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Encyclopedia > Star Trek comics
Star Trek
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Original Series · 80 episodes
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Star Trek Portal

Almost continuously since 1967, a number of companies have published comic book series based on Star Trek and its spin off series, including Gold Key Comics, Marvel Comics, DC Comics, Malibu, Wildstorm, and currently IDW Publishing, with varying degrees of success. As of 2006, Star Trek: Enterprise remains the only Trek series that has yet to be adapted in comic book form. The current Star Trek franchise logo Star Trek is an American science fiction entertainment series and media franchise. ... The starship Enterprise as it appeared on Star Trek Star Trek is a culturally significant science fiction television series created by Gene Roddenberry in the 1960s. ... Star Trek: The Animated Series is an animated science fiction television series set in the Star Trek universe. ... List of Star Trek: The Animated Series episodes This is a list of episodes from the fictional animated television, Star Trek: The Animated Series, set in the Star Trek universe. ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... Space station Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (ST:DS9 or STDS9 or DS9 for short) is a science fiction television series produced by Paramount and set in the Star Trek universe. ... The starship Voyager (NCC-74656), an Intrepid-class starship. ... The starship Enterprise (NX-01) Star Trek: Enterprise is a science fiction television series set in the Star Trek universe. ... This list of Star Trek: Enterprise episodes is accompanied by each episodes original airdate on UPN in the United States, along with its Nielsen rating, and number of viewers. ... Star Trek: The Motion Picture (Paramount Pictures, 1979; see also 1979 in film) is the first feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series and is released on Friday, December 7. ... Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (Paramount Pictures, 1982; see also 1982 in film) is the second feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (Paramount Pictures, 1984; see also 1984 in film) is the third feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (Paramount Pictures, 1986; see also 1986 in film) is the fourth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (Paramount Pictures, 1989; see also 1989 in film) is the fifth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (Paramount Pictures, 1991; see also 1991 in film) is the sixth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Star Trek: Generations (Paramount Pictures, 1994, see also 1994 in film) is the seventh feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Star Trek: First Contact (Paramount Pictures, 1996; see also 1996 in film), is the eighth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Star Trek: Insurrection (Paramount Pictures, 1998) is the ninth Star Trek feature film. ... Star Trek Nemesis (Paramount Pictures, 2002; see also 2002 in film) is the tenth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... This article is about the 2008 film. ... This is a list of species and races from the fictional universe of Star Trek. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... In the Star Trek science fiction universe, Humans/Terrans (Homo sapiens sapiens) are one of the races undertaking interstellar travel. ... It has been suggested that Tplana-hath be merged into this article or section. ... Romulans are a fictional alien species in the Star Trek universe related to Vulcans. ... Q In the Star Trek fictional universe, the Q are a race of near-omnipotent, near-omniscient god-like beings from a parallel existence called the Q Continuum. ... This article is about the fictional race. ... This article is about the Star Trek universe. ... Bajorans, a race of humanoids in the fictional Star Trek universe, were introduced in the Next Generation series and played an integral part in the Deep Space Nine series. ... includeonly> It has been suggested that Assimilation (Star Trek) be merged into this article or section. ... The Ferengi are a fictional extraterrestrial race from the Star Trek universe, which some have accused of being anti-semitic [1]. They first appeared in The Last Outpost, the Seventh episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation in 1987, during which they made first contact with the United Federation of... In the fictional Star Trek universe, the Dominion is a ruthless and militaristic Gamma Quadrant state, consisting of many different races, with ultimate power held by the xenophobic Changelings. ... The Mirror Universe (MU) is a fictional parallel universe in which the plots of several Star Trek television episodes take place, named for Mirror, Mirror, the original series episode in which it first appeared. ... The Star Trek franchise has produced a large number of novels, comic books, video games, and other materials, which are generally considered non-canon. ... Star Trek: Phase II was a planned television series set to air in Spring 1978 on a proposed Paramount Television Service (which eventually became United Paramount Network) based on the characters of Gene Roddenberrys Star Trek. ... This is a list of the various Star Trek novels, novelisations, short story collections that have been published since 1968. ... The Star Fleet Universe is the variant of the Star Trek fictional universe as detailed in the series of tactical and strategic interstellar wargames from Amarillo Design Bureau Inc. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... // Video games Throughout the years, the influence of Star Trek has expanded sufficiently to warrant the creation of a long series of PC games. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The view from the outside of the Las Vegas Hilton Star Trek: The Experience is a theme park at the Las Vegas Hilton in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, based on the fictional Star Trek universe. ... The Star Trek canon consists of the television series Star Trek (the original series), Star Trek: The Next Generation, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, Star Trek: Voyager, Star Trek: Enterprise, and the ten motion pictures based upon the series. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... This article is an attempt to list every Star Trek episode from every form of media in order by stardate. ... The below is an abridged timeline of events established in the group of television shows and feature films set in the fictional Star Trek universe. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that List of Starfleet ship classes be merged into this article or section. ... This article is becoming very long. ... In the fictional Star Trek universe, the Planet Classification System is a system developed by the Federation to categorize planets by many factors, such as atmospheric composition, age, surface temperature, size, and presence of life. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for an encyclopedia. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Memory Alpha (often abbreviated to MA) is a collaborative project to create the most definitive, accurate and accessible encyclopedic reference for topics related to the Star Trek fictional universe. ... Star Trek is one of the most culturally influential television shows[]. The original series, which aired in the late sixties, has since spawned five successor series, ten movies, a plethora of merchandise, and a multibillion dollar industry collectively known as the Star Trek franchise (owned by CBS Paramount Television). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Where no man has gone before is a saying used in the introductory sequence of all but one of the episodes of the original Star Trek science fiction television series. ... The current Star Trek franchise logo Star Trek is an American science fiction entertainment series and media franchise. ... Gold Key Comics was an imprint of Western Publishing cteated for comic books distributed to newstands. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... WildStorm Productions, or simply WildStorm or Wildstorm, is a publishing imprint and studio of American comic book publisher DC Comics. ... IDW Publishing (a division of Idea and Design Works) is an American comic book company. ... 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The starship Enterprise (NX-01) Star Trek: Enterprise is a science fiction television series set in the Star Trek universe. ...

Contents

Publishers

Gold Key

The first Star Trek comics were published by Gold Key between 1967 and 1978. Originally they were illustrated by Alberto Giolitti, an artist in Europe who had never seen the series and only had publicity photos to use as references. These comics were highly stylized and diverged wildly from the TV series continuity. Nonetheless they are fondly remembered by fans and a series of reprints (The Key Collection) of these original titles began to appear in 2004. The original issues, most of which featured photographic covers showing images from the series, are highly collectable. Writers included George Kashdan, Arnold Drake and Len Wein.[1] This gold key has had the logo removed to protect the owner from identification Gold Keys are made available to large top clients of Swiss Banks. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Arnold Drake was an American writer of comic books notable for his work on Deadman, for which he was given the Bill Finger Award, and on Doom Patrol. ... Len Wein (born June 12, 1948, New York City, New York) is an American comic book writer and editor best known for co-creating DC Comics Swamp Thing and for reviving Marvel Comics X-Men. ...


Most storylines used in the Gold Key series featured original characters and concepts, although later issues did include sequels to the TOS episodes "The City on the Edge of Forever", "Metamorphosis" and "I, Mudd". The City on the Edge of Forever is a first season episode of Star Trek: The Original Series. ... Metamorphosis is a second season episode of Star Trek: The Original Series first broadcast November 10, 1967 and repeated July 19, 1968. ... I, Mudd is an episode of Star Trek: The Original Series first broadcast November 3, 1967 and repeated April 5, 1968. ...


Marvel

Marvel's series of Star Trek comics began in 1979 with an adaptation of Star Trek: The Motion Picture, and continued for another two years, its tales presumably taking place during the apocryphal second five-year mission of Kirk and the Enterprise that would have been featured in the never-produced Star Trek: Phase II TV series. Marvel's license from Paramount prohibited them from utilizing concepts introduced in the original series, being restricted to only using the characters and concepts as they appeared in Star Trek: The Motion Picture. The series lasted a total of 18 issues, ending in 1981. Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Star Trek: The Motion Picture (Paramount Pictures, 1979; see also 1979 in film) is the first feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series and is released on Friday, December 7. ... James Tiberius Kirk, played by William Shatner, is the main character in the original Star Trek television series and the films based on it. ... The USS Enterprise, (NCC-1701) is a fictional starship in the television series Star Trek, which chronicles the vessels most famous assignment, its Five-Year mission. ... Star Trek: Phase II was a planned television series set to air in Spring 1978 on a proposed Paramount Television Service (which eventually became United Paramount Network) based on the characters of Gene Roddenberrys Star Trek. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ...


Comic Strips (UK and U.S.)

From 1969 to 1973, a series of weekly Star Trek comic strips ran in the British comic magazines Joe 90: Top Secret, TV21 & Joe 90 and Valiant and TV21. A total of 258 issues were produced, as well as hardcovers annuals of Joe 90 and TV21, and a softcover Valiant summer special. All were original stories. Two more annuals, under the Mighty TV Comic banner, also produced original Trek materials. In addition, the weekly TV Comic reprinted serialized versions of the U.S. Gold Key comics.[2] Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ...


Then, from 1979 to 1983, the Los Angeles Times Mirror Syndicate produced a daily comic strip based upon Star Trek. The strip debuted on December 2, 1979 and ran until December 3, 1983. The storylines were written and illustrated by Thomas Warkentin, Sharman DiVono, Ron Harris, Larry Niven, Martin Pasko, Padraic Shigetani, Bob Meyers, Ernie Colon, Gerry Conway and Dick Kulpa.[3] Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Sharman DiVono is a science fiction novelist, short story writer and television writer. ... The term Ron Harris can refer to: Ronald Dale Harris - former computer programmer for the Nevada Gaming Control Board Ron Harris (footballer) - 1960s English soccer player Ron Harris (photographer) - a nude photographer Ron Harris (wrestler) - an American professional wrestler. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Ernie Colon is a comics artist. ... Gerard F. Gerry Conway (September 10, 1952 - ) is an American writer of comic books and television shows. ... Former Alderman of Loves Park, Illinois. ...


DC

Main article: Star Trek DC comics

The first DC series picked up immediately after Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, beginning in 1984 but after eight issues started to place stories after Star Trek III: The Search for Spock.[4] In these later issues, Kirk, after a multi-issue showdown with the Mirror Universe, is given command of the Excelsior, while Spock, mentally restored after mind-melding with his mirror self, is given the command of the USS Surak. However, with Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home taking place right after III left off, the series quickly wiped the slate clean by having Kirk lose command of the Excelsior and Spock return to the state he was at the end of III. After the release of The Voyage Home, the series continued with Kirk commanding the Enterprise-A. These later issues also re-introduced the characters of Arex and M'Ress from Star Trek: The Animated Series. In 1988, the series ended when Paramount required all tie-in licenses to be renegotiated. Cover to Star Trek v2 #16 by Jerome K. Moore. ... Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (Paramount Pictures, 1982; see also 1982 in film) is the second feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... This article is about the year. ... Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (Paramount Pictures, 1984; see also 1984 in film) is the third feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... In the Star Trek television series, the Mirror Universe is an alternate reality. ... The USS Excelsior in 2293 The USS Excelsior is a starship in the Star Trek fictional universe. ... Spock, commonly called Mr. ... Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (Paramount Pictures, 1986; see also 1986 in film) is the fourth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... AREX is a South Korean railway line that links Incheon International Airport and Gimpo Airport, with a future section extending to Seoul Station. ... Lieutenant MRess, voiced by Majel Barrett, was a recurring character on Star Trek: The Animated Series which aired on NBC from 1973 to 1975. ... Star Trek: The Animated Series is an animated science fiction television series set in the Star Trek universe. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ...


After a year's hiatus, DC's second Star Trek series began with an adaptation of Star Trek V and took place in the large gap between Star Trek V and Star Trek VI, but did not continue on from the previous series, so storylines from that series were either ignored or rewritten. (One storyline was continued by Peter David in an original Star Trek: The Next Generation novel, Strike Zone.) Although more limited in scope than the first series, due to restrictions from Paramount (a prohibition on creating non-series-related ongoing characters resulted in R.J. Blaise - a popular character and love interest for Kirk - disappearing from the comic without explanation), the series lasted 80 issues and fleshed out some of the changes between V and VI, such as Sulu's promotion to captain of the Excelsior. As part of Paramount's increased restrictions on storytelling, planned appearances from Arex and M'Ress were shelved, with some formative artwork showing M'Ress (that appeared in a preview) re-drawn. The series was mainly written by Peter David and Howard Weinstein, who are also Star Trek novelists.[5] Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (Paramount Pictures, 1989; see also 1989 in film) is the fifth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (Paramount Pictures, 1991; see also 1991 in film) is the sixth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... Hikaru Sulu, played by George Takei, is a character in the original Star Trek series, the first six Star Trek films and one episode of Star Trek: Voyager. ... AREX is a South Korean railway line that links Incheon International Airport and Gimpo Airport, with a future section extending to Seoul Station. ... Lieutenant MRess, voiced by Majel Barrett, was a recurring character on Star Trek: The Animated Series which aired on NBC from 1973 to 1975. ...

Main article: Star Trek: the Next Generation DC comics

DC also published two Star Trek: The Next Generation comic series. The first, a six-issue miniseries taking place during the first season, was published in 1988.[6] An ongoing monthly series was launched from October 1989, covering from season two to just before Generations. The series was mainly written by Star Trek: The Next Generation novelist Michael Jan Friedman. The series would run until 1996.[7] The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... Star Trek: Generations (Paramount Pictures, 1994, see also 1994 in film) is the seventh feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ...


At the same time DC was publishing its comics, Malibu published a Deep Space Nine series during the first three seasons, and DC and Malibu joined forces to publish a TNG/DS9 mini-series. DC also published one of the first crossovers between the TOS and TNG eras in another mini-series. Space station Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (ST:DS9 or STDS9 or DS9 for short) is a science fiction television series produced by Paramount and set in the Star Trek universe. ...


Malibu

Beginning in 1993, Malibu published an ongoing series based upon Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and, as noted above, also joined forces with DC to publish a cross-over story with that company's TNG series. In addition, Malibu published a standalone issue focusing on the Romulans, and two issues of a "celebrity series" of stories written by Star Trek actors Mark Lenard and Aron Eisenberg.[8][9] Introduction The Romulans, a fictional race in the Star Trek universe, are descended from Vulcans and are characterized as being deceitful, cunning, and treacherous. ... Mark Lenard (October 15, 1924–November 22, 1996) was an American actor, primarily in television. ... Aron Eisenberg (born January 6, 1969 in Hollywood, California) is an actor best known for his role as Nog in Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. ...


In 1996, Malibu also announced plans to publish a Voyager comic, and art from this comic appeared in some comic industry periodicals, including Wizard. However, Malibu was bought out by Marvel Comics, and Paramount Pictures (owners of the Trek franchise) signed a deal with Marvel to publish comics based upon Star Trek and Mission: Impossible under the new Paramount Comics banner. Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... Mission: Impossible is the name of an American television series which aired on the CBS network from September 1966 to September 1973. ... Paramount Comics is the name of a former comic book imprint of Marvel Comics that was active for about two years beginning in 1996. ...


Return to Marvel

Marvel Comics obtained the Star Trek license from 1996. Marvel published various one-shots and the quarterly Star Trek Unlimited series, which covered TOS and TNG.[10] Marvel published monthly comics based upon Deep Space Nine and Voyager.[11][12] The starship Voyager (NCC-74656), an Intrepid-class starship. ...


They also introduced two new series, Star Trek: Early Voyages which dealt with Captain Christopher Pike's adventures as captain of the Enterprise (as depicted in the rejected TOS pilot "The Cage") and Star Trek: Starfleet Academy which dealt with a group of cadets, including Deep Space Nine's Ferengi, Nog. Star Trek: Early Voyages was a comic book series published by Marvel Comics in the United States, running for 17 issues from February 1997 until June 1998. ... Christopher Pike, played first by Jeffrey Hunter and then by Sean Kenney, is a character in the fictional Star Trek universe. ...


Fan acceptance of these comics got off to a shaky start when Marvel's inaugural publication of its new Star Trek line turned out to be a crossover between TOS and Marvel's popular superhero team, the X-Men. (This was later followed by a subsequent X-Men/TNG crossover, as well as a novel entitled Planet X based on this premise published by Pocket Books). However, the different series turned out to be relatively popular, with Starfleet Academy and Early Voyages registering strong sales. The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ...


After about 18 months, however, Marvel's management reevaluated the relatively high cost of the Star Trek license agreement with Paramount resulting in all titles being abruptly cancelled, even though Early Voyages was in the middle of a story arc at the time.[13][14]


Wildstorm

Eventually the license drifted back to DC's Wildstorm imprint. Wildstorm decided to not do an ongoing series, but instead a series of miniseries and trade paperback graphic novels from 1999 onwards. Writers included Nathan Archer, Kristine Kathryn Rusch and Dean Wesley Smith,[15], Keith R.A. DeCandido.[16], Scott Ciencin[17], Kevin J. Anderson[18], K. W. Jeter[19], John Ordover and David Mack.[20] In comics, a trade paperback (TPB or simply trade) specifically refers to a collection of stories originally published in comic books reprinted in book format, usually capturing one story arc from a single title or a series of stories with a connected story arc or common theme from one or... Graphic novel (sometimes abbreviated GN) is a term for a kind of book, usually telling an extended story with sequential art ( comics). ... Lawrence Watt-Evans (born 1954) is one of the pseudonyms of American fantasy author Lawrence Watt Evans (another pseudonym, used primarily for science fiction, is Nathan Archer). ... Kristine Kathryn Rusch (born June 1960) is a American writer; she writes in multiple genres, including science fiction, fantasy, mystery (using the pen name Kris Nelscott), and romance (under the name Kristine Grayson). ... Dean Wesley Smith is a science fiction author, known primarily for his Star Trek novels, movie novelizations, and other novels of licensed properties such as Smallville, Spider-Man, X-Men, Aliens, Roswell, Men in Black, and Quantum Leap. ... Keith R. A. DeCandido (born April 1969 in New York, United States) is an American sci-fi writer. ... Scott Ciencin is an American author. ... Kevin J. Anderson (born March 27, 1962) is an American science fiction author. ... Kevin Wayne Jeter (born 1950) is an American science fiction and horror author known for his literary writing style, dark themes, and paranoid, unsympathetic characters. ... Cover to the 1997 Star Trek: New Frontier debut novel, House of Cards by Peter David. ... David Mack is the name of several people: David W. Mack is a comic book artist and writer. ...


Their TNG publications mainly dealt with the movie era, between Insurrection and Nemesis; their Deep Space Nine stories were based on the post-Season 7 novel continuity, and their Voyager series took place during the series. Wildstorm also published an issue based on the novel series New Frontier (written by series creator Peter David)[21] and the video game Elite Force. Star Trek: Insurrection (Paramount Pictures, 1998) is the ninth Star Trek feature film. ... Star Trek Nemesis (Paramount Pictures, 2002; see also 2002 in film) is the tenth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Peter Allen David (often abbreviated PAD) (born September 23, 1956) is an American writer, best known for his work in comic books and Star Trek novels. ...


Their license expired in 2002. Also see: 2002 (number). ...


Tokyopop

For several years, no comic book company held the rights to publish Trek-based comics. However, in October 2004, Tokyopop announced plans to publish an anthology of Next Generation-based stories presented in the style of Japanese manga. Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the music movie, see Tokyo Pop. ... This article is about the comics published in East Asian countries. ...


No firm publication date was ever announced, but two projects by Tokyopop, based upon the original series, were released instead. The new comic anthologies, produced by Joshua Ortega, were released annually in September 2006 (Shinsei Shinsei) and 2007 (Kakan ni Shinkou). Five artists and writer teams presented five new stories, per volume, based on the original series. [1] Joshua Ortega (b. ...


IDW Publishing

On November 9, 2006, IDW Publishing announced that they had secured the publishing rights to Star Trek from CBS Consumer Products.[22] is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... IDW Publishing (a division of Idea and Design Works) is an American comic book company. ... CBS Consumer Products, a unit of the CBS Corporation, manages the worldwide licensing, merchandising, and video activities for a diverse slate of properties owned or controlled by the CBS Corporation, including CBS Paramount Television and King World Productions, Inc. ...


IDW's first title, Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Space Between, is a six-issue miniseries, and launched in January 2007. The Space Between is written by David Tischman and drawn by Casey Maloney.[23] This storyline was collected in trade paperback form in September 2007.


The second series Star Trek: Klingons: Blood Will Tell, launched in April, focusing on the Klingons' point of view on various episodes from the original series - the first four issues based around "Errand of Mercy", "The Trouble with Tribbles", "A Private Little War" and "Day of the Dove", respectively, and features a framing story based around the events of Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country.[24] This article is about the fictional race. ... Errand of Mercy is an episode of Star Trek: The Original Series, and was broadcast on March 23, 1967. ... The Trouble With Tribbles is a second-season episode of Star Trek: The Original Series, first broadcast on December 29, 1967 and repeated June 21, 1968. ... A Private Little War is a second season episode of Star Trek: The Original Series, first broadcast February 2, 1968 and repeated on August 23, 1968. ... Day of the Dove is a third season episode of Star Trek: The Original Series, first broadcast November 1, 1968 and repeated June 17, 1969. ... Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (Paramount Pictures, 1991; see also 1991 in film) is the sixth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ...


A third series started in July 2007, to be called Star Trek: Year Four, continuing the five-year mission of Kirk's Enterprise after the end of Star Trek: The Original Series. A fourth series, Alien Spotlight launched in September 2007, focusing on various alien races, and a character-based TNG series, tentatively entitled House Call, will start in January 2008. The USS Enterprise, (NCC-1701) is a fictional starship in the television series Star Trek, which chronicles the vessels most famous assignment, its Five-Year mission. ... The starship Enterprise as it appeared on Star Trek Star Trek is a culturally significant science fiction television series created by Gene Roddenberry in the 1960s. ...


References

  1. ^ Curt Danhauser. Guide to the Gold Key Star Trek Comics. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  2. ^ Rich Handley. The Star Trek Comic Strips. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  3. ^ Los Angeles Times Syndicate Star Trek newspaper comic strip. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  4. ^ First Star Trek monthly series from DC Comics, 1984-1988. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  5. ^ Second Star Trek monthly series from DC Comics, 1989-1996. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  6. ^ Star Trek: The Next Generation mini-series from DC Comics, 1998. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  7. ^ Star Trek: The Next Generation monthly series from DC Comics, 1989-1996. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  8. ^ Star Trek: Deep Space Nine monthly series from Malibu Comics, 1993-1995. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  9. ^ Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Celebrity Series from Malibu Comics, 1995. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  10. ^ Star Trek: Unlimited monthly series from Marvel Paramount Comics, 1996-1998. Retrieved on 2006-12-29.
  11. ^ Star Trek: Deep Space Nine monthly series from Marvel Comics, 1996-1998. Retrieved on 2006-12-29.
  12. ^ Star Trek: Voyager monthly series from Marvel Comics, 1996-1998. Retrieved on 2006-12-29.
  13. ^ Star Trek: Early Voyages monthly series from Marvel Comics, 1997-1998. Retrieved on 2006-12-29.
  14. ^ Star Trek: Starfleet Academy monthly series from Marvel Comics, 1996-1998. Retrieved on 2006-12-29.
  15. ^ Star Trek: Voyager - Planet Killer mini-series from Wildstorm Comics, 2001. Retrieved on 2006-12-29.
  16. ^ Star Trek: The Next Generation mini-series from Wildstorm, 2000. Retrieved on 2006-12-29.
  17. ^ Star Trek: The Next Generation mini-series from Wildstorm, 2000-2001. Retrieved on 2006-12-29.
  18. ^ Star Trek: The Next Generation graphic novels from Wildstorm, 2001-2002. Retrieved on 2006-12-29.
  19. ^ Star Trek: Deep Space Nine - N-Vector mini-series from Wildstorm, 2000. Retrieved on 2006-12-29.
  20. ^ Star Trek: Divided We Fall mini-series from Wildstorm, 2001. Retrieved on 2006-12-29.
  21. ^ Star Trek: New Frontier one-shot comic from Wildstorm, 2000. Retrieved on 2006-12-29.
  22. ^ IDW Publishing (November 9, 2006). Star Trek Comics Soar Again. Press release. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  23. ^ "Star Trek Returns With All-New Comics Voyages", Spike: Asylum #4, IDW Publishing, December 2006. 
  24. ^ IDW News. IDW Publishing (December 18, 2006). Retrieved on 2006-12-25.

 
 

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