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Encyclopedia > Steamboat
Paddle steamers — Lucerne, Switzerland.
Finnish steamer — S/S Ukkopekka, Finland.
Finnish steamer — S/S Ukkopekka, Finland.

A steamboat or steamship, sometimes called a steamer, is a ship in which the primary method of propulsion is steam power, typically driving a propeller or paddlewheel. Look up steamboat in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... steamboat - Lake Lucerne, switzerland picture taken by ivo meier, switzerland, http://www. ... steamboat - Lake Lucerne, switzerland picture taken by ivo meier, switzerland, http://www. ... For other uses, see Lake Lucerne (disambiguation). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (2608 × 1952 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (2608 × 1952 pixel, file size: 1. ... Finnish steamer S/S Ukkopekka. ... For other uses, see Ship (disambiguation). ... // The term steam engine may also refer to an entire railroad steam locomotive. ... For other uses, see Propeller (disambiguation). ... A paddle steamer, paddleboat, or paddlewheeler is a ship or boat propelled by one or more paddle wheels driven by a steam engine. ...


The term steamboat is usually used to refer to smaller steam-powered boats working on lakes and rivers, particularly riverboats; steamship generally refers to steam powered ships capable of carrying a (ship's) boat. The term steamwheeler is archaic and rarely used. A riverboat is a specialized watercraft (vessel) designed for operating on inland waterways. ... For other uses, see Ship (disambiguation). ...


Steamships gradually replaced sailing ships for commercial shipping through the 19th century, and they were overtaken by diesel-driven ships in the second half of the twentieth century. Most warships used steam propulsion until the advent of the gas turbine. Today, nuclear powered warships and submarines use steam to drive turbines, but are not referred to as steamships or steamboats. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This machine has a single-stage centrifugal compressor and turbine, a recuperator, and foil bearings. ... Nuclear navy, or nuclear powered navy consists of ships powered by relatively small onboard nuclear reactors known as naval reactors. ... For other uses, see Submarine (disambiguation). ...


Screw-driven steamships generally carry the ship prefix "SS" before their names. Paddle steamers usually carry the prefix "PS" and Steamships powered by the steam turbine may be prefixed "TS" (Turbine Ship). The term steamer is occasionally used, out of nostalgia, for diesel motor-driven vessels, prefixed "MV". A paddle steamer, paddleboat, or paddlewheeler is a ship or boat propelled by one or more paddle wheels driven by a steam engine. ... This article is about the fuel. ...

Contents

Early development

Denis Papin's design for a piston-and-cylinder engine, 1690.
Denis Papin's design for a piston-and-cylinder engine, 1690.

As often happens with inventions, the development of the steam engine powered vessel involved many people, sometimes working at the same time. Image File history File links Papinengine. ... Image File history File links Papinengine. ... Denis Papin Denis Papin (22 August 1647 - c. ... Events Giovanni Domenico Cassini observes differential rotation within Jupiters atmosphere. ... // The term steam engine may also refer to an entire railroad steam locomotive. ...


One of the first to propose the idea (around 1692) was the French physicist Denis Papin. In a 1690 article in Acta Eruditorum, he describes a steamboat equipped with four cylinders, propelling rotating wheels. In 1707 he constructed a paddle-powered boat, but whether or not it was full-size and steam-powered is unclear. Events February 13 - Massacre of Glencoe March 1 - The Salem witch trials begin in Salem Village, Massachusetts Bay Colony with the charging of three women with witchcraft. ... Denis Papin Denis Papin (22 August 1647 - c. ... Acta Eruditorum (Latin: reports, acts of the scholars) was the first scientific journal of the German lands, published from 1682 to 1782. ... Events January 1 - John V is crowned King of Portugal March 26 - The Acts of Union becomes law, making the separate Kingdoms of England and Scotland into one country, the Kingdom of Great Britain. ...


In 1736, Jonathan Hulls took out a patent in England for a Newcomen engine-powered steamboat, but it was the improvement in steam engines by James Watt that made the concept feasible. William Henry of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, having learned of Watt's engine on a visit to England, made his own engine and in 1763 attempted to put it in a boat. The boat sank, and while he made an improved model he does not seem to have had much success, though he may have inspired others. Events January 26 - Stanislaus I of Poland abdicates his throne. ... For other uses, see Patent (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Thomas Newcomen (baptised 24 February 1664; died 5 August 1729) was an ironmonger by trade, and a Baptist lay preacher by calling. ... For other persons named James Watt, see James Watt (disambiguation). ... For other men with the same name, see: Wiliam Henry (disambiguation). ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...

Model of steamship, built in 1784 by Claude de Jouffroy.
Model of steamship, built in 1784 by Claude de Jouffroy.

In France, by 1774 Marquis Claude de Jouffroy and his colleagues had made a 13 metre (42' 8") working steamboat with rotating paddles, the Palmipède. The ship sailed on the Doubs in June and July 1776, apparently the first steamship to sail successfully. In 1783 a new paddle steamer, Pyroscaphe, successfully steamed up the river Saône for fifteen minutes before the engine failed, but bureaucracy thwarted further progress. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1560x556, 1058 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Steamboat Claude-François-Dorothée, marquis de Jouffroy dAbbans Metadata This file contains additional information, probably... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1560x556, 1058 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Steamboat Claude-François-Dorothée, marquis de Jouffroy dAbbans Metadata This file contains additional information, probably... Claude-François-Dorothée, marquis de Jouffroy dAbbans (1751-1832) is claimed by the French as the first inventor of the steamboat; he made a paddle steamer ply on the Rhône in 1783, but misfortunes due to the French Revolution hindered his progress, till he was forestalled... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... Claude-François-Dorothée, marquis de Jouffroy dAbbans (1751-1832) is claimed by the French as the first inventor of the steamboat; he made a paddle steamer ply on the Rhône in 1783, but misfortunes due to the French Revolution hindered his progress, till he was forestalled... Doubs is a département in eastern France named after the Doubs River. ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... A paddle steamer, paddleboat, or paddlewheeler is a ship or boat propelled by one or more paddle wheels driven by a steam engine. ... Pyroscape was an early experimental steamship build by Marquis de Jouffroy dAbbans in 1783. ... The Saône is a river of eastern France. ...


From 1784 James Rumsey built a pump-driven (water jet) boat and successfully steamed upstream on the Potomac river in 1786; the following year he obtained a patent from the State of Virginia. In Pennsylvania, John Fitch, an acquaintance of Henry, made a model paddle steamer in 1785, and subsequently developed propulsion by floats on a chain, obtained a patent in 1786, then built a steamboat which underwent a successful trial in 1787. In 1788, a steamboat built by John Fitch operated in regular commercial service along the Delaware river between Philadelphia PA and Burlington NJ, carrying as many as 30 passengers. This boat could typically make 7 to 8 miles per hour, and traveled more than 2000 miles during its short length of service. The Fitch steamboat was not a commercial success, as this travel route was adequately covered by relatively good wagon roads. The following year a second boat made 50 km (30 mile) excursions, and in 1790 a third boat ran a series of trials on the Delaware River before patent disputes dissuaded Fitch from continuing. 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... James Rumsey (1743-92) was an American mechanical engineer who exhibited a boat propelled by machinery in 1786 on the Potomac River before George Washington. ... Water Jet has several meanings including : simply a jet of water under pressure a marine propulsion mechanism for jetskis and some other types of boats (see: pump-jet) a tool for cutting and abrasion in the machining of engineering materials, see water jet cutter. ... The Potomac River flows into the Chesapeake Bay, located along the mid-Atlantic coast of the United States (USA). ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... John Fitch (born on January 21, 1743 in South Windsor, Connecticut, died by suicide July, 1798) was a clockmaker, brassworker, and silversmith who built the first recorded steam powered ship in the United States, in 1786. ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... For the Delaware River in Kansas, see Delaware River (Kansas) The Delaware River is a river on the Atlantic coast of the United States. ...


Meanwhile, Patrick Miller of Dalswinton, near Dumfries, Scotland, had developed double-hulled boats propelled by cranked paddlewheels placed between the hulls, and he engaged engineer William Symington to build his patent steam engine into a boat which was successfully tried out on Dalswinton Loch in 1788, and followed by a larger steamboat the next year. Miller then abandoned the project, but ten years later Symington was engaged by Lord Dundas, and in March 1802, Charlotte Dundas towed two 70 ton barges 30 km (19 miles) along the Forth and Clyde Canal to Glasgow. This vessel, the first tow boat, has been called the "first practical steamboat", and the first to be followed by continuous development of steamboats. Although plans to introduce boats on the Forth and Clyde canal were thwarted by fears of erosion of the banks, development was taken up both in Britain and abroad. The banker Patrick Miller of Dalswinton, just north of Dumfries, was a shareholder in the Carron Company engineering works and an enthusiastic experimenter in ordnance and naval architecture, including double or triple hulled pleasure boats propelled by cranked paddlewheels placed between the hulls. ... This article is on the Scottish town. ... This article is about the country. ... The first practieal steamboat was built by the engineer William Symington,1764 - 1831, born in the lead mining village of Leadhills, Lanarkshire, Scotland. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Thomas Dundas, 1st Baron Dundas February 16, 1741 - June 14, 1820, was a powerful figure in Britain, now remembered for commissioning the Charlotte Dundas, the worlds first practical steamboat. Following education at Eton and St. ... --69. ... The Charlotte Dundas is regarded as the worlds first practical steamboat, the first towing steamboat and the boat that demonstrated the practicality of steam power for ships. ... The Forth and Clyde Canal is a canal in Scotland. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ...

Fulton presents his steamship to Bonaparte in 1803.
Fulton presents his steamship to Bonaparte in 1803.

Robert Fulton, who may have become interested in steamboats when he visited Henry in 1777 at the age of 12, visited Britain and France where he built and tested an experimental steamboat on the River Seine in 1803, and was aware of the success of Charlotte Dundas. Before returning to the United States he ordered a Boulton and Watt steam engine, and on return built what he called the North River Steamboat (often mistakenly described as the Clermont ). In 1807 this steamboat began a regular passenger boat service between New York City and Albany, New York, 240 km (150 miles) distant, which was a commercial success. In 1808 John and James Winans built Vermont in Burlington, Vermont, the second steamboat to operate commercially. In 1809, Accommodation, built by the Hon. John Molson at Montreal, and fitted with engines made in that city, was running successfully between Montreal and Quebec, being the first steamer on the St. Lawrence and in Canada. The experience of both vessels showed that the new system of propulsion was commercially viable, and as a result its application to the more open waters of the Great Lakes was next considered. That idea went on hiatus due to the War of 1812. Image File history File links FultonSeine. ... Image File history File links FultonSeine. ... For other persons named Robert Fulton, see Robert Fulton (disambiguation). ... Year 1777 (MDCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the river in France; it should not be confused with the Senne, a much smaller river that flows through Brussels. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Matthew Boulton. ... For other persons named James Watt, see James Watt (disambiguation). ... The major components of a Watt pumping engine. ... Fultons monster, the Clermont or North River Steamer The first commercially successful steamship of the paddle steamer design, the Clermont left New York City for Albany, New York travelling on the Hudson River on August 17, 1807, inaugurating the first successful commercial steamboat service in the world. ... Year 1807 (MDCCCVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other uses, see Albany. ... Year 1808 (MDCCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Burlington is the largest city in the U.S. state of Vermont and is the shire town of Chittenden County, Vermont. ... Year 1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... John Molson (December 28, 1763 – January 11, 1836) was an Anglo-Quebecer who was a major brewer and entrepreneur in Canada, starting the Molson Brewing Company. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... This page concerns the Christian martyr. ... The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ... This article is about the U.S. – U.K. war. ...


In Scotland the ideas of Charlotte Dundas were taken up by Henry Bell, and in 1812 the Comet began passenger steamboat service on the River Clyde between Glasgow and Greenock. This was the first commercially successful service in Europe. This article is about the country. ... Henry Bell. ... For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting... The paddle steamer PS Comet was built for Henry Bell, hotel and baths owner in Helensburgh, and began a passenger service in 1812 on the River Clyde between Glasgow and Greenock, the first commercially successful steamboat service in Europe. ... The River Clyde opening out at Newark Castle, Port Glasgow past Clydeport Ocean Terminal, Greenock, to the Firth of Clyde on the left, and to the right past Ardmore Point to the Gare Loch. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Greenock (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


In 1815, Pierre Andriel crossed the English Channel aboard Élise, marking the first sea-going use of a steam ship. Satellite view of the English Channel The English Channel (French: , the sleeve) is an arm of the Atlantic Ocean that separates the island of Great Britain from northern France and joins the North Sea to the Atlantic. ... The Élise was the first steam ship to cross the English Channel. ...


River steamboats

Model of a shallow draft stern wheel riverboat
Model of a shallow draft stern wheel riverboat

Steamboats on major American rivers soon followed Fulton's success. In 1811 the first in a continuous (still in commercial passenger operation as of 2007) line of river steamboats left the dock at Pittsburgh down the Ohio River and on to New Orleans.[1] Mark Twain, in his Life on the Mississippi, described much of the operation of these vessels. For most of the 19th century and part of the early 20th century, trade on the Mississippi River would be dominated by paddle-wheel steamboats. Their success led to penetration deep into the continent, where Anson Northrup in 1859 became first steamer to cross the U.S.-Canadian border on the Red River. They would also be involved in major political events, as when Louis Riel seized International at Fort Garry, or Gabriel Dumont was engaged by Northcote at Batoche. Very few such craft survive to the present day, most destroyed by boiler explosions or fires. One of the few surviving Mississippi sternwheelers from this period, Julius C. Wilkie, is a museum ship at Winona, Minnesota. For modern craft operated on rivers, see the riverboat article. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1736x877, 254 KB)Model of a stern wheel river boat at the San Francisco Maritime Museum. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1736x877, 254 KB)Model of a stern wheel river boat at the San Francisco Maritime Museum. ... City nickname: The Steel City Location in the state of Pennsylvania Founded 1758 Mayor Tom Murphy (Dem) Area  - Total  - Water 151. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ... Life on the Mississippi cover Life on the Mississippi is a memoir by Mark Twain detailing his days as a steamboat pilot on the Mississippi River before the American Civil War. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Categories: Water-transport stubs ... The Red River drainage basin, with the Red River highlighted The Red River in Greater Grand Forks, as viewed from the Grand Forks side of the river The Red River in Fargo-Moorhead, as viewed from the Fargo side of the river For other things named Red River, see the... For the opera, see Louis Riel (opera). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Upper Fort Garry in the early 1870s Fort Garry also known as Upper Fort Garry was a Hudsons Bay Company trading post at the confluence of the Red and Assiniboine rivers in what is now downtown Winnipeg. ... This article is about the 19th century Métis. ... Northcote, Victoria is a suburb of Melbourne, Australia. ... Batoche, Saskatchewan is the site of the historic Battle of Batoche, the last battlefield in the Northwest Rebellion of 1885. ... A boiler is a closed vessel in which water or other fluid is heated. ... USS Wisconsin, one of three Iowa class battleships opened to the public as a museum, and was one of two Iowas maintained in the US Mothball fleet. ... Winona is the county seat of Winona County6. ... A riverboat is a specialized watercraft (vessel) designed for operating on inland waterways. ...


The cartoon Steamboat Willie introduced steamboat pilot Mickey Mouse to the public. Steamboat Willie (1928) is an animated cartoon featuring Mickey Mouse released on November 18, 1928. ... Mickey Mouse is an Academy Award-winning comic animal cartoon character who has become an icon for The Walt Disney Company. ...

The Belle of Louisville (formerly the Idlewild)

The Belle of Louisville, out of Louisville, Kentucky is the oldest continually operating steamboat on the inland waterways of the United States: she was laid down as Idlewild in 1914. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 681 pixel, file size: 378 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)The Belle of Louisville. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 681 pixel, file size: 378 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)The Belle of Louisville. ... The Belle of Louisville still serves as the symbol of Louisville in her 90th year. ... The Belle of Louisville still serves as the symbol of Louisville in her 90th year. ... Louisville redirects here. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ...


In Canada, the city of Terrace, British Columbia, celebrates "Riverboat Days" each summer. The Skeena River passes through Terrace and played a crucial role during the age of the steamboat. The first steamer to enter the Skeena was Union in 1864. In 1866 Mumford attempted to ascend the river but was only able to reach the Kitsumkalum River. It was not until 1891 Hudson's Bay Company sternwheeler Caledonia successfully negotiated Kitselas Canyon and reached Hazelton. A number of other steamers were built around the turn of the century, in part due to the growing fish industry and the gold rush.[1] For more information, see Steamboats of the Skeena River. Mayor Jack Talstra Councillors Lynne Christiansen Marylin Davies Brian Downie Carol Leclerc Rich McDaniel Brad Pollard Land area 42. ... The Skeena River is the second longest river in British Columbia, Canada. ... Hudsons Bay Company (HBC; Compagnie de la Baie dHudson in French) is the oldest commercial corporation in North America and is one of the oldest in the world. ... The Bulkley River (left) flowing into the Skeena River (right) near Ksan Ksan Historical Village // Hazelton is a small town located at the junction of the Bulkley and Skeena Rivers in northern British Columbia, Canada. ... Salmon for sale at a fish market. ... For other meanings, see Gold rush (disambiguation) A California Gold Rush handbill A gold rush is a period of feverish migration of workers into the area of a dramatic discovery of commercial quantities of gold. ... The Skeena River is British Columbia’s fastest flowing waterway, often rising as much as 17 feet in a day and can fluctuate as much as sixty feet between high and low water. ...

S.S. Inlander on the Skeena River at Kitselas Canyon, 1911

Sternwheelers were an instrumental transportation technology in the development of Western Canada. They were used on most of the navigable waterways of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, B.C and the Yukon at one time or another, generally being supplanted by the expansion of railroads and road access. In the more mountainous and remote areas of the Yukon and British Columbia, working sternwheelers lived on well into the 20th century. Image File history File links Sternwheeler_Inlander. ... Image File history File links Sternwheeler_Inlander. ... The Skeena River is the second longest river in British Columbia, Canada. ...


The simplicity of these vessels and their shallow draft made them indispensable to pioneer communities that were otherwise virtually cut off from the outside world. Because of their shallow, flat bottomed construction, (the Canadian examples of the western river sternwheeler generally needed less than three feet of water to float in) they could nose up almost anywhere along a riverbank to pick up or drop off passengers and freight. Sternwheelers would also prove vital to the construction of the railroads that would eventually replace them, and were used to haul supplies, track and other materials to construction camps.


The simple, versatile locomotive-style boilers fitted to most sternwheelers after about the 1860s could burn coal in more populated areas like the lakes of the Kootenays and the Okanagan region in southern B.C. or wood in the more remote areas such as the Yukon or northern B.C.


The hulls were generally wooden, (although a few steel and composite hulls were built after about 1898) and were braced internally with a series of built-up longitudinal timbers called keelsons. Further reilience was given to the hulls by a system of "hog rods" or "hog chains" that were fastened into the keelsons and led up and over vertical masts called "hog-posts" and back down again.


Like their counterparts on the Mississippi and its tributaries and the vessels on the rivers of California, Idaho, Oregon, Washington and Alaska, the Canadian sternwheelers tended to have fairly short life-spans. The hard usage they were subjected to and inherent flexibility of their shallow wooden hulls meant that relatively few of them had careers longer than a decade.


In the Yukon Territory there are two vessels preserved, the S.S. Klondike in Whitehorse and the S.S. Keno in Dawson City, plus many other derelict hulks can still be found along the Yukon River.


In British Columbia, the S.S. Moyie, built by the Canadian Pacific Railroad in 1898, was operated on Kootenay Lake in south-eastern B.C. until 1957. It has been carefully restored and is on display in the village of Kaslo, while the S.S. Sicamous of 1914 has been preserved in Penticton at the south end of Okanagan Lake.


The SS Samson V is the only Canadian steam-powered sternwheeler that has been preserved afloat. It was built in 1937 by the Canadian federal Department of Public Works as a snagboat for clearing logs and debris out of the lower reaches of the Fraser River and for maintaining docks and aids to navigation. The fifth in a line of Fraser River snagpullers, the Samson V has engines, paddlewheel and other components that were passed down from the Samson II of 1914. It is now moored on the Fraser River as a floating museum in its home port of New Westminster, near Vancouver, B.C.


Some good reference works on the history of these vessels include Art Downs' British Columbia-Yukon Sternwheel Days (1992 Heritage House Publishing Company, Surrey, B.C.), Robert D. Turner's Sternwheelers and Steam Tugs (1998, Sono Nis Press, Victoria, B.C.), Edward Affleck's A Century of Paddlewheelers in the Pacific Northwest, the Yukon and Alaska (2000, Alexander Nicolls Press, Vancouver, B.C.) Graham Wilson, Paddlewheelers of Alaska and the Yukon (1999,Wolf Creek Books, Whitehorse,Yukon) and Robin Sheret's Smoke, Ash and Steam (1997, Western Isles Cruise and Dive Co. , Victoria, B.C.).


There are six major commercial steamboats that currently operate on the inland waterways of the United States. They are the steamers Belle of Louisville, Delta Queen, Julia Belle Swain, Mississippi Queen, Natchez, and American Queen. Three of these boats are overnight passenger vessels operated by Majestic America Line, formerly the Delta Queen Steamboat Company of New Orleans, LA. The Belle of Louisville still serves as the symbol of Louisville in her 90th year. ... The Delta Queen in Memphis, Tennessee The Delta Queen is an American sternwheel steamboat. ... The Julie Belle Swain is a steam-powered sternwheeler currently operating out of La Crosse, Wisconsin, USA. Designed and built in 1971 by Capt. ... The in New Orleans The Str. ... American Queen is the largest steamboat ever built. ... New Orleans (French: Nouvelle-Orléans) is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ...


Lake, loch, estuary and sea-going steamers

Bell's Comet started a rapid expansion of steam services on the Firth of Clyde, and within four years a steamer service was in operation on the inland Loch Lomond, a forerunner of the lake steamers still gracing Swiss lakes. Today the 1900 steamer SS Sir Walter Scott still sails on Loch Katrine, while on Loch Lomond PS Maid of the Loch is being restored. Map of the Firth of Clyde and area The Firth of Clyde forms a large area of coastal water, sheltered from the Atlantic ocean by the Kintyre peninsula which encloses the outer firth in Argyll and Ayrshire, Scotland. ... For other uses, see Loch Lomond (disambiguation). ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... For the first Premier of Saskatchewan see Thomas Walter Scott Sir Walter Scott (August 14, 1771 - September 21, 1832) was a prolific Scottish historical novelist and poet popular throughout Europe. ... Above Stronachlachar, looking eastward along the length of the loch. ... The steamer PS Maid of the Loch was the last paddle steamer built in Britain, and is the last of a long line of Loch Lomond steamers that began about 1816, within four years of Henry Bells pioneering passenger steamboat service on the River Clyde. ...


On the Clyde itself, within ten years of Comet's start there were nearly fifty steamers, and services had started across the Irish Sea to Belfast. By 1900 there were over 300 Clyde steamers. The paddle steamer Waverley, built in 1947, is the last survivor of these fleets, and the last seagoing paddle steamer in the world. This ship sails a full season of cruises every year from places around Britain, and has sailed across the English Channel for a visit to commemorate the sinking of her predecessor, built in 1899 at the Battle of Dunkirk in 1940. Relief map of the Irish Sea. ... This article is about the city in Northern Ireland. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... Henry Bells PS Comet started a rapid expansion of steam services on the Firth of Clyde, and within four years a steamer service was in operation on the inland Loch Lomond, a forerunner of the lake steamers that still grace the Swiss lakes. ... A paddle steamer, paddleboat, or paddlewheeler is a ship or boat propelled by one or more paddle wheels driven by a steam engine. ... PS Waverley steaming down the Firth of Clyde - additional views at Image:PS Waverley off Brodick castle 1989. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Satellite view of the English Channel The English Channel (French: , the sleeve) is an arm of the Atlantic Ocean that separates the island of Great Britain from northern France and joins the North Sea to the Atlantic. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about a Second World War battle in 1940, for the 1658 battle of the same name see Battle of the Dunes (1658) Combatants United Kingdom France Belgium Germany Commanders Lord Gort General Weygand Gerd von Rundstedt (Army Group A) Ewald von Kleist (Panzergruppe von Kleist) Strength approx. ...


People have had a particular affection for the Clyde puffers, small steam freighters of traditional design developed to use the Scottish canals and to serve the Highlands and Islands. They were immortalised by the tales of Para Handy's boat Vital Spark by Neil Munro and by the film The Maggie, and a small number are being conserved to continue in steam around the west highland sea lochs. The Clyde puffer is essentially a type of small steamboat which provided a vital supply link around the west coast and Hebrides islands of Scotland, stumpy little cargo ships that have achieved almost mythical status thanks largely to the short stories Neil Munro wrote about the Vital Spark and her... Lowland-Highland divide Highland Sign with welcome in English and Gaelic The Scottish Highlands (A Ghàidhealtachd in Gaelic) include the rugged and mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ... Para Handy (real name Peter MacFarlane) is a fictional character created by Neil Munro in a series of stories published in the Glasgow Evening News. ... The Vital Spark is a fictional (indeed, the archetypal) Clyde puffer, created by Neil Munro. ... Neil Munro (1864 - 1930) was a journalist and author. ... The Maggie (released in the U.S. as High and Dry) is a 1954 British comedy film. ...


The Clyde sludge boats had a tradition of occasionally taking passengers on their trips from Glasgow, past the Isle of Arran, down the Firth of Clyde, and one has emerged from retirement as "SS Shieldhall, Steam powered General Cargo-Passenger Steamer available for Trips in the Solent", offering outings from Southampton, England with views of the two triple expansion engines. For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... The Isle of Arran (Scots Gaelic: Eilean Arainn) is the largest island in the Firth of Clyde with an area of 430 km² (167 square miles). ... Map of the Firth of Clyde and area The Firth of Clyde forms a large area of coastal water, sheltered from the Atlantic ocean by the Kintyre peninsula which encloses the outer firth in Argyll and Ayrshire, Scotland. ... The SS Shieldhall is now advertised as SS Shieldhall, Steam powered General Cargo-Passenger Steamer available for Trips in the Solent, but spent her working days as one of the familiar Clyde sludge boats making regular trips from Shieldhall in Glasgow, Scotland, down the River Clyde and Firth of Clyde... For other uses, see Southampton (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


From 1844 through 1857, luxurious palace steamers carried passengers and cargo around the North American Great Lakes.[2] Palace steamers were luxurious steamships that carried passengers and cargo around the North American Great Lakes from 1844 through 1857. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... The Great Lakes from space The Laurentian Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes in North America on or near the Canada-United States border. ...


Built in 1856, PS Skibladner is the oldest steamship still in operation, serving towns along lake Mjøsa in Norway. 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... PS Skibladner is a paddle steamer operating on the lake of Mjøsa in Norway. ... Paddle steamers - Lucerne-Switzerland Left: original paddlewheel from a paddle steamer on the lake of Lucerne. ... Mjøsa is Norways largest lake. ...


The 1912 steamer TSS Earnslaw still makes regular sight-seeing trips across Lake Wakatipu, an alpine lake near Queenstown, New Zealand. This article needs to be wikified. ... Northern end Near Walter Peak Lake Wakatipu Lake Wakatipu Lake Wakatipu is an inland lake on the South Island of New Zealand. ... For other places with the same name, see Queenstown (disambiguation). ...


Swiss lakes are home of a number of large steamships. On Lake Lucerne, five paddle steamers are still in service: Uri (built in 1901, 800 passengers), Unterwalden (1902, 800 passengers), Schiller (1906, 900 passengers), Gallia (1913, 900 passengers, fastest paddle-wheeler on European lakes) and Stadt Luzern (1928, 1200 passengers, last steamship built for a Swiss lake). There are also five steamers as well as some old steamships converted to diesel-powered paddlewheelers on Lake Geneva, two steamers on Lake Zurich and single ones on other lakes. For other uses, see Lake Lucerne (disambiguation). ... A paddle steamer, paddleboat, or paddlewheeler is a ship or boat propelled by one or more paddle wheels driven by a steam engine. ... Lake Geneva or Lake Léman (French Lac Léman, le Léman, or Lac de Genève) is the second largest freshwater lake in Central Europe (after Lake Balaton). ... ...


Ocean steamships

The side-wheel paddle steamer SS Great Western was the first purpose-built steamship to initiate regularly scheduled trans-Atlantic crossings, starting in 1838. The first regular steamship service from the west to the east coast of the United States began on February 28, 1849 with the arrival of the SS California in San Francisco Bay. California left New York Harbor on October 6, 1848, rounded Cape Horn at the tip of South America, and arrived at San Francisco, California after a 4-month 21-day journey. SS Great Eastern was built in 18541857 with the intent of linking Great Britain with India, via the Cape of Good Hope, without coaling stops; she would know a turbulent history, and was never put to her intended use. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x740, 224 KB) Description:Great Eastern at Hearts Content, July 1866 Source: http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x740, 224 KB) Description:Great Eastern at Hearts Content, July 1866 Source: http://www. ... The SS Great Eastern was an iron sailing steam ship designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel. ... The steamship SS Great Western (named for the Great Western Railway Company) was the first steamship purposely built for the Atlantic crossing. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1849 (MDCCCXLIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, and the Golden Gate San Francisco Bay is a shallow, productive estuary through which water draining approximately forty percent of California, flowing in the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers from the Sierra Nevada mountains, enters the Pacific Ocean. ... New York Harbor, a geographic term, refers collectively to the rivers, bays, and tidal estuaries near the mouth of the Hudson River in the vicinity of New York City. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Cape Horn from the South. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... San Francisco redirects here. ... The SS Great Eastern was an iron sailing steam ship designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel. ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Cape of Good Hope; looking towards the west, from the coastal cliffs above Cape Point. ...


As early as the 1820s, side-wheel steamers plied the waters of Narragansett Bay, Buzzard's Bay, the Atlantic Ocean, and Long Island Sound between the ports of southern New England and New York City. Eventually most of the steamship lines that traversed "The Sound" came under the control of J. P. Morgan who consolidated them into the New England Steamship Company, probably better know by the name of its most famous route, the Fall River Line, which transported Astors, Vanderbilts, and the elite of the Eastern Establishment between New York City, Boston, and their palatial summer 'cottages' at Newport, Rhode Island. The last of the great paddle steamer fleet was put out of business by a combination of competition from railroads and automobiles, labor troubles, and the Great Depression ecomomy in 1937; however, service on "The Sound" between Providence, and New York City continued with screw steamers, until brought to an end in early 1942 by the menace of WWII German U-boat attacks. Narragansett Bay, shown in pink. ... Buzzards Bay is a bay of the Atlantic Ocean adjacent to the state of Massachusetts. ... New York City waterways: 1. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the financier. ... The Fall River Line was a combination steamboat and railroad connection between New York City and Boston, completed in early 1847. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... For other uses, see Newport (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Providence may mean: Divine Providence Providence College in Rhode Island, USA Providence, television series Providence, a 1977 film Providence, a 1991 film starring Keanu Reeves Providence, 1970s-era Providence may also refer to: Providence, Rhode Island (in Providence County) Providence, Alabama Providence, Kentucky Providence, New York It is also the... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... German soldiers at the Battle of Stalingrad World War II was the most extensive and costly armed conflict in the history of the world, involving the great majority of the worlds nations, being fought simultaneously in several major theatres, and costing tens of millions of lives. ... U-boat is also a nickname for some diesel locomotives built by GE; see List of GE locomotives October 1939. ...


Commodore Matthew Perry of the United States used steamships (such as the USS Mississippi) to help force Japan to open its ports up to American trade in 1853. This was a contributing factor to the Meiji Restoration. Matthew Calbraith Perry (1794-1858) Matthew Calbraith Perry (April 10, 1794 – March 4, 1858) was the Commodore of the U.S. Navy who compelled the opening of Japan to the West with the Convention of Kanagawa in 1854. ... USS Mississippi, a sidewheel steamer, was the first ship of the United States Navy bear that name. ... The Late Tokugawa Shogunate (Japanese: Bakumatsu) is the period between 1853 and 1867 during which Japan ended its isolationist foreign policy called sakoku and modernized from a feudal shogunate to the Meiji government. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Meiji Restoration ), also known as the Meiji Ishin, Revolution, or Renewal, was a chain of events that led to enormous changes in Japans political and social structure. ...


By 1870, a number of inventions, such as the screw propeller and the triple expansion engine made trans-oceanic shipping economically viable. Thus began the era of cheap and safe travel and trade around the world. 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Propeller (disambiguation). ... // The term steam engine may also refer to an entire railroad steam locomotive. ...

RMS Titanic
RMS Titanic

RMS Titanic was the largest steamship in the world when she sank in 1912; a subsequent major sinking of a steamer was that of the RMS Lusitania, as an act of World War I. Launched in 1938, RMS Queen Elizabeth was the largest passenger steamship ever built. Launched in 1969, RMS Queen Elizabeth 2 (QE2) was the last passenger steamship to cross the Atlantic Ocean on a scheduled liner voyage before she was converted to diesels in 1986. The last major passenger ship built with steam engines was the Fairsky, launched in 1984. Image File history File links RMS_Titanic_sea_trials_April_2,_1912. ... Image File history File links RMS_Titanic_sea_trials_April_2,_1912. ... For other uses, see Titanic (disambiguation). ... RMS Lusitania was a British luxury ocean liner owned by the Cunard Steamship Line Shipping Company and built by John Brown and Company of Clydebank, Scotland. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... RMS Queen Elizabeth was a steam-powered ocean liner of the Cunard Steamship Company. ... RMS Queen Elizabeth 2 (QE2) is a Cunard Line ocean liner named after the earlier Cunard liner RMS Queen Elizabeth. ... The Pacific Sky, (formerly Sky Princess), was an Australian cruise ship operated by P&O Cruises Australia (November 2000 - May 2006). ...


SS Explorer is the last remaining steam trawler in Britain. She was built in Aberdeen, including the last steam engine built there, and was launched in 1955 as a fishery research vessel. Accommodation was provided for researchers, including a computer cabin. Currently she is berthed at Edinburgh Dock, Leith, by Edinburgh, and is subject of a restoration project. The SS Explorer is the last sea-going steam trawler and is registered to Leith. ... The Water of Leith looking upriver from the docks, with the old buildings along Leith Shore including The Kings Wark and The Old Ship Hotel and Kings Landing. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ...


SS Delphine is a classic 1920's yacht commissioned by Horace Dodge, co-founder of Dodge Brothers of automobile fame. The yacht was launched on April 2, 1921, and spans 258 feet. The Delphine can reach 15 knots under power from her two quadruple steam expansion engines, each of 1500HP. Interactive images including those of her original engines can be viewed here..VR Panoramic images of The SS Delphine After a full restoration she now cruises the Mediterranean under charter. A full history can be viewed on the official website SS Delphine is a yacht commissioned by Horace Dodge, co-founder of Dodge Brothers. ...


The turbine steamship Royal Yacht Britannia, now retired from service, is berthed nearby at Ocean Terminal, Leith. A Siemens steam turbine with the case opened. ... Her Majestys Yacht Britannia was the 83rd Royal Yacht since the restoration of King Charles II in 1660. ...


Steamboat images

External links

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... // The term steam engine may also refer to an entire railroad steam locomotive. ... Side view of Howard Steamboat Museum The Howard Steamboat Museum is located in Jeffersonville, Indiana, across from Louisville, Kentucky. ... Sternwheel packet, wooden hull, built at McKeesport, PA, 1850, 117 tons. ...

References

  1. ^ Pioneer Legacy - Chronicles of the Lower Skeena River - Volume 1, Norma V. Bennett, 1997
  2. ^ University of Wisconsin Sea Grant Institute website

  Results from FactBites:
 
Steamboat - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1839 words)
A steamboat or steamship, sometimes called a steamer, is a boat or vessel which is propelled by steam power that drives a propeller or paddlewheel.
Robert Fulton, who may have become interested in steamboats when he visited William Henry in 1777 at the age of 12, visited Britain and France where he built and tested an experimental steamboat on the River Seine in 1803, and was aware of the success of the Charlotte Dundas.
The Belle of Louisville, based at the port of Louisville, Kentucky is the oldest continually operating steamboat on the inland waterways of the United States: her hull was laid as the Idlewild in 1914.
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