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Encyclopedia > State funeral

A state funeral is a public funeral ceremony held to honour heads of state or other important people of national significance. They usually include much pomp and ceremony. A head of state or chief of state is the chief public representative of a nation-state, federation or commonwealth, whose role generally includes personifying the continuity and legitimacy of the state and exercising the political powers, functions and duties granted to the head of state in the countrys...


Most state funerals make one point clear: the family of the deceased agreed to the public honors because so many other citizens in their countries want to join in.

Contents


United Kingdom

The Queen Mother's Funeral Procession. The Queen Mother had a royal ceremonial funeral rather than a state funeral

A state funeral consists of a military procession using a gun carriage from the private resting chapel to Westminster Hall, where the body usually lies in state for three days. This is then followed by a funeral service at Westminster Abbey or St. Paul's Cathedral. This work is copyrighted. ... This work is copyrighted. ... Clock Tower and New Palace Yard from the west The Palace of Westminster, on the banks of the River Thames in Westminster, London, is the home of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, which form the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The Abbeys western façade The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to as Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral, in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... St Pauls Cathedral is a cathedral on Ludgate Hill, in the City of London in London, and the seat of the Bishop of London. ...


Many of the features of a state funeral are shared by other types of funeral—a Royal Ceremonial funeral (for example, Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother) often has a lying in state and Westminster Abbey service. The distinction between a state funeral and a ceremonial funeral is that in a state funeral, the gun carriage bearing the coffin is drawn by sailors from the Royal Navy rather than horses. This tradition dates from the funeral of Queen Victoria; the horses drawing the gun carriage bolted, and so ratings from the Royal Navy hauled it to the Royal Chapel at Windsor. Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon as Queen Elizabeth. ... The Royal Navy of the United Kingdom is the senior service of the British armed services, being the oldest of its three branches. ... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from 1 January 1877, until her death in 1901. ... Windsor Castle: The Round Tower or keep dominating the castle, as seen from the River Thames. ...

The Prince of Wales guarding his Grandmother's coffin on April 8th, 2002
The Prince of Wales guarding his Grandmother's coffin on April 8th, 2002

During the lying in state, the coffin rests on a catafalque in the middle of Westminster Hall. Each corner is guarded by various units of the Sovereign's Bodyguard or the Household Division. However, on some occasions (most notably the funerals of King George V and Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother), male members of the Royal Family have mounted the guard, in what has become known as the Vigil of the Princes. For George V, his four sons King Edward VIII, The Duke of York, The Duke of Gloucester and The Duke of Kent stood guard. For the Queen Mother, her grandsons The Prince of Wales, The Duke of York, The Earl of Wessex and Viscount Linley took post. [1] The Prince of Wales guarding his Grandmothers casket. ... Lying-in-state is the term used during a major funeral procession when the coffin is placed on public view to allow members of the public to pay their respects to the deceased. ... A coffin (in North American English, also known as a casket) is a funerary box used in the display and containment of deceased remains -- either for burial or after cremation. ... A catafalque is a raised bier or platform of sorts (often movable) used to support the casket or coffin, or in the case of a pope: the body, of a person during a funeral or memorial service. ... Clock Tower and New Palace Yard from the west The Palace of Westminster, on the banks of the River Thames in Westminster, London, is the home of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, which form the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The Queens bodyguard Sovereigns Bodyguard is the name given to three ceremonial units in the United Kingdom who are tasked with guarding the Sovereign. ... Household Division is term used principally in the Commonwealth of Nations to describe a country’s most elite or historically senior military groupings, or those military groupings that provide functions associated directly with the Sovereign. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 - 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, as a result of his creating it from the British branch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon as Queen Elizabeth. ... Members of the Royal Family on the balcony of Buckingham Palace after the Trooping the Colour ceremony Close relatives of the monarch of the United Kingdom are known by the appellation The Royal Family. ... 1936 2002 The Vigil of the Princes is the unofficial name given to two occasions when male members of the British Royal Family have stood guard during the lying in state of one of their relatives. ... King Edward VIII King of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, King of Ireland Emperor of India His Majesty King Edward VIII, (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David), later His Royal Highness The Duke of Windsor (23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was the second British monarch of the House... The title Duke of York is a title of nobility usually given to the second son of the British monarch, unless the title is already held by an earlier monarchs son who is still alive. ... Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Kent (1671-1740), was a British courtier. ... The Prince Charles, Prince of Wales (Charles Philip Arthur George Mountbatten-Windsor; born 14 November 1948), is the eldest son of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. ... HRH The Duke of York His Royal Highness The Prince Andrew, Duke of York, (Andrew Albert Christian Edward Mountbatten-Windsor, formerly Windsor), styled HRH The Duke of York (born February 19, 1960), is a member of the British Royal Family, the third child and second son of Queen Elizabeth II... HRH The Earl of Wessex His Royal Highness The Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex (Edward Antony Richard Louis Mountbatten-Windsor), styled HRH The Earl of Wessex (born March 10, 1964), is a member of the British Royal Family, the youngest son of Queen Elizabeth II. He has held the title... David Albert Charles Armstrong-Jones, Viscount Linley (born November 3, 1961), is the son of the late Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon and Antony Armstrong-Jones, 1st Earl of Snowdon. ...


The honour of a state funeral is usually reserved for the Sovereign as Head of State. Few others have had them:

(Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield was offered the honour, but refused it.) Lord Nelson Vice-Admiral Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson, Duke of Bronte, KB, RN (29 September 1758 – 21 October 1805) was a British admiral famous for his participation in the Napoleonic Wars, most notably in the Battle of Trafalgar, where he lost his life. ... Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (c. ... Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston (October 20, 1784 - October 18, 1865) was a British Prime Minister and Liberal politician. ... William Ewart Gladstone (December 29, 1809 - May 19, 1898) was a British Liberal politician and Prime Minister (1868-1874, 1880-1885, 1886 and 1892-1894). ... Frederick Sleigh Roberts, 1st Earl Roberts of Kandahar, Pretoria and Waterford, VC, KG, KP, GCB, OM, GCSI, GCIE, PC (September 30, 1832 - November 14, 1914) was a distinguished British soldier and one of the most successful commanders of the Victorian era. ... Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, KG, OM, CH, TD, FRS, PC(Can) (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was an English statesman and author, best known as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom during the Second World War. ... Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield, KG, PC, FRS (21 December 1804 – 19 April 1881) was an English statesman and literary figure. ...


The most famous state funeral was that of a commoner—Churchill in 1965. The only difference between his state funeral and that of the Sovereign was the gun salute—prime ministers get a 19-gun salute, as a head of government. 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... A 21-gun salute is fired by the members of the U.S. Army. ...


United States

The assassination of John F. Kennedy produced the state funeral that is carved most deeply in America's memory
The assassination of John F. Kennedy produced the state funeral that is carved most deeply in America's memory

In the U.S., state funerals are granted by law to presidents and other individuals designated by the president. While tradition and protocol greatly influence the funeral planning, the exact sequence of events is largely determined by the family of the deceased. This decision is made once a president leaves office. Image File history File links The flag-draped casket of President John F. Kennedy, assassinated in Dallas, leaves Capitol Hill for his funeral at St. ... Image File history File links The flag-draped casket of President John F. Kennedy, assassinated in Dallas, leaves Capitol Hill for his funeral at St. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Protocol can mean any logbook or other artifact (forged or authentic) of a political meeting between persons from different nations. ...


History and development

The pomp and circumstance of state funerals were eschewed by the founding fathers who believed them to be too reminiscent of British rule. The first general mourning proclaimed in America was on the death of Benjamin Franklin in 1790 and the next on the death of George Washington in 1799. Though public mournings were held all over the country for George Washington, his funeral was a local affair in Mount Vernon. The first major funeral ceremony was for William Henry Harrison, the first president to die in office. Alexander Hunter, a Washington merchant, was commissioned to design the ceremony. He had the White House draped in black ribbon and ordered a curtained and upholstered black and white carriage to carry the casket. Benjamin Franklin by Jean-Baptiste Greuze 1777 Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most well known Founding Fathers of the United States. ... 1790 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... George Washington (February 22, 1732–December 14, 1799) commanded Americas war for independence (1775–1783), and was the first President of the United States, from 1789 to 1797. ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Mount Vernon is the name of several places around the world, most notably Mount Vernon, the Virginia plantation of George Washington, the first President of the United States. ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States, (1841). ... The southern side of the White House The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States of America. ...


However, it was not until the assassination of Abraham Lincoln in 1865 that the United States experienced a nationwide period of mourning, made possible by advances in communications technologies — train and telegraph. Lincoln was the first U.S. president to lie in state in the Rotunda of the U.S. Capitol. Ceremonies conducted henceforth have been based on Lincoln's funeral. Ten presidents have been honored by having their remains lie in state (on the same black catafalque built for Lincoln) in the Rotunda with a ceremonial honor guard to attend them. Assassination is the deliberate killing of an important person, usually a political figure or other strategically important individual. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was an American politician who served as the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... Telegraphy (from the Greek words tele = far away and grapho = write) is the long distance transmission of written messages without physical transport of letters, originally over wire. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Lying-in-state is the term used during a major funeral procession when the coffin is placed on public view to allow members of the public to pay their respects to the deceased. ... In Mosta, Malta, the Rotunda of Santa Marija Assunta is covered by a saucer dome. ... United States Capitol The United States Capitol is the building which serves as home for the legislative branch of the United States government. ... A catafalque is a raised bier or platform of sorts (often movable) used to support the casket or coffin, or in the case of a pope: the body, of a person during a funeral or memorial service. ...


Major components

Funeral processions in the nation's capital have honored ten presidents, including the four who were assassinated. The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Assassination is the deliberate killing of an important person, usually a political figure or other strategically important individual. ...


Most state funerals include Armed Forces pallbearers, various 21-gun salutes, renditions by military bands and choirs, a military chaplain for the immediate family, and a flag-draped casket as a veteran's honor. A 21-gun salute is fired by the members of the U.S. Army. ...


Presidents who die in office lie in repose in the East Room of the White House. Former presidents lie in repose in their home state before traveling to Washington, D.C.. Lying in repose is when the remains of a deceased person, often one of some stature, are available for viewing by the public. ... The East Room is one of the largest rooms in the White House, the home of the President of the United States. ... Nickname: DC, The District Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., with regard to the surrounding states of Maryland and Virginia. ...

President Reagan's funeral procession
President Reagan's funeral procession
Reagan lying in state
Reagan lying in state

A ceremonial funeral procession in a caisson (drawn by six horses of the same color, three riders and a section chief mounted on a separate horse from the Old Guard Caisson Platoon) is a traditional component of a state funeral observance. The procession begins in sight of the White House and travels to the U.S. Capitol. For former presidents, the casket is transferred to the caisson at 16th St. and Constitution Avenue before the South Lawn and the procession moves down Constitution Avenue, but for sitting presidents, the casket is transferred at the Pennsylvania Avenue entrance of the mansion and the procession moves down Pennsylvania Avenue. (Pennsylvania Ave. in front of the White House has been closed since the Oklahoma City bombing in 1995.) The procession is composed of National Guard, active-duty, academy, and reserve personnel that represent the five branches of the United States armed forces and the casket is followed by a riderless horse. Each march unit is led by a service band. The procession usually ends at the center steps of the east front of the U.S. Capitol. Exceptions were made for LBJ and Ronald Reagan. LBJ was carried up the Senate wing steps because the center steps were blocked with construction from the second inauguration of Richard Nixon just days earlier.[1] Reagan, as former governor of California, requested that he be carried up the steps which face west, overlooking California. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2464x1632, 745 KB) Description WASHINGTON (AFPN) -- Members of a joint honor guard escort the caisson bearing former President Ronald Reagans flag-draped casket during his funeral procession here June 9. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2464x1632, 745 KB) Description WASHINGTON (AFPN) -- Members of a joint honor guard escort the caisson bearing former President Ronald Reagans flag-draped casket during his funeral procession here June 9. ... President George W. Bush and his wife, Laura, pay their respects to former president Ronald Reagan as he lies in state. ... President George W. Bush and his wife, Laura, pay their respects to former president Ronald Reagan as he lies in state. ... Caisson is a two-wheeled, horse-drawn carriage used to hold and transport the coffin during a military funeral or a state funeral. ... The southern side of the White House The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States of America. ... In Washington, D.C., Constitution Avenue is a major east-west street running just north of the United States Capitol in the citys Northwest and Northeast quadrants. ... Pennsylvania Avenue street sign, 2004. ... Damage to the Murrah building before cleanup began. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... The riderless horse, Sgt. ... United States Service Bands Each of the branches of the U.S. military, has a headquarters band organization, all but one of which are in the Washington, D.C. area. ... United States Capitol The United States Capitol is the building which serves as home for the legislative branch of the United States government. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908 – January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was the 36th President of the United States (1963–1969). ... President George W. Bush, First Lady Laura Bush, Vice-President Dick Cheney, Lynne Cheney, and former President Bill Clinton and Senator Hillary Clinton, watch the casket of former President Ronald Reagan carried into the Washington National Cathedral The death and state funeral of Ronald Reagan took place in June 2004. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ...


Upon the casket's arrival at the Rotunda of the U.S. Capitol a short service (the official "state funeral") is given with members of Congress present. In Mosta, Malta, the Rotunda of Santa Marija Assunta is covered by a saucer dome. ... Seal of the Congress. ...


Afterwards, the late president's body lies in state for public viewing. Although lying in state continues through the night, it differs from lying in repose. The honor guard, whose members represent each of the armed services, maintain a vigil over the remains throughout the period of time the remains lie in state. Public viewing is allowed continuously during the lying in state until one hour before the departure ceremony.

Reagan's national funeral service
Reagan's national funeral service

A national memorial service is held in Washington, D.C. It is held either at Washington National Cathedral or at another church or cathedral, if the family requests, with various foreign dignitaries and government officials attending. On the matter of seating arrangements for the funeral, the presidential party is followed by heads of state, arranged alphabetically by the English spelling of their countries. Royalty representing heads of state, such as princes and dukes, come next, followed by heads of government, such as prime ministers and premiers. During the ceremony, generals sit in the north nave, family members in the south nave, if the ceremony is held at Washington National Cathedral. President George W. Bush eulogizing Ronald Reagan at the state funeral. ... President George W. Bush eulogizing Ronald Reagan at the state funeral. ... Washington National Cathedral was the site of two Presidential state funerals: for Dwight D. Eisenhower and Ronald W. Reagan, and a presidential burial in the cathedral mausoleum: Woodrow Wilson. ...


Immediately after the service is completed, the body travels to its final resting place for interment.


Before the mid-20th Century, the body was moved long distances by funeral train procession, where thousands of citizens would line the railroad tracks to pay their last respects. Transport in recent decades between the deceased president's home state and Washington, D.C. has been by one of the jets usually used as Air Force One. Arrivals and departures are usually met with 21-gun salutes. Air Force One is the air traffic control call sign of any U.S. Air Force aircraft carrying the President of the United States. ... A 21-gun salute is fired by the members of the U.S. Army. ...


The most famous state funeral in the U.S. was that of John F. Kennedy in 1963, resulting from his assassination. John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), often referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ... President Kennedy, with his wife, Jacqueline Kennedy, and Texas Governor John Connally in the Presidential limousine shortly before the assassination. ...


Funeral arrangements

State funerals are usually planned years in advance. Each living U.S. president—current or former—is required to have funeral plans in place upon becoming president. These details become more important upon leaving office, as it reduces stress for the president's family in an era of worldwide electronic media scrutiny.


The Military District of Washington (MDW) has primary responsibility in conducting the ceremony and goes by a 138-page planning document. The commanding general of the MDW appoints an Armed Forces team to provide security for the presidential remains, whether they be lying in state or in a church or other location. Additionally, in the post-9/11 world, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is responsible for security measures since state funerals may be terrorist targets. Military District of Washington Shoulder Sleeve Insignia Military District of Washington Distinctive Unit Insignia The Military District of Washington (MDW), is one of nineteen major commands of the U.S. Army. ... This article talks about the aftermath of the September 11, 2001 attacks. ... The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is a Cabinet department of the federal government of the United States that is concerned with protecting the American homeland and the safety of American citizens. ...


Canada

Prime Minister Trudeau's casket arrives on Parliament Hill
Prime Minister Trudeau's casket arrives on Parliament Hill
Trudeau lying in state
Trudeau lying in state

In Canada, those entitled to state funerals include current and former governors general and prime ministers, as well as other eminent Canadians as decreed by the government. Hearse with Trudeaus body arrives on Parliament Hill. ... Hearse with Trudeaus body arrives on Parliament Hill. ... Prime Minister Jean Chretien and his wife, Aline, pay their respects to former prime minister Pierre Trudeau as he lies in state. ... Prime Minister Jean Chretien and his wife, Aline, pay their respects to former prime minister Pierre Trudeau as he lies in state. ... The Governor General of Canada (French: Gouverneure générale du Canada or Gouverneur général du Canada) is the representative of the Canadian monarch. ... Stephen Harper is the current Prime Minister of Canada. ...


The body arrives on Parliament Hill by hearse rather than by caisson or gun carriage. On arrival, an honour guard meets the hearse and escorts the body into the centre block of Parliament Hill in a simple ceremony. The honour guard is drawn from the RCMP for a prime minister or from the Governor General's Foot Guards for a governor general. Centre Block, Parliament Hill, Ottawa, Canada Parliament Hill, (French Colline du Parlement), -The Hill for locals- is a scenic location on the banks of the Ottawa River in downtown Ottawa, Canada. ... A Buddhist-style japanese hearse An antique limousine style hearse from Volvo Funeral carriage, Museum of Funeral Customs A hearse is a funeral vehicle, a conveyance for the coffin from e. ... The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP or Mounties; French, Gendarmerie royale du Canada, GRC) is both the federal police force and the national police of Canada. ... The Governor Generals Foot Guards is one of three Household regiments in the Canadian Army reserve forces, along with The Governor Generals Horse Guards and the Canadian Grenadier Guards. ...


Lying in state occurs in the Senate Chamber in the case of a governor general, or in the Hall of Honour for a prime minister, and usually lasts for two days. Unlike in the United Kingdom and the United States, public viewing isn't allowed continuously until a certain time. There are designated hours each day of the lying in state. In certain cases, everyone may be allowed access despite the deadline, but only after police officers tour the lines.

Trudeau leaving Parliament Hill
Trudeau leaving Parliament Hill

Similar to the United States and the United Kingdom, there are guards at each corner of the casket. The guards are from the RCMP and Canadian Forces. In the case of the governor general, their foot guards also guard the casket. With prime ministers, the other guards are from Parliamentary security and Senate security. Image File history File links TrudeauHearseLeavesParliamentHill. ... Image File history File links TrudeauHearseLeavesParliamentHill. ... The Canadian Forces (French: Forces canadiennes) are the combined armed forces of Canada. ...


As the body is escorted from Parliament Hill to the hearse, a 21-gun salute is fired for governors general or a 19-gun salute in the case of a prime minister. When the funeral service is held in Ottawa, it is usually held at Christ Church Cathedral. Christ Church Catherdral Christ Church Catherdral is the Anglican cathedral in Ottawa, Canada. ...


Ireland

State funerals in the Republic of Ireland and predecessor states since independence in 1921 have taken place on the following occasions: Former Taoiseach John A. Costello did not receive a state funeral, at the request of his family. ...

Roman Catholic Church

When the pope dies, the officials in Vatican City begin a vigorous series of rituals dating back to the middle ages. The current Pope is Benedict XVI (born Joseph Alois Ratzinger), who was elected at the age of 78 on 19 April 2005. ...


The standard announcement is as follows:


After the initial determination of his death, made by calling his given name in Latin (for example, in the case of Pope John Paul II the camerlengo called "Carolus") three times without response, the Camerlengo ("Cardinal Chamberlain" is the English title) drapes a white cloth over the deceased pope's head and declares him dead, orders the papal offices and apartment sealed, and destroys the pontiff's signet ring (the Ring of the Fisherman) and seals with the silver hammer. The Pope's body is initially moved to the Clementine Hall in the Apostolic Palace, where he is privately viewed by Vatican officials in a ceremony to confirm and certify his death. Latin is an ancient Indo-European language. ... Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: ), born Karol Józef Wojtyła [1] (May 18, 1920 – April 2, 2005) reigned as Pope of the Catholic Church from... The title Camerlengo (Italian for Chamberlain) refers to an official of the Papal court, referring either to the Chamberlain of the Roman Catholic Church, to the Chamberlain of the Sacred College of Cardinals, or to various lesser dignitaries. ... The title Camerlengo (Italian for Chamberlain) refers to an official of the Papal court, referring either to the Chamberlain of the Roman Catholic Church, to the Chamberlain of the Sacred College of Cardinals, or to various lesser dignitaries. ... The Ring of the Fisherman or Pescatorio is an official part of the regalia worn by the pope, described by the Roman Catholic Church (of which he is the head) as the successor of Saint Peter, a fisherman by trade. ... The Clementine Hall is used as a reception room and hosts formal ceremonies by the pope. ... View across St. ...


The Pope's death is announced to the world in the standard form:


"The Holy Father died this evening at ______ (time) in his private apartment. All the procedures outlined in the apostolic Constitution 'Universi Dominici Gregis' that was written by John Paul II on Feb. 22, 1996, have been put in motion." [2]


The above form was used upon the death of John Paul II. The same form used until a future Pope does decide to make changes. Official papal image of John Paul II. His Holiness Pope John Paul II, né Karol Józef Wojtyła (born May 18, 1920 in Wadowice, Poland), is the current Pope — the Bishop of Rome and head of the Roman Catholic Church. ...


After that, his body is moved to St. Peter's Basilica to lay in state, guarded by the Swiss Guard, for public viewing and mourning for several more days. The pontiff is then moved to his final resting place. The popes of the last century have been buried beneath St. Peter's Basilica.[citation needed] The Basilica of Saint Peter from Castel SantAngelo. ... Papal Swiss Guards in traditional uniforms Swiss Guards are Swiss mercenary soldiers who served as bodyguards, ceremonial guards and palace guards at foreign European courts from the late 15th century until the present day (in the form of the Papal Swiss Guard). ...


Australia

In Australia, State Funerals are increasingly offered to persons of general celebrity.


New South Wales

State Funerals held in NSW are subject to a policy operated since 1966. Where the family of the deceased does not wish to have a State funeral, the offer of a State memorial service will be considered.


Politicians (both current and former) and people holding positions such as Governor and Chief Justice automatically qualify for a State funeral, however the Premier of the state of NSW can offer such a service for those determined to be distinguished citizens of NSW.


See also

President George W. Bush, First Lady Laura Bush, Vice-President Dick Cheney, Lynne Cheney, and former President Bill Clinton and Senator Hillary Clinton, watch the casket of former President Ronald Reagan carried into the Washington National Cathedral The death and state funeral of Ronald Reagan took place in June 2004. ... Justin Trudeau breaking down into tears after giving his eulogy The death and state funeral of Pierre Trudeau took place in September 2000. ... The funeral of Pope John Paul II was held on 8 April 2005, six days after his death on 2 April. ... An aerial view of the casket of JFK during his funeral at St. ...

References

  1. ^ Foley, Thomas, "Thousands in Washington Brave Cold to Say Goodby to Johnson, The Los Angeles Times, January 25, 1973

The Los Angeles Times (also L.A. Times) is a daily newspaper published in Los Angeles, California and distributed throughout the Western United States. ... January 25 is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ...

External links

  • The traditions of a British state funeral
  • Memorializing U.S. Presidents
  • Funeral Section of the RCMP Ceremonial and Protocol Guide
  • "STATE, OFFICIAL, AND SPECIAL MILITARY FUNERALS" by the U.S. Army
  • The Last Salute by the U.S. Army
  • NSW Policy on State Funerals

  Results from FactBites:
 
State funeral - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2073 words)
A state funeral consists of a military procession using a gun carriage from the private resting chapel to Westminster Hall, where the body usually lies in state for three days.
The distinction between a state funeral and a ceremonial funeral is that in a state funeral, the gun carriage bearing the coffin is drawn by sailors from the Royal Navy rather than horses.
A ceremonial funeral procession in a caisson (drawn by six horses of the same color, three riders and a section chief mounted on a separate horse from the Old Guard Caisson Platoon) is a traditional component of a state funeral observance.
Death and state funeral of Ronald Reagan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2430 words)
A state funeral was conducted at the Washington National Cathedral on June 11, 2004 (which President George W. Bush declared a national day of mourning by proclamation).
The state funeral was executed by the Military District of Washington (MDW).
During the funeral services, each time Nancy Reagan appeared in public, she was escorted by Army Major General Galen B. Jackman, commanding general of the Military District of Washington (CG/MDW) at that time.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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