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Encyclopedia > State University of New York at Plattsburgh
SUNY Plattsburgh

Motto: A superbus preteritus, A validus posterus
A Proud Past, A Strong Future
Established 1889
Type: Public
President: John Ettling[1]
Staff: 270
Students: 6214 [1]
Undergraduates: 5567 [1]
Postgraduates: 650 [1]
Location Plattsburgh, New York, USA
Campus: Micropolis, 256 acres (1 km²) maintained [2]
Former names: Plattsburgh Normal and Training School
Colors: Red and White
Mascot: Cardinal Burghy
Athletics: 18 varsity teams
Website: www.plattsburgh.edu

The State University of New York College at Plattsburgh (also known as SUNY Plattsburgh, Plattsburgh State, or Plattsburgh State University) is a selective, four-year, public liberal arts college in Plattsburgh, New York. Image File history File links Suny-logo-trans. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... This article is about work. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Nickname: Location within the state of New York Coordinates: , Country State County Clinton Government  - Mayor Donald Kasprzak Area  - Total 6. ... This article is about the state. ... United States micropolitan areas, as defined by the Census Bureau and the Office of Management and Budget, are areas in the United States based around a core city or town with a population of 10,000 to 49,999. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... “km” redirects here. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Genera Periporphyrus Saltator Caryothraustes Parkerthraustes Rhodothraupis Cardinalis Pheucticus Cyanocompsa Guiraca Passerina Spiza The Cardinals or Cardinalidae are a family of passerine birds found in North and South America. ... Image File history File links Burghy2. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... Nickname: Location within the state of New York Coordinates: , Country State County Clinton Government  - Mayor Donald Kasprzak Area  - Total 6. ... This article is about the state. ...

Contents

History

Founding of the Plattsburgh Normal

After decades championing for the cause of a Normal School, or teachers college, for Plattsburgh, influential businessmen and former state politician Smith M. Weed formally proposed a bill on January 12, 1888.[3] With the strong backing of Assemblyman General Stephen Moffitt, the Plattsburgh Normal School bill was passed by both houses of the New York State Legislature and signed into law by Governor David B. Hill in June 1889.[4] The Board of Directors adopted official by-laws for Plattsburgh Normal and Training School on September 2, 1889.[5] A normal school or teachers college is an educational institution for training teachers. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the toll-free telephone number see Toll-free telephone number Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... David Bennett Hill (August 29, 1843 - October 20, 1910) was a Governor of New York. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Opening of Normal Hall

Plattsburgh Normal and Training School, early-1910s
Plattsburgh Normal and Training School, early-1910s

At a meeting held on June 28, 1889, it was decided that the location of the new normal school would be on land known as "the former athletic grounds", bounded on the north by Court Street, on the east by Wells Street, on the south by Brinkerhoff Street, and on the west by Beekman Street.[6] However these original plans were dropped in favor of a larger plot created by combining land on each side of Court Street west of Beekman Street, so that "Court Street, one of the finest residence streets in the village, leads directly to the main entrance".[7] This is the same location where Hawkins Hall now rests on the current campus of SUNY Plattsburgh.modern map Image File history File links 1916PlattsburghNormalSchool. ... Image File history File links 1916PlattsburghNormalSchool. ... // The 1910s represent the culmination of European militarism which had its beginnings during the second half of the 19th Century. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Class of 1895

The impressive structure, known as "Normal Hall", was constructed by Brown Brothers of Mohawk, New York, who also built the Court House in downtown Plattsburgh.[8] Normal Hall was used both for classes and as a dormitory. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Mohawk is the name of some places in the U.S. state of New York: Mohawk, Herkimer County, New York Mohawk, Montgomery County, New York This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... A typical American college dorm room Another typical not-so-clean college dorm room Watterson Towers, Illinois State University Potomac Hall, second-largest dormitory at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. ...


Plattsburgh Normal and Training School officially opened with its first day of classes on the morning of September 3, 1890.[9] The school's first principal was Fox Holden, former Superintendent of the Plattsburgh Union Graded Schools.[7] Holden served for only three years, from 1890 until the first graduating class in 1892. is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Fire of 1929

The ruins of Normal Hall
The ruins of Normal Hall

On January 26, 1929, a fire completely destroyed the Plattsburgh Normal School. The fire started in the boiler room on a cold Saturday morning. Aided by high winds, the entire structure was fully engulfed in flames within a half-hour. Six children were rescued from the school by faculty members. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Classes resumed the following Wednesday at City Hall in downtown.[10] By June of 1930 plans were presented for a new structure to replace Normal Hall. The new building would be twice as long and boast three times the capacity of the original building. Among its many modern features was a 1,000 seat auditorium. Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The new structure was completed in 1932 and was named Hawkins Hall in honor of George K. Hawkins, the principal of Plattsburgh Normal School from 1898 to 1933.[2] Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


State University of New York

Plattsburgh Normal School was renamed SUNY Plattsburgh when it joined the State University of New York system with its establishment in 1948. When the school became part of the SUNY system, it changed from a two-year teacher's institution to a selective, four-year, public liberal arts college. Not to be confused with University of the State of New York. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ...


During the 1960s and 1970s SUNY Plattsburgh, as well as the whole State University of New York system, underwent rapid growth.[citation needed] Many of the more modern buildings on campus were constructed during this time period, including the Angell College Center, Feinberg Library, and several high-rise dormitories. The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ...


Campus

Amity Plaza in front of the Angell College Center, 2006
Amity Plaza in front of the Angell College Center, 2006

The primary campus of the State University of New York at Plattsburgh is located in the city of Plattsburgh, in upstate New York. The campus is near Lake Champlain and the Adirondack Mountains, in a region known as the Champlain Valley. The closest major city outside of Plattsburgh is Burlington, Vermont, which is less than 20 miles "as the crow flies" but takes an hour to travel via ferry. The closest major city within New York is Albany (headquarters of the SUNY system), 140 miles to the south. SUNY Plattsburgh also has a strong connection with Canada, due to the Canadian border being just 20 miles north and the city of Montreal just over 50 miles away. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 283 pixel Image in higher resolution (1428 × 505 pixel, file size: 648 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): State University of... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 283 pixel Image in higher resolution (1428 × 505 pixel, file size: 648 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): State University of... Nickname: Location within the state of New York Coordinates: , Country State County Clinton Government  - Mayor Donald Kasprzak Area  - Total 6. ... The areas highlighted in YELLOW and GREEN are those which are considered to be a bona fide part of Upstate New York from the perspective of New York City. ... Landsat photo Lake Champlain (French: lac Champlain) is a large lake in North America, mostly within the borders of the United States (states of Vermont and New York) but partially situated across the US-Canada border in the province of Quebec. ... Stream on the hike to the top of Ampersand Mountain The Adirondack mountain range is located in the northeastern part of New York that runs through Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Fulton, Hamilton, Herkimer, Lewis, St. ... Champlain Valley is a region of the United States around Lake Champlain in Vermont and New York. ... Burlington is the largest city in the U.S. state of Vermont and is the shire town of Chittenden County, Vermont. ... Look up as the crow flies in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The ferryboat Dongan Hills, filled with commuters, about to dock at a New York City pier, circa 1945. ... This article is about the state. ... For other uses, see Albany. ... Not to be confused with University of the State of New York. ... The Peace Arch border Canada and the United States of America share the longest common border, officially known as the International Boundary, between any two countries that is not militarized or actively patrolled. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - Total 365. ...

Amity Plaza, 1990
Amity Plaza, 1990

The Plattsburgh campus includes thirty-six buildings on 256 acres[2], generally located in an area just west of the intersection of Broad Street and Rugar Street. The center of campus is Amity Plaza, a large outdoor courtyard surrounded by many of the most essential buildings on campus, including the Angell College Center, Myers Fine Arts Building, and Feinberg Library.[11] The iconic focal point of Amity Plaza is the massive metal sculpture of two people shaking hands, which represents amity between the United States and Canada.[12] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 419 pixel Image in higher resolution (1164 × 609 pixel, file size: 149 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took this photograph in 1990. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 419 pixel Image in higher resolution (1164 × 609 pixel, file size: 149 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took this photograph in 1990. ...

Champlain Valley Hall, the oldest building on campus.
Champlain Valley Hall, the oldest building on campus.

The most distinctive academic building on campus is Hawkins Hall, located on Beekman Street between Broad Street and Cornelia Street. Hawkins Hall replaced the original Plattsburgh Normal School which burned to the ground at that same location in 1929. The oldest building on campus is Champlain Valley Hall, while MacDonough Hall is the oldest dormitory. Other dorms line Rugar Street, including six 9-story high-rises.[11] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 895 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Champlain Valley Hall I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 895 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Champlain Valley Hall I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A typical American college dorm room Another typical not-so-clean college dorm room Watterson Towers, Illinois State University Potomac Hall, second-largest dormitory at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. ... High-rise is a 1975 novel by J. G. Ballard. ...


Several key athletic facilities are located 1/4 mile west of the main campus at the Field House Complex. Among these facilities is the Ronald B. Stafford Ice Arena, the 3,500 seat home to Cardinal Hockey. SUNY Plattsburgh also has a number of other remote sites, ranging from Valcour Educational Conference Center in nearby Peru, New York to a Branch Campus located in Queensbury, New York (near Glens Falls). Peru is a town in Clinton County in the U.S. state of New York. ... Queensbury is a town located in Warren County, New York, USA. As of the 2000 census, the town had a total population of 25,441. ... Glens Falls is a city in Warren County, New York, USA. It is part of the Glens Falls, New York Metropolitan Statistical Area. ...


More information

SUNY Plattsburgh offers degree programs, primarily at the Bachelor's level, in over 60 areas of study. The college is home to approximately 6,000 students and 300 faculty.


Plattsburgh maintains the original goals of the Plattsburgh Normal School in the form of a well-regarded education department and a nursing program. All degree programs are offered within three academic divisions: Arts and Science; Education, Health and Human Services (including the SUNY Plattsburgh Auditory Research Laboratories); and the School of Business and Economics. There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


SUNY Plattsburgh is also notable for its pioneering environmental science program, its communications and media program, its national championship hockey team, and its large art museum.


Plattsburgh State was the first college in the SUNY system to offer an environmental science program; one of the best in North America[citation needed], which is popular with the many students who choose to attend Plattsburgh for its close proximity to the Adirondack Mountains. The region provides further advantages for students enrolling in Plattsburgh's Bachelor's program in Expeditionary Studies. Many SUNY Plattsburgh students are avid skiers and snowboarders as evidenced from the popular Adirondack Experience Program or ADX. ADX often facilitates trips to Whiteface Mountain and Titus Mountain. The State University of New York (acronym SUNY; usually pronounced SOO-nee) is a system of public institutions of higher education in New York, United States. ... Environmental science is the study of the interactions among the physical, chemical and biological components of the environment; with a focus on pollution and degradation of the environment related to human activities; and the impact on biodiversity and sustainability from local and global development. ... North America North America is a continent [1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Stream on the hike to the top of Ampersand Mountain The Adirondack mountain range is located in the northeastern part of New York that runs through Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Fulton, Hamilton, Herkimer, Lewis, St. ... Whiteface Mountain is one of the High Peaks of the Adirondack Mountains, located near Lake Placid, New York. ... Titus Mountain or The Titus as it is colloquially referred to, is a mountain near Malone, New York, with a base elevation of 150 feet (45 m) and summit elevation of 1350 feet (400 m). ...


The Men's Hockey and Women's Hockey teams are perennial powerhouses in the NCAA's division III. The men's team has won the national championship title several times, with the women's hockey team making it to the Frozen Four numerous times, finally winning the National Title in 2007. The Plattsburgh State Art Museum is considered a "Museum Without Walls" and includes the Rockwell Kent Gallery (repository of the bulk of the work of American painter Rockwell Kent), a large open-air sculpture park, and a number of works by other well-known artists including Pablo Picasso and Auguste Rodin. The college also offers an extensive Canadian Studies program through the Center for the Study of Canada. About 1,200 students — approximately 20 percent of the undergraduate population—have taken required Canadian Studies courses, the highest percentage of any college in the United States.[13] The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Rockwell Kent photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1933 Rockwell Kent (1882-1971), an American artist was born in Tarrytown, New York, was well educated in art. ... Picasso redirects here. ... Auguste Rodin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Canadian Studies is a Collegiate study of Canadian culture, Canadian languages, literature, Quebec, agriculture, history, and their government and politics. ...


Notable alumni and former students

Performing Arts

Dave Annable (born September 15, 1979) is an American actor. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Brothers and Sisters (1979 TV series). ... People, a weekly magazine of celebrity and popular culture news, debuted on February 27, 1974. ... Tom Chapin is a Grammy Award-winning musician, entertainer, and songwriter. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... “Instrumentalist” redirects here. ... Tim Robbins at Cannes, 2001 Height: 6 ft 4 in / 1. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Bull Durham is a 1988 American movie about love and baseball. ... For the novella, see Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption. ...

Literature

Nancy Kress (born Nancy Anne Koningisor in Buffalo, New York on January 20, 1948) is a science fiction writer. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... A science-fiction novel by noted author Nancy Kress which won the Hugo Award and Nebula Award. ...

Broadcasting

This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... An Emmy Award. ... A journalist is a person who practices journalism. ... NBC News endcap, used from 2002 to present. ...

Politics

Anthony David Weiner (born September 4, 1964) is a Democratic politician from the U.S. state of New York. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... This article is about the state. ...

Notable faculty and staff

The Emma Willard School, originally called Troy Female Seminary and often referred to simply as Emma, is an independent university-preparatory day and boarding school for young women, located in Troy, New York, offering grades 9-12 and PG. It was founded by the womens advocate Emma Willard in... Suffragette with banner, Washington DC, 1918 The title of suffragette was given to members of the womens suffrage movement in the United Kingdom and United States, particularly in the years prior to World War I. The name was the Womens Social and Political Union (founded in 1903). ... The Emma Willard School, originally called Troy Female Semninary and often referred to simply as Emma, is an independent university-preparatory day and boarding school for young women, located in Troy, New York offering grades 9-12 and PG. It was founded by the womens advocate Emma Willard in... Russell Sage College (often Russell Sage or RSC) is a womens college located in Troy, New York, approximately 150 miles north of New York City in the Capital District. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Jacques Gerard Lemaire (born September 7, 1945 in Lasalle, Quebec, Canada) is a former ice hockey centre and current head coach in the National Hockey League. ... NHL can also be an abbreviation for National Historic Landmark or Non-Hodgkins lymphoma. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Hockey Hall of Fame logo The Hockey Hall of Fame, located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, is dedicated to the history of ice hockey with exhibits featuring memorabilia and NHL trophies (including the Stanley Cup) along with interactive activities. ... This article is about the year. ...

Campus media

  • Cardinal Points - Student-run newspaper.
  • Plattsburgh State Television - Student run television station.
  • WQKE 93.9FM - Student run radio station named The Quake focusing on underground music of all genres.

Plattsburgh State Television, known as PSTV, is a college television station on the campus of SUNY Plattsburgh in Plattsburgh, New York. ... WQKE, The Quake is broadcast on 93. ...

Trivia

Peter Kenneth Frampton (born April 22, 1950 in Beckenham, Kent) is an English musician, best known today for his solo work in the mid-1970s and as one of the original members of the band Humble Pie. ... For the magazine, see Classic Rock (magazine). ... Do You Feel Like We Do is a song by Peter Frampton originally on the Framptons Camel album released in 1973. ... Frampton Comes Alive! is a live album by Peter Frampton. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... USMC convoys staging prior to going north into Iraq in March of 2004 A staging area is a temporary location where military units, aircraft and warships plus their matériel are assembled ahead of an attack or invasion. ... The 1976 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXI Olympiad, were held in 1976 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - Total 365. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the sport. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... This is a list of films that have received an Oscar and nomination for best documentary short subject. ... If You Love This Planet is a 1982 short documentary film recording a lecture given to students by physician and nuclear critic Dr. Helen Caldicott about the dangers posed by nuclear weapons. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Yes Men is a film. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c "Building on our Success", Plattsburgh Magazine 7 (3): 16-18, Fall 2006
  2. ^ a b SUNY Plattsburgh Aerial Campus Map. State University of New York at Plattsburgh. Retrieved on 2007-11-27.
  3. ^ "A Normal School At Plattsburgh", The Plattsburgh Sentinel, January 13, 1888, p. 1. 
  4. ^ "Got It At Last! A State Normal School To Be Located At Plattsburgh", The Plattsburgh Sentinel, June 21, 1889, p. 1. 
  5. ^ "The Normal School", The Plattsburgh Sentinel, September 6, 1889, p. 1. 
  6. ^ "Plans For New Normal School Are Presented", The Plattsburgh Sentinel, June 24, 1930, p. 2. 
  7. ^ a b "The State Normal School At Plattsburgh", The Plattsburgh Sentinel, August 1, 1890, pp. 1. 
  8. ^ "A New Essex Co. Railroad", The Plattsburgh Sentinel, August 1, 1890, p. 8. 
  9. ^ "Successful Opening of the New Normal School", The Plattsburgh Sentinel, September 5, 1890, p. 1. 
  10. ^ "Plattsburgh State Normal School Destroyed By Fire Saturday", The Plattsburgh Sentinel, January 29, 1929, p. 3. 
  11. ^ a b Self-Guided Campus Tour (pdf). State University of New York at Plattsburgh. Retrieved on 2007-11-21.
  12. ^ Sussman, Mike (February 09, 2007). SUNY Plattsburgh Trivia II. Retrieved on 2007-11-21.
  13. ^ Zaidi, Noor. "Oh Canada! It's More Than Just Hockey And Beer." Columbia Spectator. December 3, 2004.
  14. ^ Dave Annable Biography. Yahoo! TV. Yahoo!. Retrieved on 2007-11-15.
  15. ^ Dave Annable Biography. TV Guide. Retrieved on 2007-11-15.
  16. ^ "The Sexiest Men Alive", People, November 26, 2007, <http://www.people.com/people/package/gallery/0,,20154290_20159879_7,00.html>
  17. ^ Tom Chapin to Perform Concert at Plattsburgh State Oct. 18. State University of New York at Plattsburgh. Retrieved on 2007-11-15.
  18. ^ Tim Robbins' New York Times biography (accessed 10 Dec 2005)
  19. ^ Alumni Profile: Nancy Kress ('69). State University of New York at Plattsburgh. Retrieved on 2007-11-15.
  20. ^ Author, Alumna Nancy Kress to Receive Honorary Degree at May 15 Commencement. State University of New York at Plattsburgh. Retrieved on 2007-11-15.
  21. ^ Dawn Fratangelo. MSNBC (March 15, 2004). Retrieved on 2007-11-16.
  22. ^ a b Information and Resources for High School & Transfer Counselors. State University of New York at Plattsburgh. Retrieved on 2007-11-16.
  23. ^ Biography of Congressman Anthony D. Weiner. United States House of Representatives. Retrieved on 2007-11-16.
  24. ^ Archibold, Randal C. & Urbina, Ian (August 30, 2005), "THE HOPEFULS: Anthony D. Weiner; A Scrappy Congressman, Ready for His Next Risk", The New York Times, <http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9A07E0DA1631F933A0575BC0A9639C8B63&sec=&spon=&pagewanted=print>. Retrieved on 2007-11-16
  25. ^ Eliza Kellas, Innovative Educator. Women of Courage, Ten North Country Pioneers in Profile. St. Lawrence County, NY Branch of the American Association of University Women (1989). Retrieved on 2007-11-16.
  26. ^ Shea, Kevin. One on One with Jacques Lemaire. Legends of Hockey. Retrieved on 2007-11-16.
  27. ^ Jacques Lemaire, Career Statistics. Legends of Hockey. Retrieved on 2007-11-16.
  28. ^ Crowe, Cameron (1976). Do You Feel Like We Do. In Frampton Comes Alive [CD liner notes]. Santa Monica: A&M Records.
  29. ^ Reinhold, Robert. "Ford Gives Olympic Athletes a Send-Off", The New York Times, July 11, 1976, p. 1. 
  30. ^ "Ford speech in Plattsburgh" (Reprint), The Press Republican, December 28, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-01-02. 
  31. ^ Conner, Floyd (October 1, 2001). Basketball's Most Wanted. Brassey's, 149 of 304. ISBN 1-57488-361-5. 
  • Skopp, Dr. Douglas Richard[3] (1989). Bright With Promise: From the Normal and Training School to SUNY Plattsburgh: 1889-1989; A Pictorial History. Norfolk, VA: Donning Press. 

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the toll-free telephone number see Toll-free telephone number Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Yahoo redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... TV Guide is the name of two North American weekly magazines about television programming, one in the United States and one in Canada. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the news website, see msnbc. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ...

External links

Coordinates: 44°41′36″N, 73°27′59″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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