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Encyclopedia > State capitalist

There are multiple definitions of the term state capitalism.

Contents


Use by Trotskyists

The most common definition of state capitalism within Marxist literature is that it is a social system combining capitalism (the wage labor system of producing and appropriating surplus value) with state ownership. A state capitalist country is therefore a country where the government controls the economy and essentially acts like a single giant corporation. A relatively recent text by Stephen A. Resnick and Richard D. Wolff, Class Theory and History, explores state capitalism in the former Soviet Union, continuing a theme that has been debated within Marxist theory for most of the past century. Much of this debate has been among Trotskyist communist groups, among whom the most influential formulation has been that of Tony Cliff, associated with the International Socialist Tendency and the British Socialist Workers Party (SWP), although the discussion goes back to internal debates in the Left Opposition in the late 1920s. Trotskyism can refer to either the body of ideas associated with Leon Trotsky or the movement based on those ideas. ... Marxism is the political practice and social theory based on the works of Karl Marx, a 19th century German philosopher, economist, journalist, and revolutionary, along with Friedrich Engels. ... Capitalism has been defined in various ways (see Capitalism in Wikiquote). ... Surplus value, according to Marxism, is unpaid labour that is extracted from the worker by the capitalist, and serves as the basis for capitalist accumulation. ... A corporation is a legal entity (distinct from a natural person) that often has similar rights in law to those of a Civil law systems may refer to corporations as moral persons; they may also go by the name AS (anonymous society) or something similar, depending on language (see below). ... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a popular movement. ... Tony Cliff Tony Cliff (May 20, 1917 – May 9, 2000) was a Trotskyist politician. ... The International Socialist Tendency is an international grouping of organisations around the ideas of Tony Cliff, founder of the Socialist Workers Party in the UK. It has sections across the world, however its strongest presence is in Europe, especially in the UK, Greece and Ireland. ... Fist Logo The Socialist Workers Party (SWP) is the largest political party of the far left in Britain. ... The Left Opposition was a faction within the Communist Party of the Soviet Union during 1923-1927. ... Sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or primarily in North America as the Roaring Twenties. // Events and trends Technology John T. Thompson invents Thompson submachine gun, also known as Tommy gun John Logie Baird invents the first working television system (1925) Charles Lindbergh becomes the first person to fly...


Use by Maoists

From 1956 to the early 1980s, the Chinese Maoists and their Maoist or anti-revisionist adherents around the world often described the Soviet Union as state capitalist, as part of their description of the style and politics of Khrushchev and his successors. After Mao's death, amid the supporters of the Cultural Revolution and the exploits of the 'Gang of Four', some stuck with this formulation while others extended it to China, and most ceased to be Maoists. Maoism or Mao Tse-tung Thought (Chinese: 毛泽东思想, pinyin: Máo Zédōng SÄ«xiÇŽng), is a variant of Marxism-Leninism derived from the teachings of Mao Zedong (1893–1976). ... In the communist or Marxist-Leninist movement, an anti-revisionist is one who favors a strict interpretation of the ideology along Stalinist or Maoist lines. ... Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchyov (Khrushchev) (Russian: Ники́та Серге́евич Хрущёв   listen?, April 17, 1894 â€“ September 11, 1971) was the leader of the Soviet Union after the death of Joseph Stalin. ... A poster during the Cultural Revolution The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution (Simplified Chinese: 无产阶级文化大革命; Traditional Chinese: 無產階級文化大革命; pinyin: ; literally Proletarian Cultural Great Revolution; often abbreviated to 文化大革命 wén huà dà gé mìng, literally Great Cultural Revolution, or simply 文革 wén gé, literally Cultural Revolution) in the Peoples Republic of China... The Gang of Four on trial The Gang of Four (Chinese: 四人帮; pinyin: ) was a group of Communist Party leaders in the Peoples Republic of China who were arrested and removed from their positions in 1976, following the death of Mao Zedong, and were blamed for the events of...


State Capitalism in Western countries

An alternate definition is that state capitalism is a close relationship between the government and private capitalism, such as one in which the private capitalists produce for a guaranteed market. An example of this would be the military-industrial complex where autonomous entrepreneurial firms produce for government contracts and are not subject to the discipline of competitive markets. Many, including Cliff, see this as part of a continuum characterizing the modern world economy with 'normal' capitalism at one extreme and complete state capitalism like that of the former USSR at the other. This continuum has narrowed somewhat since the 1980s with the collapse of the USSR and its satellites and with large-scale privatization in Eastern Europe and most of the third world. The term military-industrial complex usually refers to the combination of the U.S. armed forces, arms industry and associated political and commercial interests, which grew rapidly in scale and influence in the wake of World War II, although it can also be used to describe any such relationship of... Tony Cliff Tony Cliff (May 20, 1917 – May 9, 2000) was a Trotskyist politician. ... Privatization (sometimes privatisation, denationalization, or, especially in India, disinvestment) is the process of transferring property, from public ownership to private ownership and/or transferring the management of a service or activity from the government to the private sector. ... Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current national boundaries: Russia (dark orange), other countries of the former USSR (medium orange) and other former communist regimes (light orange) Current division of Europe into five (or more) regions: Eastern Europe is marked in orange Eastern... For the Jamaican reggae band, see Third World (band). ...


Both the first definition (the one used by Trotskyists) and this third one flow from discussion among Marxists at the beginning of the twentieth century, most notably Nikolai Bukharin who, in his book Imperialism and the world economy thought that advanced, 'imperialist' countries exhibited the latter definition and considered (and rejected) the possibility that they could arrive at the former. Nikolai Ivanovich Bukharin (Russian: Николай Иванович Бухарин), (October 9 (September 27 Old Style) 1888 – March 13, 1938) was a Bolshevik revolutionary and intellectual, and later a Soviet politician. ... Imperialism is the policy of extending the control or authority over foreign entities as a means of acquisition and/or maintenance of empires, either through direct territorial or through indirect methods of exerting control on the politics and/or economy of other countries. ...


See also

Stalinism is a brand of political theory, and the political and economic system implemented by Joseph Stalin in the Soviet Union. ... Bureaucratic collectivism is a theory of class society. ... Coordinatorism is an economic system in which control is held neither by people who own capital, nor by the workers, but instead is held by an intervening class of coordinators, typically in the roles of managers, administrators, engineers, university intellectuals, doctors, lawyers. ... In Trotskyist political theory, deformed workers states are states where capitalism has been overthrown through social revolution and the property forms have changed into a collectivized planned economy, but where the working class has never held political power (as it did in Russia shortly after the Russian Revolution). ... In Trotskyist political theory, degenerated workers states are states where capitalism has been overthrown through social revolution and the property forms have changed into a collectivized planned economy, but where the working class has lost its political power and socialist democracy has been replaced by a form of dictatorship. ... The new class is a term to describe the privileged ruling class of bureaucrats and Communist party functionaries which typically arises in a Stalinist communist state. ... State socialism, broadly speaking, is any variety of socialism which relies on ownership of the means of production by the state. ... Statism is a term to describe any economic system where a government implements a significant degree of centralized economic planning, which may include state ownership of the means of production, as opposed to a system where the overwhelming majority of economic planning occurs at a decentralized level by private individuals...

External links

  • State Capitalism in Russia by Tony Cliff
  • Imperialism and World Economy by Nikolai Bukharin

  Results from FactBites:
 
State socialism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (318 words)
State socialism, broadly speaking, is any variety of socialism which relies on ownership of the means of production by the state.
State socialism is often referred to simply as "socialism"; the attributive "state" is usually added only by socialists with a different vision, wishing to criticise state socialism.
Other Marxists denounce those "Communist" states as Stalinist, arguing that their leadership was corrupt and that it abandoned Marxism in all but name.
State capitalist - definition of State capitalist in Encyclopedia (475 words)
The most common definition of state capitalism within Marxist literature is that it is a social system combining capitalism (the wage labor system of producing and appropriating surplus value) with state ownership.
The term "state capitalism" has also been used by anarchists, but in that case it is applied to the entire history of Soviet Russia, from 1918 onward.
An alternative definition is that state capitalism is a close relationship between the government and private capitalism, such as one in which the private capitalists produce for a guaranteed market, where many (but not an overwhelming proportion) of large enterprises are government-owned.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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