FACTOID # 7: The top five best educated states are all in the Northeast.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Statue of Freedom

The Statue of Freedom, sometimes called Armed Freedom or simply Freedom, is Thomas Crawford's bronze statue that, since 1863, has crowned the dome of the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, DC. The original and formal name of the work was Freedom Triumphant in War and Peace. Official United States publications say that the statue, "is officially known as the Statue of Freedom." [1] Monument of Liberty may refer to: The Shipka Memorial in the Balkan mountains, Bulgaria The Monument of Liberty in Rousse, Bulgaria The Liberty Statue in Budapest, Hungary The Freedom Monument in Riga, Latvia The Statue of Liberty in New York City, USA The Liberty Memorial in Kansas City, Missouri, USA... statue of FREEDOM; http://www. ... Thomas Crawford (March 22, 1813/14 – October 10, 1857) was a sculptor who was born in New York. ... Assorted ancient Bronze castings found as part of a cache, probably intended for recycling. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the location for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United...

Contents

Description

Freedom is a female allegorical figure who holds a sheathed sword in her right hand and a laurel wreath of victory and the shield of the United States with thirteen stripes in her left hand. She wears a helmet adorned with stars and an eagle's head. A brooch inscribed "U.S." secures her fringed robes. She stands on a cast-iron globe encircled with the national motto, E Pluribus Unum. The lower part of the base is decorated with fasces and wreaths. Ten bronze points tipped with platinum are attached to her headdress, shoulders, and shield for protection from lightning. The bronze statue stands 19 feet 6 inches (6 m) tall and weighs approximately 15,000 pounds (6,800 kg). Her crest rises 288 feet (88 m) above the east front plaza." An allegory (from Greek αλλος, allos, other, and αγορευειν, agoreuein, to speak in public) is a figurative representation conveying a meaning other than and in addition to the literal. ... Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century Look up Sword in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... E pluribus unum included in the Great Seal of the United States, being one of the nations mottos at the time of the seals creation E Pluribus Unum was one of the first mottos adopted by the United States government. ... Roman fasces. ... General Name, Symbol, Number platinum, Pt, 78 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 10, 6, d Appearance grayish white Standard atomic weight 195. ... For information on lightning precautions, see Lightning safety. ...


History

Statue of Freedom
Statue of Freedom

A monumental statue for the top of the national Capitol appeared in Architect Thomas U. Walter's original drawing for the new cast-iron dome, which was authorized in 1855. Walter's drawing showed the outline of a statue representing Liberty; Crawford proposed an allegorical figure of Freedom Triumphant in War and Peace. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 412 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1700 × 2473 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 412 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1700 × 2473 pixel, file size: 1. ... Thomas U. Walter Portrait by Francisco Pausas, 1925, after a Mathew Brady photograph Thomas Ustick Walter (September 4, 1804 – October 30, 1887) of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania was the dean of American architecture between the death of Benjamin Latrobe and the work of H.H. Richardson. ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Crawford was commissioned to design the Statue of Freedom in 1854 and executed the plaster model for the statue in his studio in Rome. He died in 1857 before the model left his studio. The model, packed into six crates, was shipped from Italy in a small sailing vessel in the spring of 1858. During the voyage the ship began to leak and stopped in Gibraltar for repairs. After leaving Gibraltar, the ship began leaking again to the point that it could go no farther than Bermuda, where the model was stored until other transportation could be arranged. Half of the crates finally arrived in New York in December, but all sections were not in Washington D.C. until late March of 1859. 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Beginning in 1860, the statue was cast in five main sections by Clark Mills, whose bronze foundry was located on the outskirts of Washington. Work was halted in 1861 because of the Civil War, but by the end of 1862 the statue was finished and temporarily displayed on the Capitol grounds. The cost of the statue, exclusive of installation, was $23,796.82. Late in 1863, construction of the dome was sufficiently advanced for the installation of the statue, which was hoisted in sections and assembled atop the cast-iron pedestal. The final section, the figure's head and shoulders, was raised on December 2, 1863, to a salute of 35 guns answered by the guns of the 12 forts around Washington. [2] 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... Clark Mills can refer to: Clark Mills, New York Clark Mills, American sculptor This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... This article is about 1862 . ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

However, an interesting note about Freedom is that while it was being cast at Mills' foundry the foreman in charge of the casting went on strike. Instead of paying him the higher wages he demanded Mills turned the project over to Phillip Reid, one of the slaves working at the facility. Reid presided over the rest of the casting and assembly of the figure. The figure was placed in position on December 2, 1863. Reid had to wait until November 1864, at which time he, at least symbolically, received his freedom cap. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 415 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1860 × 2687 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 415 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1860 × 2687 pixel, file size: 1. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline for Biographies. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...

The Statue of Freedom was removed from the dome for five months in 1993.
The Statue of Freedom was removed from the dome for five months in 1993.

On May 9, 1993, after being in place almost 130 years, the statue was brought down from its pedestal by helicopter for restoration. The work was needed because of extensive pitting and corrosion on the surface of the bronze and because of a crack and rusting on the cast-iron pedestal. The project was guided by the recommendations of a thorough conservation and engineering study conducted in 1991. The United States Capitol Preservation Commission provided $780,000 in privately raised funds, which covered all project costs. The work was performed by New Arts Foundry, of Baltimore, Maryland. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 771 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (864 × 672 pixel, file size: 183 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 771 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (864 × 672 pixel, file size: 183 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Helicopter (disambiguation). ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... The United States Capitol Preservation Commission was established under Title VIII of Public Law 100-696 () in November 1988 for the purpose of providing for improvements in, preservation of, and acquisitions (including works of fine art and other property for display) for the United States Capitol and other locations under...


The cast-iron pedestal was restored in place atop the dome. The metal was stripped of paint, and the wreaths and fasces were removed to ensure that they were thoroughly cleaned and coated. The crack was permanently repaired, and the entire pedestal was primed and painted with a color specially mixed to match the statue. Since then, every 2-3 years, the statue undergoes two weeks of cleaning and recoating as necessary.


Restoration of the statue and the pedestal was completed in approximately four months. The Statue of Freedom was returned to its pedestal by helicopter on October 23, 1993, amidst the congressional celebration of the bicentennial of the U.S. Capitol. is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... An anniversary is a day that commemorates an event that occurred on the same day of the year some time in the past. ...


The plaster model of the statue, which had been in storage for 25 years, was reassembled and restored in the basement rotunda of the Russell Senate Office Building, where it was returned to permanent public display in January 1993. This photograph, taken from southwest of the building, shows the main entrance along Constitution Avenue, N.E. The rotunda of the Russell Building featuring the sculpture by Frederick Hart. ...


The head of the statue is depicted on a postage stamp (United States Scott No. 573), which was re-issued in 2006. Covers of the 2002 edition featured art on stamps. ...


Notes

  1. ^ Compilation of Works of Art and Other Objects in the United States Capitol, Prepared by the Architect of the Capitol under the Joint Committee on the Library, United States Government Printing House, Washington, 1965, page 364
  2. ^ Gale, Robert L. Thomas Crawford: American Sculptor, University of Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh, 1964, p. 190

External Links

  • The Architect of the Capitol website page on "Freedom" (Accessed 13 July 2007)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Statue of Freedom (908 words)
The bronze Statue of Freedom by Thomas Crawford is the crowning feature of the dome of the United States Capitol.
Crawford was commissioned to design the Statue of Freedom in 1855 and executed the plaster model for the statue in his studio in Rome.
The Statue of Freedom was returned to its pedestal by helicopter on October 23, 1993, amidst the congressional celebration of the bicentennial of the U.S. Capitol.
Statue of Freedom - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (798 words)
The Statue of Freedom is a bronze statue sculpted by Thomas Crawford, placed atop the dome of the United States Capitol in Washington, DC.
Freedom is a female figure who holds a sheathed sword in her right hand and a laurel wreath of victory and the shield of the United States with thirteen stripes in her left hand.
The Statue of Freedom was returned to its pedestal by helicopter on October 23, 1993, amidst the congressional celebration of the bicentennial of the U.S. Capitol.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m