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Encyclopedia > Statute

A statute is a formal, written law of a country or state, written and enacted by its legislative authority, perhaps to then be ratified by the highest executive in the government, and finally published. Typically, statutes command, prohibit, or declare policy. Statutes are sometimes referred to as legislation or "black letter law." ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1884 KB) Summary en: The Statute of Grand Duchy of Lithuania }}} Statut Wielkiego Księstwa Litweskiego Author: Wojsyl, 2005 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Statute Grand Duchy of Lithuania ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1884 KB) Summary en: The Statute of Grand Duchy of Lithuania }}} Statut Wielkiego Księstwa Litweskiego Author: Wojsyl, 2005 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Statute Grand Duchy of Lithuania ... The presumable banner of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania with the coat of arms, called Пагоня in Belarusian, Vytis in Lithuanian and Pogoń in Polish Another version of the Lithuanian banner The Grand Duchy of Lithuania (Lithuanian: Lietuvos Didžioji Kunigaikštystė, Belarusian: Вялі́кае Кня́ства Літо́ўскае (ВКЛ), Ukrainian: Велике Князівство Литовське (ВКЛ), Polish: Wielkie Księstwo Litewskie) was an... Weighing scales represent the way law balances peoples interests For other senses of this word, see Law (disambiguation). ... Look up country in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A state is a set of institutions that possess the authority to make the rules that govern the people in one or more societies, having internal and external sovereignty over a definite territory. ... A legislature is a governmental deliberative body with the power to adopt laws. ... Legislation (or statutory law) is law which has been promulgated (or enacted) by a legislature or other governing body. ... A statute is a formal, written law of a country or state, written and enacted by its legislative authority, perhaps to then be ratified by the highest executive in the government, and finally published. ...


In many countries, published statutes are organized in topical arrangements called codes, such as the Civil Code of Quebec or the United States Code. The Civil Code of Québec (CcQ) is the legal text defining civil laws in the province of Quebec, Canada. ... The United States Code (U.S.C.) is a compilation and codification of the general and permanent federal law of the United States. ...


International law

The term statute is sometimes also used to refer to an international treaty that establishes an institution, such as the Statute of the European Central Bank, a protocol to the Treaty of Maastricht. This includes international courts as well, such as the Statute of the International Court of Justice and the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. Single European Act A treaty is a binding agreement under international law entered into by actors in international law, namely states and international organizations. ... Institutions are structures and mechanisms of social order and cooperation governing the behavior of two or more individuals. ... Headquarters Frankfurt, Germany Established 1 January 1998 President Jean-Claude Trichet Central Bank of Austria, Belgium, France, Finland, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain Currency Euro -ISO 4217 Code EUR Reserves >€4 billion Base borrowing rate 4. ... The Maastricht treaty (formally, the Treaty on European Union) was signed on 7 February 1992 in Maastricht between the members of the European Community and entered into force on 1 November 1993. ... Peace Palace, seat of the ICJ. The International Court of Justice (known colloquially as the World Court or ICJ; French: Cour internationale de justice) is the principal judicial organ of the United Nations. ... Official logo of the ICC. The International Criminal Court (ICC) was established in 2002 as a permanent tribunal to prosecute individuals for genocide, crimes against humanity, crime of aggression, and war crimes, as defined by several international agreements, most prominently the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. ...


See also

Law
Legal systems Common law | Civil law | Customary law | Religious law | Socialist law | International law

Sources of law Statutory law (Legislation | Civil code | Statutory interpretation)
Non-statutory law (Custom | Case law | Equity)

Adjudication Public law (Criminal law | Constitutional law | Administrative law)
Private law (Civil law | Law of obligations | Contract | Tort | Wills and Trusts)
Courts (Adversarial system | Inquisitorial system | Evidence | Judiciary | Lawyers)

Jurisprudence Philosophy of law | Natural law | Legal positivism | Legal formalism | Legal realism | Legal interpretivism | Feminist legal theory | Law and economics | Critical legal studies | Comparative law
See also:List of areas of law


In United States administrative law, an organic statute is a statute enacted by Congress that creates an administrative agency, and defines its authorities and responsibilities. ... Weighing scales represent the way law balances peoples interests For other senses of this word, see Law (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Scale_of_justice. ... This article concerns the common-law legal system, as contrasted with the civil law legal system; for other meanings of the term, within the field of law, see common law (disambiguation). ... Civil law is the predominant system of law in the world, with its origins in Roman law, and sets out a comprehensive system of rules, usually codified, that are applied and interpreted by judges. ... In law, custom, or customary law consists of established patterns of behaviour that can be objectively verified within a particular social setting. ... In the religious sense, law can be thought of as the ordering principle of reality; knowledge as revealed by God defining and governing all human affairs. ... Socialist law is the official name of the legal system used in Communist states. ... International law (also called public international law to distinguish from private international law, i. ... Sources of law are the materials and processes out of which law is developed. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Legislation (or statutory law) is law which has been promulgated (or enacted) by a legislature or other governing body. ... A civil code is a systematic compilation of laws designed to comprehensively deal with the core areas of private law. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Common Law, now often referred to as Non-statutory law is the foundation for justice in the Union States under our constitional scheme. ... In law, custom, or customary law consists of established patterns of behaviour that can be objectively verified within a particular social setting. ... Case law (precedential law) is the body of judge-made law and legal decisions that interprets prior case law, statutes and other legal authority -- including doctrinal writings by legal scholars such as the Corpus Juris Secundum, Halsburys Laws of England or the doctinal writings found in the Recueil Dalloz... The Court of Chancery, London, early 19th century This article is about concept of equity in Anglo-American jurisprudence. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Dispute resolution. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Criminal law (also known as penal law) is the body of statutory and common law that deals with crime and the legal punishment of criminal offenses. ... Constitutional law is the study of foundational laws that govern the scope of powers and authority of various bodies in relation to the creation and execution of other laws by a government. ... Administrative law is the body of law that arises from the activities of administrative agencies of government. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... In the common law, civil law refers to the area of law governing relations between private individuals. ... The Law of Obligations is one of the component elements of the civil law system of law and encompasses contractual obligations, quasi-contractual obligations such as unjust enrichment and extra-contractual obligations. ... A contract is a promise or an agreement made of a set of promises. ... // Tort is a legal term that means civil wrong, as opposed to a criminal wrong. ... In the common law, a will or testament is a document by which a person (the testator) regulates the rights of others over his property or family after death. ... The law of trusts and estates is generally considered the body of law which governs the management of personal affairs and the disposition of property of an individual in anticipation and the event of such persons incapacity or death, also known as the law of successions in civil law. ... A trial at the Old Bailey in London as drawn by Thomas Rowlandson and Augustus Pugin for Ackermanns Microcosm of London (1808-11). ... The adversarial system (or adversary system) of law is the system of law, generally adopted in common law countries, that relies on the skill of the different advocates representing their partys positions and not on some neutral party, usually the judge, trying to ascertain the truth of the case. ... An inquisitorial system is a legal system where the court or a part of the court is actively involved in determining the facts of the case, as opposed to an adversarial system where the role of the court is solely that of an impartial referee between parties. ... The law of evidence governs the use of testimony (e. ... In law, the judiciary or judicature is the system of courts which administer justice in the name of the sovereign or state, and provide a mechanism for the resolution of disputes. ... English barrister 16th century painting of a civil law notary, by Flemish painter Quentin Massys. ... Jurisprudence is the theory and philosophy of law. ... Philosophy of law is a branch of philosophy and jurisprudence which studies basic questions about law and legal systems, such as what is the law?, what are the criteria for legal validity?, what is the relationship between law and morality?, and many other similar questions. ... Natural law (Latin jus naturale) is law that exists independently of the positive law of a given political order, society or nation-state. ... Legal positivism is a school of thought in jurisprudence and the philosophy of law. ... Legal formalism is a Positivist view in jurisprudence and the philosophy of law. ... Legal realism is a family of theories about the nature of law developed in the first half of the 20th century in the United States (American Legal Realism) and Scandinavia (Scandinavian Legal Realism). ... Interpretivism is a school of thought in contemporary jurisprudence and the philosophy of law. ... The study of feminist legal theory is a school thought based on the common view that laws treatment of women in relation to men has not been equal nor fair. ... Law and economics is the term usually applied to an approach to legal theory that incorporates methods and ideas borrowed from the discipline of economics. ... Critical legal studies refers to a movement in legal thought that applied methods similar to those of critical theory (the Frankfurt School) to law. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The following is a list of major areas of legal practice and important legal subject-matters. ...


Statute mile


  Results from FactBites:
 
What's the Statute of Limitations on My Debt? (286 words)
The statute of limitations doesn't keep collectors from attempting to collect from you.
In essence, the statute of limitations works in your favor only if you're sued for a debt and you can provide proof that the statute of limitations on that debt has expired.
If the statute has expired and collectors are still trying to collect from you, sending a cease and desist letter is a viable solution.
Special Court Statute - Special Court for Sierra Leone (2554 words)
In considering the penalty to be imposed on a person convicted of a crime under the present Statute, the Special Court shall take into account the extent to which any penalty imposed by a national court on the same person for the same act has already been served.
The accused shall be presumed innocent until proved guilty according to the provisions of the present Statute.
If, pursuant to the applicable law of the State in which the convicted person is imprisoned, he or she is eligible for pardon or commutation of sentence, the State concerned shall notify the Special Court accordingly.
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