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Encyclopedia > Stefan Nemanja
Stefan Nemanja

Icon of Stefan Nemanja as Saint Simeon
Simeon the Myrovlyte
Simeon Elaiovrytis
Born 1109,Ribnica in Doclea or Zeta
Died 13 February 1199,Hilandar monastery, Mount Athos
Venerated in Eastern Orthodox Church; especially the Serbian Orthodox Church
Feast 26 February
Saints Portal

Stefan Nemanja (Old Church Slavonic: Стѣфань, Serbian: Стефан Немања, pronounced [ˈstɛfaːn 'nɛmaɲa]) (1109-13 February 1199) was a Medieval Serb nobleman, descended from the Vukanović who was Grand Prince (Serbian: Велики Жупан) of the medieval Serb state of Rascia (Рашка) in 1166-1199. He established control over the territories of neighboring Serb states, including Zeta/Doclea, and unified them into a single state. He founded the Nemanjić dynasty and became recognized as an Orthodox Christian Saint (Symeon) after numerous miracles following his death. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Events Battle of Naklo Battle of Hundsfeld Fulk of Jerusalem becomes count of Anjou Alfonso I of Aragon marries Urraca of Castile Crusaders capture Tripoli Anselm of Laon becomes chancellor of Laon Births July 25 - Afonso, first king of Portugal Deaths Alfonso VI of Castile Anselm of Canterbury, philosopher and... Area: 153,6 km² Population  - males  - females 9. ... Duklja (Latin: Doclea or Dioclea, after the town of Dioclea) was a vassal state of Byzantium until it won its independence in 1042, ruled by the Vojislavljevic Dynasty, located in Zeta, or modern Montenegro and northern Albania including the city of Shkodër. ... Zeta was the Serbian independent principality that replaced the ancient Kingdom of Duklja (Latin: Doclea) for the Serbian territories roughly encompassing present-day Republic of Montenegro. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events John Lackland, becomes King of England Births Isobel of Huntingdon (d. ... Hilandar (Greek Chilandar) is an Eastern Orthodox monastery on Mount Athos in Greece, traditionally occupied and maintained by the Serbian Orthodox Church. ... Capital Karyes Official languages Koine Greek and Church Slavonic (both liturgical); Modern Greek, Russian, Serbian, Georgian, Bulgarian, Romanian (civil use) Government  -  Head of State2 Dora Bakoyannis  -  Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I Area  -  Total 390 km²  150 sq mi  Population  -   estimate 2,250  Demonyms: Athonite, Hagiorite (English); Αθωνίτης, Αγιορίτης (Greek). ... The Eastern Orthodox Church is a Christian body that views itself as: the historical continuation of the original Christian community established by Jesus Christ and the Twelve Apostles, having maintained unbroken the link between its clergy and the Apostles by means of Apostolic Succession. ... Flag of the Serbian Orthodox Church The MONTENEGRO Orthodox Church (crnogorski: Crnogorska Православна Црква / Crnogorska Pravoslavna Crkva; СПЦ / SPC) or the Church of Montenegro is one of the autocephalous Orthodox Christian churches, ranking sixth after Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, Jerusalem, and Russia. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as that saints day. ... February 26 is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Gloriole. ... Old Church Slavonic (Old Bulgarian or Old Slavic) is the first literary Slavic language, developed from the Slavic dialect of Thessaloniki (Solun) by the 9th century Byzantine missionaries, Saints Cyril and Methodius. ... Serbian (српски језик; srpski jezik) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... Events Battle of Naklo Battle of Hundsfeld Fulk of Jerusalem becomes count of Anjou Alfonso I of Aragon marries Urraca of Castile Crusaders capture Tripoli Anselm of Laon becomes chancellor of Laon Births July 25 - Afonso, first king of Portugal Deaths Alfonso VI of Castile Anselm of Canterbury, philosopher and... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events John Lackland, becomes King of England Births Isobel of Huntingdon (d. ... Serbs (in the Serbian language Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people living chiefly in Serbia and Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... The House of Vojislav was a medieval dynasty that inherited the claims over Duklja of the old ruling House of Saint Vladimir and the Serbian House of Vlastimir dynasty. ... The title Grand Prince (Latin, Magnus Princeps; German, Großfürst, Finnish Suuriruhtinas, Swedish Storfurste, Lithuanian Didysis kunigaikÅ¡tis, Russian Великий князь Velikii kniaz) ranks in honour below Emperor and Tsar but higher than a sovereign Prince (Fürst) or Royal Prince. ... Serbian (српски језик; srpski jezik) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... The Serbs entered their present territory early in the 7th century AD, settling in six distinct tribal delimitations: Rascia/RaÅ¡ka (present-day Western Serbia and Northern Montenegro), Bosnia [1] (indistinct from Rascia until the 12th century), Zachumlie/Zahumlje (western Herzegovina), Trebounia/Travunija (eastern Herzegovina), Pagania/Paganija (middle Dalmatia) and... Raška (Raschka, Rascia, Rassa) was the central and most successful medieval Serbian state (or župa, area ruled by a župan) that unified neighboring Serbian tribes into the main medieval Serbian state in Balkans. ... This is the list of political entities (states and provinces) that were inhabited or ruled by Serbs during the history. ... Zeta was one of the first Montenegrin states in the Middle Ages. ... Duklja according to De administrando imperio. ... The House of Nemanjić, fresco from Visoki Dečani monastery The House of Nemanjić (Serbian: Немањићи; Anglicised: Nemanyid) was a medieval Serbian ruling dynasty. ... The Eastern Orthodox Church is a Christian body that views itself as: the historical continuation of the original Christian community established by Jesus Christ and the Twelve Apostles, having maintained unbroken the link between its clergy and the Apostles by means of Apostolic Succession. ... In traditional Christian iconography, Saints are often depicted as having halos. ...

Contents

Name and title

Various names have been used to refer to Stefan Nemanja, including Stefan I and the Latin Stephanus Nemanja. Sometimes the spelling of his name is anglicised, to become Stephen Nemanya. In the latter part of his life, he became a monk and hence was referred to as Monk Simeon or Monk Symeon. After his death, he was canonised by the Orthodox Church, and became St. Simeon the Myrrh-flowing (Greek: Elaiovrytis; English: He who flows with the Holy Oil). Nemanja's name is a Serbian version of Nehemiah. His son and successor, Stefan the First-Crowned, called him The Gatherer of the Lost Pieces of the Land of his Grandfathers, and also their Rebuilder. Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... Anglicized refers to foreign words, often surnames, that are changed from a foreign language into English. ... The Eastern Orthodox Church is a Christian body that views itself as: the historical continuation of the original Christian community established by Jesus Christ and the Twelve Apostles, having maintained unbroken the link between its clergy and the Apostles by means of Apostolic Succession. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Chrism (Greek word literally meaning an anointing), also called Myrrh (Myron), Holy Oil, or Consecrated Oil, is a consecrated oil used in the Oriental Orthodox and Eastern Orthodox churches, in the Assyrian Church of the East, in the Old-Catholic churches, and in Roman Catholic, Anglican and Lutheran churches in... Serbian (српски језик; srpski jezik) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... Nehemiah or Nechemya (נְחֶמְיָה Comforted of/is the LORD (YHWH), Standard Hebrew Nəḥemya, Tiberian Hebrew Nəḥemyāh, ) is a major figure in the post-exile history of the Jews as recorded in the Bible, and is believed to be the primary author of the Book of Nehemiah. ... Map of Stefans realm Stefan II or Stephen II, known afterwards as Stefan Prvovenčani (lit. ...


Life

Nemanja was born in 1109, in Ribnica, one of the largest continental towns of Doclea/Zeta as the son of the exiled Serb Prince Zavida of Zachlumia, of the House of Vojislavljević. Prince Zavida ruled his demesne in Rascia peacefully, before getting into conflict with his brothers, who forced him to retreat to his personal holdings in Doclea - Ribnica. Although Zavida was an Orthodox Christian, Zeta had an overwhelming Roman Catholic influence, so Zavida, as a politically pliable person, had Nemanja baptised by a Catholic Priest. Stefan, Nemanja's biographer, wrote: And as in that land were Latin heretics; so by God's will (Nemanja) in that temple received Latin Christianity. In Nemanja's honour, a Monastery of Saint Peter and Paul was later raised at the place of his birth. Coordinates Mayor Dr. Miomir MugoÅ¡a (DPS - SDP) Municipality area 1,441 km² Population (2003 census)  - city  - municipality  - density 136,473 169,132 117,4 pop per km² Time zone  - Standard  - Summer (DST) CET (UTC+1) CEST (UTC+2) Founded Before 12th Century as Birziminium Area code +382 81 Car... Duklja according to De administrando imperio. ... Zeta was one of the first Montenegrin states in the Middle Ages. ... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... The term prince, from the Latin root princeps, is used for a member of the highest ranks of the aristocracy or the nobility. ... Zahumlje in the 9th century, according to De administrando imperio Zahumlje, also known as the Land of Hum and Chelm, was a medieval principality located in todays Herzegovina (modern day Bosnia and Herzegovina), and southern Dalmatia (modern day Republic of Croatia). ... The House of Vojislav was a medieval dynasty that inherited the claims over Duklja of the old ruling House of Saint Vladimir and the Serbian House of Vlastimir dynasty. ... Stefan Prvovenčani (lit. ...


Although of noble descent, Nemanja had a humble childhood in an uncomfortable house made of solid stone, with cotton and cloth-made curtains to protect the interior from the sun and the doors and floor covered by many-coloured sheets. At nighttime, the house was lit by candles and lanterns, unlike the ordinary poor housings. Ordinarily, all precious objects were held in a chest to which only the house elder possessed a key. As bedsheets were very rare in those days, even for the wealthiest, Nemanja often slept at the floor, covered only with fur. Later were mattresses, plumes and straw-mattresses used. The main types of food eaten were herbal, bread (unleavened or otherwise), gruel and meat or cheese pies. The most used nutritious product was, naturally, cheese, but pig and goat meat was used substantially as well. Of the pigs' products, the most appreciated was ham and bacon. Much rarer was fish and game on the menu. The standard drinks on Nemanja's table were wine and mead. Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Gruel is a type of preparation consisting of some type of cereal boiled in water or milk. ... This article is about the baked good, for other uses see Pie (disambiguation). ... Cheese is a solid food made from the milk of cows, goats, sheep, and other mammals. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Species See Species and subspecies The goat is a mammal in the genus Capra, which consists of nine species: the Ibex, the West Caucasian Tur, the East Caucasian Tur, the Markhor, and the Wild Goat. ... Kinnikuman character, see Meat Alexandria. ... Ham with cloves Technically, ham is the thigh and butt of any animal that is slaughtered for meat, but the term is usually restricted to a cut of pork, the haunch of a pig or boar. ... Look up bacon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A giant grouper at the Georgia Aquarium Fish are aquatic vertebrates that are typically cold-blooded; covered with scales, and equipped with two sets of paired fins and several unpaired fins. ... Game is any animal hunted for food or not normally domesticated (such as venison). ... A glass of red wine This article is about the alcoholic beverage. ... Mead Mead is a fermented alcoholic beverage made of honey, water, and yeast. ...


Nemanja spent his free time hunting quails, partridges and other birds, which was considered a noble trade. He received the most prestige for capturing falcons. He used to take part in regular falcon captures in the hills near Kotor and their training grounds to help men hunt. Beside hunting, martial games were also an important aspect of Nemanja's life. Nemanja learned to handle swords, as well as to shoot from bows and slings. Nemanja often participated, as was usual for those times, in numerous feasts that always came with dancing, most notably the kolo, and ended up with harsh orgies. The most often played instruments were pipes, fiddles, bagpipes and horns. Fancy-dress balls were frequent subjects of these parties; animal masks were used. When there were no such things, sources of entertainment were most often found at taverns, were women worked, over whom brawls often erupted. Singing was also of great importance to life and songs were used for all occasions, but especially at weddings - epic poems were a necessity of life whose continuity could not be interrupted. “Hunter” redirects here. ... Genera Coturnix Anurophasis Perdicula Ophrysia † See also Pheasant, Partridge, Grouse Quail is a collective name for several genera of mid-sized birds in the pheasant family Phasianidae, or in the family Odontophoridae. ... Genera Perdix Alectoris Lerwa Bambusicola Ptilopachus Rollulus Haematortyx Caloperdix Arborophila Xenoperdix Melanoperdix †See also Pheasant, Quail, Grouse Partridges are birds in the pheasant family, Phasianidae. ... Species About 37; see text. ... Coordinates Mayor Marija Ćatović (DPS - SDP) Municipality area 335 km² Population (2003 census)  - city  - municipality  - density 1,331 22,947 {{{density}}} No. ... Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century Look up Sword in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This image depicts a typical bow, as made by the Huns, lying against a tree. ... The word sling may refer to one of the following: A sling (weapon) is a device used to hurl projectiles A sling is one of any sort of mixed alcoholic drink, also known as a cocktail. ... The Forum for European-Australian Science and Technology Cooperation (FEAST) is a non-government organisation aimed at highlighting and developing collaborative research activities between Europe (European countries and the European Union) and Australia. ... Kolo (Serbian Cyrillic: Коло , Croatian Latin: Кolo) is a collective folk dance, where a group of people (usually several dozen, at the very least three) hold each other by the hands or around the waist dancing, ideally in a circle, hence the name. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The flute is a musical instrument of the woodwind family. ... The term fiddle refers to a violin when used in folk music. ... A bagpipe performer in Amsterdam. ... The horn (popularly known also as the French horn) is a brass instrument decended from the natural horn that consists of tubing wrapped into a coiled form. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Harry Belafonte singing, photograph by C. van Vechten Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice, which is often contrasted with speech. ... The epic is a broadly defined genre of poetry, which retells in a continuous narrative the life and works of a heroic or mythological person or group of persons. ...


After the defeat of Duklja's King Đorđe, and the exodus of his branch of the Vojislavljević family and their supporters to Rascia, Nemanja went with his family to their Rascian family estates. Upon his arrival in Ras, the capital of Rascia, Nemanja was re-baptised into the Eastern Orthodox Church in Ras' Church of Saint Peter and Paul. This mainly political action was conducted due to the dominating influence of the Eastern Church in Rascia. George was a King of Duklja in 1113 - 1118. ... Raška (Raschka, Rascia, Rassa) was the central and most successful medieval Serbian state (or župa, area ruled by a župan) that unified neighboring Serbian tribes into the main medieval Serbian state in Balkans. ... In molecular biology, Ras is the name of a protein, the gene that encodes it, and the family and superfamily of proteins to which it belongs. ... The Eastern Orthodox Church is a Christian body that views itself as: the historical continuation of the original Christian community established by Jesus Christ and the Twelve Apostles, having maintained unbroken the link between its clergy and the Apostles by means of Apostolic Succession. ... It has been suggested that Ecclesia (Church) be merged into this article or section. ... Saint Peter, also known as Shimon Keipha Ben-Yonah/Bar-Yonah, Simon Peter, Cephas and Keipha — original name Shimon or Simeon (Acts 15:14) — was one of the Twelve Apostles whom Jesus chose as his original disciples. ... Paul of Tarsus (b. ...


Prince

Stefan Nemanja as a ruler

When he reached adulthood, Nemanja became Prince (Serbian: Жупан) of Ibar, Toplica, Rasina and Reke, ruling in the name of his grandfather, Grand Prince Uroš I, who was a first a vassal of the Byzantine Emperor, and then later of the King of Hungary. Nemanja married a Serbian noblewoman, Ana, with whom he had two sons: Vukan and Stefan, naming them in accordance with Doclean tradition. The political scene in Rascia switched rapidly. The next Grand Prince, Uroš II Prvoslav, was deposed because of his support of the Hungarian Crown. After interregnums of Princes Desa and Beloš, Desa finally became Nemanja's liege in 1162. Desa refused to accept the Byzantine Emperor's demands and Nemanja supported the dethronement of Desa by the Byzantines in 1163. King Stefan Nemanja File links The following pages link to this file: Stefan Nemanja Categories: GFDL images ... King Stefan Nemanja File links The following pages link to this file: Stefan Nemanja Categories: GFDL images ... The term prince, from the Latin root princeps, is used for a member of the highest ranks of the aristocracy or the nobility. ... Serbian (српски језик; srpski jezik) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... Saint Ibar was an early Irish bishop. ... Toplica District Toplički okrug The Toplica District expands in the southern part of Serbia. ... Rasina District within Central Serbia Rasina District Rasinski okrug The Rasina District expands in the central part of the Republic of Serbia and Montenegro. ... The Pusta reka (Serbian Cyrillic: Пуста река) is a river in southern Serbia, a 71-km long left tributary to the Južna Morava. ... The title Grand Prince (Latin, Magnus Princeps; German, Großfürst, Finnish Suuriruhtinas, Swedish Storfurste, Lithuanian Didysis kunigaikÅ¡tis, Russian Великий князь Velikii kniaz) ranks in honour below Emperor and Tsar but higher than a sovereign Prince (Fürst) or Royal Prince. ... The House of Vojislav was a medieval dynasty that inherited the claims over Duklja of the old ruling House of Saint Vladimir and the Serbian House of Vlastimir dynasty. ... This is a list of Byzantine Emperors. ... This is a list of all rulers of Hungary since Árpád. ... Vukan II Nemanjić (Serbian: Вукан II Немањић), son of Serbian Grand Župan Stefan Nemanja. ... Stefan Prvovenčani (lit. ... Liege or Liège has several meanings: A Liège is a classic sporting car, designed for personal assembly, by Peter Davis in Evesham, UK, and often used in Classic Trials and other long distance motoring events A liege is the person or entity to which one has pledged allegiance. ... Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered around its capital in Constantinople. ...


In 1163, Byzantine Emperor Manuel I Komnenos installed Nemanja's older brother Tihomir as Grand Prince of Rascia in Prince Desa's place, which disappointed Nemanja greatly, as he expected that he would get the throne. Nemanja met the Emperor Manuel in Niš in 1162, who gave him the region of Dubočica to rule over and declared him independent. The Emperor gave him the title of Imperial Dream already in 1161--a high title in the Byzantine hierarchy, as it was important for the Byzantine Emperor to have the borderlands of the Empire ruled by loyal leaders. Nemanja's Serb squadrons fought in the Imperial Army in 1164 in Srem during the Emperor's 1163 War against the Kingdom of Hungary. Nemanja ruled independently, as he built the Monastery of Saint Nicholas in Kuršumlija and the Monastery of the Holy Mother of Christ near Kosanica-Toplica without the approval of his older brother, the Grand Prince of Rascia. His brothers invited him to Ras to a Council, supposedly to resolve the situation, but instead they imprisoned him and had him closed in a nearby cave. According to myth, Saint George himself freed him from the cave. This is a list of Byzantine Emperors. ... Manuel I Komnenos, or Comnenus, (Greek: Μανουήλ Α Κομνηνός, ManouÄ“l I KomnÄ“nos), November 28, 1118 – September 24, 1180), was a Byzantine Emperor of the 12th century who reigned over a crucial turning point in the history of Byzantium and the Mediterranean. ... The title Grand Prince (Latin, Magnus Princeps; German, Großfürst, Finnish Suuriruhtinas, Swedish Storfurste, Lithuanian Didysis kunigaikÅ¡tis, Russian Великий князь Velikii kniaz) ranks in honour below Emperor and Tsar but higher than a sovereign Prince (Fürst) or Royal Prince. ... Raška (Raschka, Rascia, Rassa) was the central and most successful medieval Serbian state (or župa, area ruled by a župan) that unified neighboring Serbian tribes into the main medieval Serbian state in Balkans. ... NiÅ¡ or Nish (Serbian: Ниш / NiÅ¡,  , Latin: Naissus, Greek: Ναισσός Naissos) is a city in Serbia situated at 43. ... Leskovac (Serbian Cyrillic: Лесковац) is a city located in southern Serbia at 43. ... For the region in Europe, see Srem (region) For the Polish city, see Śrem, Poland This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Kingdom of Hungary (Hungarian: Magyar Királyság) is the name of a multiethnic kingdom that existed in Central Europe from 1000 to 1918. ... Saint Nicholas (Greek: , Agios Nikolaos, victory of the people) is the common name for Saint Nicholas, Bishop of Myra (in modern day Antalya province, Turkey), who had a reputation for secret gift-giving, but is now commonly identified with Santa Claus. ... Town panorama from the hill Samokovo Night panorama from old town KurÅ¡umlija (Serbian Cyrillic: Куршумлија; Anglicised: Kurshumlia) is a town and municipality located in the south of Serbia, nearby the rivers Toplica, Kosanica and Banjska, on the southeast of mountain Kopaonik, and northwest of Radan Mountain. ... Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek Θεοτόκος) is a title of Mary, the mother of Jesus. ... The Kosanica (Serbian Cyrillic: Косаница) is the river in southern Serbia. ... Toplica District Toplički okrug The Toplica District expands in the southern part of Serbia. ... In molecular biology, Ras is the name of a protein, the gene that encodes it, and the family and superfamily of proteins to which it belongs. ... Saint-George is a municipality with 695 inhabitants (as of 2003) in the district of Aubonne in the canton of Vaud, Switzerland. ...


Grand Prince

First reign

In 1166-1168, Prince Nemanja rebelled against his older brother, the Grand Prince of Rascia, deposed him and exiled him with his brothers, Miroslav and Stracimir. The Byzantine Emperor raised a mercenary army for Tihomir, made up of Greeks, Francs and Turks, which was defeated by Nemanja at the Battle of Pantino, south of Zvečan. Nemanja assumed the title of Grand Prince of All Rascia, and took the first name Stefan (Greek: Stephanos (crowned)) in honour of his patron saint - Saint Stephen. Tihomir drowned himself in the river of Sitnica. Stefan Nemanja built the church of Đurđevi Stupovi (English: Pillars of St. George) in Ras in 1171. According to the legend, this was to thank Saint George for freeing him from the cave in which he was imprisoned by his brothers. The same year, Nemanja had his third son - Rastko. Nemanja attributed his rise to power to none other than Saint George. A mercenary, is a person who takes part in an armed conflict and is motivated to take part in the hostilities essentially by the desire for private gain and, in fact, is promised, by or on behalf of a Party to the conflict, material compensation substantially in excess of that... Zvečan/Звечан (Serbian) or Zveçan/Zveçani (Albanian) is a town and municipality in Kosovo (under UN administration, formally part of Serbia). ... The title Grand Prince (Latin, Magnus Princeps; German, Großfürst, Finnish Suuriruhtinas, Swedish Storfurste, Lithuanian Didysis kunigaikÅ¡tis, Russian Великий князь Velikii kniaz) ranks in honour below Emperor and Tsar but higher than a sovereign Prince (Fürst) or Royal Prince. ... Raška (Raschka, Rascia, Rassa) was the central and most successful medieval Serbian state (or župa, area ruled by a župan) that unified neighboring Serbian tribes into the main medieval Serbian state in Balkans. ... Stephanos, crowned with wreath, a Greek name, was adopted by all the Nemanjići rulers of Serbia. ... alex (Cyrillic: Слава) is the Orthodox Christian custom of celebrating a family patron saint. ... St. ... The Sitnica (Albanian: Sitnicë; Serbian Cyrillic: Ситница), is a 90 km long river in Kosovo and Metohija province of Serbia (Serbia and Montenegro). ... Djurdjevi Stupovi, Nemanjic dynasty ĐurÄ‘evi Stupovi is a 12th-century Eastern Orthodox church located in the vicinity of todays city of Novi Pazar, in the Sandžak region of Serbia. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... In molecular biology, Ras is the name of a protein, the gene that encodes it, and the family and superfamily of proteins to which it belongs. ... Saint-George is a municipality with 695 inhabitants (as of 2003) in the district of Aubonne in the canton of Vaud, Switzerland. ... Saint Sava Saint Sava (1175 or 1176 - January 12, 1235 or 1236), originally the prince Rastko Nemanjić (son of the Serbian ruler and founder of the Serbian medieval state Stefan Nemanja and brother of Stefan Prvovenčani, first Serbian king), is the first Serb archbishop (1219-1233), the most important...


In 1171, Grand Prince Stefan Nemanja sided with the Venetian Republic in a dispute with the Byzantine Empire, with the aim of gaining full independence from Byzantine rule. The Venetians incited the Slavs of the eastern Adriatic littoral to rebel against Byzantine rule and Nemanja wished to join them, launching an offensive towards the coastal city of Kotor. A German fleet was formed to replace the Venetian navy, and it advanced eastwards in the September of 1171, capturing Ragusa. Nemanja was ready to make a full-scale rebellion. Nemanja also made an alliance with the Kingdom of Hungary, and, though the Hungarians, with the Duchy of Austria. Grand Prince Nemanja dispatched a force to the Morava valley in 1172, to jeopardise communications and the traffic between Niš and Belgrade and to instigate a rebellion amongst the local Serbs at Ravno. As a result, the Serb citizens of Ravno refused to allow passage to the King of Saxony Heinrich the Lion , a Byzantine ally. The Serbs organised a surprise attack on the German camp; they then attacked their own neighbours and disturbed the peace in the local region. In 1172, Nemanja joined the anti-Byzantine coalition with the Kingdom of Hungary, the Venetian Republic and the Holy Roman Empire. The alliance, however, soon collapsed as Venice faced a mutiny and an outbreak of plague that devastated her navy, while the King of Hungary died and a new, pro-Byzantine, King ascended the throne, so the Rascian Grand Prince was left alone. The same year the Byzantine Emperor Manuel I Komnenos launched an expedition against Rascia and defeated Nemanja's forces, so the Grand Prince met him in Niš to surrender. He came to the Emperor with his head and feet bare, bowed before him and gave him his own personal sword as a mark of surrender. Emperor Manuel had him imprisoned and brought him to the Imperial Capital of Constantinople as a personal slave. In the Byzantine Empire's capital, Nemanja was tutored by and befriended Manuel. Nemanja vowed to never again attack Manuel, while the Emperor in return recognized Stefan Nemanja and his bloodline as the rightful Grand Princes of the Rascian lands. William, archbishop of Tyre, who visited Constantinople in 1179, described the "rebellious Serbs" as "an uneducated people, lacking discipline, living in mountains and forests, unskilled in agriculture. They are rich in herds and flocks and unusually well supplied with milk, cheese, butter, meat, honey and wax".[1] Venetia is a name used mostly in a historical context for the area of north-eastern Italy formerly under the control of the Republic of Venice and corresponding approximately to the present-day Italian administrative regions of the Veneto and Friuli-Venezia Giulia. ... It has been suggested that Eastern Roman Empire be merged into this article or section. ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... The Adriatic Sea is an arm of the Mediterranean Sea separating the Apennine peninsula (Italy) from the Balkan peninsula, and the system of the Apennine Mountains from that of the Dinaric Alps and adjacent ranges. ... Coordinates Mayor Marija Ćatović (DPS - SDP) Municipality area 335 km² Population (2003 census)  - city  - municipality  - density 1,331 22,947 {{{density}}} No. ... County Dubrovnik–Neretva Area 143. ... The Kingdom of Hungary (Hungarian: Magyar Királyság) is the name of a multiethnic kingdom that existed in Central Europe from 1000 to 1918. ... Originally from Bamberg in Franconia, now northern Bavaria, the Babenbergs or Babenberger ruled Austria as counts of the march and dukes from 976 - 1248, before the rise of the house of Habsburg. ... Morava may refer to: Moravia, eastern part of the territory of the Czech Republic; Morava River (Central Europe), a river in the Czech Republic, Austria and Slovakia; Great Moravia, early-medieval Empire in Central Europe; Great Morava (Velika Morava), a river in central Serbia; South Morava (Južna Morava), a... NiÅ¡ or Nish (Serbian: Ниш / NiÅ¡,  , Latin: Naissus, Greek: Ναισσός Naissos) is a city in Serbia situated at 43. ... Location of Belgrade within Serbia Coordinates: Country Serbia District City of Belgrade Municipalities 17 Government  - Mayor Nenad Bogdanović (DS) (since 2004)  - Ruling parties DS/DSS/G17+ Area  - City 3,222. ... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Ćuprija (Serbian Cyrillic: Ћуприја) is a town and municipality in Serbia, situated at 43. ... List of Dukes, Electors, and Kings of Saxony, 880-1918 The original Duchy of Saxony was in Northern Germany, roughly corresponding to the modern German state of Lower Saxony and Westphalia. ... Henry the Lion (face of statue on his tomb in Brunswick Cathedral) Coronation of Henry the Lion and Matilda of England (1188) Henry the Lion, in German, Heinrich der Löwe) (1129 – August 6, 1195; was a member of the Welf dynasty and Duke of Saxony, as Henry III, since... The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... The Kingdom of Hungary (Hungarian: Magyar Királyság) is the name of a multiethnic kingdom that existed in Central Europe from 1000 to 1918. ... The Republic of Venice was a city-state in Venetia in Northeastern Italy, based around the city of Venice. ... The extent of the Holy Roman Empire in c. ... The bubonic plague or bubonic fever is the best-known variant of the deadly infectious disease caused by the enterobacteria Yersinia pestis. ... This is a list of all rulers of Hungary since Árpád. ... This is a list of Byzantine Emperors. ... Manuel I Komnenos, or Comnenus, (Greek: Μανουήλ Α Κομνηνός, ManouÄ“l I KomnÄ“nos), November 28, 1118 – September 24, 1180), was a Byzantine Emperor of the 12th century who reigned over a crucial turning point in the history of Byzantium and the Mediterranean. ... Raška (Raschka, Rascia, Rassa) was the central and most successful medieval Serbian state (or župa, area ruled by a župan) that unified neighboring Serbian tribes into the main medieval Serbian state in Balkans. ... NiÅ¡ or Nish (Serbian: Ниш / NiÅ¡,  , Latin: Naissus, Greek: Ναισσός Naissos) is a city in Serbia situated at 43. ... Map of Constantinople. ... It has been suggested that Eastern Roman Empire be merged into this article or section. ... William of Tyre (c. ...


Second reign

The map of Grand Prince Stefan Nemanja's unified Serb lands
The map of Grand Prince Stefan Nemanja's unified Serb lands

Nemanja used the following decade to deal with the Bogomil heresy that was present in his realm, as well as strengthening Eastern Orthodox Christianity. He declared the Bogomils heretics and punished them because of their religious beliefs, burning their books. He had their lands confiscated, burned some at the stake, and exiled others. By the end of his reign, Duke Stefan Nemanja had completely rooted out the Bogomils. Stefan Nemanja forced his brothers, Stracimir of West Moravia and Miroslav of Zachlumia and Lim to accept his supreme rule in return for his forgiveness; he also made Tihomir's son Stefan Prvoslav give up his claim to the throne. The Duke's army was involved only in a single conflict at the request of his Byzantine liege; in Asia Minor. In the meantime, Prince Stracimir built the Monastery of the Mother of Christ in his capital at Moravian Grac (today Čačak), while Great Prince Miroslav raised the Monastery of Saint Peter on Lim. Miroslav also married the sister of Kulin Ban of Bosnia, creating an important bloodline link between the ruling dynasties of Serbia and Bosnia. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (607x848, 60 KB) Summary From the Serb Land of Montenegro website - full permission granted through an envoy of the Rastko Organization. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (607x848, 60 KB) Summary From the Serb Land of Montenegro website - full permission granted through an envoy of the Rastko Organization. ... Bogomils was the name of a defunct Gnostic social-religious movement and doctrine which originated in Macedonia in X century at the time of Peter I of Bulgaria (927-969) as a reaction of the state and clerical oppression. ... The Eastern Orthodox Church is a Christian body that views itself as: the historical continuation of the original Christian community established by Jesus Christ and the Twelve Apostles, having maintained unbroken the link between its clergy and the Apostles by means of Apostolic Succession. ... Heresy, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, is a theological or religious opinion or doctrine maintained in opposition, or held to be contrary, to the ‘catholic’ or orthodox doctrine of the Christian Church, or, by extension, to that of any church, creed, or religious system, considered as orthodox. ... The Velika Morava is a river in Serbia that flows into the Danube near Smederevo. ... Zahumlje in the 9th century, according to De administrando imperio Zahumlje, also known as the Land of Hum and Chelm, was a medieval principality located in todays Herzegovina (modern day Bosnia and Herzegovina), and southern Dalmatia (modern day Republic of Croatia). ... The Lim bay and valley is a peculiar geographic feature found near Rovinj and Vrsar on the western coast of Istria, Croatia, south of Poreč. The name comes from the Latin limes for limit, referring to the landforms position at the border of two Roman provinces (Dalmatia and Italia). ... Liege or Liège has several meanings: A Liège is a classic sporting car, designed for personal assembly, by Peter Davis in Evesham, UK, and often used in Classic Trials and other long distance motoring events A liege is the person or entity to which one has pledged allegiance. ... Anatolia (Greek: ανατολη anatole, rising of the sun or East; compare Orient and Levant, by popular etymology Turkish Anadolu to ana mother and dolu filled), also called by the Latin name of Asia Minor, is a region of Southwest Asia which corresponds today to... Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek Θεοτόκος) is a title of Mary, the mother of Jesus. ... ÄŒačak (Serbian Cyrillic: Чачак) is a city located 140 km south from Belgrade in Serbia at 43°50 North, 20°20 East. ... ÄŒačak (Serbian Cyrillic: Чачак) is a city located 140 km south from Belgrade in Serbia at 43°50 North, 20°20 East. ... Saint Peter, also known as Shimon Keipha Ben-Yonah/Bar-Yonah, Simon Peter, Cephas and Keipha — original name Shimon or Simeon (Acts 15:14) — was one of the Twelve Apostles whom Jesus chose as his original disciples. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Approximate borders between Bosnia (marked light) and Herzegovina (marked dark) Historically and geographically, the region known as Bosnia (natively Bosna/Босна) comprises the northern part of the present-day country of Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian language 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 8th century   -  First unified state c. ... Approximate borders between Bosnia (marked light) and Herzegovina (marked dark) Historically and geographically, the region known as Bosnia (natively Bosna/Босна) comprises the northern part of the present-day country of Bosnia and Herzegovina. ...


Following the death of Emperor Manuel I Komnenos in 1180, Stefan Nemanja no longer considered that he owed any allegiance to the Byzantines since he viewed his vows as being to the Emperor, not the Empire, so he took advantage of the Empire's weakened state. Prince Miroslav put the Narentine Kačić family that orchestrated the murder of the Bishop of Split Rajneri under his protectorate. Additionally, he kept the Bishopric's money for himself. He was altogether reluctant on allowing the Catholicism to spread in his demesne as he did not allow the organization and recruitment of new members in the Cathedrals in his lands. Because of this, Miroslav was excommunicated by the Papacy in 1181. As a gesture, the Bishop of Ston abandoned his seat and since then the Ston Bishopric remained vacant. In 1183, Duke Stefan Nemanja formed alliances with King Bela III of Hungary and invaded Byzantine soil. The main reason was the new usurper to the Imperial throne, Andronicus Comnenus, that was not recognized; as well as the slaughter of Constantinople's Latins. Duke Nemanja was also assisted by his relative, Kulin Ban of Bosnia. The Byzantine forces in the eastern Serb borderlands were led by Alexios Brannes and Andronicus Lapardas . Inner fights occurred, as Brannes supported the new Emperor and Lapardas, opposing, deserted with his troops. Without difficulties the Hungaro-Serbian military pushed the Greeks out of the Valley of Morava advanced all the way to Sophia, raiding Belgrade, Braničevo, Ravno, Niš and Sophia itself. But the Hungarians soon withdrew from the war, leaving the Duke's forces raiding across western Bulgaria. Manuel I Komnenos, or Comnenus, (Greek: Μανουήλ Α Κομνηνός, ManouÄ“l I KomnÄ“nos), November 28, 1118 – September 24, 1180), was a Byzantine Emperor of the 12th century who reigned over a crucial turning point in the history of Byzantium and the Mediterranean. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about a title or office in religious bodies. ... For other uses, see Split (disambiguation). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      As a Christian ecclesiastical... The Pope is the Catholic Bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches. ... County Dubrovnik–Neretva Population 2,605 Mayor Vedran Antunica Ston on the map of Croatia Ston municipality within Dubrovnik-Neretva county Ston is a small town in the Dubrovnik-Neretva county of Croatia, located at the south of isthmus of the PeljeÅ¡ac (Sabioncello) peninsula. ... Map of Constantinople. ... The Latins were an ancient Italic people who migrated to central Italy, (Latium Vetus - Old Latium), in the 2nd millennium B.C., maybe from the Adriatic East Coast and Balcanic Area, perhaps from pressures by Illyrian peoples. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Approximate borders between Bosnia (marked light) and Herzegovina (marked dark) Historically and geographically, the region known as Bosnia (natively Bosna/Босна) comprises the northern part of the present-day country of Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Morava may refer to: Moravia, eastern part of the territory of the Czech Republic; Morava River (Central Europe), a river in the Czech Republic, Austria and Slovakia; Great Moravia, early-medieval Empire in Central Europe; Great Morava (Velika Morava), a river in central Serbia; South Morava (Južna Morava), a... Look up Sophia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Location of Belgrade within Serbia Coordinates: Country Serbia District City of Belgrade Municipalities 17 Government  - Mayor Nenad Bogdanović (DS) (since 2004)  - Ruling parties DS/DSS/G17+ Area  - City 3,222. ... Braničevo District within Central Serbia The Branicevo District (Braničevski okrug, Браничевски округ) expands in the north-east of Serbia. ... Municipality of Bosnia and Herzegovina General Information Entity {{{entity}}} Land area 447km² Population (1991 census) 527 Population density Coordinates Area code +387 36 Mayor Andrija Å imunović (HDZ) Website Ravno is a town and the seat of its municipality in Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... NiÅ¡ or Nish (Serbian: Ниш / NiÅ¡,  , Latin: Naissus, Greek: Ναισσός Naissos) is a city in Serbia situated at 43. ...


In 1184, the Great Prince of Zahumlje Miroslav went to retake the islands of Korčula and Vis. On 18 August 1184 Miroslav's fleet was devastated by the Ragusian navy at Poljice near Koločep, and signed peace with the Dubrovnik Republic. He channelled the order to his brother, Prince Stracimir. In 1185, Prince Stracimir raided Korčula and Vis with the Doclean fleet. He joined the war against the Republic of Ragusa, but was forced to withdraw because Miroslav already made peace by the time Stracimir marshaled his forces. The same year the Byzantines launched a counter-attack on Serbia, but a Bulgarian uprising was raised in the Danubian areas which made the offensive get called-off, so Duke Stefan Nemanja utilized the situation and conquered the Timok Frontier with Niš and sacked Svrljig, Ravno and Koželj. While Stefan Nemanja held Niš, it served as his capital and base of operations. County Dubrovnik–Neretva Area 279 km² (entire island) Location Mayor Mirko Duhović (SDP) Population 3,232 (town); 16,138 (island) Korčula (Italian Curzola, Latin Corcyra Nigra, Greek Korkyra Melaina, Old-Slavic: Krkar) is an island in the Adriatic Sea, in the Dubrovnik-Neretva county of Croatia. ... Vis can refer to: Vis, a type of Polish handgun, after the Polish word for power in Latin Vis, an island in the Adriatic Vis, town and municipality on the aforementioned island See also: VIS This is a disambiguation page — a list of articles associated with the same title. ... August 18 is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events Abbeville receives its commercial charter. ... The Republic of Dubrovnik, also known as the Republic of Ragusa, was a maritime city-state that was based in the city of Dubrovnik from the 14th century until 1808. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Borders of the Republic of Ragusa, 1426-1808 Capital Ragusa Language(s) Latin, Italian since 1492 Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Duke  - 1808 Auguste Marmont Historical era Renaissance  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Invasion by France January 31, 1808  - Annexed October 14, 1808 Area  - 1808? 1,500 km2 579... A map of the region of Timok Timok (Cyrillic: Тимок) is a river in Serbia. ... NiÅ¡ or Nish (Serbian: Ниш / NiÅ¡,  , Latin: Naissus, Greek: Ναισσός Naissos) is a city in Serbia situated at 43. ... Svrljig is a small town on the river SvrljiÅ¡ki Timok, 30 km east from NiÅ¡, the biggest city in south Serbia. ...


In 1186, Duke Stefan Nemanja launched a campaign to invade and annex his homeland and heartland of the Serbian Civilization which he long prepared - Doclea. Already in 1185, he annexed and victouriously entered the city of Kotor - sparing it from any destruction - where he built himself a Chateu. Duklja, as a coastal land, had a dominant Catholic Christian character spreading from the City of Bar with a Roman Catholic Archbishopric and also from Kotor and Ragusa. Rascia stood as an ethnicly purer, patriarchal, more conservative, with the national language and heritage staying at large and with an insignificant number of Romanized nomads, over Duklja--significantly populated by the autochthonous Romanized populace and Arbanasses next to Serbs and having almost all inscriptions written in Latin. This ethnic mixture greatly affected its political life. Doclea was no longer in its high ages of glory. The time was ripe for a final decision between the two conflicting elements over the Serbian people - the West or East. When Stefan's forces reached Bar on their road, they besieged it. As a ransom, the Duke demanded that the City pays him 800 perpers. The City was defended by its patriotic Archbishop, Serbian Primate Gregory (Grgur). He has been writing his Chronicle since 1171, in which he presented a calling the return of former Doclean power and celebrated the fame and longevity of Dioclea's Latin Cities. Archbishop Grgur requested reinforcements from Nemanja's nephew, Doclea's ruling Prince Mihailo, but Mihailo was being attacked by Nemanja's brothers Stracimir and Miroslav. In 1186 Stefan Nemanja appointed his oldest son Vukan of Nemanja as the ruler of the province of Zeta (Kingdom of Dioclea and Dalmatia), and made his second son, Stefan II of Nemanja, the successor to the Grand Princely throne. With the takeover of the Doclean territories, its traditions became the basis of the Serbian culture of the Nemanjić. To confirm his grip over Doclea, Duke Nemanja harshly persecuted the local Greek nobility, charging them for molesting and torturing his people for centuries, and ultimately cursing the Greeks and exterminating them in Duklja through exiles. Duklja (Latin: Doclea or Dioclea, after the town of Dioclea) was a vassal state of Byzantium until it won its independence in 1042, ruled by the Vojislavljevic Dynasty, located in Zeta, or modern Montenegro and northern Albania including the city of Shkodër. ... Coordinates Mayor Marija Ćatović (DPS - SDP) Municipality area 335 km² Population (2003 census)  - city  - municipality  - density 1,331 22,947 {{{density}}} No. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Roman Catholic Church... Coordinates Mayor Žarko Pavićević (DPS - SDP) Municipality area 598 km² Population (2003 census)  - city  - municipality  - density 13,719 40,037 67. ... Coordinates Mayor Marija Ćatović (DPS - SDP) Municipality area 335 km² Population (2003 census)  - city  - municipality  - density 1,331 22,947 {{{density}}} No. ... County Dubrovnik–Neretva Area 143. ... Raška (Raschka, Rascia, Rassa) was the central and most successful medieval Serbian state (or župa, area ruled by a župan) that unified neighboring Serbian tribes into the main medieval Serbian state in Balkans. ... The Latins were an ancient Italic people who migrated to central Italy, (Latium Vetus - Old Latium), in the 2nd millennium B.C., maybe from the Adriatic East Coast and Balcanic Area, perhaps from pressures by Illyrian peoples. ... Languages Albanian Religions mostly Sunni Muslims, but also large amounts of Bektashi Muslims, Orthodox Christians, Catholic Christians, other. ... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... Coordinates Mayor Žarko Pavićević (DPS - SDP) Municipality area 598 km² Population (2003 census)  - city  - municipality  - density 13,719 40,037 67. ... 100 perpers coin, minted in 1910 Perper was currency used in Serbia under Tsar Dusan and in Montenegro at the beginning of 20th century. ... Families 15, See classification A primate is any member of the biological order Primates, the group that contains all the species commonly related to the lemurs, monkeys, and apes, with the latter category including humans. ... The Chronicle of the Priest of Duklja (Presbyter Diocleas), also known as Slavonic Kingdom (Sclavorum Regnum), is a medieval chronicle originally written by a Catholic priest from Dioclea (modern Bar, Montenegro) around 1172-1196. ... Vukan II Nemanjić (Serbian: Вукан II Немањић), son of Serbian Grand Župan Stefan Nemanja. ... Zeta was one of the first Montenegrin states in the Middle Ages. ... Duklja according to De administrando imperio. ... Stefan Prvovenčani (lit. ... Serbian culture refers to the culture of Serbia as well as the culture of Serbs in other parts of the former Yugoslavia and elsewhere in the world. ... Nemanjić dynasty insignia Nemanjić (Serbian Немањић; in English formerly Nemanjid) was a medieval Serbian ruling dynasty. ...


In 1187, Duke Stefan Nemanja attempted one final attack against the Republic of Dubrovnik with his brothers. Long street fights followed within the City. Norman reinforcements finally arrived and succeeded in pushing the Serbian troops out of some sectors of the City. On 27 September 1187, a peace treaty was negotiated in Dubrovnik. The Serbian side was represented by Prince Nevdal and Družina Vidošević, while Dubrovnik's Prince Krvaš and Archbishop Tribun together with a Norman emissary from the Kingdom of Sicily represented the Ragusian side. It was arranged that ever since there would be eternal peace between Serbia and Dubrovnik, that Dubrovnik will accept the nominal rule of the Serb Kings and that the House of Nemanjić would forever maintain the statehood of the Republic. The Ragusian traders received free passage rights across the Serbian Lands and were entitled to use Nemanja's fields and forests that surrounded the city. In turn, the Republic's border would be always open to the Zachlumians and its Government had to pay taxes to the Serbian Lords. Norman conquests in red. ... September 27 is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events May 1 - Battle of Cresson - Saladin defeats the crusaders July 4 - Saladin defeats Guy of Lusignan, King of Jerusalem, at the Battle of Hattin. ... The House of Nemanjić, fresco from Visoki Dečani monastery The House of Nemanjić (Serbian: Немањићи; Anglicised: Nemanyid) was a medieval Serbian ruling dynasty. ... Zahumlje in the 9th century, according to De administrando imperio Zahumlje, also known as the Land of Hum and Chelm, was a medieval South Slavic principality located in todays Herzegovina (modern day Bosnia and Herzegovina), and southern Dalmatia (modern day Republic of Croatia). ...


In 1188, Duke Stefan Nemanja sent an envoy to Nirnberg, Friedrich Barbarossa's Capital of the Holy Roman Empire inviting him to stay during while Crusading to the Holy Land, Count Berthold Andex of Istria's Krain who was at the same time Duke of Croatia and Slavonia. The Holy Roman Emperor disembarked on the Third Crusade and arrived on 27 July 1189 to Niš with 100,000 Crusaders, where Stefan Nemanja and Stracimir accepted and guested Emperor Friedrich. A marriage was arranged between Barthold Andex's daughter and Miroslav's son Toljen to strengthen Serbian-German relations. Nemanja's proposals to Barbarossa that he should abandon the Holy War and strike at the Byzantines with him met little approval. Friedrich needed Byzantine help to move his military might to Asia. Friedrich's plans changed when a Byzantine force stopped him from reaching his next stop - Sophia. The Greeks also started raiding his Army, which infuriated the Emperor so much that he planned an offensive to Constantinople itself. Stefan Nemanja offered 20,000 men to support the Emperor's military campaign, while the Bulgarians offered more than twice that amount. Despite being in his early 70s, Stefan Nemanja followed the Crusaders with his Army to the border at Trojan's Gate, when he moved to new conquests and dispatched envoys to Adrianopolis to officialize the Alliance with Emperor Friedrich. While his envoys were negotiating with Berthold Andex, who was negoatiating in Friedrich's place, Nemanja took Pernik, Zemen, Velbužd, Žitomisk, Stob, Prizren and rest of Kosovo and Metohija and even Skopje. The alliance with the Crusaders was not forged, because Friedrich signed peace with the Byzantines on 14 February 1190 in Adrianopolis. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This article is about the medieval crusades. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Holy Land (Biblical). ... Istria (Croatian and Slovenian: Istra, Venetian and Italian: Istria) is the largest peninsula in the Adriatic Sea. ... Krain is either a township in Minnesota. ... Coat of arms Slavonia (Croatian: Slavonija) is a geographical and historical region in eastern Croatia. ... The Holy Roman Emperor was, with some variation, the ruler of the Holy Roman Empire, the predecessor of modern Germany, during its existence from the 10th century until its collapse in 1806. ... The Third Crusade (1189–1192), also known as the Kings Crusade, was an attempt by European leaders to reconquer the Holy Land from Saladin. ... July 27 is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 21 - Philip II of France and Richard I of England begin to assemble troops to wage the Third Crusade September 3- Richard I of England is crowned as king of England. ... NiÅ¡ or Nish (Serbian: Ниш / NiÅ¡,  , Latin: Naissus, Greek: Ναισσός Naissos) is a city in Serbia situated at 43. ... Selimiye Mosque, built by Sinan in 1575 Edirne is a city in Thrace, the westernmost part of Turkey, close to the borders with Greece and Bulgaria. ... Overview of the city Pernik (Bulgarian: ) is a city in western Bulgaria with a population of 91,883 as of 2006. ... After Serbian expansion under the rule of King Milutin, Bulgarian Emperor Michael III Shishman sought to take over Macedonia and destroy the power of Serbian Kingdom. ... Verity Stob is a pseudonym of a programmer based in the UK who also contributes articles to journals: she first wrote for . ... For uses of the name Kosova, see Kosova (disambiguation). ... Metohija (Serbian: Метохија) also spelled Metohia, is a large western basin in Kosovo. ... The church of St. ... February 14 is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 16 - Massacre and mass-suicide of the Jews of York, England prompted by Crusaders and Richard Malebys kill 150-500 Jews in Cliffords Tower June 10 - Third Crusade: Frederick I Barbarossa drowned in the Saleph River while leading an army to Jerusalem. ...

The Seal of Stefan Nemanja from the late 12th century
The Seal of Stefan Nemanja from the late 12th century

In 1189, Duklja's Prince Mihailo died, leaving the future rulers of his demesne undisputable. Realizing that their time has passed, his wife Desislava went with the remaining still loyal Doclean nobility in her two ships seeking shelter in the Republic of Dubrovnik. She was accompanied by Grgur who was just exiled from the Bar Archbishopric by Nemanja's order. She would then gift the two ships to the Republic and retire to Omiš. Grgur left to Split seeking the local Archbishop for assistance, but found no one seated there. He would continue to travel and finish his famous Chronicle of the Priest of Duklja upon his death in 1196. Stefan Nemanja introduced Orthodox Christianity in Zeta, putting a halt to the dominating Latin culture and language and Catholic religion as masses of the population were converting to Eastern Orthodoxy and the Latin books were no longer being written. Thankful to Nemanja's rapid actions, Bogumilism didn't breach to Zeta and lastly, Nemanja exiled the Greeks from this new land. In 1189, Prince Miroslav of Zahumlje created the omnibus of the Medieval Slavic litteratrue - the famous Miroslav's Gospel. The work was so inspiring that Ban Kulin of Bosnia had his edict to the Dubrovnik Republic written by the same scribes. Around this time, Nemanja's brother Stracimir died, so Stefan acquired his demesne - West Moravia. Image File history File links Nemanja_pecat. ... Image File history File links Nemanja_pecat. ... OmiÅ¡ on the map of Croatia OmiÅ¡ (Population: 15,800 ; Area: 266 km2 (103 mi2) - the City and port in Dalmatia, Croatia (Dalmacija, Hrvatska) located approximately 25 km (16 miles) south-east of the Croatias second largest City of Split. ... The Chronicle of the Priest of Duklja (Presbyter Diocleas), also known as Slavonic Kingdom (Sclavorum Regnum), is a medieval chronicle originally written by a Catholic priest from Dioclea (modern Bar, Montenegro) around 1172-1196. ... The Eastern Orthodox Church is a Christian body that views itself as: the historical continuation of the original Christian community established by Jesus Christ and the Twelve Apostles, having maintained unbroken the link between its clergy and the Apostles by means of Apostolic Succession. ... Zeta was one of the first Montenegrin states in the Middle Ages. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... Bogomilism is the Gnostic dualistic sect, the synthesis of Armenian Paulicianism and the local Slavonic Church reform movement in Bulgaria and Bosnia-Herzegovina between 950 and 1396 and in the Byzantine Empire between 1018 and 1186. ... Ban Kulin (1163-1204) was a powerful Bosnian Ban who ruled from 1180 to 1204 first as a vassal of the Byzantine Empire and then of the Kingdom of Hungary. ... Approximate borders between Bosnia (marked light) and Herzegovina (marked dark) Historically and geographically, the region known as Bosnia (natively Bosna/Босна) comprises the northern part of the present-day country of Bosnia and Herzegovina. ...


In 1190, the new Byzantine Emperor Isaac II Angelo prepared a massive and experienced Army to strike against Nemanja. The same year, Stefan Nemanja finished his magnificent Temple of the Immaculate Holy Virgin the Benefactor out of the White Marble as his dynasty's endowment. It became the Temple of the House of Nemanjić. Also in 1190 Prince Miroslav died of old age, so Stefan Nemanja implaced his son Rastko as the new Prince of Zahumlje in Ston, who enduced the religious spirit of the populace greatly. The Studenica Monastery is the largest and richest Serbian Orthodox monastery. ... Venus de Milo, front. ... The House of Nemanjić, fresco from Visoki Dečani monastery The House of Nemanjić (Serbian: Немањићи; Anglicised: Nemanyid) was a medieval Serbian ruling dynasty. ... Saint Sava Saint Sava (1175 or 1176 - January 12, 1235 or 1236), originally the prince Rastko Nemanjić (son of the Serbian ruler and founder of the Serbian medieval state Stefan Nemanja and brother of Stefan Prvovenčani, first Serbian king), is the first Serb archbishop (1219-1233), the most important...


In Fall, 1191, this well-prepared Byzantine Army, led by the Emperor himself, clashed with Nemanja and his forces in South Moravia. Stefan Nemanja suffered a terrifying defeat, which made him retreat to the mountains. The Byzantines raided all lands around the bank of the river and even burned down Stefan's Court in Kuršumlija. Nemanja had the tactical advantage, so Emperor Isaac decided to negotiate a final peace treaty. Stefan Nemanja had to give up a large part of his conquests, east of the river of Morava and recognize the Byzantine Emperor's supreme rule, while the Emperor recognized him as the rightful Grand Prince. To signify the final peace, Nemanja's son Stefan married the Byzantine Princess Eudocia and received the title of Sebastokrator - among the highest Byzantine Courtier titles, only given to the Emperor's family members. The Emperor only wanted to separate the Serbs from the Bulgarians, so he kept Niš and Ravno; while the Greek Lands of Zeta, Kosovo with Lipljan, Metohija to Prizren and the Arbanass Pilot were kept by Stefan Nemanja. Južna Morava or South Morava (Serbian: Јужна Морава) is a river in Serbia which represents the shorter headwater of Velika Morava. ... Town panorama from the hill Samokovo Night panorama from old town KurÅ¡umlija (Serbian Cyrillic: Куршумлија; Anglicised: Kurshumlia) is a town and municipality located in the south of Serbia, nearby the rivers Toplica, Kosanica and Banjska, on the southeast of mountain Kopaonik, and northwest of Radan Mountain. ... Stefan Prvovenčani (lit. ... Zeta was one of the first Montenegrin states in the Middle Ages. ... For uses of the name Kosova, see Kosova (disambiguation). ... Lipljan (Albanian: Lipjan, Serbian: Lipljan or Липљан) is a city in central Kosovo, a Serbian province under UN administration. ... Metohija (Serbian: Метохија) also spelled Metohia, is a large western basin in Kosovo. ... View of Prizren. ... Languages Albanian Religions mostly Sunni Muslims, but also large amounts of Bektashi Muslims, Orthodox Christians, Catholic Christians, other. ... For other uses, see Aviator (disambiguation). ...


In 1192, Rastko flees his Monastery in Ston to Mount Athos in the Byzantine Empire where he accepted Monastic vows and asserted the name Sava. This greatly saddenned the Grand Prince. In Rastko's place, Miroslav's son Toljen became Prince of Zahumlje and founded a local dynasty. Rascia was in danger once more as Nemanja's former ally, King Bela Arpad invaded his realm from the north. The Grand Prince's quick military activities pushed the Hungarians across the border northwards in 1193. Capital Karyes Official languages Koine Greek and Church Slavonic (both liturgical); Modern Greek, Russian, Serbian, Georgian, Bulgarian, Romanian (civil use) Government  -  Head of State2 Dora Bakoyannis  -  Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I Area  -  Total 390 km²  150 sq mi  Population  -   estimate 2,250  Demonyms: Athonite, Hagiorite (English); Αθωνίτης, Αγιορίτης (Greek). ... Monasticism (from Greek: monachos—a solitary person) is the religious practice of renouncing all worldly pursuits in order to fully devote ones life to spiritual work. ...


In 1195, Stefan Nemanja's brother-in-law Alexius III inherited the Eastern Roman Imperial throne. Nemanja, tired of ruling, expanded the power and lands of his son Vukan. He put Zeta with Trebinje, Hvosno and his capital of Toplica under Vukan's absolute rule. Vukan II Nemanjić (Serbian: Вукан II Немањић), son of Serbian Grand Župan Stefan Nemanja. ... Zeta was one of the first Montenegrin states in the Middle Ages. ... Trebinje (Cyrillic: Требиње) is the southern-most municipality and town in Republika Srpska, Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Metohija (Serbian: Метохија) also spelled Metohia, is a large western basin in Kosovo. ... Toplica District Toplički okrug The Toplica District expands in the southern part of Serbia. ...


Abdication & Later Life

Scanned copy of Monk Simeon's edict to Hilandar from 1198-1199, from the from the Dubrovnik Archive
Scanned copy of Monk Simeon's edict to Hilandar from 1198-1199, from the from the Dubrovnik Archive

On March 25, 1196, Stefan Nemanja summoned a Council (Serbian: Сабор / Sabor) in Ras, where he officially abdicated in favour of his second son, Stefan, to whom he bequeathed all his earthly possessions. This decision was not in accordance with the traditional right of primogeniture, according to which Vukan, his first son, should inherited the throne. This was not accepted lightly by Vukan. Nemanja took monastic vows with his wife Ana in the Church of Saint Peter and Paul in Ras and adopted the monastic name of Simeon. His wife took the name Anastasia. Simeon subsequently retired to his Studenica monastery and Anastasia retired to the Monastery of the Mother of Christ in Kuršumlija. After numerous pleas by his son Sava (originally baptised Rastko), Simeon left to the Holy Mountain, Mount Athos, and joined his son in 1197 in the Vatopedi monastery. In 1199, the two rebuilt together the ruined Eastern Orthodox Monastery of Hilandar given to the Serbian people by the Byzantine Emperor, which became the heart of Serbian spiritual culture. Simeon died in front of his son Sava, on 13 February 1199, in front of the icon of the Virgin Hodegetria (The Three-Handed Virgin) in his 86th year of life. He was buried in the grounds of Hilandar monastery. His last words were to request that Sava take his remains to Serbia, "when God permits it, after a certain period of time". Nemanja's son Sava wrote the Liturgy of Saint Simeon in Nemanja's honour. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (642x2600, 322 KB) Summary Other versions Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Stefan Nemanja ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (642x2600, 322 KB) Summary Other versions Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Stefan Nemanja ... Hilandar (Greek Chilandar) is an Eastern Orthodox monastery on Mount Athos in Greece, traditionally occupied and maintained by the Serbian Orthodox Church. ... County Dubrovnik–Neretva Area 143. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Spring, London, popular uprising of the poor against the rich led by William Fitz Osbern. ... Serbian (српски језик; srpski jezik) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... In molecular biology, Ras is the name of a protein, the gene that encodes it, and the family and superfamily of proteins to which it belongs. ... Stefan Prvovenčani (lit. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Monasticism (from Greek: monachos—a solitary person) is the religious practice of renouncing all worldly pursuits in order to fully devote ones life to spiritual work. ... Studenica The Studenica Monastery is the largest and richest Serbian Orthodox monastery. ... Town panorama from the hill Samokovo Night panorama from old town KurÅ¡umlija (Serbian Cyrillic: Куршумлија; Anglicised: Kurshumlia) is a town and municipality located in the south of Serbia, nearby the rivers Toplica, Kosanica and Banjska, on the southeast of mountain Kopaonik, and northwest of Radan Mountain. ... Baptism is a water purification ritual practiced in certain religions such as Christianity, Mandaeanism, Sikhism, and some historic sects of Judaism. ... Capital Karyes Official languages Koine Greek and Church Slavonic (both liturgical); Modern Greek, Russian, Serbian, Georgian, Bulgarian, Romanian (civil use) Government  -  Head of State2 Dora Bakoyannis  -  Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I Area  -  Total 390 km²  150 sq mi  Population  -   estimate 2,250  Demonyms: Athonite, Hagiorite (English); Αθωνίτης, Αγιορίτης (Greek). ... The holy monastery of Vatopedi was built during the second half of the 10th century, by three monks, Athanasius, Nicholas and Antonius from Adrinople, who were the pupils of St. ... The Eastern Orthodox Church is a Christian body that views itself as: the historical continuation of the original Christian community established by Jesus Christ and the Twelve Apostles, having maintained unbroken the link between its clergy and the Apostles by means of Apostolic Succession. ... Hilandar (Greek Chilandar) is an Eastern Orthodox monastery on Mount Athos in Greece, traditionally occupied and maintained by the Serbian Orthodox Church. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events John Lackland, becomes King of England Births Isobel of Huntingdon (d. ... Look up icon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Saint Sava Saint Sava (1175 or 1176 - January 12, 1235 or 1236), originally the prince Rastko Nemanjić (son of the Serbian ruler and founder of the Serbian medieval state Stefan Nemanja and brother of Stefan Prvovenčani, first Serbian king), is the first Serb archbishop (1219-1233), the most important...


According to myth, a holy oil seeped from his tomb. This is how he gained the epithet "the Myrrh-flowing". This miracle is said to have not occurred in the past 300 years. His body is, however, even in modern times supposed to give off "a sweet smell, like violets" (Kindersley, 23). It is because of this and numerous miracles that occurred over his dead body that the Serbian Orthodox Church canonised him in 1200, and declared his feast-day on February 26 (February 13 Old Style). In 1206 his son Sava brought his remains to Rascia. The civil war between Nemanja's other sons Stefan and Vukan was tearing apart the Serb lands. It is over Simeon's deceased body that the two brothers made peace and returned to their demesnes. Simeon was re-buried in 1207 in his personal foundation, the Studenica monastery, where holy oil again seeped, from his new grave. The Cult of Saint Simeon that was founded maintained his heritage and the foundations of a firm national identity amongst the Serbs. The Cult still lives on in Studenica and among the monks of Mount Athos, cherishing his life, works and remains: A miracle, derived from the old Latin word miraculum meaning something wonderful, is a striking interposition of divine intervention by a god in the universe by which the ordinary course and operation of Nature is overruled, suspended, or modified. ... Flag of the Serbian Orthodox Church The MONTENEGRO Orthodox Church (crnogorski: Crnogorska Православна Црква / Crnogorska Pravoslavna Crkva; СПЦ / SPC) or the Church of Montenegro is one of the autocephalous Orthodox Christian churches, ranking sixth after Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, Jerusalem, and Russia. ... ... February 26 is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Old Style can refer to: Old Style and New Style dates, a shift from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar: in Britain in 1752, in Russia in 1918. ... Raška (Raschka, Rascia, Rassa) was the central and most successful medieval Serbian state (or župa, area ruled by a župan) that unified neighboring Serbian tribes into the main medieval Serbian state in Balkans. ... Stefan Prvovenčani (lit. ... Vukan II Nemanjić (Serbian: Вукан II Немањић), son of Serbian Grand Župan Stefan Nemanja. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Studenica The Studenica Monastery is the largest and richest Serbian Orthodox monastery. ... The Studenica Monastery is the largest and richest Serbian Orthodox monastery. ... Capital Karyes Official languages Koine Greek and Church Slavonic (both liturgical); Modern Greek, Russian, Serbian, Georgian, Bulgarian, Romanian (civil use) Government  -  Head of State2 Dora Bakoyannis  -  Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I Area  -  Total 390 km²  150 sq mi  Population  -   estimate 2,250  Demonyms: Athonite, Hagiorite (English); Αθωνίτης, Αγιορίτης (Greek). ...

  • Charter of Grand Prince Stephen to Hilandar
  • Old and new Relics of Saint Simeon
  • Vine of Saint Symeon
  • Cell of Saint Symeon
  • Icon of Saint Symeon

Marriage & Descendants

Nemanja was married to a Serb noblewoman by the name of Ana. They had three sons and three daughters: Serbs (in the Serbian language Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people living chiefly in Serbia and Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ...

Stefan Prvovenčani (lit. ... Saint Sava Saint Sava (1175 or 1176 - January 12, 1235 or 1236), originally the prince Rastko Nemanjić (son of the Serbian ruler and founder of the Serbian medieval state Stefan Nemanja and brother of Stefan Prvovenčani, first Serbian king), is the first Serb archbishop (1219-1233), the most important... Saint Sava Saint Sava (1175 or 1176 - January 12, 1235 or 1236), originally the prince Rastko Nemanjić (son of the Serbian ruler and founder of the Serbian medieval state Stefan Nemanja and brother of Stefan Prvovenčani, first Serbian king), is the first Serb archbishop (1219-1233), the most important... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop. ... In traditional Christian iconography, Saints are often depicted as having halos. ... Flag of the Serbian Orthodox Church The MONTENEGRO Orthodox Church (crnogorski: Crnogorska Православна Црква / Crnogorska Pravoslavna Crkva; СПЦ / SPC) or the Church of Montenegro is one of the autocephalous Orthodox Christian churches, ranking sixth after Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, Jerusalem, and Russia. ... Vukan II Nemanjić (Serbian: Вукан II Немањић), son of Serbian Grand Župan Stefan Nemanja. ... Duklja according to De administrando imperio. ... Zeta was one of the first Montenegrin states in the Middle Ages. ... Raška (Raschka, Rascia, Rassa) was the central and most successful medieval Serbian state (or župa, area ruled by a župan) that unified neighboring Serbian tribes into the main medieval Serbian state in Balkans. ... The Asen dynasty ruled the Second Bulgarian Empire between 1187 and 1280. ... Tsar (Bulgarian, Serbian and Macedonian цар, Russian  , in scientific transliteration respectively car and car ), occasionally spelled Czar or Tzar and sometimes Csar or Zar in English, is a Slavonic term designating certain monarchs. ... Tsar Constantine Tikh of Bulgaria (ruled 1257-1277) took the throne of Bulgaria after the assasination of Michael II Asen of Bulgaria in 1256. ...

Foundations

Saint Nicholas (Greek: , Agios Nikolaos, victory of the people) is the common name for Saint Nicholas, Bishop of Myra (in modern day Antalya province, Turkey), who had a reputation for secret gift-giving, but is now commonly identified with Santa Claus. ... Town panorama from the hill Samokovo Night panorama from old town Kuršumlija (Serbian Cyrillic: Куршумлија; Anglicised: Kurshumlia) is a town and municipality located in the south of Serbia, nearby the rivers Toplica, Kosanica and Banjska, on the southeast of mountain Kopaonik, and northwest of Radan Mountain. ... Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek Θεοτόκος) is a title of Mary, the mother of Jesus. ... The Kosanica (Serbian Cyrillic: Косаница) is the river in southern Serbia. ... Toplica District Toplički okrug The Toplica District expands in the southern part of Serbia. ... Djurdjevi Stupovi, Nemanjic dynasty Đurđevi Stupovi is a 12th-century Eastern Orthodox church located in the vicinity of todays city of Novi Pazar, in the Sandžak region of Serbia. ... In molecular biology, Ras is the name of a protein, the gene that encodes it, and the family and superfamily of proteins to which it belongs. ... Studenica The Studenica Monastery is the largest and richest Serbian Orthodox monastery. ... Saint Ibar was an early Irish bishop. ... Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek Θεοτόκος) is a title of Mary, the mother of Jesus. ... Bistrica can refer to: a town in Montenegro. ... The Lim bay and valley is a peculiar geographic feature found near Rovinj and Vrsar on the western coast of Istria, Croatia, south of Poreč. The name comes from the Latin limes for limit, referring to the landforms position at the border of two Roman provinces (Dalmatia and Italia). ... Saint Nicholas (Greek: , Agios Nikolaos, victory of the people) is the common name for Saint Nicholas, Bishop of Myra (in modern day Antalya province, Turkey), who had a reputation for secret gift-giving, but is now commonly identified with Santa Claus. ... Saint Ibar was an early Irish bishop. ... In molecular biology, Ras is the name of a protein, the gene that encodes it, and the family and superfamily of proteins to which it belongs. ...

Reconstructions

  • Chilandar monastery on Mount Athos in 1199
  • Monastery of Saint Archangel Michael in Skopje
  • Monastery of Saint Pantheleimon in Niš

Hilandar (Greek Chilandar) is an Eastern Orthodox monastery on Mount Athos in Greece, traditionally occupied and maintained by the Serbian Orthodox Church. ... Capital Karyes Official languages Koine Greek and Church Slavonic (both liturgical); Modern Greek, Russian, Serbian, Georgian, Bulgarian, Romanian (civil use) Government  -  Head of State2 Dora Bakoyannis  -  Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I Area  -  Total 390 km²  150 sq mi  Population  -   estimate 2,250  Demonyms: Athonite, Hagiorite (English); Αθωνίτης, Αγιορίτης (Greek). ... The church of St. ... NiÅ¡ or Nish (Serbian: Ниш / NiÅ¡,  , Latin: Naissus, Greek: Ναισσός Naissos) is a city in Serbia situated at 43. ...

Donations

Preceded by
Zavida
Prince of Ibar, Toplica, Rasina, Reke
unknown–1196
Succeeded by
Stefan II
Preceded by
Byzantine Emperor Manuel I Comnenus
Prince of Dubočica
1162–1196
Succeeded by
Stefan II
Preceded by
Stefan Tihomir
Grand Prince of Rascia/Duke of the Serb Land
1168–1196
Succeeded by
Stefan II
Preceded by
Stracimir
Prince of West Moravia
1189–1196
Succeeded by
Stefan II
Preceded by
Mihailo III
Prince of Doclea
11861196
Succeeded by
Vukan II

For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... Central Bethlehem Bethlehem (Arabic بيت لحم   house of meat; Standard Hebrew בית לחם house of bread, Bet léḥem / Bet láḥem; Tiberian Hebrew Bêṯ léḥem / Bêṯ lāḥem; Greek: Βηθλεέμ) is a city in the Bethlehem Governorate of the West Bank under Palestinian Authority considered a central hub of Palestinian cultural and tourism... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... Saint Nicholas (Greek: , Agios Nikolaos, victory of the people) is the common name for Saint Nicholas, Bishop of Myra (in modern day Antalya province, Turkey), who had a reputation for secret gift-giving, but is now commonly identified with Santa Claus. ... Location within Italy Bari is the capital of the province of Bari and of the Apulia (or Puglia) region, on the Adriatic sea, in Italy. ... Map of Constantinople. ... The White Tower The Arch of Galerius Map showing the Thessaloníki prefecture Thessaloníki (Θεσσαλονίκη) is the second-largest city of Greece and is the principal city and the capital of the Greek region of Macedonia. ... This is the list of Serbian monarchs. ... The Ibar river is a river in southern Serbia and Montenegro, with a total length of 276 km (171 miles). ... Toplica District Toplički okrug The Toplica District expands in the southern part of Serbia. ... Rasina District within Central Serbia Rasina District Rasinski okrug The Rasina District expands in the central part of the Republic of Serbia and Montenegro. ... The Pusta reka (Serbian Cyrillic: Пуста река) is a river in southern Serbia, a 71-km long left tributary to the Južna Morava. ... Stefan Prvovenčani (lit. ... This is a list of Byzantine Emperors. ... Manuel I Comnenus (Greek: Μανουήλ Α ο Κομνηνός; November 28, 1118 – September 24, 1180), was a Byzantine Emperor of the 12th century who reigned over a crucial turning point in the history of Byzantium and the Mediterranean. ... This is the list of Serbian monarchs. ... Leskovac (Serbian Cyrillic: Лесковац) is a city located in southern Serbia at 43. ... Stefan Prvovenčani (lit. ... This is the list of Serbian monarchs. ... Raška (Raschka, Rascia, Rassa) was the central and most successful medieval Serbian state (or župa, area ruled by a župan) that unified neighboring Serbian tribes into the main medieval Serbian state in Balkans. ... This is the list of Serbian monarchs. ... Stefan Prvovenčani (lit. ... This is the list of Serbian monarchs. ... The Velika Morava is a river in Serbia that flows into the Danube near Smederevo. ... Stefan Prvovenčani (lit. ... Mihailo III Vojislav was the ruler of Duklja, from 1162 to 1186. ... Duklja according to De administrando imperio. ... Events John the Chanter becomes Bishop of Exeter. ... Events Spring, London, popular uprising of the poor against the rich led by William Fitz Osbern. ... Vukan II Nemanjić (Serbian: Вукан II Немањић), son of Serbian Grand Župan Stefan Nemanja. ...

Notes

  1. ^ William of Tyre, Historia Transmarina 20.4.
  2. ^ Genealogy of the Nemanjić

See also

First Serbian state was founded in 800s by House of Vlastimirović under the name of Raška; it has evolved into Serbian Kingdom and Empire under House of Nemanjić. In modern era it was an autonomous principality (1817–1878), independent principality and kingdom (1878–1918), part of the Kingdom of... The history of Montenegro begins in the early Middle Ages, after the arrival of the Slavs into that part of the former Roman province of Dalmatia that forms present-day Montenegro. ... The History of Herzegovina ranges from the first Slavic migrations to the region to the most recent Bosnian War. ... Coat of arms of Serbia This is a list of Serbian monarchs. ... // Stefan Vojislav, (c. ... Nemanjić family tree Uroš I Zavida Tihomir Stefan Prvoslav Stracimir Miroslav Toljen Petar Nikola Vladislav Boriša Toljen Petar Bajko Andrija Bogdan Tvrtko Bogdan Tvrtko Đorđe Radoslav Vukosava Andrija Petar Slava Dragoslava Petar Stefan I Nemanja, Great Župan of Raška (1166 - 1196) and Duklja/Zeta (1186 - 1196) Vukan...

External links

Vladimir Ćorović Vladimir Ćorović (Владимир Ћоровић) (1885-1941) is the most significant Serbian historian of great syntheses, with the Viennese Ph. ...

Sources

  • Judah, Tim (1997). The Serbs: History, Myth & the Destruction of Yugoslavia, Yale University Press.
  • Kindersley, Anne (1976). The Mountains of Serbia: Travels through Inland Yugoslavia, John Murray (Publishers) Ltd.
  • Mandic, O. Dominic (1970). Croats and Serbs: Two old and different Nations. Translated by Vicko Rendic and Jacques Perret. Available at: www.magma.ca/~rendic.
  • Pavlowitch, Stevan K. (2002). Serbia: the History behind the Name, Hurst & Company.
  • The Serbian Unity Congress.
  • Servia/Serbia, Catholic Encyclopedia (1907)
  • Veselinović, Andrija & Ljušić, Radoš (2001). Српске династије, Platoneum.
  • CD Chilandar by Studio A, Aetos, Library of Serb Patriarchate and Chilandar monastery, Belgrade, 1998
  • Ćorović, Vladimir (2005). ИЛУСТРОВАНА ИСТОРИЈА СРБА, Book II, Politika.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Stefan Nemanja (174 words)
Der Artikel Stefan Nemanja gehört zur Kategorie: Mann, Župan (Serbien), 12.
Zwar siegte Byzanz über Stefan Nemanja 1190 in der Schlacht an der Morava, doch musste Byzanz die serbische Unabhängigkeit akzeptieren.
Stefan Nemanja selbst zog sich 1196 als Mönch Simeon auf den Berg Athos zurück, wo er 1200 starb.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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