sculptures which is located in Xian, China. ... Xian redirects here. ... A rune stone in Lund Rune stones are stones with runic inscriptions dating from the early Middle Ages but are found to have been used most prominently during the Viking Age. ... A Monumental Inscription is an inscription, typically carved in stone, on a grave marker or memorial plaque. ... Hilarri facsimile in Ainhoa Hilarri (from Basque hil dead and harri stone) is the name given to disk-shaped funerary steles that are typical of the Basque Country. ... Location of the Basque Country The Basque Country divided in seven provinces Capital Pamplona Official languages Basque, French, Spanish Demonym Basque Currency Euro The Basque-speaking areas This article is about the overall Basque domain. ...

Bibliography

  • John Boardman ed., The Cambridge Ancient History, Part 1, 2nd Edition, (ISBN-13: 9780521224963 | ISBN-10: 0521224969)
  • Christopher A. Pool, Olmec Archaeology and Early Mesoamerica, Cambridge University Press 2007 (ISBN-13: 9780521783125)
  • Karen E. Till, The New Berlin: Memory, Politics, Place, University of Minnesota Press 2005

Footnotes and references

  1. ^ Memoirs By Egypt Exploration Society Archaeological Survey of Egypt 1908, p. 19
  2. ^ e.g. Piye's victory stela (M. Lichtheim, Ancient Egyptian Literature Vol 3, The University of California Press 1980, , pp.66ff) or Shalmaneser's stela at Saluria (Boardman, op.cit, p.335)
  3. ^ Pool, op.cit., p.265
  4. ^ Pool, op.cit., p.277
  5. ^ Till, op.cit., p.168

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Steles
  • Funerary Stela

  Results from FactBites:
 
Merneptah Stele - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (672 words)
The Merneptah Stele (also known as the Israel Stele and the Victory Stele of Merneptah) is the reverse of a stele originally erected by the Ancient Egyptian king Thutmose III, but later inscribed by Merneptah.
It is also widely known as the "Israel stele", as it is the only Egyptian document generally accepted as mentioning "Israel", thus becoming the first known documentation of Israel.
Many Egyptologists refer to it as the "Israel stele" because of this, though the title is an erroneous one, as the stela is clearly not about Israel at all.
Stele - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (308 words)
Stele is also a concept in plant biology.
A stele (or stela) is a stone or wooden slab, generally taller than it is wide, erected for funerary or commemorative purposes, most usually decorated with the names and titles of the deceased or living—inscribed, carved in relief (bas relief, sunken relief, raised relief, etc), or painted onto the slab.
An informative stele of Tiglath-Pileser III is preserved in the British Museum.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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