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Encyclopedia > Star Trek canon

The Star Trek canon consists of the television series Star Trek (the original series), Star Trek: The Next Generation, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, Star Trek: Voyager, Star Trek: Enterprise, and the ten motion pictures based upon the series. Star Trek collectively refers to an American science-fiction franchise spanning six unique television series (which comprise 726 episodes) and ten feature films, in addition to hundreds of novels, computer and video games, fan stories, and other works of fiction — all of which are set within the same fictional universe... In the context of fiction, the canon of a fictional universe comprises those novels, stories, films, etc. ... The starship Enterprise as it appeared on Star Trek Star Trek is a culturally significant science fiction television series created by Gene Roddenberry in the 1960s. ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... Space station Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (ST:DS9 or STDS9 or DS9 for short) is a science fiction television series produced by Paramount and set in the Star Trek universe. ... The starship Voyager (NCC-74656), an Intrepid-class starship. ... The starship Enterprise (NX-01) Star Trek: Enterprise is a science fiction television series set in the Star Trek universe. ... Star Trek collectively refers to an American science-fiction franchise spanning six unique television series (which comprise 726 episodes) and ten feature films, in addition to hundreds of novels, computer and video games, fan stories, and other works of fiction — all of which are set within the same fictional universe...

Contents


Canon

The canonicity of some works – both those usually considered canon (the live series and movies, as above) and non-canon (all other licensed materials) – has been a source of some discussion. The status of the various novels, comic books, Star Trek: The Animated Series was decided by Gene Roddenberry as being non-canon at around the time Star Trek: The Next Generation (TNG) was released. Before this point there was no official policy either way, and many reference books and other works had been presumed to be canonical. Roddenberry also said he considered elements of the films Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (ST5:TFF) and Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (ST6:TUC) to be apocryphal, although these films remain full canon. Daniel Defoes Robinson Crusoe; title page of 1719 newspaper edition A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended fictional narrative in prose. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Star Trek: The Animated Series is an animated science fiction television series set in the Star Trek universe. ... Gene Roddenberry, the creator of Star Trek Eugene Wesley Roddenberry (August 19, 1921 – October 24, 1991 Born in El Paso, Texas) was an American scriptwriter and producer. ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (Paramount Pictures, 1989; see also 1989 in film) is the fifth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (Paramount Pictures, 1991; see also 1991 in film) is the sixth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ...


Paramount Pictures, owners of the Star Trek franchise, has maintained the definitions of canon since Roddenberry's death in 1991. This means that, while the writers of subsequent Star Trek TV and film productions were not forbidden from referring to concepts introduced in a non-canon source, they are also not obliged to consider any of them when developing storylines. This has led to many occasions in which official "canon" stories contradict "non-canon" stories, particularly those from the novels and comic books. The Paramount Pictures logo used since 2003. ...


Further complicating the issue is exactly which version of a live action work is precisely canon. The Director's Cut DVD of Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (ST2:TWOK) is a good example of this: this special edition and the TV version include scenes cut from the theatrical release which add significant background information, such as details about the family and backstory of Montgomery Scott. No official statement has been made on the issue, but the inclusion of said scenes during the regular course of any official version of source material means they are generally de facto canon. However, this does not apply to extra non-canon scenes that do not appear during the usual course of any official release; for example, various character scenes that were cut from Star Trek: Nemesis but later included on their DVDs. A Directors cut is a specially edited version of a movie that is supposed to represent the directors own approved edit of the movie. ... DVD-R writing/reading side DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is an optical disc storage media format that can be used for data storage, including movies with high video and sound quality. ... Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (Paramount Pictures, 1982; see also 1982 in film) is the second feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Montgomery Scott, nicknamed Scotty, is a fictional character in the Star Trek universe. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without... Star Trek Nemesis (Paramount Pictures, 2002; see also 2002 in film) is the tenth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ...


Semi-canon

Official works licensed by Paramount Pictures but not included in canon are considered semi-canon – a grey area – by some: these include reference works like the popular Star Trek Chronology and technical manuals about Star Trek 'technology'. Such works are generally written by major contributors for on-screen materials (the live series and movies) and contain canonical elements. On-screen canon evidence supersedes information in reference works whenever there is a contradiction. The Paramount Pictures logo used since 2003. ... Gray Area n. ... In general, a reference is something that refers or points to something else, or acts as a connection or a link between two things. ... Treknobabble is a portmanteau of Star Trek and technobabble (itself a portmanteau of technology and babble). It is used humorously by fans of the various Star Trek television series, and disparagingly by its critics, to describe the infamous amount of pseudoscientific gibberish packed into many episodes of these television series. ...


Non-canon

According to the editors at Pocket Books, current rights holders for publishing Star Trek fiction books, no novels or other printed stories are considered canon by Paramount. These non-canon works also include the Voyager novels Pathways and Mosaic, both by the series producer Jeri Taylor. This viewpoint is considered controversial by many fans of Star Trek fiction, some of whom consider the literary works to be superior to many examples of the televised and filmed Star Trek. Confusing the issue further, the StarTrek.com FAQ currently lists those two novels as being canon. This confuses the issue, since it raises the issue of who exactly at Paramount Pictures defines the canon: the production staff of the Star Trek movies and television programs, or executives higher up in the company, and what happens if a minor point of canon conflicts between the two. Pocket Books is the name of a subdivision of Simon & Schuster publishers. ... The starship Voyager (NCC-74656), an Intrepid-class starship. ... Jeri Taylor is an American television series, movie and video game director, television producer and screenwriter. ...


Various official computer games based on Star Trek have been released – often by Paramount's sister firm Simon and Schuster – but these, too, are discontinuous from the canon. This article needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... Jean-François Millet Le Semeur (The Sower) Simon & Schuster logo, circa 1961. ...


No animated series episode is considered canon; however, elements from the animated series have been introduced into canon by live-action episode writers, an example being the "Kaswahn" ritual mentioned in the episode "Yesteryear" which remained officially non-canonical until it was mentioned in a 2002 episode of Star Trek: Enterprise called "The Catwalk." The non-canon nature of TAS remains an area of controversy among fans as the series introduced several key pieces of backstory for the Trek universe, including details of Spock's childhood, and the identification of Robert April as the first captain of the Enterprise. Neither of these elements have as yet been officially introduced into canon. Star Trek: The Animated Series is an animated science fiction television series set in the Star Trek universe. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... The starship Enterprise (NX-01) Star Trek: Enterprise is a science fiction television series set in the Star Trek universe. ... Spock, also called Mr. ... Robert M. April is a fictional character in the Star Trek universe, who in some Star Trek media is portrayed as the first captain of the USS Enterprise (NCC-1701). ... In the fictional universe of Star Trek, the USS Enterprise, (NCC-1701) was the ship in the original NBC TV series Star Trek, which chronicled the vessels most famous assignment, a five-year mission of exploration and diplomacy under Captain James T. Kirks command. ...


There is similar ambiguity regarding licensed Star Trek trading cards and the related collectible card games. Various trading cards A trading card (or collectible card) is a small card which is intended for trading and collecting. ... The Star Trek Customizable Card Game is, as the name implies, a collectible card game based on the Star Trek universe. ...


Fanon

Star Trek fanon encompasses anything else produced by fans or their opinions and not sanctioned by Paramount, including the plethora of Star Trek websites except official websites. Some Star Trek fans do not accept Star Trek: Enterprise as canon: given its shorter run compared with the other later series (which many attribute to faltering leadership at Paramount and a resulting decline in the popularity of the franchise), some allege it violates continuity with earlier on-screen material and others base their opinions on it violating aspects of fanon. Others believe it takes place in an alternate universe that follows a different timeline than that established in The Original Series (TOS). Fanon is a fact or ongoing situation related to a television program, book, movie, or video game that has been used so much by fan writers or among the fandom that it has been more or less established as having happened in the fictional world, but it has not actually... Trekkie (or Trekker) is a term that in recent decades has been used to describe a fan of the Star Trek science fiction franchise. ... The starship Enterprise as it appeared on Star Trek Star Trek is a culturally significant science fiction television series created by Gene Roddenberry in the 1960s. ...


Canonicity of other materials

Unofficially decanonized material

While official policy of Paramount Pictures is that all live action Star Trek is fully canonical, interviews and commentaries with writers and producers have revealed that there was an unofficial but widespread policy in the Star Trek production offices that certain parts of Star Trek were to be ignored outright and treated as if they never existed. These elements were parts of Star Trek that the producers (and largely fans) considered to be in conflict with existing canon, and not worth acknowledging. Particularly, the events of Star Trek V: The Final Frontier and the Star Trek: Voyager (VOY) episode "Threshold" received this treatment. The starship Voyager (NCC-74656), an Intrepid-class starship. ... Threshold is an episode of the Star Trek: Voyager television series. ...


Despite over 560 hours of canonical Star Trek produced after ST5:TFF, not a single reference to any of its events has ever been made in canonical on-screen Star Trek since then. In fact, some later works outright contradict or ignore these works, such as the episode "Sarek" of TNG, which mentions that Sarek's first wife was from Earth (contradicting the "long lost" secret Vulcan princess he supposedly married before Amanda Grayson according to ST5:TFF). Despite the seemingly monumental engineering achievements in "Threshold" (being able to achieve infinite/transwarp speed, even if the process is injurious to organic life), they are never mentioned again in VOY or any other canonical source. Futhermore the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "All Good Things..." has several scenes set in the future, one in which warp 13 is attained, not only reaching, but shattering the 'Warp 10 Barrier' with no infinite speed or ill effects on people. Although it is important to note that "All Good Things..." was made several years before "Threshold." Sarek is the title of an episode from the third season of Star Trek: The Next Generation. ... Amanda Grayson is a fictional character in the Star Trek universe. ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... All Good Things. ...


Roddenberry canon and personal canon

Roddenberry canon is a term used by fans to refer to Star Trek subject matter that Gene Roddenberry – creator of TOS and TNG – approved of and is considered canonical, instead of what Paramount Pictures considers canonical. This means disregarding parts of ST5:TFF and ST6:TUC (see Canon), and including the animated series. Some fans also use this rationale to discount anything produced after Roddenberry's death, or anything after the original series or some other arbitrary point where they believe that Star Trek diverged from the wishes of Roddenberry. Gene Roddenberry, the creator of Star Trek Eugene Wesley Roddenberry (August 19, 1921 – October 24, 1991 Born in El Paso, Texas) was an American scriptwriter and producer. ...


The term "personal canon" has been used to describe such selective rejection of aspects of the Star Trek franchise by fans, in what is often called called Krypto-revisionism. Krypto-revisionism is a concept created and named by writers Steven Grant and Mark Evanier, and describes the rejection by the audience of a storyline, concept, plot, or idea in an ongoing series. ...


Star Fleet Universe

The Star Fleet Universe is a separate, officially licensed, and consistent but schismatic canon of Star Trek that first split in 1979 with the production of the Star Fleet Battles wargame set in the Star Trek setting, and later the Star Fleet Command computer game and Prime Directive Roleplaying game. It is a separate canon that because of limitations in its license, it can only use the original series, the animated series, and the Franz Joseph reference works to base its setting from, and has expanded to create an entirely separate and far more warlike setting. The Star Fleet Universe is the variant of the Star Trek fictional universe as detailed in the series of tactical and strategic interstellar wargames from Amarillo Design Bureau Inc. ... Star Fleet Battles is a tactical strategy board game set in the Star Fleet Universe originally created in 1979 by Stephen V. Cole; it has since been updated many times. ... Starfleet Command is a computer game based on the table-top wargame Star Fleet Battles. ... Prime Directive is a role-playing game set in the Star Trek-derived Star Fleet Universe. ...


FASA

In 1982, around the time of the release of ST2:TWOK, FASA was licensed to produce a Star Trek roleplaying game. With a dearth of official references, FASA created large amounts of background material on the Star Trek universe. For the next five years, they would become the de facto standard canon among fans, with various fan produced manuals, as well as official novels, based on the similar setting. These included an explanation for why Klingons looked different between the original series and the movies, and the names of starship classes, such as the ships now known as Miranda class starships being called "Avenger class starships". This canon was not contradicted in official materials of the time: Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (ST3:TSFS) and Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, and other officially licensed books of the time like Mr. Scott's Guide to the Enterprise, were consistent with and based on the FASA materials. This article is about the role-playing game company. ... Star Trek: The Role Playing Game is, as the name indicates, a role-playing game set in the fictional Star Trek universe published and edited by FASA Corporation from 1982 to 1989. ... The USS Reliant (NCC-1864), a Miranda class starship. ... Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (Paramount Pictures, 1984; see also 1984 in film) is the third feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (Paramount Pictures, 1986; see also 1986 in film) is the fourth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Mr. ...


However, in 1987, TNG began to significantly contradict many assumptions of FASA about the direction of Star Trek. After FASA produced their Star Trek: The Next Generation Officer's Manual after the first season of TNG, which tried to reconcile and retcon on-screen events into the FASA canon, Paramount Pictures revoked FASA's license to publish Star Trek materials, saying that their works were too militaristic for Star Trek. Shortly after the license was revoked, new licensed manuals and source materials were published that quickly contradicted virtually everything created by FASA and all the assumptions about Star Trek canon that had been established over the last several years, in what was interpreted by some as a continuity reboot since so much canon had been revoked and replaced. Reboot, in series fiction, means to discard all previous continuity in the series and start anew. ...


Franz Joseph materials

In 1973, Franz Joseph, a naval architect who was interested in Star Trek, was licensed by Roddenberry (who at the time controlled Star Trek licensing personally though his company Lincoln Enterprises) to produce official reference works about Star Trek. He produced the Star Trek Blueprints (ISBN 0-345-25821-5), a comprehensive deck-by-deck set of blueprints that provided in exacting detail every aspect of the starship Enterprise. Following both Roddenberry's strong approval of the work and their large success to the fan community, in 1975 he followed by producing The Star Trek Star Fleet Technical Manual (ISBN 0-345-34074-4), which gave not only general details about the Enterprise, but included new starship designs. 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Franz Joseph (born Franz Joseph Schnaubelt) (1914–1994) was an artist and author loosely associated with the 1960’s American television show Star Trek. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1975 calendar). ... The Star Trek Star Fleet Technical Manual (Ballantine Books 1975, reprinted in 1986) is a fictional reference book by Franz Joseph Schnaubelt about the workings of Starfleet, a military, exploratory, and diplomatic organization featured in the television series Star Trek. ...


Information from the book was used in the production of the first three feature films. The opening to Star Trek: The Motion Picture included a scene where the names and registry numbers of ships mentioned in the Technical Manual were read in the background, while ship schematics copied directly from the Technical Manual were used as displays on the bridge in both ST2:TWOK and ST3:TSFS (including a close up in the latter). These uses by the production staff of Star Trek on screen cemented their image as official parts of Star Trek canon at the time. Star Trek: The Motion Picture (Paramount Pictures, 1979; see also 1979 in film) is the first feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series and is released on Friday, December 7. ...


For many years, these reference works formed the backbone for treatments of the Star Trek setting. Their general assumptions about Starfleet and the galaxy as a whole were the basis of the Star Fleet Universe and FASA's version of Star Trek, as well as most novels about Star Trek. This book was one of the materials that was stripped of its canonical status at around the same time as FASA's version of Star Trek and its ideas about Star Trek were ignored from that point on.


Klingon language

Also in the Star Trek universe, issues of what is and is not canon also are rife in the various Klingon-speaking communities. The Klingon language or Klingonese (tlhIngan Hol in Klingon) is the constructed language spoken by Klingons in the fictional Star Trek universe. ...


The Klingon Language Institute (KLI) takes the policy that Klingon is only canon if sanctioned by its creator, Marc Okrand; this essentially limits canon to what appears in the books The Klingon Dictionary, Klingon for the Galactic Traveller, the tapes Power Klingon and Conversational Klingon, the various movies up to and including ST6:TUC (Klingon in the later movies tended to be done without Okrand's involvement) and various articles in the KLI's journal, HolQeD; however, various interviews and conversations with Okrand have also been considered canon. Whether the Klingon in the novel Sarek is canon is debated, although the author, Ann C. Crispin, states in the introduction to that book that the Klingon in that book was okayed by Okrand. The Klingon Language Institute is an organization devoted to studying and teaching the human-made Klingon language from the Star Trek science fiction universe. ... Marc Okrand is the creator of the Klingon language. ... The Klingon Dictionary is a book by Marc Okrand describing the Klingon language. ... Sarek is a Vulcan character in the Star Trek fictional universe. ... Ann C. Crispin is a science fiction writer and the author of over sixteen published novels. ...


Other groups have used Okrand's work and expanded upon it – for instance, Glen Proechel's Interstellar Language School – or include various other Trek novels, novellas or movies in Klingon language canon.


See also

  • Wikipedia:WikiProject Star Trek

External links

  • "What is Canon?" at Ex Astris Scientia
  • "The Star Trek Canon" at ST-v-SW.Net

  Results from FactBites:
 
Timeline: Star Trek (2880 words)
Thus, Star Trek: The Motion Picture was rushed at great expense (and somewhat unfinished) into theaters to a decent box office gross but an underwhelming reaction by both critics and fans to the movie itself (particularly in the wake of the enormously popular and faster-tempo Star Wars).
Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan exploded into theaters and became one of the most beloved and successful Star Trek movies of all time (the debate goes on between fans about which is better: 2, 4 or 6?).
Star Trek: Voyager would return to the bridge of a Starfleet vessel, with a couple twists: the captain would be a woman (Kate Mulgrew), the crew mixed between rebel and Starfleet personnel (and a holographic doctor!), and the ship accidentally shot into another part of the galaxy and would be seeking a way home.
Star Trek canon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1711 words)
The Director's Cut DVD of Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (ST2:TWOK) is a good example of this: this special edition and the TV version include scenes cut from the theatrical release which add significant background information, such as details about the family and backstory of Montgomery Scott.
Star Trek fanon encompasses anything else produced by fans or their opinions and not sanctioned by Paramount, including the plethora of Star Trek websites except official websites.
Also in the Star Trek universe, issues of what is and is not canon also are rife in the various Klingon-speaking communities.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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