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Encyclopedia > Status quo ante bellum

The term status quo ante bellum comes from Latin meaning literally, as things were before the war. No side gains or loses territory, economic, or political rights. One example of a war that ended status quo ante bellum was the War of 1812, which was concluded with the Treaty of Ghent in 1814; the treaty left no gains or losses in land for either the US or the United Kingdom: the USA had failed in one of its war aims to annex Canada, but succeeded in its primary aim of preventing further harrassment of American sailors on the high seas, and forever ended the question of a British reconquest of the US. The term was originally used in treaties to refer to the withdrawal of enemy troops and restoration of prewar leadership. The War of 1812 was a conflict fought in North America between the United States and Great Britain from 1812 to 1815. ... The Treaty of Ghent, signed on December 24, 1814, in Ghent, Belgium, ended the War of 1812 between the United States and United Kingdom. ...


It has been generalised to form the phrase status quo. For the perennial British rock band, see Status Quo (band) Status quo is a Latin term meaning the present current, existing state of affairs. ...


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Definition of Status quo ante bellum (178 words)
The term status quo ante bellum comes from Latin meaning literally, as things were before the war.
One example of a war that ended status quo ante bellum was the War of 1812, which was concluded with the Treaty of Ghent in 1814; the treaty left no gains or losses in land for either the US or Britain, though the US had sought to annex Canada.
The term was originally used in treaties to refer to the withdraw of enemy troops and restoration of prewar leadership.
Status quo - Wikinfo (1465 words)
Status quo is a Latin term meaning the present, current, existing state of affairs.
The concept of status quo comes from the diplomatic term status quo ante bellum, meaning "as it was before war," referring to the withdrawal of enemy troops and restoration of power to prewar leadership.
Arguing to preserve the status quo is usually done in the context of opposing a large, often radical change.
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