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Encyclopedia > Statutory holidays

The word holiday has related but different meanings in English-speaking countries. Based on the words holy and day -, holidays originally represented special religious days. The word has evolved in general usage to mean any special day. Holiness means the state of being holy, that is, set apart for the worship or service of a god or gods. ... A day (symbol: d) is a unit of time equal to 24 hours. ...


In most of the English-speaking world a holiday is also a period spent away from home or business in travel or recreation (e.g. "I'm going on holiday to Malta next week"), the North American equivalent being "vacation". However, some Canadians (especially those of English or Irish decent) will use both the terms vacation and holiday interchangeably when referring to a trip away from home or time off work. Travel is the transport of people on a trip or journey. ... Tigers playing in the water. ... This article is on vacation as time off. ...


In Canada and the United States, a Holiday is a day set aside by a nation or culture (in some cases, multiple nations and cultures) typically for celebration but sometimes for some other kind of special culture-wide (or national) observation or activity. A holiday can also be a special day on which school and/or offices are closed, such as Labor Day. One of the most influential doctrines in history is that all humans are divided into groups called nations. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Culture The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... A celebration is a joyous observation on the occasion of either something joyful that is happening or has just happened: a birth, etc. ...

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Public holidays

A public holiday or legal holiday is a holiday endorsed by the state. Public holidays can be either religious, in which case they reflect the dominant religion in a country, or secular, in which case they are usually political or historical in character. "Public Holiday" is the term used in Australia and "Bank Holiday" in the UK, although some industries in the UK work through Bank Holidays. "Legal holiday" is not a term used outside the United States. A state is an organized political community occupying a definite territory, having an organized government/anarchy, and possessing internal and external and even in your pantssovereignty. ... This article concerns secularity, that is, being secular, in various senses. ... Politics is the process and method of decision-making for groups of human beings. ... History is often used as a generic term for information about the past, such as in geologic history of the Earth. When used as the name of a field of study, history refers to the study and interpretation of the record of human societies. ... In the United States, a holiday is a day set aside by a nation or culture (in some cases, multiple nations and cultures) typically for celebration but sometimes for some other kind of special culture-wide (or national) observation or activity. ...


Consecutive holidays

Consecutive holidays are a string of holidays taken together without working days in between. They tend to be considered a good chance to take short trips. In late 1990s, the Japanese government passed a law that increased the likelihood of consecutive holidays by moving holidays from fixed days to a relative position in a month, such as the second Monday. Well-known consecutive holidays include:

  • In Japan, golden-week, lasting roughly a full week.
  • In Poland during holidays on the 1st and 3rd of May, when taking a few days of leave can result in 9-day-long holidays; this is called The Picnic (or Majówka).
  • In Ireland, St. Patrick's Day can occasionally occur in Holy Week, the week before Easter; in this case the three holidays (St. Patrick's Day, Good Friday, and Easter Monday) plus three days leave can result in a 10-day break.
  • In Australia and England, a public holiday otherwise falling on a Sunday will result in observance of the public holiday on the next available weekday (generally Monday). This arrangement results in a long weekend
  • The U.S. Congress changed the observance of Memorial Day, Veterans Day, and Washington's Birthday from fixed dates to certain Mondays in 1968 (effective 1971). Several states had passed similar laws earlier.

Golden Week (Japanese: ゴールデンウィーク or 黄金週間, abbreviation: GW) is a Japanese term applied to the period containing the following public holidays: April 29 Greenery Day (みどりの日, until 2006) Showa Day (昭和の日, from 2007) May 3 - Constitution Memorial Day (憲法記念日) May 4 Bank Holiday (国民の休日, from 1985 to 2006) Greenery Day... In the armed forces, leave is permission to be away from ones unit for a period of time. ... Holidays in Poland are regulated by the Non-working Days Act of 18 January 1951 (Ustawa z dnia 18 stycznia 1951 o dniach wolnych od pracy) — Journal of Laws, No. ... Friends and family gather for a picnic in a public park in Columbus, Ohio, c. ... St. ... Holy Week is the Christian week from Palm Sunday through Holy Saturday. ... Easter is the most important religious holiday of the Christian liturgical year, observed in March, April, or May to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus, which Christians believe occurred after his death by crucifixion in AD 30-33 (see Good Friday). ... Good Friday is a holy day celebrated by Christians on the Friday before Easter or Pascha. ... Easter Monday is a Christian holiday celebrated the next day after Easter Sunday. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... A long weekend is a term used in Western countries, particularly in North America, to denote a weekend that is at least three days long (a three-day weekend), due to a holiday falling on either the Friday or Monday. ... Congress in Joint Session. ... Relatives and others traditionally place flags near veterans headstones on Memorial Day Memorial Day is a United States federal holiday that takes place on May 30th and is observed on the last Monday of May. ... There are 24. ... Washingtons Birthday, popularly known as Presidents Day, is a national holiday in the United States of America celebrated on the third Monday of February. ...

Religious holidays

Buddhist holidays

A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE. It had subsequently been accepted by... ... Stalls selling food or toys are a familiar sight at festivals throughout Japan. ... Shinto (Kanji: 神道 Shintō) (sometimes called Shintoism) is a native religion of Japan and was once its state religion. ... Blessed Rainy Day is the holiday marking the end of the monsoon season in Bhutan. ...

Celtic, Norse, and Neopagan holidays

In the order of the Wheel of the Year: Celtic mythology is the mythology of Celtic polytheism, the apparent religion of the Iron Age Celts. ... Norse or Scandinavian mythology refers to the pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian people, including those who settled on Iceland, where the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... Neopaganism (sometimes Neo-Paganism) describes a heterogeneous group of new religious movements, particularly those influenced by ancient, mainly pre-Christian and sometimes pre-Judaic religions. ... In Neopaganism, the Wheel of the Year is the natural cycle of the seasons, commemorated by the eight Sabbats. ...

This article contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... October 31 is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 61 days remaining, as the final day of October. ... November 1 is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 60 days remaining. ... The New Year is an event that happens when a culture celebrates the end of one year and the beginning of the next. ... In many parts of the world, winter is associated with snow. ... October 29 is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 63 days remaining. ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... The New Year is an event that happens when a culture celebrates the end of one year and the beginning of the next. ... Yule was the winter solstice celebration of the Germanic pagans still celebrated by Ásatrúar. ... December 21 is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... December 22 is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Illumination of Earth by Sun on the day of the northern hemisphere winter solstice Illumination of Earth by Sun on the day of the southern hemisphere winter solstice In astronomy, the winter solstice is the moment when the earth is at a point in its orbit where one hemisphere is... Imbolc is one of the eight solar holidays, festivals or sabbats of the Neopagan wheel of the year, with some origins in Irish mythology and the pre-Christian Celtic calendar. ... February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Spring is one of the four seasons of temperate zones. ... This article is about the solar holiday. ... Easter is the most important religious holiday of the Christian liturgical year, observed in March, April, or May to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus, which Christians believe occurred after his death by crucifixion in AD 30-33 (see Good Friday). ... March 21 is the 80th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (81st in leap years). ... March 22 is the 81st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (82nd in Leap years). ... Illumination of Earth by Sun on the day of equinox The vernal equinox (or spring equinox) marks the beginning of astronomical spring. ... Beltane or Beltaine (from Irish Beáltaine or Scottish Gaelic Bealtuinn; both from Old Irish Beltene, bright fire from *belo-te(p)niâ), where *belo- is allied to English word bale (as in bale-fire), the Anglo-Saxon bael, and the Lithuanian baltas, meaning white or shining (from which the... April 30 is the 120th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (121st in leap years), with 245 days remaining, as the last day in April. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... Summer is a season, defined by convention in meteorology as the whole months of June, July, and August, in the Northern hemisphere, and the whole months of December, January, and February, in the Southern hemisphere. ... Litha, the entire light half of the year, is centered upon Midsummer, with which it is easily identified, so that the summer solstice holiday is often referred to as Litha, especially in the recreated calendar used in the revived Germanic religion of Asatru. ... June 21 is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 193 days remaining. ... June 22 is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 192 days remaining. ... Illumination of Earth by the sun on the northern hemisphere summer solstice The summer solstice is an astronomical term regarding the position of the sun in relation to the celestial equator. ... Midsummer celebration, Åmmeberg, Sweden Midsummer, or Litha as it was known by the ancient Germanic peoples and to this day by many Neopagans, refers the period of time centered upon the summer solstice and the religious celebrations that accompany it. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... August 1 is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. ... August 2 is the 214th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (215th in leap years), with 151 days remaining. ... OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXx Autumn (also fall in North American English) is one of the four temperate seasons, the transition from summer into winter. ... This article is about the American NeoPagan festival Mabon. ... September 21 is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years). ... September 22 is the 265th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (266th in leap years). ... Illumination of Earth by Sun on the day of equinox The autumnal equinox (or fall equinox) occurs during the month of September in the Northern Hemisphere, and during March in the Southern Hemisphere. ...

Christian holidays

See also: liturgical year

The Catholic fiestas patronales are celebrated in each place's patron saint's day, according to the Calendar of saints. Christianity is a monotheistic religion that recognizes Jesus Christ as its central figure, Lord and Messiah. ... The liturgical year, also known as the Christian year, consists of the cycle of liturgical seasons in some Christian churches which determines when Feasts, Memorials, Commemorations, and Solemnities are to be observed and which portions of Scripture are to be read. ... Advent (from the Latin Adventus, sc. ... All Saints in Poland The festival of All Saints, also sometimes known as All Hallows, or Hallowmas, is a feast celebrated in honour of all the saints and martyrs, known or unknown. ... All Souls Day by William Bouguereau All Souls Day (Commemoratio omnium fidelium defunctorum) is the day set apart in the Roman Catholic Church for the commemoration of the faithful departed. ... For other meanings see Ascension (disambiguation) The Ascension is one of the great feasts in the Christian liturgical calendar, and commemorates the bodily Ascension of Jesus into Heaven forty days after his resurrection from the dead. ... Jesus, also known as Jesus of Nazareth or Jesus the Nazarene, is the central figure of Christianity, in which context he is known as Jesus Christ (from Greek Ιησούς Χριστός) with Christ being a title meaning Anointed One or Messiah. Christian viewpoints on Jesus (known as Christology) are both diverse and complex. ... In the Western Christian calendar, Ash Wednesday is the first day of Lent. ... The Assumption has been a subject of Christian art for centuries According to Roman Catholic theology and the traditions of the Roman Catholic Church, the body and soul of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Mary, the mother of Jesus) was taken into Heaven after the end of her earthly life. ... Candlemas is the last festival in the Christian year that is dated by reference to Christmas; subsequent holidays are calculated with reference to Easter, so Candlemas marks the end of the Christmas and Epiphany season. ... The Holy Innocents by Giotto di Bondone. ... Christmas (literally, the Mass of Christ) is a traditional holiday observed in much of the world on 25 December, or on 7 January in most Eastern Orthodox Churches. ... Jesus, also known as Jesus of Nazareth or Jesus the Nazarene, is the central figure of Christianity, in which context he is known as Jesus Christ (from Greek Ιησούς Χριστός) with Christ being a title meaning Anointed One or Messiah. Christian viewpoints on Jesus (known as Christology) are both diverse and complex. ... Corpus Christi celebrations in Antigua Guatemala, 14 June, 1979 Corpus Christi (Latin: Body of Christ) in Catholicism is a religious feast celebrated by Roman Catholics on the eighth Thursday after Easter, i. ... Jesus, also known as Jesus of Nazareth or Jesus the Nazarene, is the central figure of Christianity, in which context he is known as Jesus Christ (from Greek Ιησούς Χριστός) with Christ being a title meaning Anointed One or Messiah. Christian viewpoints on Jesus (known as Christology) are both diverse and complex. ... Easter is the most important religious holiday of the Christian liturgical year, observed in March, April, or May to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus, which Christians believe occurred after his death by crucifixion in AD 30-33 (see Good Friday). ... According to the New Testament, especially the Gospels, Jesus, also called Christ, had the power to lay his life down and to take it up again, being both human and God as well as the Promised Messiah. ... Easter Triduum (or Paschal Triduum) is a term used by some Christian churches, particularly the Roman Catholic Church, to denote, collectively, the last three days before Easter Sunday. ... The Easter Vigil, also called the Great Vigil of Easter, is a service held in many Christian churches as the official celebration of the Resurrection of Jesus. ... Good Friday is a holy day celebrated by Christians on the Friday before Easter or Pascha. ... Jesus, also known as Jesus of Nazareth or Jesus the Nazarene, is the central figure of Christianity, in which context he is known as Jesus Christ (from Greek Ιησούς Χριστός) with Christ being a title meaning Anointed One or Messiah. Christian viewpoints on Jesus (known as Christology) are both diverse and complex. ... Orthodox pilgrims bathing with the Holy Fire in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre on Holy Saturday. ... In the Christian calendar, Holy Thursday (also called Maundy Thursday) is the Thursday before Easter. ... This article relates to the events described in the New Testament of the Bible, see The Last Supper (disambiguation) for other uses, including a list of famous works of art with this name. ... This article is about the Christian feast. ... Look up Lent in Wiktionary, the free dictionary In Western Christianity, Lent is the period before the Christian holy day of Easter. ... The name of the Jewish holiday Shavuot is commonly translated as Pentecost. Pentecost is the Christian festival that commemorates the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the Apostles, fifty days after the Resurrection of Jesus at Easter, and ten days after the Ascension. ... The word Whitsun is another name for Pentecost It has that meaning in the following: Whitsun, a poem by Sylvia Plath The Whitsun Weddings, a poem by Philip Larkin A Whitsun Ale (esp. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Jesus, also known as Jesus of Nazareth or Jesus the Nazarene, is the central figure of Christianity, in which context he is known as Jesus Christ (from Greek Ιησούς Χριστός) with Christ being a title meaning Anointed One or Messiah. Christian viewpoints on Jesus (known as Christology) are both diverse and complex. ... In the Christian calendar, Shrove Tuesday is the English name for the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday, which in turn marks the beginning of Lent. ... Mardi Gras (French for Fat Tuesday) is the day before Ash Wednesday, and is also called Shrove Tuesday. It is the final day of Carnival (pronounced CAR-nuh-vul in English; car-nee-VAHL in most Romance languages). ... Swabian-Alemannic carnival clowns in Wolfach, Germany A carnival parade is a public celebration, combining some elements of a circus and public street party, generally during the Carnival Season. ... Advent (from the Latin Adventus, sc. ... New Years Eve is a celebration held the day before New Years Day, on December 31, the final day of the year. ... The Fiestas patronales are yearly celebrations held in countries influenced by Spanish culture. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as the saints day of that saint. ...


Hindu holidays

This article is about the Hindu religion; for other meanings of the word, see Hindu (disambiguation). ... Traditional fervour and gaiety mark the celebrations of Baisakhi, which stands for the dawn of a new year in north India. ... Diwālī or Dīpāvali (also transliterated Deepavali; Sanskrit: row of lights) is the Hindu Festival of Lights. ... Lakshmi is also an actress in South Indian films. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Ekadasi is the eleventh lunar day (Tithi) of the shukla (bright) or krishna (dark) paksha (fortnight) respectively, of every lunar month in the Hindu calendar (Panchang). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Ganesha Chaturthi. ... Krishna Janmaashtami, (जन्माष्टमी), also known as Krishnaashtami, Gokulaashtami, Sree Jayanti, Ashtami Rohini or sometimes merely as Janmaashtami, is a Hindu festival celebrating the birth of Lord Krishna, the eighth avatar (incarnation) of Vishnu. ... Most Indian regions celebrate New Years Day according to their regional calendars. ... Holi or Phagwah (Bhojpuri) is an annual Hindu spring festival. ... The festival of Maha Shivratri is looked upon with greatest reverence & respect by the devotees of Lord Shiva. ... Makar Sankranti is a mid-winter festival of India. ... Onam ഓണം, the foremost festival among the cultural repertoire of Malayalees, falls in the harvest season of August- September. ... Pongal (பொங்கல் in Tamil), also called Sankranti in Karnataka (ಸ೦ಕ್ರಾ೦ತಿ in Kannada), is an Indian harvest and a thanksgiving festival. ... Rama-Lilas is a Hindu religious holiday; celebrated in northern India, at the end of the monsoon season. ... Rama Navami falls on the ninth day of a Hindu lunar year (or Chaitra Masa Suklapaksha Navami). ... Vaikunta Ekadasi, the Ekadasi of Vaikunta (the abode of the Vishnu) falls on the 11th day of the Sukla Paksha (the waxing phase of the moon) of the Dhanur (Margazhi in Tamil terminology) month - the ninth of the Hindu Lunar Calendar. ...

Islamic holidays

Islam (Arabic: ; ( â–¶ (help· info)), the submission to God) is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions and the worlds second-largest religion. ... For the Canaanite and Ugaritic mother-goddess, please see Asherah. ... Shia Islam or Shi`ism (from the Arabic word شيعة, short for the historic phrase shi`at `Ali شيعة علي, meaning the followers of Ali) is the second-largest denomination of the religion of Islam. ... In muslim communities, Eid (Arabic: عيد ) is the name of two Islamic festivals: Eid ul-Fitr, marking the end of the month-long fast of Ramadan, held on the first day of Shawwal. ... A lunar calendar is a calendar whose date indicates the moon phase. ... Eid ul-Fitr (Arabic: عيد الفطر), often abbreviated as simply Eid, is an Islamic holiday that marks the end of Ramadan, the month of fasting. ... Eid ul-Adha (Arabic: عيد الأضحى) occurs on the tenth day of the Islamic month of Dhul Hijja. ... The Festival of Muharram (Arabic: احتفال محرم or مناسبة محرم) is an important period of mourning in the Shiite branch of Islam. ... Ramadan or Ramadhan (Arabic: رمضان) is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar and the holiest month in Islam. ...

Jewish holidays

Main articles: Jewish holiday, and [[{{{2}}}]], and [[{{{3}}}]], and [[{{{4}}}]], and [[{{{5}}}]]

The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... A Jewish holiday or Jewish Festival is a day or series of days observed by Jews as holy or secular commemorations of important events in Jewish history. ... Hanukkah, also known as the Festival of Lights or Festival of Dedication, is an eight day Jewish holiday that starts on the 25th day of Kislev, which generally is in December, or sometimes, late November. ... Lag Ba’omer is a Jewish holiday celebrated on the thirty third day of the counting of the Omer which is on the 18th of Iyar. ... Passover, also known as Pesach or Pesah (פסח pesaḥ), is a Jewish holiday, beginning on the evening of the 14th day of Nisan, that commemorates The Exodus and freedom of the Children of Israel from Ancient Egypt. ... Purim (פּוּרִים Lots, Standard Hebrew Purim, Tiberian Hebrew Pûrîm: plural of פּוּר pûr Lot, from Akkadian pÅ«ru) is a Jewish holiday that commemorates the deliverance of the Persian Jews from the plot of the evil Haman to exterminate them, as recorded in the biblical Book of Esther. ... This article is about the Jewish holiday of Rosh Hashanah. ... Shavuot (Hebrew שבועות), ([seven] weeks) (pronounced: shah-voo-OH-t) is one of the three Biblical pilgrimage festivals. ... Sukkot (סוכות or סֻכּוֹת sukkōt, booths) or Succoth or Sukkos is a Biblical pilgrimage festival which occurs in autumn on the 15th day of the month of Tishri (mid- to late-October). ... // Tisha BAv (תשעה באב tish‘āh bÉ™-āḇ) is a major annual fast day in Judaism. ... Tu Bishvat or Tu B Shevat, Tobi Shvat, etc. ... Yom Kippur (יום כיפור yom kippÅ«r) is the Jewish holiday of the Day of Atonement. ...

Bahá'í holidays

Main articles: Bahá'í calendar, and [[{{{2}}}]], and [[{{{3}}}]], and [[{{{4}}}]], and [[{{{5}}}]]
  • Naw Ruz (Bahá'í New Year)
  • 1st Day of Ridván
  • 9th Day of Ridvan
  • 12th Day of Ridvan
  • Declaration of the Báb
  • Ascension of Bahá'u'lláh
  • Martyrdom of the Báb
  • Birth of the Báb
  • Birth of Bahá'u'lláh

Seat of the Universal House of Justice, governing body of the Baháís The Baháí Faith is an emerging global religion founded by Baháulláh, a 19th century Persian exile. ... The Baháí calendar, common to the Baháí Faith, is a solar calendar with regular years 365 days long and leap years 366 days long as explained within the Kitáb-i-Aqdas. ... Norouz (Newroz in Kurdish) (also spelled Norooz, Noruz, Novruz, Noh Ruz, Nauroz, Nav-roze, Navroz, Naw-Rúz or Nowrouz and in Persian نوروز) is the traditional Middle Eastern festival of spring which starts at the exact moment of the vernal equinox, commencing the start of the spring. ... is a twelve day festival in the Baháí Faith, commemorating the commencement of Baháulláh´s prophethood. ... Shrine of the Báb at night from above in Haifa, Israel Siyyid Mírzá Alí-Muhammad (میرزا علی‌محمد in Persian) (October 20, 1819 - July 9, 1850), was a merchant from Shiraz, Persia, who at the age of 25, claimed to be a new and independent Manifestation of God, and the promised... Shrine of Baháulláh Mírzá Husayn-Alí (Persian: میرزا حسینعلی) (b: 1817 - d: 1892), who later took the title of Baháulláh (بهاءالله The Glory of God in Arabic) was the founder and prophet of the Baháí Faith. ...

The Northern Hemisphere winter holiday season

In many Western countries, the winter holiday season is a period of time surrounding Christmas. Except in North America, the phrases "holiday season" and "holiday period" usually mean the summer months when most people take their annual holiday ("vacation" in North American English), and phrases such as the "festive period" are used to describe the period around Christmas and New Year. Usually, this festive period begins near the end of November and ends with New Year's Day on January 1, reflecting traditional pagan celebrations of the period around the winter solstice in the northern hemisphere. In some Christian countries, the end of the festive season is considered to be after the feast of Epiphany, although this has only symbolic value. For alternative meanings for The West in the United States, see the U.S. West and American West. ... Christmas (literally, the Mass of Christ) is a traditional holiday observed in much of the world on 25 December, or on 7 January in most Eastern Orthodox Churches. ... This article is on vacation as time off. ... Christmas (literally, the Mass of Christ) is a traditional holiday observed in much of the world on 25 December, or on 7 January in most Eastern Orthodox Churches. ... The New Year is an event that happens when a culture celebrates the end of one year and the beginning of the next. ... For information on the movie, New Years Day, see New Years Day (film). ... Paganism (from Latin paganus) and Heathenry are catch-all terms which have come to connote a broad set of spiritual/religious beliefs and practices of a natural religion, as opposed to the Abrahamic religions. ... Illumination of Earth by Sun on the day of the northern hemisphere winter solstice Illumination of Earth by Sun on the day of the southern hemisphere winter solstice In astronomy, the winter solstice is the moment when the earth is at a point in its orbit where one hemisphere is... Christianity is a monotheistic religion that recognizes Jesus Christ as its central figure, Lord and Messiah. ... John the Baptist baptizes Jesus Christ as Angels look on in wonder in an Eastern Orthodox icon of the Theophany This article is about the Christian feast. ...


Holidays traditionally in the winter holiday season

  • Thanksgiving - (fourth Thursday in November in USA, second Monday in October in Canada) — Holiday generally observed as an expression of gratitude, traditionally to God, for the autumn harvest. It is traditionally celebrated with a meal shared among friends and family in which turkey is eaten. It is celebrated by many as a secular holiday, and marks the beginning of the American "holiday season".
  • Hanukkah - (26 Kislev - 2/3 Tevet - almost always in December) — Jewish holiday celebrating the defeat of Seleucid forces who had tried to prevent Israel from practising Judaism, and also celebrating the miracle of the Menorah lights burning for eight days with only enough (olive) oil for one day.
  • Christmas Day - (25 December) — Christian holiday commemorating the traditional birth-date of Jesus. Christmas is also celebrated as a secular gift-giving holiday; other observances include the decoration of trees and houses.
  • Kwanzaa (USA) - (26 December - 1 January) — Holiday observance held from December 26 to January 1 honoring African-American heritage, primarily in the United States. It was created in 1966.
  • Boxing Day (26 December) — Holiday observed in many Commonwealth countries on 26 December. In many European countries it is also a holiday, called St Stephen's Day or the second day of Christmas.

The First Thanksgiving, after the painting by Jean Louis Gerome Ferris (1863–1930) Thanksgiving is an annual holiday observed in the United States and Canada to celebrate being thankful for the things one has. ... Gratitude is a positive emotion, which involves a feeling of emotional indebtedness towards another person; often accompanied by a desire to thank them, or to reciprocate for a favour they have done for you. ... God is the term used to denote the Supreme Being ascribed by monotheistic religions to be the creator, ruler and/or the sum total of, existence. ... OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXx Autumn (also fall in North American English) is one of the four temperate seasons, the transition from summer into winter. ... Hay bales after harvest in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany In agriculture, harvesting is the process of gathering mature crops from the fields. ... Hanukkah, also known as the Festival of Lights or Festival of Dedication, is an eight day Jewish holiday that starts on the 25th day of Kislev, which generally is in December, or sometimes, late November. ... Kislev (כִּסְלֵו, Standard Hebrew Kislev, Tiberian Hebrew KislÄ“w: from Akkadian kislimu) is the third month of the ecclesiastical year and the ninth month of the civil year on the Hebrew calendar. ... Tevet (טֵבֵת, Standard Hebrew Tevet, Tiberian Hebrew Ṭēḇēṯ: from Akkadian ṭebētu) is the fourth month of the ecclesiastical year and the tenth month of the civil year on the Hebrew calendar. ... The word Jew (Hebrew: יהודי transliterated: Yehudi) is used in many ways but generally refers to a follower of Judaism, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity; and often a combination of these attributes. ... The Seleucid Empire was one of several political states founded after the death of Alexander the Great, whose generals squabbled over the division of Alexanders empire. ... Judaism is the religion of the Jewish people. ... Yarmulke and Menorah from the Harry S Truman collection A menorah (sometimes capitalized) is a branched candelabrum with seven candle-holders. ... Joseph and Mary with baby Jesus, at the first Christmas Christmas (literally, the Mass of Christ) is a holiday in the Christian calendar, usually observed on December 25, which celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... Christianity is a monotheistic religion that recognizes Jesus Christ as its central figure, Lord and Messiah. ... Jesus, also known as Jesus of Nazareth or Jesus the Nazarene, is the central figure of Christianity, in which context he is known as Jesus Christ (from Greek Ιησούς Χριστός) with Christ being a title meaning Anointed One or Messiah. Christian viewpoints on Jesus (known as Christology) are both diverse and complex. ... A woman lights kinara candles on a table decorated with the symbols of Kwanzaa. ... Boxing Day is a public holiday observed in many Commonwealth countries on 26 December. ... For information on the movie, New Years Day, see New Years Day (film). ... The Gregorian calendar is the calendar that is used nearly everywhere in the world. ... The Opera House and Sydney Harbour Bridge illuminated under New Years Eve Fireworks 2005 New Years Eve is a celebration held the day before New Years Day, on December 31, the final day of the Gregorian year. ... For information on the movie, New Years Day, see New Years Day (film). ...

Winter holiday greetings

With the winter holidays, come various different greetings appropriate for each holiday or the entire season. They are:

  • Merry Christmas (sometimes referenced in Spanish or French as Feliz Navidad and Joyeux Noel)
  • Happy Hanukkah
  • Season's Greetings
  • Happy Holiday(s)
  • Joyous Yule
  • Happy Kwanzaa
  • Happy New Year
  • Happy Solstice
  • Happy Thanksgiving
  • Happy Winter

Merry Christmas is a spoken greeting traditionally used on or around the Christmas holiday on December 25 of every year. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Holiday. ...

National holidays

Further information: national holiday and list of holidays by country This is the list of holidays by country. ...


International holidays (secular)

Many other days are marked to celebrate events or people, but are not strictly holidays as time off work is rarely given.

This article is about several astronomical terms (apogee & perigee, aphelion & perihelion, generic equivalents based on apsis, and related but rarer terms. ... January 3 is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... January 6 is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Valentines Day postcard, c. ... February 14 is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... A leap year (or intercalary year) is a year containing an extra day or month in order to keep the calendar year in sync with an astronomical or seasonal year. ... February 29 is the 60th day of a leap year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 306 days remaining. ... Astronomy Day is an annual event intended to provide a means of interaction between the general public and various astronomy enthusiasts, groups and professionals. ... Crust composition Oxygen 43% Silicon 21% Aluminium 10% Calcium 9% Iron 9% Magnesium 5% Titanium 2% Nickel 0. ... April Fools Day or All Fools Day, though not a holiday in its own right, is a notable day celebrated in many countries on April 1. ... April 1 is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 274 days remaining. ... Earth flag Earth Day is a name used by two different observances held annually in the (northern) spring, both intended to inspire awareness of and appreciation for the Earths fragile environment. ... April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... May Day is a name for various holidays celebrated on May 1 (or in the beginning of May), the most famous one being Labor Day. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... Mothers Day is a day for celebrating motherhood and thanking mothers. ... Look up Lent in Wiktionary, the free dictionary In Western Christianity, Lent is the period before the Christian holy day of Easter. ... World Ocean Day began on 8 June 1992 at the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro , Brazil. ... June 8 is the 159th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (160th in leap years), with 206 days remaining. ... Fathers Day is a holiday to celebrate fatherhood and parenting by males, just as Mothers Day celebrates motherhood. ... March 19 is the 78th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (79th in leap years). ... August 8 is the 220th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (221st in leap years), with 145 days remaining. ... National motto: None Official language Mandarin Chinese Capital and largest city Taipei President Chen Shui-bian Premier Frank Hsieh Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 138th 35,980 km² 2. ... A jack-o-lantern Halloween is an observance celebrated on the night of October 31, most notably by children dressing in costumes and going door-to-door collecting candy. ... October 31 is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 61 days remaining, as the final day of October. ... Main article: League of Nations The term United Nations was coined by Franklin D. Roosevelt during World War II, to refer to the Allies. ... International Womens Day, or International Womans Day (IWD), is marked on 8 March every year. ...

Other secular holidays

Other secular holidays not observed internationally:

Boxing Day is a public holiday observed in many Commonwealth countries on 26 December. ... December 26 is the 360th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, 361st in leap years. ... Flag of the Commonwealth of Nations The Commonwealth of Nations is a voluntary association of independent sovereign states, most of which were once governed by the United Kingdom and are its former colonies. ... There are two recognized definitions of the term, Flag Day. ... June 14 is the 165th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (166th in leap years), with 200 days remaining. ... James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. ... Groundhog Day is a traditional festival celebrated in the USA and Canada on February 2. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Labour Day (or Labor Day) is an annual holiday that resulted from efforts of the labour union movement, to celebrate the economic and social achievements of workers. ... Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-08-20, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... An Independence Day is an annual celebration commemorating the anniversary of a nations assumption of independent statehood, usually after ceasing to be a colony or part of another state. ... Lee-Jackson-King Day was a holiday celebrated in the Commonwealth of Virginia from 1984 to 2000. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Other U.S. States Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner Official languages English Area 110,862 km² (35th)  - Land 102,642 km²  - Water 8,220 km² (7. ... Loyalty Day is observed on May 1 in the United States. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... Martin Luther King Jr. ... Patriots Grave in the Old Burying Ground, Arlington, Massachusetts. ... Pioneer Day is a holiday celebrated on July 24 in the U.S. state of Utah. ... July 24 is the 205th day (206th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 160 days remaining. ... Koninginnedag in Amsterdam, 2005 Koninginnedag in Amsterdam, 2005 Queens Day (Dutch: Koninginnedag) on April 30 (or celebrated on April 29 if the 30th is Sunday) is a national holiday in the Netherlands. ... March 30 is the 89th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (90th in Leap years). ... Sweetest Day is a holiday celebrated primarily in the Midwestern U.S. states of Illinois, Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin. ...

Unofficial holidays

These are holidays celebrated by various groups and individuals. Some are designed to promote a cause, others recognize historical events not recognized officially, and others are "funny" holidays are generally intended as humorous distractions and excuses to share laughs among friends.

Winter-een-mas is a week long celebration of video games that lasts from January 25th through January 31st. ... (Redirected from 25 January) January 25 is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 4 is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... International Dadaism Month is a month of celebrating the Dada movement. ... February 4 is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... April 1 is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 274 days remaining. ... March 28 is the 87th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (88th in Leap years). ... July 15 is the 196th day (197th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 169 days remaining. ... August 2 is the 214th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (215th in leap years), with 151 days remaining. ... August 7 is the 219th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (220th in leap years), with 146 days remaining. ... August 16 is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... August 26 is the 238th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (239th in leap years). ... September 18 is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years). ... September 22 is the 265th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (266th in leap years). ... October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in Leap years). ... October 17 is the 290th (in leap years the 291st) day of the year according to the Gregorian calendar. ... October 26 is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 66 days remaining. ... There are two days held in honor of the mathematical constant Ï€ (Pi): Pi Day and Pi Approximation Day. ... March 14 is the 73rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (74th in Leap years) with 292 days remaining in the year. ... The number 420 is a euphemism for cannabis and its associated culture. ... April 20 is the 110th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (111th in leap years). ... Towel Day is celebrated every May 25 as a tribute to the late Douglas Adams. ... May 25 is the 145th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (146th in leap years). ... Douglas Noël Adams in an undated publicity photograph by Jill Furmanovsky. ... A 24-hour comic is a 24 page comic book written, drawn, and completed in 24 hours. ... April 24 is the 114th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (115th in leap years). ... No Pants Day is an international holiday observed in several Anglo-saxon and other countries on the first Friday in May by not wearing pants (trousers). ... Bloomsday is a secular holiday, celebrated annually on June 16. ... June 16 is the 167th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (168th in leap years), with 198 days remaining. ... James Augustine Aloysius Joyce (February 2, 1882 – January 13, 1941) was an expatriate Irish writer and poet, widely considered to be one of the most influential writers of the 20th century. ... The first edition of Ulysses was published in 1922. ... X-Day was the term used by the Japanese Imperial General Headquarters for the day that they would begin the Greater East Asia War, a part of World War II. X-Day is the name for July 5th, 1998, the scheduled end of the world in the Church of the... July 5 is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 179 days remaining. ... Evoloterra is a secular holiday celebrating human achievement in general, and the event of the first manned Moon Landing in particular. ... July 20 is the 201st day (202nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 164 days remaining. ... The first moon landing by a human was that of American Neil Armstrong, Commander of the Apollo 11 mission. ... There are two days held in honour of the mathematical constant π (Pi): Pi Day and Pi Approximation Day. ... 22 July is the 203rd day (204th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 162 days remaining. ... August 11 is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... International Talk Like a Pirate Day is a parodic holiday invented in 1995 by two Americans, John Baur (Ol Chum Bucket) and Mark Summers (Capn Slappy), who proclaimed September 19 each year as the day when everyone in the world should talk like pirates. ... September 19 is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years). ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... September 28 is the 271st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (272nd in leap years). ... October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in Leap years). ... April Fools Day or All Fools Day, though not a holiday in its own right, is a notable day celebrated in many countries on April 1. ... October 15 is the 288th day of the year (289th in Leap years). ... Mole Day is an unofficial holiday celebrated among chemists in America on October 23, between 6:02 AM and 6:03 PM, making the date 6:02 10/23 in the American way of writing out dates. ... October 23 is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 69 days remaining. ... Frank Costanza (played by Jerry Stiller, left) holds the aluminum pole his family has used in past Festivus celebrations, while talking to Jerry Seinfeld (played by himself) Festivus is a nondenominational holiday featured in an episode of Seinfeld, a popular American television sitcom of the 1990s. ... December 23 is the 357th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (358th in leap years). ... Virgin Mobile plc is a mobile phone service provider operating in the UK, Australia and Canada, and the US. The company was the worlds first Mobile Virtual Network Operator, launched in the UK in 1999. ... Blame Someone Else Day is held annually on the first Friday the 13th of the year. ... Look up paraskavedekatriaphobia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Flying Spaghetti Monsterism (FSM) is a satirical parody religion created in 2005 to protest the decision by the Kansas State Board of Education to require the teaching of intelligent design as an alternative to biological evolution. ... Tax Freedom Day is the first day of the year in which a nation as a whole has earned enough money to pay for its annual tax burden or cost of government. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... (Redirected from 24 October) October 24 is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 68 days remaining. ...

Vanishing holidays

Some holidays that were once widely celebrated are less so today, for various reasons. One example of this fact is revealed by the assumption inherent in this bit of dialogue from the 1961 musical-comedy album, Stan Freberg Presents The United States of America, Volume One. Christopher Columbus, who has arrived in the New World just moments earlier, tells a Native American that he wants to cash a check... Stanley Victor Freberg (born August 7, 1926 in Los Angeles) is a voice actor, comedian, and advertising creative. ... Christopher Columbus (conjectural image by Sebastiano del Piombo). ... Carte dAmérique, Guillaume Delisle, c. ... Native Americans (also Indians, Aboriginal Peoples, American Indians, First Nations, Alaskan Natives, Amerindians, or Indigenous Peoples of America) are the indigenous inhabitants of The Americas prior to the European colonization, and their modern descendants. ...

  • Native: "You out of luck today. Banks closed."
  • Columbus: "Oh? Why?"
  • Native: "Columbus Day!"

No holidays?

Referring to the original meaning of the term, Henny Youngman included this joke among his vast catalog of one-liners: Henny Youngman performing at the Jerry Lewis MDA Telethon Henny Youngman (Henry Youngman, March 16, 1906 - February 24, 1998) was a comedian and violinist famous for one-liners, short simple jokes usually delivered rapid-fire. ...

"I was an atheist for awhile, but I gave it up. No holidays!"

Although Youngman's jest suggests that the list of holidays for a non-believer would necessarily be the "empty set", many non-believers honor various holidays and "holy" days, and those of one faith often honor holidays of other faiths. For information about the band, see Atheist (band). ... In mathematics and more specifically set theory, the empty set is the unique set which contains no elements. ...


See also

Wikibooks
Wikibooks Cookbook has more about this subject:
Holiday Recipes

Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo-en. ... In the United States, a Federal holiday is a holiday for which federal workers are excused from work. ... Nothing to do with sexy ones. ... Holiday Heart Syndrome is a consequence of binge drinking. ... Land on Normandy In military parlance, D-Day is a term often used to denote the day on which a combat attack or operation is to be initiated. ... Adventure tourism is a type of niche tourism involving exploration or travel to remote areas, where the traveller should expect the unexpected. ... This is the list of holidays by country. ... This article is in need of attention. ... This is the list of observances recognized in the United States and no more than two other independent countries. ... This is the list of observances recognized in the United Kingdom and no more than two other independent countries. ...

External links

  • Google category: Holidays -- Calendars and Lists
  • Sharp calendar of religious festivals
  • Holiday Stress Brings Anxiety and Abuse (ABC News)
  • Holidays' (Holidays forum)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Statutory holiday entitlement | Business Link (450 words)
Holiday entitlement for part-time workers is the same as for full-time workers, calculated on a pro rata basis.
Making payments for statutory holiday entitlement through a system of rolled-up holiday pay is no longer lawful.
The whole of a worker's statutory leave entitlement exists from the beginning of each leave year - but in the first year of their employment you may restrict your workers to accruing leave monthly at the rate of one twelfth of the annual entitlement.
National Holidays (502 words)
Statutory holidays are established by Act of Parliament and are observed, without fail, by federal employees and by most Canadians, although increasingly, statutory holidays are becoming days for shopping and for large sales.
The statutory holiday began in 1879, almost certainly as an imitation of the American celebration, but earlier in the year as a recognition of the shorter growing season in Canada.
Civic Holiday, variously called Heritage Day in Alberta and Saskatchewan and Simcoe Day in Ontario, is also celebrated in Manitoba and the NWT and gives a long weekend at the beginning of August.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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