FACTOID # 3: South Carolina has the highest rate of violent crimes and aggravated assaults per capita among US states.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Steam (content delivery)
Steam

The Steam welcome screen
Maintainer: Valve Corporation
Stable release: API: v007  (October 15, 2007) [+/−]
Preview release: -  (-) [+/−]
OS: Microsoft Windows
Available language(s): Multilingual (18)
Use: Content delivery
License: Proprietary
Website: www.steampowered.com

Steam is a digital distribution, digital rights management, multiplayer and communications platform developed by Valve Corporation. It is used to digitally distribute and manage games ranging from first-person shooters and RPGs to racing games and cross-genre independent titles. Among its clients are Take-Two Interactive, Eidos Interactive, Introversion Software, Strategy First, PopCap Games, Capcom, id Software and most recently, THQ. Image File history File links Steam_logo. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (992 × 661 pixel, file size: 1. ... In software engineering, software maintenance is the process of enhancing and optimizing deployed software (software release), as well as remedying defects. ... Valve Corporation is an American video game developer based in Bellevue, Washington, USA, made famous by its first product, Half-Life, which was released in November 1998. ... A software release refers to the creation and availability of a new version of a computer software product. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... A software release refers to the creation and availability of a new version of a computer software product. ... An operating system (OS) is the software that manages the sharing of the resources of a computer. ... “Windows” redirects here. ... Content delivery describes the delivery of digital media content such as digital audio or digital video over a delivery medium such as broadcasting or the Internet. ... A software license is a legal agreement which may take the form of a proprietary or gratuitous license as well as a memorandum of contract between a producer and a user of computer software. ... It has been suggested that closed source be merged into this article or section. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Digital distribution (Also known as digital delivery) is the principle of providing digital information and content over the Internet in the form of products or services. ... Digital rights management (DRM) is an umbrella term that refers to access control technologies used by publishers and other copyright holders to limit usage of digital media or devices. ... Online gaming redirects here. ... Valve Corporation is an American video game developer based in Bellevue, Washington, USA, made famous by its first product, Half-Life, which was released in November 1998. ... This article is about video games. ... This article is about traditional role-playing games. ... A racing game is any game that involves competing in races through a surrogate playing piece or vehicle, either getting it from one point to another or completing a number of circuits in the shortest time. ... Take-Two Interactive Software, Inc. ... Eidos Interactive is a publisher of video and computer games with its parent company based in the United Kingdom. ... Introversion Software is a UK based company that labels itself The last of the bedroom programmers. It was founded by three friends, Chris Delay, Mark Morris and Thomas Arundel. ... Strategy First is a software company based in Montreal, Canada. ... PopCap Games is an online gaming developer and publisher, based in Seattle, Washington, United States. ... For the original NASA meaning, see capsule communicator. ... id Software (IPA: officially, though originally ) is an American computer game developer based in Mesquite, Texas, a suburb of Dallas. ... THQ Inc. ...


As of September 2, 2007 over 200 PC games are available on Steam, and there are approximately 13 million active users.[1] is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

Contents

Client functionality

Purchases

Steam allows users to purchase access to games through a digital distribution system. Instead of receiving a box, disc, or even CD key, purchased software is immediately attached on the Steam servers to the user’s Steam account (which is registered for free), from which it can be accessed and downloaded from anywhere that allows the use of the Steam client. Games can either be bought individually (with some exceptions) or as part of a “package” of multiple games, if one is available, which will provide better value for money. Digital distribution (Also known as digital delivery) is the principle of providing digital information and content over the Internet in the form of products or services. ...

Steam's list of payment options, given during each purchase process.

All purchases are made from the desktop through the Steam client, with an encrypted connection, and users are required to enter their billing details from scratch for each purchase as Steam does not store them between transactions. Only electronic payment is accepted: Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Information in this article or section has not been verified against sources and may not be reliable. ... A cryptographic protocol is an abstract or concrete protocol that performs a security-related function and applies cryptographic methods. ...

The Maestro debit cards popular in Europe are not supported directly, but can be used in Paypal payments. Visa is a brand of credit card and debit card operated by the Visa International Service Association of San Francisco, California, USA, an economic joint venture of 21,000 financial institutions that issue and market Visa products. ... MasterCard Worldwide (NYSE: MA) is a membership organization owned by the 25,000+ financial institutions that issue its card. ... American Express (NYSE: AXP), sometimes known as AmEx or Amex, is a diversified global financial services company, headquartered in New York City. ... Discover Network acceptance mark Discover Card is one of the four major credit card brands issued primarily in the United States, with over 50 million cardholders. ... Japan Credit Bureau, usually abbreviated as JCB, is a credit card company based in Tokyo, Japan. ... eBay North First Street satellite office campus (home to PayPal) PayPal is an e-commerce business allowing payments and money transfers to be made through the Internet. ... Visa Electron logo. ... A wire transfer is a method of transferring of funds from one entity to another. ... Maestro is an international debit card service; a joint venture by MasterCard and Europay International. ...


Price points

Disregarding discounts and package offers, most Steam games are priced at one of the following pre-tax levels:[4]

  • US$4.95 (retro games)
  • US$9.95
  • US$14.95
  • US$19.95
  • US$29.95
  • US$39.95 (publisher contracts only)
  • US$49.95 (publisher contracts only)
  • US$54.95 (for some regions)
  • US$59.95 (for some regions)

Steam receives criticism for the prices of games brought into its library through publisher contracts, which are almost all priced at US$49.95 or, more recently, US$39.95. In these cases Steam is frequently undercut to a large degree by physical retailers, sometimes from the moment they are made available through it. While Valve have never stated a reason for the high prices, it is worth bearing in mind Scott Miller's explanation of why prices for retailing games were also at US$49.95 on the Triton delivery service: Scott Miller is an entrepreneur and former game programmer. ... Triton is a digital delivery and digital rights management service created by Digital Streams Interactive, Inc. ...

Take2 even admitted that retailers are doing everything they can to slow down digital distribution ... They even threatened Take2, “if you guys drop the price on your digital side, then we’re not going to be taking as many games, or ANY games, on the retail side”. The retailers right now are doing everything they can to keep their share of the pie.[5]

Prices on Steam drop over time, but at a rate far slower than that of retail reductions.[citation needed] Take-Two Interactive Software, Inc. ...


Prices sometimes differ in different territories; for instance, Prey was available in America for US$19.95 but was US$49.95 everywhere else.[citation needed], while Bioshock has a listed price of US$49.95 for some areas, such as the United States, while it is US$54.95 in other areas, such as Europe. Some regions benefit from cheaper games on Steam than in retail because Steam is based on the US dollar. Australian recommended retail price for Bioshock is $89.95 AUD ($78 USD), while the game costs only $49.95 USD on Steam. Prey is an as of yet unreleased video game being developed by Human Head Studios and produced by 3D Realms, using a modified version of the Doom 3 engine. ...


Local VAT rates apply.


System limitations

There are several limitations to the current billing system:

  • Prices are always displayed in US$, regardless of the user’s local currency.
  • Tax is not applied to the quoted price until the very last stage of the purchase, after the user has entered their billing details.
  • All purchases end in an American bank, incurring an overseas transaction fee for some users.
  • Due to Steam products' ephemeral nature and Steam's resultant susceptibility to fraud, billing details entered must match exactly with those held by the bank.[6]
    • For the same reasons, certain types of failed transactions (such as chargebacks) will cause the user’s Steam account to be disabled until audited by support staff.[7]

USD redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Downloads

Steam screenshot depicting the user interface environment.

Instead of requiring users to seek out and download the content they want, Steam works, at a high level, in a manner analogous to a feed reader: The user selects the game they want on their computer and Steam then automates the process of downloading the content and keeping it up to date. The latest version of the game is immediately downloaded, and if there are multiple versions (e.g. a 64-bit edition) the correct one will be chosen automatically based on the computer’s hardware and/or software environment. This process happens every time Steam is started online, not just when a game is installed, ensuring that as many users as possible have the latest software. Image File history File links Steam_Jan062007_Interface. ... Image File history File links Steam_Jan062007_Interface. ... An aggregator or news aggregator is client software that uses a web feed to retrieve syndicated web content such as weblogs, podcasts, vlogs, and mainstream mass media websites, or in the case of a search aggregator, a customized set of search results. ... In computing, a 64-bit component is one in which data are processed or stored in 64-bit units (words). ...


Steam connects over its own internet protocol, independent of the HTTP or FTP protocols used by the web. It downloads only from dedicated “content servers” spread out across the world by Valve and authorised third parties,[8] connecting to several at once to try to ensure a fast and stable connection.[9] A common error in this process is the “content servers too busy” message – which is most likely to mean that the cached “clientregistry.blob” connection information has become corrupt, rather than its literal interpretation.[citation needed] Content is compressed during a download, to a currently uncertain ratio, but unpacked for local storage as it arrives. For other senses of this word, see protocol. ... HTTP (for HyperText Transfer Protocol) is the primary method used to convey information on the World Wide Web. ... The abbreviation FTP can refer to: The File Transfer Protocol used on the Internet. ...


Steam can validate its downloaded content for errors, a process that gives many of the benefits of reinstalling in a fraction of the time.


Content streaming

Steam has a “Distributed File System” that allows a game to launch before it has been completely downloaded.[10] By creating lists of files and requesting them only when about to be needed, a linear game can be begun with only the executable code and a buffer of the first few areas downloaded. In the worst-case scenario, the game will hang while Steam downloads in the background (ideally a progress bar would be displayed).


Steam’s “preloader” travels top-to-bottom through a defined list of files, whether the game is running or not, unless interrupted. The onus is almost entirely on the game developer to manage the system however, and nobody has yet developed any system that takes advantage of it beyond its built-in behaviour. In fact with a handful of exceptions only Valve’s old GoldSrc games use content streaming at all; as a result, and thanks to their age, they can be launched within seconds of their download starting on modern internet connections. A demonstration level created by Valve showcasing the GoldSrc engine. ...


Game Cache Files

Steam-integrated games download to non-compressed archive files with the extension .gcf, standing for Game Cache File, which can be found in the /SteamApps folder. The GCF format is a similar idea to the various archive formats used by other developers, such as PAK files, and has the following effects: The ZIP file format is a popular data compression and archival format. ...

  • Makes games more portable
  • Prevents the usually needless indexing of game data files by the operating system
  • Prevents users from accidentally overwriting important files
  • Allows Steam to tamper-proof files[11]
    • This allows servers to ensure custom content is not being used to cheat by forcing content to be loading from the GCF
  • Allows Steam to reserve disk drive space before a download starts, ensuring that the download will be able to complete regardless of future disk usage
  • Reduces fragmentation (internal fragmentation is still possible, but only need be corrected once)
  • Requires certain files, such as executables, to be duplicated in a standard operating system folder before a game can run

Games that do not fully integrate with Steam use the “No Cache File” .ncf format, which is merely an index of files pointing to a standard operating system folder in the /common subfolder. In a computer operating system, fragmentation is a consequence of allocating and freeing differently-sized blocks of data storage. ...


Valve have not released a tool that allows the unrestricted browsing of GCF files, although development tools for their games can browse for files relevant to them. Third-party tool GCFScape is widely used by Valve’s mod community to view and extract general data. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Social Networking

Screenshot of the "Steam Community".

On June 20, 2007, Valve announced a major update "The Steam Community", which would allow users to setup their own personal pages on Steam, along with many other social networking tools. Valve also believes that this will be the biggest update to Steam since its initial release. This update was released as a beta on August 6, 2007 and was officially released on September 12, 2007. Users are required to make a profile, called a SteamID, which will then be attached to your Steam User account. The SteamID page of each user contains info such as the users friends, how long they have played each game for in the past two weeks, their Steam Rating, which is a rating out of 10 according to how long they have played games for, and which groups they are in.[12] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 528 pixelsFull resolution (1001 × 661 pixel, file size: 83 KB, MIME type: image/png) Screenshot of Steams social networking, Steam Community. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 528 pixelsFull resolution (1001 × 661 pixel, file size: 83 KB, MIME type: image/png) Screenshot of Steams social networking, Steam Community. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


A major new feature in the Steam Community update is the new Steam Overlay. This is a layer put on the screen, whenever the user presses a defined hot key (customizable by the user) at the same time, has buttons to change Settings, view the players in your current server (For Source and GoldSrc games only) and view your Steam Friends list. This overlay works in any Steam game, not just Source and GoldSrc games. The overlay also functions in some non-Steam games that have been added to your Steam games list..


Friends

A conversation in The Steam Community friends.

Friends is Steam’s instant messaging service. Version 3.0 of the system was released on 31 May 2006, after several years of the broken and unmaintained version 2.0. Friends allows users of Steam accounts to enter one-to-one conversations; its defining features are its ability to be used both from the desktop and natively from games that support it, and its display of the game a user is running along with the ability to quickly join any multiplayer server he or she is connected to. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Instant messaging (IM) is a form of real-time communication between two or more people based on typed text. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Friends is a popular attack vector for phishers trying to hijack users’ Steam accounts, as it is a semi-official channel and can be accessed without buying any games. Valve have attempted to combat this by adding phishing warning messages at the start of each conversation and banning the use of certain words (such as “valve” and “steam”) from display names.[13] This phishing attempt, disguised as an official email from a (fictional) bank, attempts to trick the banks members into giving away their account information by confirming it at the phishers linked website. ...


On September 12, 2007, friends was updated with the Steam Community update. It now shows the users avatar by each users name, it allows Voice chat to be used as well as text, it changes the color of the users name depending on if they are Ingame/Online/etc, you can now make multi-user chats, and it now shows when users come online/send you a message/play a game, with a small fading rectangle in the bottom right corner of the screen. is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Server Browser

Steam’s server browser allows users to search, filter, bookmark and join internet and LAN games for the titles that integrate with it. It works from the desktop and from a game's menu, and integrates with Friends to show a centralised list of servers to which contacts are connected. “LAN” redirects here. ...


Valve Anti-Cheat

Valve's proprietary anti-cheat solution incorporated into Steam. See Valve Anti-Cheat. Valve Anti-Cheat, abbreviated to VAC, is a proprietary anti-cheat solution developed and maintained by Valve Corporation as a component of the Steam platform. ...


Promotions

Alongside standard pop-up “Update News” adverts and price discounts, Steam provides Guest Pass, Free Weekend and Hardware promotions, all of which unique to it:


Guest Passes

The Guest Pass dialogue.

Guest passes are a similar concept to that of spawned copies of games. Each pass allows the owner of the associated multiplayer game to hand out unrestricted but time-limited access by entering the Steam account name or e-mail address of a friend. The system is designed to replace standard multiplayer demos that inevitably crowd users into demo servers where they are either picked on by experienced players or unable to play with the full version’s player base. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


Guest Passes are made generally available on an account when one of the games that use the system (currently Counter-Strike: Source, Day of Defeat: Source, The Ship and Red Orchestra) are purchased, when guest passes are first enabled for a game, and in some cases when a first pass or set of passes given to an account reaches its expiry date. ... Day of Defeat (DoD) is a team-based multiplayer World War II first-person shooter computer game. ... The Ship is a first person shooter computer game utilising Valve Softwares Source engine developed at Outerlight Ltd. ...


Free Weekends

Free Weekends are multi-player promotions in which a game becomes free to play on Steam for a weekend, or sometimes an entire week. When the promotion ends users can no longer play the game, but have already downloaded everything they need to continue doing so once they have bought a copy.


Free Weekends are criticized by existing players for flooding a game’s servers with newbies, and allowing cheaters free reign. This article or section should be merged with WP:INTRO and WP:TUTOR Wikipedia is an encyclopedia written collaboratively by its readers. ... Cheating in online games are activities that modify the game experience to give one player an unfair advantage over the other players. ...


Hardware promotions

Steam keeps a record of the hardware in the computer it is running on for various purposes (see #Statistic gathering), one of which is enabling hardware manufacturers to run after-sale promotions directly to their customers. The first (and currently only) example of this is the "ATi Steam Offer",[14] which gives free copies of Half-Life 2: Lost Coast and Half-Life 2: Deathmatch to all owners of Radeon video cards, one bundle per card, and is to last from May 2007 to an unspecified future date. ATI Radeon is a brand of graphics processing units (GPU) that has been manufactured by ATI Technologies since 2000 and the successor to their Rage line. ... A video card, also referred to as a graphics accelerator card, display adapter, graphics card, and numerous other terms, is an item of personal computer hardware whose function is to generate and output images to a display. ...


The promotional games are handed out based on a unique hardware ID, which can be spoofed. This leads to a user illegitimately gaining almost infinite sets of the promo games (that may well be sold on, to give a motive for such actions), and also to the legitimate owner of the hardware with that ID being unable to claim their games.


ATi has also announced on their website that copies of Steam will be distributed alongside all Catalyst driver and software installations throughout early 2008.[15] It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Catalysis. ...


Statistic gathering

Steam collects and reports anonymous and non-identifying metrics of its usage, stability, and performance, both from the client and from some games. While some of these data are reported back to the public in aggregate form, for instance hardware specifications and gameplay statistics, other data has been known to be collected without any indication.


To date the only known example of undisclosed collection has been that of the level of internal fragmentation of Steam's files. The data was used to justify the development of an internal defragmentation utility to reverse the performance-degrading process. "Rather than having to guess or estimate performance bottle-necks", a Steam Update News entry said at the time, "Steam gave us the ability to precisely solve the real-world problem."[16] In a computer operating system, fragmentation is a consequence of allocating and freeing differently-sized blocks of data storage. ... In the context of administering computer systems, defragmentation is a process that reduces the amount of fragmentation in file systems. ...


The full extent of statistic gathering is unknown.


Mod integration

In most games there is no built-in utility for launching mods, but Steam’s interface treats them in almost exactly the same way as it does purchased games; including, for some, browsable pages on the official site. Mods appear in a user’s list of installed games with the icons, developer links and other such details that are used by full games.[17] They can also use VAC, Friends, the server browser, and any other Steam feature supported by their parent game. They cannot currently be distributed through Steam however, and as such do not automatically update or use the GCF or NCF file formats. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Currently, mods for Valve’s GoldSrc games, Valve’s Source games and Red Orchestra can be integrated. A demonstration level created by Valve showcasing the GoldSrc engine. ... Source engine logo A Half-Life 2: Episode One scene running on the Source engine, demonstrating High Dynamic Range, Rim lighting, Phong shading, facial expressions, realtime cameras and VGUI. In-engine Team Fortress 2 character line-up, demonstrating a cartoon-oriented set of basic shaders, depth of field, facial animation...


History

Steam's development began at an uncertain date prior to 2002. Prior to 'Steam', its codenames were 'Grid' and 'Gazelle'.[18] It was revealed to the public on 22 March 2002 at the Game Developers Conference,[19] and was presented purely as a distribution network: no mention of purchases was made. During his presentation Gabe Newell claimed "consumers [could] purchase and start applications faster than if they install them from a CD" and cited the "[elimination of] the overhead costs of traditional physical distribution" (GameSpot quotes). To demonstrate the ease of integrating Steam to a game, Relic Entertainment had created a special version of their then-unreleased game Impossible Creatures (Relic hadn't any further involvement in Steam until Company of Heroes was released in 2007). is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... The Game Developers Conference (GDC) is the largest annual gathering of professional video game developers, focusing on learning, inspiration, and networking. ... Relic Entertainment is a game development company that specializes in 3D real-time strategy games and has released a number of innovative PC games. ... Impossible Creatures is a real time strategy game developed by Relic Entertainment in conjunction with Microsoft Game Studios. ...


Two future Steam components — 'Tracker', now Friends, and the server browser, had actually been released prior to the GDC presentation, along with the Counter-Strike 1.4 beta on February 27, 2002.[20] These components and their VGUI display engine were eventually to be integrated into the main client. Counter-Strike (CS) is a popular team-based mod of Valves first-person shooter (FPS) Half-Life. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...

Section under construction; disjoint follows.

This possibility was poignantly highlighted by the legal battle between Valve and their publisher Vivendi Universal Games, where VUG argued that Steam was an attempt to circumvent their publishing agreement. However, on November 29, 2004, Valve announced that the courts had granted their motion of summary judgement in this case. Vivendi Universal (VU) is a French company active in media and communications with activities in music, television and film, publishing, telecommunications and the Internet. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A summary judgment is a legal decision in a case made when one party to a lawsuit requests summary judgment by pre-trial motion. ...



The client application, Steam version 1.0, was first made available for download in 2002 during the beta period for Counter-Strike 1.4. At that time, it appeared to be a method of streamlining the patch process common in online computer games. Installation and use of the Steam program was mandatory for CS 1.4 beta testers, but Steam remained an optional component. Some time after CS 1.5 was released, Steam and WON users were allowed to play against each other on the same servers. Later, Steam version 2.0, complete with a new VGUI2 interface previously only seen on the Tracker component (which then became Friends), was released along with the Counter-Strike 1.6 beta. In late 2003, Steam was revealed as a replacement for much of the dated framework of WON and Half-Life multiplayer and also as a distribution system for entire games. Counter-Strike (CS) is a popular team-based mod of Valves first-person shooter (FPS) Half-Life. ... A computer game is a game composed of a computer-controlled virtual universe that players interact with in order to achieve a defined goal or set of goals. ...


Valve's Doug Lombardi announced in October 2004 that Half-Life 2 required activation via Steam in order to play the game. When Half-Life 2 arrived at some stores earlier than its intended release date of November 16, Valve reported that their contract with Vivendi prevented them from activating the Steam authentication servers until the 16th. is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Recently, Valve has been negotiating contracts with several publishers and independent developers to release their products on Steam, typically with a pre-order discount of 10% off their MSRP. Rag Doll Kung Fu and Darwinia are two examples, and Canadian publisher Strategy First announced in December 2005 that it would be partnering with Valve for digital distribution of current and future titles. Rag Doll Kung Fu is a fighting/party computer game created nearly entirely by the previous Lionhead Studios artist Mark Healey and distributed over Valves Steam content delivery platform starting October 12, 2005. ... Darwinia is the second game made by Introversion Software, the creators of Uplink. ... Strategy First is a software company based in Montreal, Canada. ...


On Friday, March 24, 2006, Valve has implemented a column under the "My Games" tab in which it states the Metacritic score (Metascore) for each of the game. The Metascore is calculated through an average of the scores given to it by other critics, such as IGN.com and Gamespot.com. is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Metacritic is a website that collates reviews of music albums, games, movies, TV shows, DVDs and books. ...


Early Instability

Up until early/mid 2004, Steam was a very unstable system in all regards. Catastrophic crashes, constant connectivity issues, along with a broken Friends system and general glitches prevailed. It was during this period that negative feedback concerning Steam was at its peak, particularly when the former WON validation system was shut down — while the service did not cope with the extra load in an unusually bad way, the huge influx of new users increased the volume of complaints immensely. A crash in computing is a condition where a program (either an application or part of the operating system) stops performing its expected function and also stops responding to other parts of the system. ... Glitch City, a Pokémon programming error that creates a jumble of pixels A glitch is a short-lived fault in a system. ...


Half-Life 2 Release

On November 16, 2004, Half-Life 2 was officially released. While the launch was mainly regarded as successful, later in the day a significant number of buyers (both through Steam and retail) found themselves unable to play the game, due in part to a bottleneck of Valve's Steam system. The European authentication servers went down for about 5 hours before being fixed, preventing those with accounts stored on them from decrypting or playing the game they had bought. The problem was, according to Steam engineer Taylor Sherman, "a little more involved" than lack of bandwidth. He predicted that the problem would never happen again. is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Half-Life 2 (HL2) is a science fiction first-person shooter computer game that is the sequel to Half-Life. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


Steam 3.0

The Steam 2.0 client was introduced for the platform's official release; Steam 3.0 is therefore the first major architectural upgrade undergone by the system's end-user software. While Valve has never explicitly stated their aims in regard to 3.0, they are believed by industry commentators to be based around the transition of Steam from something that 'just works' to a platform that customers and developers would positively want to use for more tangible reasons than profit margins and independence. This view is supported by the list of known Steam 3.0 technologies:

Valve Anti-Cheat 2
See Valve Anti-Cheat
User Interface 3.0
Designed to accommodate a larger catalogue[21]
Supported à la carte purchasing
Provided room for future expansion
Released on October 11, 2005[22] after a six-day public beta.
Friends 3.0
Based on new UDP connection technology[23]
Allows future expansion
'Guest Passes' now re-offered[24][25]
Beta opened January 31, 2006, refreshed on March 13, 2006[26]
Officially released May 31, 2006, ahead of Half-Life 2: Episode One.[27]

Versions (although the term is somewhat of a misnomer) 2.0 and 3.0 of Steam are operated simultaneously as functions are migrated. Version 2.0 is contained within steam.dll, while the parts of 3.0 in use can be found in steamclient.dll. Valve Anti-Cheat, abbreviated to VAC, is a proprietary anti-cheat solution developed and maintained by Valve Corporation as a component of the Steam platform. ... A la carte (also à la carte), is a French phrase meaning from the menu, and it is used in restaurant terminology in one of two ways: First, it may refer to a menu of items priced and ordered separately rather than selected from a list of preset multi-course meals... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... User Datagram Protocol (UDP) is one of the core protocols of the Internet protocol suite. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Valve Cyber Café Program

Steam has also allowed Valve to run a subscription-based cyber café program [1], the Valve Cyber Café Program, which is the only legal way for a cyber café to offer Steam-based games. There are two pricing models, a flat-rate per-client fee each month or the upcoming 'Valve Time Tracker' system that offers a pay-as-you-go model.


Program benefits

In addition to what is offered by the regular Steam client (see above), the Cybercafé program:

  • Is cheaper in the short term
  • Gives access to all participating titles from the Steam library, including new releases, for a fixed fee
  • Gives access to the Cybercafé Administration Server (CAS)
    • Updates are downloaded once to the server then distributed to clients via LAN
    • Licenses can be used on any computer on the premises
    • Stores a customer's saved games and configurations as a permanent profile
  • Free tournament licenses
  • Promotional materials
  • Account protection against bannings and thefts
  • Priority support
  • Optional entry in the Cyber Café Directory

Lan can stand for several things: A local area network Lan (airline) formerly LanChile Lan Peru Län, a kind of administrative division used in Sweden Lan Mandragoran, a fictional character in the Wheel of Time fantasy series by Robert Jordan. ...

Program drawbacks

  • The flat-rate fee model can end up more expensive in cafés where Steam games are not often played.
  • Not all games can be offered as not all of Valve's clients agree to café distribution.

Criticism of Steam

Privacy concerns

The matter of privacy has been raised, as it is necessary to validate every Steam game online before it can be launched (an "offline mode" can subsequently be used). There are no alternate methods of activation such as via telephone or fax, which causes the system to deny access to those without internet connections. For other uses, see Telephone (disambiguation). ... A Samsung fax machine Fax (short for facsimile, from Latin fac simile, make similar, i. ...


While it is not widely discussed, Steam also collects and reports anonymous and non-identifying metrics of its usage, stability, and performance. Steam is also used to report similarly anonymous and non-identifying data by several of its games. While some forms of this data are reported back to the public in aggregate form, for instance hardware specifications and gameplay statistics, other non-identifying data has been known to be collected without any indication (and with the Steam EULA absolving Valve of responsibility). A software license is a type of proprietary or gratiuitious license as well as a memorandum of contract between a producer and a user of computer software — sometimes called an End User License Agreement (EULA) — that specifies the perimeters of the permission granted by the owner to the...


To date the only known example of this undisclosed collection of data has been that of the level of internal fragmentation of Steam's files. The data was used to justify the development of an internal defragmentation utility to reverse the performance-degrading process. "Rather than having to guess or estimate performance bottle-necks", a Steam Update News entry said at the time, "Steam gave us the ability to precisely solve the real-world problem."[16] In a computer operating system, fragmentation is a consequence of allocating and freeing differently-sized blocks of data storage. ... In the context of administering computer systems, defragmentation is a process that reduces the amount of fragmentation in file systems. ...


The full extent of undisclosed data collection is unknown.


Possibility of system failure

A topic of discussion among Steam users is how their games will be activated if Steam is no longer available. Valve head Gabe Newell made the following statement on the issue:[28]

If you right click on a game in Steam, you'll see that you can back up the files yourself. Unless there was some situation I don't understand, we would presumably disable authentication before any event that would preclude the authentication servers from being available.

We've tested disabling authentication and it works.

However, this speculative public statement attributed to Mr. Newell is not contained or otherwise reflected in the current Steam Subscriber Agreement (found at http://www.steampowered.com/v/index.php?area=subscriber_agreement). According to the Steam Subscriber Agreement, Steam's availability is not guaranteed and Valve is under no legal obligation to release any such update disabling Steam's authentication in any event.


Temporary system failures, most recently the December 2006 Seattle storms that knocked out root authentication servers and brought down the entire network,[29] must currently be weathered by users wishing to play online or make new purchases. Recent examples of such downtimes are listed in the History section.


Resale limitations

Games bought through Steam cannot legally be resold due to the unsuitability of current Proof of Purchase laws. The only valid proof in an entirely digital transaction is the credit card used during the process; as credit cards ownership cannot be transferred, neither can that of Steam-bought games. Valve term Steam purchases "subscriptions",[30] attempting to avoid any legal paradoxes this situation might create - such as anti-trust violations from the dampening secondary market of their and their clients' products. A proof of purchase is typically some portion of the package of consumer goods, and is defined by the products manufacturer. ... Anti-competitive practices are business or government practices that prevent and/or reduce competition in a market. ... The secondary market is the financial market for trading of securities that have already been issued in an initial private or public offering. ...


Valve does not explicitly prohibit account transfers, but claims that, as a source of fraud within their systems, they are ill-advised.


When a buyer purchases a boxed game he/she must authenticate it with the registration of a CD Key.[31] In the event that the CD Key that they have registered is already in Steam's database, the user is required to submit an image of the physical purchased CD Key for verification purposes, as well as a purchase receipt less than 90 days old[32]. However, if the user has bought used software, either from a vendor, online auction or another user, Valve will not transfer the CD Key to the new owner, rendering the software useless. A serial number is a unique number that is one of a series assigned for identification which varies from its successor or predecessor by a fixed discrete integer value. ...


Forced auto-updating

Another commonly debated issue is that of Steam's auto-update model. By default, to play a game offline, Steam and the game itself must be fully updated. Updates are checked for whenever Steam starts online: if there is an update available, the user is forced to wait for update process to finish before being able to play again (Steam is able to stream games when online,[33] allowing them to be run before all of their content is downloaded and avoiding this issue, but the feature is rarely used even by Valve).


Furthermore, once applied an update cannot be rolled back by the user. While this is beneficial when a problematic update needs to be recalled and in ensuring client compatibility in online games, it prevents users with unusual or unrecognized issues reverting their software to its previous, functional state.


As of 27 June 2007 Steam can be set to stay offline and never attempt a connection,[34] allowing users to reliably prevent it from ever connecting without needing external software. is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Changes to minimum specifications

On 26 February 2007 an update to Steam was released that warned users running Windows 98 and Windows Me that past 30 June 2007 their systems would no longer be able to run the program, or any games that previously supported those operating systems, and which also warned users without SSE processors that Source engine games would no longer function "within the next few months" if they did not upgrade their computer hardware (due to the impending release of its multiprocessor update).[35] Windows 98 (codenamed Memphis) is a graphical operating system released on June 25, 1998 by Microsoft and the successor to Windows 95. ... Windows Millennium Edition, or Windows Me (IPA pronunciation: [miː], [ɛm iː]), is a hybrid 16-bit/32-bit graphical operating system released on September 14, 2000 by Microsoft. ... SSE (Streaming SIMD Extensions, originally called ISSE, Internet Streaming SIMD Extensions) is a SIMD (Single Instruction, Multiple Data) instruction set designed by Intel and introduced in 1999 in their Pentium III series processors as a reply to AMDs 3DNow! (which had debuted a year earlier). ... Source engine logo A Half-Life 2: Episode One scene running on the Source engine, demonstrating High Dynamic Range, Rim lighting, Phong shading, facial expressions, realtime cameras and VGUI. In-engine Team Fortress 2 character line-up, demonstrating a cartoon-oriented set of basic shaders, depth of field, facial animation... Source engine logo A Half-Life 2: Episode One scene running on the Source engine, demonstrating High Dynamic Range, Rim lighting, Phong shading, facial expressions, realtime cameras and VGUI. In-engine Team Fortress 2 character line-up, demonstrating a cartoon-oriented set of basic shaders, depth of field, facial animation...


Although both of these new criteria most likely affected only a small percentage of Steam users based upon the results of the Steam Hardware Survey (found at http://www.steampowered.com/status/survey.html ),[35] these changes in system requirements clearly demonstrate how Valve's policy of forcing all Steam users to run only the latest version of the Steam software can prevent existing customers of games which require Steam from being able to play those games because their computers can no longer run Steam due to the changed system requirements.


Auto-updates and third-party mods

The auto-update model can also affect the large mod community surrounding Steam games. Several times in the past an update to a game has damaged its third-party mods, sometimes to the point at which they cannot run. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


This issue has largely been eliminated with Steam's beta test function, which allows mod makers to self-test their projects with an update before it is released to the wider user base. The process relies on the modders to spot errors, and is as such far from infallible (an issue with one update which crippled the pre-retail Garry's Mod was well-known during the beta period, but not addressed by Garry or Valve until after release), but has in general improved the situation considerably. In software engineering, development stage terminology expresses how far through the development sequence things have progressed and how much further development a product may require. ... “Garry Newman” redirects here. ...


Cross-platform Support

Steam is criticized by some of its users and in some cases open source advocates for not being available for Linux and Mac OS X; Valve describes it as "strictly a Windows application".[36] In 2005 this stance led to a discussion thread on the official forums which accrued 1600 posts until it was closed in 2007 by a volunteer moderator.[37] On 16 September 2007, Valve posted a job posting on their official site looking for "Port Windows-based games to the Linux platform."[38] Open source refers to projects that are open to the public and which draw on other projects that are freely available to the general public. ... This article is about operating systems that use the Linux kernel. ... Mac OS X (IPA: ) is a line of graphical operating systems developed, marketed, and sold by Apple Inc. ... “Windows” redirects here. ... Gaia Online, the largest English language forum-based community as of April 2005 — powered by a modified version of phpBB. An Internet forum is a web application which provides for discussion, often in conjunction with online communities. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Reduced Performance

Since it is required to have the Steam software running in order to play a game which requires Steam whether online or offline, this can negatively impact a game's performance, especially on older computers. This is especially evident for older games, such as the original Half-Life which have been updated since their original releases to require Steam, where the memory and virtual memory usage of the Steam software sometimes surpasses that of the game itself. Even computers that could easily run a game prior to its update that requires Steam may experience noticeable or substantial performance issues such as frame rate drops when running the newer version of the game which requires Steam. Half-Life For a quantity subject to exponential decay, the half-life is the time required for the quantity to fall to half of its initial value. ... How virtual memory maps to physical memory Virtual memory is an addressing scheme implemented in hardware and software that allows non-contiguous memory to be addressed as if it were contiguous. ... Frame rate, or frame frequency, is the measurement of the frequency (rate) at which an imaging device produces unique consecutive images called frames. ...


Security

Many hacks sprang up following Half-Life 2's launch, each claiming to be able to circumvent Steam and enable the user to get the games for free. Many were actually trojans, keyloggers, or viruses. Some were genuine, but Valve, realizing the advent of complaints about hacks being used, released server-side fixes to prevent users who had not paid for the software from playing online and disabled accounts using them whenever possible. It is still possible to circumvent Steam's authentication process and download some of the games listed on Steam for free using various warez programs. A re-write of the client user ticket authentication system successfully stopped illegitimate users from playing any Steam games online. In the context of computer software, a Trojan horse is a program that installs malicious software while under the guise of doing something else. ... Keystroke logging (often called keylogging) is a diagnostic tool used in software development that captures the users keystrokes. ... A computer virus is a computer program that can copy itself and infect a computer without permission or knowledge of the user. ... Warez refers primarily to virtual copyrighted material traded in violation of copyright law. ...

  • On December 15, 2005 Valve warned its customers that, having fixed the security holes that allowed several 'Steam hacks' to function, their creators had added code to steal legitimate account information instead [2]. They also warned of cheat distributors bundling keyloggers with their supposedly undetectable cheats.
  • Servers can sometimes (the situation frequently changes) be modified to allow illegitimate and legitimate users to play alongside each other. These servers are able to use VAC and other anti-cheat tools to ban cheaters, but naturally the schemes are not effective in an environment where new identities can be created instantly and freely.
  • When Steam's authentication servers are off-line (for instance during maintenance) illegitimate users can play on legitimate servers.
  • Single-player and LAN (i.e. offline) gameplay is entirely open, with cracker-produced code available to replace Steam's vital functions.

is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Localization

Steam is available in 18 languages:

The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Traditional Chinese (Traditional Chinese: 正體字/繁體字, Simplified Chinese: 正体字/繁体字) refers to one of two standard sets of printed Chinese characters. ...

See also

A SteamID is a unique identifier used for Steam, an online game service run by Valve Software. ... This article is being considered for deletion for the 2nd time in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Valve Corporation is an American video game developer based in Bellevue, Washington, USA, made famous by its first product, Half-Life, which was released in November 1998. ... Valve Anti-Cheat, abbreviated to VAC, is a proprietary anti-cheat solution developed and maintained by Valve Corporation as a component of the Steam platform. ... Digital distribution (Also known as digital delivery) is the principle of providing digital information and content over the Internet in the form of products or services. ... GameTap is a subscription-based video game service by Turner Broadcasting System (TBS). ... GameShadow is a freeware utility that keeps PC gamers up-to-date with patches, game demos, movies, mods and other content for PC games. ... EA Link EA (Electronic Arts) Link is an electronic content delivery system that brings the companys products directly to the consumer over the Internet like a purchased download would. ... Stardock Central is a software content delivery and digital rights management system used by Stardock customers to access components of the Object Desktop, TotalGaming. ... Direct2Drive is a video game and entertainment distributor and retail store operated alongside its FilePlanet service by IGN and GameSpy since 2004. ... RealNetworks NASDAQ: RNWK is a provider of Internet media delivery software and services based in Seattle, United States. ...

References

  1. ^ Steam® Surpasses 13 Million Accounts. Steam news (2007-05-23). Retrieved on 2007-05-24.
  2. ^ What forms of payment are accepted on Steam?. Steam Credit Card Purchase and Billing FAQ (17 October 2006). Retrieved on 2006-10-21.
  3. ^ PayPal and Wire Transfer arriving soon. "The Steam Review" (August 27 2006). Retrieved on 2006-10-06.
  4. ^ Steam library. Steam homepage (n.d.). Retrieved on 2007-05-20.
  5. ^ Next-Gen.Biz Podcast Episode 6. Next-Gen Podcasts (2006-10-17). Retrieved on 2007-05-20.
  6. ^ Why was my purchase declined?. "Steam Credit Card Purchase and Billing FAQ (17 October 2006). Retrieved on 2006-10-21.
  7. ^ Why is my Steam account disabled?. Steam Support (17 October 2006). Retrieved on 2006-10-26.
  8. ^ Content Server Stats. Steam homepage (n.d.). Retrieved on 2007-05-20. (click “View individual server statistics”)
  9. ^ Taylor Sherman (2005-05-09). re: Oz users STILL stuffed on server selection for update. Steam Users Forums. Retrieved on 2007-10-20.
  10. ^ Content streaming. Valve Developer Community (2006-05-14). Retrieved on 2007-05-20.
  11. ^ Pure servers. Valve Developer Community (2007-06-06). Retrieved on 2007-07-11.
  12. ^ http://developer.valvesoftware.com/wiki/Steam_rating
  13. ^ Steam client update released. Steam news (30 August 2006). Retrieved on 2007-05-20.
  14. ^ ATi Steam Offer. Steam homepage (2007-05-30). Retrieved on 2007-06-04.
  15. ^ ATi Steam Promotion. ATi Technologies homepage. Retrieved on 2007-06-05.
  16. ^ a b Wednesday May 31, 2006 - Steam client update released. Steam Update News (31 May 2006). Retrieved on 2006-10-26.
  17. ^ Steam 3rd Party Mod Support. Valve Developer Community (2006). Retrieved on 2007-06-04.
  18. ^ Talk:GCF. Valve Developer Community (9 October 2005). Retrieved on 7 September 2006.
  19. ^ GDC 2002: Valve unveils Steam. GameSpot.com (22 March 2002). Retrieved on 7 September 2006.
  20. ^ Valves Tracker. CS Extreme (7 March 2002). Retrieved on 7 September 2006.
  21. ^ Steam to receive ‘visual overhaul’. The Steam Review (September 29 2005). Retrieved on 2006-11-29.
  22. ^ Steam Client Update Released. Steam News (October 11 2005). Retrieved on 2006-11-29.
  23. ^ Friends 3.0 Pre-beta Interview. The Steam Review (January 1 2006). Retrieved on 2006-11-29.
  24. ^ Guest Passes resurface. The Steam Review (October 27 2006). Retrieved on 2006-11-29.
  25. ^ Steam News - Release of GuestPasses. Steam (January 8 2007). Retrieved on 2007-01-09.
  26. ^ Friends Beta. Valve Developer Community (January 31 2006). Retrieved on 2006-11-29.
  27. ^ Steam client update released. Steam Update News (May 31 2006). Retrieved on 2006-11-29.
  28. ^ I emailed Gabe Newell about what would happen if Steam went down. "Steam User Forums" (6 September 2005). Retrieved on 2006-10-06.
  29. ^ Steam Unavailable; Seattle Area Power Outage. Shacknews (15 December 2006). Retrieved on 2007-09-23.
  30. ^ Steam Subscriber Agreement (11 August 2005). Retrieved on 2007-06-25.
  31. ^ Retail CD Keys. Valve Corporation (02/27/2007). Retrieved on 2007-03-18.
  32. ^ CD Key Reset Process. Valve Corporation (02/27/2007). Retrieved on 2007-03-18.
  33. ^ Content Streaming. Valve Developer Community (28 June 2005). Retrieved on 2007-01-18.
  34. ^ Steam client update released. Steam news (2007-06-27). Retrieved on 2007-06-27.
  35. ^ a b Windows 98/ME support ending this July. The Steam Review (2007-03-01). Retrieved on 2007-04-05.
  36. ^ Answer. Valve Corp. (2007-07-17). Retrieved on 2007-07-19.
  37. ^ Linux client!!!. Steam Forums (2005-12-14). Retrieved on 2007-07-19.
  38. ^ Valve Porting Steam Games To Linux?. Phoronix (2007-09-16). Retrieved on 2007-09-16.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Official
Steam website - Official Steam website
The Steam Community - web access to Steam's social networking features
Valve Software - Valve's official website
Valve Developer Community/Steam - Steam category on the official VDC Wiki
Community
Steam Users Forums - Official discussion forums
The Steam Review - Analytical comment and discussion on Steam
The Steam Podcast - Weekly chat about recent Steam news, gaming and hardware news, and interviews with people in the industry
How to run Steam in Linux using Cedega (formerly WineX)
GCFScape: Tool for viewing and extracting Steam's GCF format
Other
CrosuS: Community-built mod download service supporting various games and mods

  Results from FactBites:
 
Valve (340 words)
Steam provides the ability to distribute games and other content directly to customers.
Steam also provides integrated tools for publishing content directly to customers, flexible billing, ensured-version control, anti-cheating, anti-piracy, game-server browser functionality, an in-game instant messaging platform, and more.
Valve, the Valve logo, Half-Life, the Half-Life logo, the Lambda logo, Steam, the Steam logo, Team Fortress, the Team Fortress logo, Opposing Force, Day of Defeat, the Day of Defeat logo, Counter-Strike, the Counter-Strike logo, Source, the Source logo, Valve Source and Counter-Strike: Condition Zero are trademarks and/or registered trademarks of Valve Corporation.
Steam (content delivery) information - Search.com (2648 words)
Steam was primarily developed to attain 'secure content delivery and rights management' (primary source lost, consider secondary), allowing users to download, update and use content wherever they are, ensuring in the process that they own the product.
In early February 2005 a backend Steam server crashed, causing exactly half of all users to be unable to log in (all those registered to one of the two authentication server groupings).
Despite a six-day public beta [7], the new Steam UI released on October 11 2005 [8] contained a bug that caused all mods for all games to crash on load, for anyone with a space in their install path (such as "/Program Files/").
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m