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Encyclopedia > Staple food

A staple food is a food that forms the basis of a traditional diet.[1] Staple foods vary from place to place, but are typically inexpensive starchy foods of vegetable origin that are high in food energy (Calories) and carbohydrate and that can be stored for use throughout the year. The staple food of a specific cuisine may commonly be served as part of every meal, and its name may be used synonymously with "food" in some contexts, such as the reference to "our daily bread" in The Lord's Prayer, and a common greeting of "Have you eaten rice?" denoting "How are you?" in certain cultures. A traditional diet is a diet that was considered normal in a given location prior to the advent of industrial agriculture and the general availability of fresh foreign food. ... Starch (CAS# 9005-25-8, chemical formula (C6H10O5)n,[1]) is a mixture of amylose and amylopectin (usually in 20:80 or 30:70 ratios). ... For other uses, see Vegetable (disambiguation). ... Food energy is the amount of energy in food that is available through digestion. ... Lactose is a disaccharide found in milk. ... Cuisine (from French cuisine, cooking; culinary art; kitchen; ultimately from Latin coquere, to cook) is a specific set of cooking traditions and practices, often associated with a specific culture. ... The Lords Prayer (sometimes known by its first two Latin words as the Pater Noster, in Greek as the , or the English equivalent Our Father) is probably the best-known prayer in Christianity. ...


Most staple foods derive either from cereals such as wheat, barley, rye, maize, or rice, or starchy root vegetables such as potatoes, yams, taro, and cassava.[2] Other staple foods include pulses (dried legumes), sago (derived from the pith of the sago palm tree), and fruits such as breadfruit and plantains.[3] Grain redirects here. ... Species T. aestivum T. boeoticum T. dicoccoides T. dicoccon T. durum T. monococcum T. spelta T. sphaerococcum T. timopheevii References:   ITIS 42236 2002-09-22 Wheat Wheat For the indie rock group, see Wheat (band). ... For other uses, see Barley (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Secale cereale M.Bieb. ... This article is about the maize plant. ... For other uses, see Rice (disambiguation). ... Root vegetables are underground plant parts used as vegetables. ... For other uses, see Potato (disambiguation). ... Yam may refer to: Yam (vegetable), common name for members of Dioscorea Yam (god), a Levantine deity A colloquially American term for Shellfish Yam (route), a Mongolian supply point system An animal in the same family as the Yak and Wild Buffalo A colloquially American term for sweet potato A... This article is about the plant. ... Yuca redirects here. ... Pulses are defined by the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO) as annual leguminous crops yielding from one to twelve grains or seeds of variable size, shape and color within a pod. ... This article is about the fruit of the plants also called legumes. For the plants themselves, see Fabaceae . ... For other uses, see Sago (disambiguation). ... The centre dark spot (about 1 mm diameter) in this yew wood is the pith Elderberry shoot cut longitudinally to show the broad, solid pith (rough-textured, white) inside the wood (smooth, yellow-tinged). ... Binomial name Artocarpus altilis (Parkinson) Fosberg The Breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis) is a tree and fruit native to the Malay Peninsula and western Pacific islands. ... Plantain is the common name for two very different plants. ...


Rice is most commonly eaten as cooked entire grains, but most other cereals are milled into flour or meal which is used to make bread; noodles or other pasta; and porridges and "mushes" such as polenta or mealie pap. Mashed root vegetables can be used to make similar porridge-like dishes, including poi and fufu. Pulses (particularly chickpeas) and starchy root vegetables, such as Canna, can also be made into flour. For other uses, see Flour (disambiguation). ... For the coarsely ground flour, see flour. ... For other uses, see Bread (disambiguation). ... A cook making hand-pulled noodles. ... Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ... Polenta with sopressa and mushrooms. ... Cornmeal is flour ground from dried maize (corn) with usage ranging from bread to pesticides. ... Poi is a Hawaiian word for the primary Polynesian food staple made from the corm of the kalo plant (known widely as taro). ... Young women in preparing Fufu in Democratic Republic of Congo Fufu, also spelled foofoo, foufou, or fu fu, is a staple food of West and Central Africa. ... Binomial name Cicer arietinum L. Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Species 19 classified species, see list below Canna (or Canna lily, although not a true lily) is a genus of nineteen species of flowering plants, the only genus in the family Cannaceae. ...


Although nutritious, staple foods generally do not by themselves provide a full range of nutrients, so other foods need to be added to the diet to prevent malnutrition.[1] For example, the deficiency disease pellagra is associated with a diet consisting primarily of maize, and beriberi with a diet of white (i.e. refined) rice.[4] A nutrient is a substance used in an organisms metabolism which must be taken in from the environment. ... Percentage of population affected by malnutrition by country, according to United Nations statistics. ... Pellagra is a vitamin deficiency disease caused by dietary lack of niacin (vitamin B3) and protein, especially proteins containing the essential amino acid tryptophan. ... This article is about the maize plant. ... Beriberi is a nervous system ailment caused by thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. ... For other uses, see Rice (disambiguation). ...


It has been hypothesized that some staple foods may act as a Giffen good in conditions of extreme poverty. This was first noted by Robert Giffen who argued that potato demand actually rose during the Great Irish Famine (1845-1849). While theoretically possible, this is a controversial view among economists as studies have failed to find much evidence of Giffen good behaviour in actual markets.[5] A Giffen good is a product for which a rise in price of this product makes people buy even more of the product. ... Sir Robert Giffen (1837 – April 12, 1910), was a British statistician and economist. ... Great Irish Famine may also refer to Great Irish Famine (1740-1741). ...


See also

Insertformulahere A famine food or poverty food is any inexpensive or readily-available foodstuff used to nourish people in times of extreme poverty or starvation, as during a war or famine. ... Grain redirects here. ... Root vegetables are underground plant parts used as vegetables. ... Pulses are defined by the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO) as annual leguminous crops yielding from one to twelve grains or seeds of variable size, shape and color within a pod. ... For other uses, see Bread (disambiguation). ... Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... For other uses, see Noodle (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rice (disambiguation). ... This article is about the maize plant. ...


Notes

  1. ^ a b Staple foods: What do people eat?
  2. ^ Staple Foods -- Root and Tuber Crops
  3. ^ Staple Foods II -- Fruits
  4. ^ Staple Foods -- Rice
  5. ^ Micahel L. Katz and Harvey S. Rosen. Microeconomics 3rd ed. pg. 97

  Results from FactBites:
 
Food - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2441 words)
Food is the main source of energy and of nutrition for animals, and is usually of animal or plant origin.
Food for livestock is fodder and traditionally comprises hay or grain.
Food allergy is thought to develop easier in patients with the atopic syndrome, a very common combination of diseases: allergic rhinitis and conjunctivitis, eczema and asthma.
Staple food - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (176 words)
A staple food is basic but nutritious food that forms the basis of a traditional diet, particularly that of the poor.
Although nutritious, staple foods generally do not by themselves provide a full range of nutrients, so other foods need to be added to the diet to prevent malnutrition.
Staple foods vary from place to place, but are usually of vegetable origin, from cereals, pulses, corn, rice, millets and plants growing starchy roots.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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