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Encyclopedia > Stanford University
Leland Stanford Junior University

Motto: Die Luft der Freiheit weht
"The wind of freedom blows" (German)[1]
Established: 1891[2]
Type: Private
Endowment: $17.2 Billion[3]
President: John L. Hennessy
Faculty: 1,807[4]
Undergraduates: 6,689[5]
Postgraduates: 8,201[5]
Location: Stanford, CA, U.S.
Campus: Suburban, 8,180 acres (33.1 km²)
Athletic nickname: Stanford Cardinal
Mascot: Stanford Tree (unofficial)
Athletics: NCAA Division I (FBS) Pac-10
Website: Stanford.edu

Leland Stanford Junior University, commonly known as Stanford University or simply Stanford, is a private university located approximately 37 miles (60 kilometers) southeast of San Francisco and approximately 20 miles (32 km) northwest of San Jose in Stanford, California, United States. Stanford is situated adjacent to the city of Palo Alto, on the San Francisco Peninsula. Stanford may refer to: Stanford, Kentucky Stanford, California (Stanford University) Stanford University Stanford-le-Hope, Essex Stanford, Northamptonshire Stanford in the Vale, Oxfordshire Stanford, South Africa See also the various places named Stamford. ... Stanford University seal. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... John LeRoy Hennessy, the founder of MIPS Computer Systems Inc. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Stanford is a census-designated place (CDP) located in Santa Clara County, California. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... “Suburbia” redirects here. ... Having no offical mascot, the athletic teams at Stanford University are referred to as Stanford Cardinal. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... The Stanford Tree is the unofficial mascot of Stanford University. ... NCAA redirects here. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10) is a college athletic conference which operates in the western United States. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... San Francisco redirects here. ... For other uses, see San José. Nickname: Location of San Jose within Santa Clara County, California. ... Stanford is a census-designated place (CDP) located in Santa Clara County, California. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Location in Santa Clara County and the state of California Coordinates: , Country State County Santa Clara Government  - Mayor Yoriko Kishimoto[1] Area  - City 25. ... USGS Satellite photo of the San Francisco Bay Area. ...

Contents

History

The ruins of Stanford Library after the 1906 San Francisco earthquake
The children of California shall be our children.

—Leland Stanford Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (674x720, 98 KB) The library of Stanford University is reduced to ruins after the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, 1906. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (674x720, 98 KB) The library of Stanford University is reduced to ruins after the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, 1906. ... San Francisco Earthquake redirects here. ...

Stanford was founded by railroad magnate and California Governor Leland Stanford and his wife, Jane Stanford. It is named in honor of their only child, Leland Stanford, Jr., who died of typhoid just before his 16th birthday. This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger (left) and Governor Gray Davis (right) with President George W. Bush in 2003 The Governor of California is the highest executive authority in the state government, whose responsibilities include making yearly State of the State addresses to the California State Legislature, submitting the budget, and ensuring that... Amasa Leland Stanford (March 9, 1824 – June 21, 1893) was an American tycoon, politician and founder of Stanford University. ... Jane Stanford (August 25, 1828–February 28, 1905), was the wife of Leland Stanford and cofounded Stanford University with her husband. ... Leland Stanford, Jr. ... This is about the disease typhoid fever. ...


The story that a lady in "faded gingham" and a man in a "homespun threadbare suit" went to visit the president of Harvard about making a donation, were rebuffed, and then founded Stanford is untrue. [6] Harvard redirects here. ...


Locals and members of the university community are known to refer to the school as The Farm, a nod to the fact that the university is located on the former site of Leland Stanford's horse farm.


The University's founding grant was written on November 11, 1885, and accepted by the first Board of Trustees on November 14. The cornerstone was laid on May 14, 1887, and the University officially opened on October 1, 1891, to 559 students and 15 faculty members, seven of whom hailed from Cornell University[7]. At the opening of the school, there was no tuition for students, a program which lasted into the 1930's [3]. Among the first class of students was a young future president Herbert Hoover, who would claim to be first student ever at Stanford, by virtue of having been the first person in the first class to sleep in the dormitory.[8] is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Cornell redirects here. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the thirty-first President of the United States (1929–1933), was a world-famous mining engineer and humanitarian administrator. ...

The school was established as a coeducational institution although it maintained a cap on female enrollment for many years. This was not due to any anti-female sentiment but rather based on a concern of Jane Stanford, who worried that without such a cap, the school could become an all-female institution, which she did not feel would be an appropriate memorial for her son. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 585 KB) Stanford University Memorial Church. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 585 KB) Stanford University Memorial Church. ... Stanford Memorial Church Stanford Memorial Church at Night Stanford Memorial Church stands at the center of the Stanford University campus in Stanford, California. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ...


The 1906 San Francisco earthquake destroyed parts of the Main Quad (including the original iteration of Memorial Church) as well as the gate that first marked the entrance of the school; rebuilding on a somewhat less grandiose scale began immediately. San Francisco Earthquake redirects here. ... Stanford Memorial Church Stanford Memorial Church at Night Stanford Memorial Church stands at the center of the Stanford University campus in Stanford, California. ...


The official motto of Stanford University, selected by the Stanfords, is "Die Luft der Freiheit weht." Translated from the German, this quotation of Ulrich von Hutten means "The wind of freedom blows." At the time of the school's establishment, German had recently replaced Latin as the supraregional language of science and philosophy. Ulrich von Hutten (1488-1523) was an outspoken critic of the Roman Catholic Church and adherent of the Lutheran Reformation. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ...


Campus

Orthographic panorama of the Main Quad, located in the heart of the Stanford University campus.
View of Hoover Tower from courtyard.
Many students use bicycles to get around the large campus.
Many students use bicycles to get around the large campus.

Stanford University owns 8,183 acres (32 km²). The main campus is bounded by El Camino Real, Stanford Avenue, Junipero Serra Boulevard and Sand Hill Road, in the northwest part of the Santa Clara Valley on the San Francisco Peninsula. stanford quad - small - vintage postcard File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Stanford-bikes. ... Image File history File links Stanford-bikes. ... For other uses, see Bicycle (disambiguation). ... A map produced in 1920 illustrating the route of El Camino Real in 1821, along with the 21 Alta California Franciscan missions. ... The Sand Hill Road freeway exit. ... The Santa Clara Valley is a valley just south of the San Francisco Bay in northern California in the United States. ... USGS Satellite photo of the San Francisco Bay Area. ...


It is sometimes asserted that Stanford University occupies the largest university campus in the world, in terms of contiguous area, and this may be true. Moscow State University, which is built vertically and has a large floor area, is the largest university, but occupies a smaller piece of land. Berry College occupies 28,000 acres (110 km²) of contiguous land, and Paul Smith's College occupies 14,200 acres (57 km²) of land in the Adirondack Mountains of upstate New York, but neither is a university. Duke University occupies 8,709 acres (35.2 km²), but they are not contiguous.[9] The United States Air Force Academy has a contiguous 18,000 acres (73 km²) at its disposal, but it is not a university. Dartmouth College, with a large land grant,[10] owns more than 50,000 acres (200 km²), but only 269 of those are part of the campus.[11][12] Moscow State University M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russian: Московский государственный университет имени Ðœ.Ð’.Ломоносова, often abbreviated МГУ, MSU, MGU) is the largest and the oldest university in Russia, founded in 1755. ... Berry College, an American private, liberal arts college, is located in the Georgian community of Mount Berry, on the northernmost boundary of Rome, Georgia. ... Paul Smiths College is a private college located in the Adirondack Mountains of Upstate New York. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, United States. ... The United States Air Force Academy (USAFA or Air Force),[1] located immediately north of Colorado Springs in El Paso County, Colorado, United States, is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers for the United States Air Force. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... Second College Grant is a grant located in Coos County, New Hampshire. ...


In the summer of 1886, when the campus was first being planned, Stanford brought the president of Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Francis Amasa Walker, and prominent Boston landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted westward for consultations. Olmsted worked out the general concept for the campus and its buildings, rejecting a hillside site in favor of the more practical flatlands. Charles Allerton Coolidge then developed this concept in the style of his late mentor, Henry Hobson Richardson, in the Richardsonian Romanesque style, characterized by rectangular stone buildings linked by arcades of half-circle arches. The original campus was also designed in the Spanish-colonial style common to California known as Mission Revival. The red tile roofs and solid sandstone masonry hold a distinctly Californian appearance and most of the subsequently erected buildings have maintained consistent exteriors. The red tile roofs and bright blue skies common to the region are a famously complementary combination. “MIT” redirects here. ... Francis Amasa Walker was born in Boston, Massachusetts (July 2,1840–January 5, 1897) and was a United States economist and educator. ... Boston redirects here. ... {{Infobox Person | name = | image = FLOlmstead. ... Charles Allerton Coolidge (born 1858, died Locust Valley, New York, Jan. ... Henry Hobson Richardson, portrait by Sir Hubert von Herkomer Trinity Church in Boston is one of Richardsons most famous works. ... Richardsonian Romanesque has both French and Spanish Romanesque characteristics, like the First Presbyterian Church in Detroit, Michigan by architechs George D. Mason and Zachariah Rice in 1891 Richardsonian Romanesque is a style of American architecture named after architect Henry Hobson Richardson, whose masterpiece is Trinity Church, Boston in Massachusetts. ... The Mission Revival Style was an architectural movement that began in the late 19th century and drew inspiration from the early Spanish Missions of California. ... Red sandstone interior of Lower Antelope Canyon, Arizona, worn smooth due to erosion by flash flooding over millions of years Sandstone is a sedimentary rock composed mainly of sand-size mineral or rock grains. ...


Much of this first construction was destroyed by the 1906 San Francisco earthquake but the University retains the Quad, the old Chemistry Building and Encina Hall (the residence of Herbert Hoover, John Steinbeck, and Anthony Kennedy during their times at Stanford). After the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake inflicted further damage, the University implemented a billion-dollar capital improvement plan to retrofit and renovate older buildings for new, up-to-date uses. San Francisco Earthquake redirects here. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the thirty-first President of the United States (1929–1933), was a world-famous mining engineer and humanitarian administrator. ... For other members of the family, see Steinbeck (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. ... The Loma Prieta earthquake was a major earthquake that struck the San Francisco Bay Area of California on October 17, 1989 at 5:04 p. ...


Stanford University is actually its own census-designated place which is part of unincorporated Santa Clara County though some of the university land is within the city limits of Palo Alto. For many intents and purposes it can be considered a part of the city of Palo Alto; they share the same school district and fire department though the police forces are separate. The United States Postal Service has assigned it two ZIP codes: 94305 for campus mail and 94309 for P.O. box mail. It lies within area code 650 and campus phone numbers start with 723, 724, 725, 736, 497, or 498. Stanford is a census-designated place (CDP) located in Santa Clara County, California. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Santa Clara County is a county located in the San Francisco Bay Area of the U.S. state of California. ... Palo Alto Unified School District (PAUSD) in Palo Alto, California is known for being one of the finest in the state. ... Firefighter with an axe A firefighter, sometimes still called a fireman though women have increasingly joined firefighting units, is a person who is trained and equipped to put out fires, rescue people and in some areas provide emergency medical services. ... USPS and Usps redirect here. ... A ZIP Code is the postal code used by the United States Postal Service, which always writes it with capital letters. ... A Post Office box is a uniquely-addressable lockable box located on the premises of a Post Office station. ... North American area code 650 includes most of San Mateo County (except northernmost portion) and the northwestern portion of Santa Clara County, in California. ...


The physicist Werner Heisenberg was once asked if he knew where Stanford University was located. "I believe it is on the west coast of the United States, not far from San Francisco. There is also another school nearby, and they steal each other's axes," he replied, referring to Stanford's rivalry with the University of California, Berkeley.[13] Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... Werner Karl Heisenberg (December 5, 1901 – February 1, 1976) was a celebrated German physicist and Nobel laureate, one of the founders of quantum mechanics and acknowledged to be one of the most important physicists of the twentieth century. ... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ...


Off campus

The off-campus Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve is a nature reserve owned by the university and used by wildlife biologists for research. Hopkins Marine Station, located in Pacific Grove, California, is a marine biology research center owned by the university since 1892. The University also has its own golf course and a seasonal lake (Lake Lagunita, actually an irrigation reservoir), both home to the endangered California Tiger Salamander. The Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve is a 1200 acre (5 km²) plot of land owned by Stanford University, located on Sand Hill Rd near Interstate 280 in Palo Alto, California. ... Hopkins Marine Station is the marine laboratory of Stanford University. ... Pacific Grove, California city hall. ... Various species of reef fish in the Hawaiian Islands. ... Lake Lagunita is an artificial lake in Stanford University, California. ... Binomial name Ambystoma californiense Gray, 1853 The California Tiger Salamander (Ambystoma californiense) is an endangered amphibian native to Northern California. ...


Landmarks

Contemporary campus landmarks include the Main Quad and Memorial Church, the Cantor Center for Visual Arts and art gallery, the Stanford Mausoleum and the Angel of Grief, Hoover Tower, the Rodin sculpture garden, the Papua New Guinea Sculpture Garden, the Arizona Cactus Garden, the Stanford University Arboretum, Green Library and the Dish. Frank Lloyd Wright's 1937 Hanna-Honeycomb House and the 1919 Lou Henry and Herbert Hoover House are both National Historic Landmarks now on university grounds. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 560 pixel Image in higher resolution (966 × 676 pixel, file size: 133 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Other versions View from east File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 560 pixel Image in higher resolution (966 × 676 pixel, file size: 133 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Other versions View from east File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are... The Lou Henry and Herbert Hoover House, located on the campus of Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, USA, is a large, rambling house, resembling blocks piled up. ... Stanford Memorial Church Stanford Memorial Church at Night Stanford Memorial Church stands at the center of the Stanford University campus in Stanford, California. ... Stanford University Museum of Art (SUMA) is associated with Stanford University and was established 1891 (simultaneous with the University) by Leland and Jane Stanford. ... The Stanford Mausoleum, located in the northwest of the Stanford University campus in the Stanford University Arboretum, holds the remains of the universitys namesake Leland Stanford, Jr. ... The original Angel of Grief in Rome. ... Yuck, Stanford ... Auguste Rodin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The Arizona Cactus Garden (30,000 square feet), also known as the Stanford Cactus Garden, is a botanical garden specializing in cactus and succulents. ... The Stanford University Arboretum is an arboretum located on the grounds of Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. ... Green Library at Stanford University, vintage linen-era postcard The Cecil H. Green Library is the main library on the Stanford University campus and part of Stanford University Libraries and Acedemic Information Resources (SULAIR). ... The Dish is a radio telescope in the Stanford Foothills. ... Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) was an American architect, interior designer, writer, educator, and philosopher from Oak Park, Illinois. ... The Hanna-Honeycomb House, also known as simply the Hanna House, located on the Stanford University campus in Palo Alto, California, USA was Frank Lloyd Wrights first work in the San Francisco region[2] and his first work with non-rectangular structures. ... The Lou Henry and Herbert Hoover House, located on the campus of Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, USA, is a large, rambling house, resembling blocks piled up. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ...


Institutions

Stanford University is governed by a board of trustees, in conjunction with the university president, provosts, faculty senate, and the deans of the various schools. Besides the university, the Stanford trustees oversee Stanford Research Park, the Stanford Shopping Center, the Cantor Center for Visual Arts, Stanford University Medical Center and many associated medical facilities (including the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital), as well as many acres of undeveloped foothills. Stanford Research Park stands on land on Palo Alto, California in the U.S. that is owned by Stanford University. ... Stanford Shopping Center is an upscale shopping mall located on El Camino Real at Sand Hill Road in Palo Alto, California. ... Stanford University Museum of Art (SUMA) is associated with Stanford University and was established 1891 (simultaneous with the University) by Leland and Jane Stanford. ... Stanford University Medical Center is one of four hospitals affiliated with Stanford University and Stanford University School of Medicine, along with the Lucile Packard Childrens Hospital, the Veterans Administration Hospital in Palo Alto and Santa Clara Valley Medical Center. ... Lucile Packard Childrens Hospital (LPCH) is a hospital located on the Stanford University campus in Palo Alto, California. ...


Other Stanford-affiliated institutions include the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and the Stanford Research Institute, a now-independent institution which originated at the University, in addition to the Stanford Humanities Center. The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is a U.S. national laboratory operated by Stanford University for the U.S. Department of Energy. ... SRI International is one of the worlds largest contract research institutions. ... Bowman House, home of the Stanford Humanities Center since 2001 The Stanford Humanities Center is an institution of advanced humanities research located at Stanford University, Stanford, CA, U.S.A. Founded in 1980, it is an integral part of Stanford’s internationally renowned research community, bringing together scholars from across...

View from Hoover Tower observation deck of the Quad and surrounding area, facing west
View from Hoover Tower observation deck of the Quad and surrounding area, facing west

Stanford also houses the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace, a major public policy think tank that attracts visiting scholars from around the world, and the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, which is dedicated to the more specific study of international relations. Apparently because it could not locate a copy in any of its libraries, the Soviet Union was obliged to ask the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace, at Stanford University, for a microfilm copy of its original edition of the first issue of Pravda (dated March 5, 1917).[citation needed] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (5226x3000, 12530 KB) Summary Stanford University campus from above, taken by Jawed Karim. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (5226x3000, 12530 KB) Summary Stanford University campus from above, taken by Jawed Karim. ... Yuck, Stanford ... Hoover Tower at the Hoover Institution The Hoover Institution on War, Revolution, and Peace is a public policy think tank and library founded by Herbert Hoover at Stanford University, his alma mater. ... Public policy is a course of action or inaction chosen by public authorities to address a problem. ... This article is about the institution. ... The Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies is a comglomerate of research centers at Stanford University in Stanford, California. ... Foreign affairs redirects here. ... For other uses, see Pravda (disambiguation). ... This article is about the day. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ...


The Stanford University Libraries hold a collection of more than eight million volumes. The main library in the SU library system is Green Library. Meyer Library holds the vast East Asia collection and the student-accessible media resources. Other significant collections include the Lane Medical Library, Terman Engineering Library, Jackson Business Library, Falconer Biology Library, Cubberley Education Library, Branner Earth Sciences Library, Swain Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Library, Jonsson Government Documents collection, Crown Law Library, the Stanford Auxiliary Library (SAL), the SLAC Library, the Hoover library, the Miller Marine Biology Library at Hopkins Marine Station, the Music Library, and the University's special collections. There are 19 libraries in all. Green Library at Stanford University, vintage linen-era postcard The Cecil H. Green Library is the main library on the Stanford University campus and part of Stanford University Libraries and Acedemic Information Resources (SULAIR). ... Meyer Library - Stanford University “Meyer Library” redirects here. ... This article is about the geographical region. ...


Digital libraries and text services include HighWire Press, the Humanities Digital Information Services group and the Media Microtext Center. Several academic departments and some residences also have their own libraries. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Stanford is a founding and charter member of CENIC, the Corporation for Education Network Initiatives in California, the nonprofit organization which provides extremely high-performance Internet-based networking to California's K-20 research and education community. CENIC logo The Corporation for Education Network Initiatives in California (CENIC) is a nonprofit corporation formed in 1996 to provide high-performance, high-bandwidth networking services to California universities and research institutions. ...


Traditions

  • Full Moon on the Quad: A student gathering in the Main Quad of the university. Traditionally, seniors exchange kisses with freshmen, although students of all four classes (as well as the occasional graduate student or stranger) have been known to participate.
  • Sunday Flicks: Watching a film on Sunday night in Memorial Auditorium. Usually involves paper airplanes or simply throwing wads of newspaper.
  • Steam-tunnelling: Exploring the steam tunnels under the Stanford campus
  • Fountain-hopping: Cavorting in any of Stanford's many fountains (such as the Claw in White Plaza)
  • Big Game events: Including Big Game Gaieties (a student-written, composed, and produced musical), which is the week before and including the Big Game vs. UC Berkeley.
  • Primal scream: Performed by stressed students at midnight during Dead Week
  • Midnight Breakfast: During Winter quarter dead week, Stanford faculty serves breakfast to students in several locations on campus (you might see a vice-provost refilling orange juice, etc.)
  • Viennese Ball: a formal ball with waltzes which was started in the 1970s by students returning from the now closed Stanford in Vienna program.[14]
  • The Stanford Powwow: Organized by the Stanford American Indian Organization and held every Mother's Day weekend.[15]
  • Mausoleum Party: Halloween Party at the Stanford family mausoleum. It was on hiatus from 2001 to 2005 due to the fear that the festivities would further deteriorate the conditions of the mausoleum, but was revived in 2006.
  • Senior Pub Night: On most Thursdays during the school year, seniors gather together at a bar in Palo Alto or San Francisco. The location rotates week to week, and chartered buses are organized to take the seniors safely between the bar and campus.
  • Uncommon Man/Uncommon Woman: Stanford does not award honorary degrees, but in 1953 the university created the degree of Uncommon Man/Uncommon Woman for persons that give rare and extraordinary service to the university. The university's highest honor, the degree is not given at prescribed intervals, but only when appropriate to recognize extraordinary service. Recipients include Herbert Hoover, Bill Hewlett, Dave Packard, Lucille Salter Packard, and John Gardner.[16]
  • Birthdays: Boys get thrown in the shower at midnight. For girls, such an ordeal is not required, but may be arranged.

Older, now inactive traditions include the Big Game bonfire on Lake Lagunita (a seasonal lake usually dry in the fall) due to the presence of endangered salamanders.
Memorial Auditorium - Stanford University Memorial Auditorium (also called Memorial Hall, or MemAud by current students), dedicated in 1937, commemorates those students and faculty from Stanford who died in World War II. Designed by Bakewell and Brown, construction of the auditorium was funded primarily through student contributions. ... Diagram of a traditional paper plane. ... This article belongs in one or more categories. ... This article is about the annual football game between California and Stanford. ... This article is about the annual football game between California and Stanford. ... The University of California, Berkeley (also known as Cal, UC Berkeley, UCB, or simply Berkeley) is a prestigious, public, coeducational university situated in the foothills of Berkeley, California to the east of San Francisco Bay, overlooking the Golden Gate and its bridge. ... Dead week is a slang term for the week before final exams in the United States of America. ... Midnight breakfast is a generic term for a communal meal served at some American colleges and universities. ... A ball is a formal dance. ... The waltz is a dance in 3/4 time, done primarily in closed position, the commonest basic figure of which is a full turn in two measures using three steps per measure. ... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... This article is about a Native American gathering. ... This article is about several worldwide days celebrating motherhood. ... This article is about the holiday. ... St. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the thirty-first President of the United States (1929–1933), was a world-famous mining engineer and humanitarian administrator. ... William R. Hewlett (May 20, 1913 - January 12, 2001) was the co-founder, with David Packard, of the Hewlett_Packard Company (HP). ... David Packard (September 7, 1912 - March 26, 1996) was a cofounder of Hewlett-Packard. ... John William Gardner, (b. ... Lake Lagunita is an artificial lake in Stanford University, California. ...

Lake Lagunita in early spring

Community

Stanford has been coeducational since its founding; however, between approximately 1899 and 1933, there was a policy in place limiting female enrollment to 500 students and maintaining a ratio of three males for every one female student. By the late 1960s the "ratio" was about 2:1 for undergraduates and much more skewed at the graduate level, except in the humanities. As of 2005, undergraduate enrollment is split nearly evenly between the sexes, but male enrollees outnumber female enrollees about 2:1 at the graduate level. Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ...


Student government

The Associated Students of Stanford University (ASSU) is the student government for Stanford University. Its elected leadership consists of the Undergraduate Senate elected by the undergraduate students, the Graduate Student Council elected by the graduate students, and the President and Vice President elected as a ticket by the entire student body. A ticket refers to a single election choice which fills more than one political office or seat. ...


Dormitories and student housing

Stanford places a strong focus on residential education. Approximately 98 percent of undergraduate students live in on-campus university housing, with another five percent living in Stanford housing at the overseas campuses. According to the Stanford Housing Assignments Office, undergraduates live in 77 different houses, including dormitories, co-ops, row houses, fraternities and sororities. Residences are located generally just outside the campus core, within ten minutes (on foot or bike) of most classrooms and libraries. Some residences are for freshmen only; others give priority to sophomores, others to both freshmen and sophomores; some are available for upperclass students only, and some are open to all four classes. All residences are coed except for seven all-male fraternities, three all-female sororities, and one all-female house. In most residences men and women live on the same floor, but a few dorms are configured for men and women to live on separate floors.[17] While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for... While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for...


Several residences are considered theme houses, with a cross-cultural, academic/language, or focus theme. Examples include Chicano themed Casa Zapata, French language oriented French House, and arts focused Kimball.[18] For other uses, see Chicano (disambiguation). ... French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ...


Another famous style of housing at Stanford are the co-ops. These houses feature cooperative living, where residents and eating associates each contribute work to keep the house running. Students often help cook meals for the co-op, or clean the shared spaces. The coops are Chi Theta Chi, Columbae, Enchanted Broccoli Forest (EBF), Hammarskjöld (which is also the International Theme House), Kairos, Terra, and the Synergy cooperative house.[19]


At any time, around 50 percent of the graduate population lives on campus. When construction concludes on the new Munger graduate residence, this percentage will probably increase. First-year graduate students are guaranteed housing, assuming they are willing to take anything.


Greek life

Stanford is home to three housed sororities (Pi Beta Phi, Kappa Alpha Theta, and Delta Delta Delta) and seven housed fraternities (Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Sigma Chi, Kappa Sigma, Kappa Alpha, Theta Delta Chi, Sigma Nu, Phi Kappa Psi), as well as a number of unhoused Greek organizations, such as Alpha Phi Alpha, Kappa Alpha Psi, Omega Psi Phi, Phi Beta Sigma, Alpha Kappa Alpha, Delta Sigma Theta, Alpha Epsilon Pi, Delta Kappa Epsilon, Kappa Kappa Gamma, Chi Omega, Delta Tau Delta, Alpha Kappa Psi, Sigma Theta Psi, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Lambda Phi Epsilon, alpha Kappa Delta Phi, and Sigma Psi Zeta. In contrast to many universities, all the Greek houses are on university land and in almost all cases the university also owns the house. As a condition to being recognized they also cannot permit the national organization or others outside the university from having a veto over membership or local governance.[20] Pi Beta Phi (ΠΒΦ) is an international fraternity for women founded as I.C. Sorosis on April 28, 1867, at Monmouth College in Monmouth, Illinois. ... Kappa Alpha Theta (ΚΑΘ) is an international womens fraternity founded on January 27, 1870 at DePauw University. ... Delta Delta Delta (ΔΔΔ), also known as Tri Delta, is a national collegiate sorority founded on November 27, 1888. ... Sigma Alpha Epsilon (ΣΑΕ) is a secret letter, social college fraternity. ... Sigma Chi (ΣΧ) is one of the largest and oldest all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities. ... ΚΣ (Kappa Sigma) is an international fraternity with currently 234 chapters and 42 colonies in North America. ... Kappa Alpha Order (commonly known as KA) is a collegiate Order of Knights and American social fraternity. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... ΣΝ (Sigma Nu) is an undergraduate college fraternity with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... Phi Kappa Psi (ΦΚΨ, Phi Psi) is a U.S. national college fraternity. ... Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is the first intercollegiate fraternity established by African Americans. ... Kappa Alpha Psi (KAΨ) is the second-oldest collegiate Greek-letter fraternity with a predominantly African American membership and the first black intercollegiate fraternity incorporated as a national body. ... Omega Psi Phi (ΩΨΦ) is a national fraternity, and was the first black national fraternal organization to be founded at a historically black college. ... Phi Beta Sigma (ΦΒΣ) Fraternity was founded at Howard University in Washington, D.C. on January 9, 1914, by three young African-American male students. ... Alpha Kappa Alpha (ΆΚΆ) is the first Greek-lettered sorority established and incorporated by African-American college women. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Alpha Epsilon Pi (ΑΕΠ or AEPi) is currently the only international Jewish college fraternity in North America, with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... Delta Kappa Epsilon (ΔΚΕ; also pronounced D-K-E or Deke) was founded at Yale College in 1844 by 15 men of the sophomore class who, upon hearing that some but not all of them had been invited to join the two existing societies (Alpha Delta Phi and Psi Upsilon), instead... Kappa Kappa Gamma (ΚΚΓ) is a college womens fraternity, founded on October 13, 1870 at Monmouth College, Illinois. ... Chi Omega (ΧΩ) is the largest womens fraternal organization in the National Panhellenic Conference. ... Delta Tau Delta (ΔΤΔ, DTD, or Delts) is a U.S.-based international college fraternity. ... ΑΚΨ (Alpha Kappa Psi) is a co-ed professional business fraternity. ... Sigma Theta Psi was formed on November 13, 1991 in San Jose , California by eighteen women seeking to solidify and immortalize the values and responsibilities, which embodied their persons. ... ΣΦΕ (Sigma Phi Epsilon), commonly nicknamed SigEp or S-P-E, is a social fraternity for male college students in the United States. ... ΛΦΕ (Lambda Phi Epsilon, also known as Lambdas, LPhiE, LFE) is a nationally-recognized Asian-interest fraternity based in the United States. ... alpha Kappa Delta Phi (αΚΔΦ) (also known as aKDPhi) is the largest, nationwide Asian-American interest sorority. ... Sigma Psi Zeta Sorority, Inc. ...


Faculty residences

One of the benefits of being a Stanford faculty member is the "Faculty Ghetto," where faculty members can live within walking or biking distance of campus. Similar to a condominium, the houses can be bought and sold but the land under the houses is rented. The Faculty Ghetto is composed of land owned entirely by Stanford. A faculty member cannot buy a lot, but he or she can buy a house, renting the underlying land on a 99-year lease. The cost of owning a house in Silicon Valley remains high, however, and the average price of single family homes on campus is actually higher than in Palo Alto. The rapid capital gains of Silicon Valley landowners are enjoyed by Stanford, although Stanford, by the terms of its founding cannot sell the land. Houses in the "Ghetto" may appreciate or may depreciate but not as rapidly as overall Silicon Valley land prices. This article is about the form of housing. ... For the Nintendo 64 game, see Space Station Silicon Valley. ...


Academics

Walkway near the Quad
Walkway near the Quad

The schools of the University include the School of Humanities and Sciences, School of Engineering, School of Earth Sciences, School of Education, Graduate School of Business, Stanford Law School and the Stanford University School of Medicine. Download high resolution version (906x1388, 575 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (906x1388, 575 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Stanford University School of Humanities and Sciences is the heart of the undergraduate program and grants the majority of Stanford Universitys degrees. ... Stanford University School of Engineering is one of the schools of Stanford University. ... The Stanford University School of Education, also known as SUSE, is one of the leading schools of education in the United States. ... Stanford GSB The Stanford Graduate School of Business (also known as Stanford Business School or Stanford GSB) is one of the professional schools of Stanford University, in Stanford, California. ... Stanford Law School is a graduate school at Stanford University located near Palo Alto, California in Silicon Valley. ... Stanford Medical School Stanford University School of Medicine is affiliated with Stanford University and is located at Stanford University Medical Center in Stanford, California, adjacent to Palo Alto and Menlo Park. ...


Stanford awards the following degrees: B.A., B.S., B.A.S., M.A., M.S., Ph.D., D.M.A., Ed.D., Ed.S., M.D., M.B.A., J.D., J.S.D., J.S.M., LL.M., M.A.T., M.F.A., M.L.S., M.S.M. and ENG. A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... B.S. redirects here. ... Bachelor of Arts and Science - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... The Doctor of Musical Arts degree (D.M.A., or A.Mus. ... The Doctor of Education degree (Ed. ... The Education Specialist, also referred to as Educational Specialist, Specialist in Education, or , is a terminal academic degree in the U.S. that is designed for individuals who wish to develop additional skills or increase their knowledge beyond the masters degree level, but do not wish to pursue a... Doctor of Medicine (M.D. or MD, from the Latin Medicinae Doctor meaning Teacher of Medicine,) is an academic degree for medical doctors. ... MBA redirects here. ... J.D. redirects here. ... Doctor of Laws (Latin: Legum Doctor, LL.D) is a doctorate-level academic degree in law. ... The Master of Laws is an advanced law degree, commonly abbreviated LL.M. (also LLM or LL.M) from its Latin name, Legum Magister. ... The Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) degree usually requires a minimum of 30 semester hours beyond the Bachelors degree. ... In the United States, a Master of Fine Arts (MFA) is a terminal graduate degree in an area of visual, plastic, literary or performing arts typically requiring two to three years of study beyond the bachelor level. ... The term engineers degree may be used to represent a graduate academic degree intermediate in rank between a masters degree and a doctorate (U.S.), or it may also represent a higher (in total, 6-year) degree equivalent to or slightly more extensive than a masters degree...


The University enrolls approximately 6,700 undergraduates and 8,000 graduate students. The University has approximately 1,700 faculty members. The largest part of the faculty (40 percent) are affiliated with the medical school, while a third serve in the School of Humanities and Sciences.


Stanford's current community of scholars includes: 18 Nobel Prize laureates; 135 members of the National Academy of Sciences; 82 members of National Academy of Engineering; 224 members of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; 21 recipients of the National Medal of Science; three recipients of the National Medal of Technology; 26 members of the National Academy of Education; 41 members of American Philosophical Society; 4 Pulitzer Prize winners; 23 MacArthur Fellows; 7 Wolf Foundation Prize winners; 7 Koret Foundation Prize winners; 7 Presidential Medal of Freedom winners.[citation needed] The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... President Harding and the National Academy of Sciences at the White House, Washington, DC, April 1921 The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) is a corporation in the United States whose members serve pro bono as advisers to the nation on science, engineering, and medicine. ... Founded in 1964, the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) in the United States provides engineering leadership in service to the nation. ... The House of the Academy, Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... National Medal of Science The National Medal of Science is an honor given by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social sciences, biology, chemistry, engineering, mathematics and physics. ... The National Medal of Technology is an honor granted by the President of the United States to inventors and innovators that have made significant contributions to the development of new and important technology. ... The American Philosophical Society is a discussion group founded as the Junto in 1743 by Benjamin Franklin. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation is a private, independent grantmaking institution. ... The Wolf Prize has been awarded annually since 1978 to living scientists and artists for The prize is awarded in Israel by the Wolf Foundation, founded by Dr. Ricardo Wolf, a German-born inventor and former Cuban ambassador to Israel. ... The Presidential Medal of Freedom The Presidential Medal of Freedom is one of the two highest civilian awards in the United States and is bestowed by the President of the United States (the other award which is considered its equivalent is the Congressional Gold Medal, which is bestowed by an...


Stanford built its international reputation as the pioneering Silicon Valley institution through top programs in business, engineering and the sciences, spawning such companies as Hewlett-Packard, Cisco Systems, VMware, Yahoo!, Google, and Sun Microsystems—indeed, "Sun" originally stood for "Stanford University Network." In addition, the Stanford Research Institute operated one of the four original nodes that comprised ARPANET, predecessor to the Internet. The university also offers distinguished programs in the humanities and social sciences, particularly American studies, creative writing, history, political science, economics, communication, musicology, and psychology. For the Nintendo 64 game, see Space Station Silicon Valley. ... Engineering is the discipline of acquiring and applying knowledge of design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... The Hewlett-Packard Company (NYSE: HPQ), commonly known as HP, is a very large, global company headquartered in Palo Alto, California, United States. ... “Cisco” redirects here. ... VMware, Inc. ... Yahoo redirects here. ... This article is about the corporation. ... Sun Microsystems, Inc. ... SRI Internationals main campus on Ravenswood Avenue, Menlo Park, California SRI International is one of the worlds largest contract research institutions. ... ARPANET logical map, March 1977. ... American studies or American civilization is an interdisciplinary field dealing with the study of the United States. ... Creative writing is a term used to distinguish certain imaginative or different types of writing from technical writing. ... This article is about the study of the past in human terms. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... For the Bobby Womack album, see Communication (1972 album). ... For album by Prince, see Musicology (album). ... Psychological science redirects here. ...


Arts

Bronze statues by Auguste Rodin are scattered through the campus, including these Burghers of Calais.
Bronze statues by Auguste Rodin are scattered through the campus, including these Burghers of Calais.

Stanford University is home to the Cantor Center for Visual Arts museum with 24 galleries, sculpture gardens, terraces, and a courtyard first established in 1891 by Jane and Leland Stanford as a memorial to their only child. Notably, the Center possesses the largest collection of Rodin works outside of Paris, France. There are also a large number of outdoor art installations throughout the campus, primarily sculptures, but some murals as well. The Papua New Guinea Sculpture Garden near Roble Hall features handmade wood carvings and "totem poles." Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1631x1205, 601 KB) Summary Description: Les Bourgeois de Calais by Auguste Rodin at the Stanford University Main Quad, Cantor Center for Visual Arts. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1631x1205, 601 KB) Summary Description: Les Bourgeois de Calais by Auguste Rodin at the Stanford University Main Quad, Cantor Center for Visual Arts. ... Auguste Rodin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Rodins The Burghers of Calais in Calais, France The Burghers of Calais (Les Bourgeois de Calais) is one of the most famous sculptures by Auguste Rodin, completed in 1888. ... Stanford University Museum of Art (SUMA) is associated with Stanford University and was established 1891 (simultaneous with the University) by Leland and Jane Stanford. ...


Stanford has a thriving artistic and musical community, including theater groups such as Ram's Head Theatrical Society and the Stanford Shakespeare Society, and award-winning a cappella music groups, such as the Mendicants, Counterpoint, Stanford Fleet Street Singers, Harmonics, Mixed Company, Testimony, Talisman, and Everyday People. This article is about the vocal technique. ... The Stanford Mendicants is an all-male a cappella group at Stanford University. ... Founded in 1990 in order to bring African and African-American music to the Stanford community, Talisman a Capella is a coed music group celebrated nationally and internationally for its outstanding musicianship and progressive repertoire, featuring music from all over the world. ...


Stanford's dance community is one of the most vibrant in the country, with an active dance division (in the Drama Department) and over 30 different dance-related student groups, including the Stanford Band's Dollie dance troupe. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Perhaps most distinctive of all is its social and vintage dance community, cultivated by dance historian Richard Powers and enjoyed by hundreds of students and thousands of alumni. Stanford hosts monthly informal dances (called Jammix) and large quarterly dance events, including Ragtime Ball (fall), the Stanford Viennese Ball (winter), and Big Dance (spring). Stanford also boasts a student-run swing performance troupe called Swingtime and several alumni performance groups, including Decadance and the Academy of Danse Libre. Social dance is a major category or classification of danceforms or dance styles, where sociability and socializing are the primary focuses of the dancing. ... Vintage Dance is the authentic recreation of historical dance styles. ... Richard Powers is one of the worlds foremost experts in American social dance, noted for his choreographies for dozens of stage productions and films, and his workshops in Paris, Rome, Prague, London, Venice, Geneva, St. ... Swingtime is a student-run swing performance troupe based at Stanford University in California. ...


The creative writing program brings young writers to campus via the Stegner Fellowships and other graduate scholarship programs. This Boy's Life author Tobias Wolff teaches writing to undergraduates and graduate students. Knight Journalism Fellows are invited to spend a year at the campus taking seminars and courses of their choice. There is also an extracurricular writing and performance group called the Stanford Spoken Word Collective, which also serves as the school's poetry slam team. Creative writing is a term used to distinguish certain imaginative or different types of writing from technical writing. ... The Stegner Fellowship program is a two-year creative writing fellowship at Stanford University. ... For the 1993 film based on the novel, see This Boys Life (film). ... Tobias Jonathan Ansell Wolff (born June 19, 1945, in Birmingham, Alabama) is a writer of fiction and nonfiction. ...


Stanford also hosts various publishing courses for professionals. Stanford Professional Publishing Course, which has been offered on campus since the late 1970s, brings together international publishing professionals to discuss changing business models in magazine and book publishing.


Athletics

Main article: Stanford Cardinal
The "block S" is the official logo of Stanford athletics
The "block S" is the official logo of Stanford athletics

Stanford participates in the NCAA's Division I-A and is a member of the Pacific-10 Conference. It also participates in the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation for indoor track (men and women), water polo (men and women), women's gymnastics, women's lacrosse, men's gymnastics, and men's volleyball. Women's field hockey team is part of the NorPac Conference.[21] Stanford's traditional sports rival is the University of California, Berkeley, its neighbor to the north in the East Bay. Having no offical mascot, the athletic teams at Stanford University are referred to as Stanford Cardinal. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... NCAA redirects here. ... The Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10) is a college athletic conference which operates in the western United States. ... The Mountain Pacific Sports Federation is a College Athletic Conference whose member teams are located in the western United States. ... A womens 400 m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track in the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in Finland. ... Water polo is a team water sport. ... Gymnastics is a sport involving the performance of sequences of movements requiring physical strength, flexibility, balance, endurance, gracefulness, and kinesthetic awareness, and includes such skills as handsprings, handstands, split leaps, aerials and cartwheels. ... For other uses, see Lacrosse (disambiguation). ... Gymnastics is a sport involving the performance of sequences of movements requiring physical strength, flexibility, balance, endurance, gracefulness, and kinesthetic awareness, and includes such skills as handsprings, handstands, split leaps, aerials and cartwheels. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men, women and children in many countries around the world. ... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ...


Stanford offers 34 varsity sports (18 female, 15 male, one coed), 19 club sports and 37 intramural sports—about 800 students participate in intercollegiate sports. The University offers about 300 athletic scholarships.

The new Stanford Stadium, site of home football games.
The new Stanford Stadium, site of home football games.

The winner of the annual "Big Game" between the Cal and Stanford football teams gains custody of the Stanford Axe. Stanford's football team played in the first Rose Bowl in 1902. Stanford won back-to-back Rose Bowls in 1971 and 1972. Stanford has played in 12 Rose Bowls, most recently in 2000. Stanford's Jim Plunkett won the Heisman Trophy in 1970. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (819x614, 602 KB) Photo taken on September 16, 2006, by myself. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (819x614, 602 KB) Photo taken on September 16, 2006, by myself. ... Stanford Stadium (capacity 50,000 as of 2006) is a stadium on the Stanford University campus. ... This article is about the annual football game between California and Stanford. ... The Stanford Axe is a trophy awarded to the winner of the annual Big Game between the University of California, Berkeley and Stanford University. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... Jim Plunkett on the February 15, 1971 cover of Sports Illustrated James W. Jim Plunkett (born December 5, 1947 in San Jose, California) is a retired American football player. ... Heisman redirects here. ...


Club sports, while not officially a part of Stanford athletics, are numerous at Stanford. Sports include archery, badminton, cricket, cycling, equestrian, ice hockey, judo, kayaking, men's lacrosse, polo, racquetball, rugby union, squash, skiing, taekwondo, triathlon and Ultimate. The men's Ultimate team won a national championship in 2002, the women's Ultimate team in 1997, 1998, 1999, 2003, 2005, and 2006, and the women's rugby team in 2005 and 2006. The cycling team won the 2007 Division I USA Cycling Collegiate Road National Championships. Archery is the practice of using a bow to shoot arrows. ... This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... Police officer on a bicycle Cycling is a means of transport, a form of recreation and a sport. ... A young rider at a horse show in Australia. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... This article is about the martial art and sport. ... Sea Kayaking at Wilsons Promontory in Victoria, Australia Kayaking is the use of a kayak for moving across water. ... For other uses, see Lacrosse (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Polo (disambiguation). ... Racquetball racquet and ball Racquetball is a sport played with racquets and a hollow rubber ball on an indoor or outdoor court. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Squash racquet and ball Players in a glass-backed squash court International Squash Singles Court, as specified by the World Squash Federation Squash is an indoor racquet sport that was formerly called Squash racquets, a reference to the squashable soft ball used in the game (compared with the harder ball... Cross-country skiing (skating style) in Einsiedeln, Switzerland. ... Taekwondo (also Tae Kwon Do, Taekwon-Do, or Tae Kwon-Do) is a Korean martial art and combat sport. ... The three components of triathlon: Swimming, Cycling, Running A triathlon is an athletic event consisting of swimming, cycling and running over various distances. ... Ultimate (sometimes called ultimate Frisbee in reference to the trademarked brand name) is a non-contact competitive team game played with a 175 gram flying disc. ...


Until 1930, Stanford did not have a "mascot" name for its athletic teams. In that year, the athletic department adopted the name "Indians." In 1972, "Indians" was dropped after a complaint of racial insensitivity was lodged by Native American students at Stanford.

The Leland Stanford Junior (pause) University Marching Band rallies football fans with arrangements of "All Right Now" and other contemporary music.
The Leland Stanford Junior (pause) University Marching Band rallies football fans with arrangements of "All Right Now" and other contemporary music.

The Stanford sports teams are now officially referred to as the Stanford Cardinal, referring to the deep red color, not the the cardinal bird. Cardinal, and later cardinal and white has been the university's official color since the 19th century. The Band's mascot, "The Tree", has become associated with the school in general. Part of Leland Stanford Junior University Marching Band (LSJUMB), the tree symbol derives from the El Palo Alto redwood tree on the Stanford and City of Palo Alto seals. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (937x705, 496 KB) The Stanford Band rallying fans at Stanford Stadium. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (937x705, 496 KB) The Stanford Band rallying fans at Stanford Stadium. ... Cardinal is a vivid red, which gets its name from the cassocks worn by Catholic cardinals. ... For other uses, see Red (disambiguation). ... Genera Periporphyrus Saltator Caryothraustes Parkerthraustes Rhodothraupis Cardinalis Pheucticus Cyanocompsa Guiraca Passerina Spiza The Cardinals or Cardinalidae are a family of passerine birds found in North and South America. ... The Stanford Tree is the unofficial mascot of Stanford University. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... El Palo Alto, circa 1910 El Palo Alto is a coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) tree located in El Palo Alto Park on the banks of San Francisquito Creek in Palo Alto, California, United States. ...


Stanford hosts an annual U.S. Open Series tennis tournament, the Bank of the West Classic) at Taube Stadium. Cobb Track, Angell Field, and Avery Stadium Pool are considered world-class athletic facilities. The US Open Series is the eight-week summer tennis season linking 10 major ATP Tour and The Sony Ericsson WTA Tour tournaments to the U.S. Open. ... Bank of the West Classic is a tennis tournament on the WTA Tour held in Stanford, California, United States. ... The Taube Tennis Center is a tennis facility located on the campus of Stanford University near Palo Alto, California. ...


Stanford has won the award for the top ranked collegiate athletic program—the NACDA Director's Cup, formerly known as the Sears Cup, every year for the past thirteen years. The Cup has been offered for fourteen years. The NACDA Directors Cup is an award given annually by the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics to the colleges and universities with the most success in collegiate athletics. ...


NCAA achievements: Stanford has earned 91 NCAA National Titles since its establishment, the second-most by any university; 74 NCAA National Titles since 1980, the most by any university; and 393 individual NCAA championships, the most by any university.


Olympic achievements: According to the Stanford Daily, "Stanford has been represented in every summer Olympiad since 1908."[22] As of 2004, Stanford athletes had won 182 Olympic medals at the summer games; "In fact, in every Olympiad since 1912, Stanford athletes have won at least one and as many as 17 gold medals."[23]


People

University presidents

  1. David Starr Jordan (1891–1913)
  2. John Casper Branner (1913–1915)
  3. Ray Lyman Wilbur (1916–1943)
  4. Donald Bertrand Tresidder (1943–1948)
  5. J. E. Wallace Sterling (1949–1968)
  6. Kenneth Sanborn Pitzer (1968–1970)
  7. Richard Wall Lyman (1970–1980)
  8. Donald Kennedy (1980–1992)
  9. Gerhard Casper (1992–2000)
  10. John L. Hennessy (2000–present)

David Starr Jordan David Starr Jordan, Ph. ... John Casper Branner (1850-1922) was an American geologist and academic. ... Calvin Coolidge Ray Lyman Wilbur Ray Lyman Wilbur (April 13, 1875–June 26, 1949) was a medical doctor, the 3rd President of Stanford University, and the 31st United States Secretary of the Interior. ... Donald Bertrand Tresidder (April 7, 1894–January 28, 1948) was president of Stanford University from 1943 until 1948 and brought the school through the difficult years of World War II. Prior to his work at Stanford, he headed the Yosemite Park and Curry Co. ... John Ewart Wallace Sterling (1906–1985) was a U.S. (Canadian-born) educator. ... Kenneth Sanborn Pitzer (1914–December 26, 1997) was an American theoretical chemist and educator. ... Richard Wall Lyman (born 1923) was a U.S. educator and historian. ... Donald Kennedy is an American scientist, public administrator and academic. ... Gerhard Casper (born 1937) is a constitutional scholar who is currently a faculty member at Stanford University. ... John LeRoy Hennessy, the founder of MIPS Computer Systems Inc. ...

Provosts

The position of Provost was created in 1952 during the Presidency of J. E. Wallace Sterling. Many people consider the Stanford Provost to be the "heir apparent" to the President because of the five men who succeeded Sterling as President, three were Provost of Stanford (Lyman, Kennedy, and Hennessy), one was Provost of the University of Chicago (Casper), while the other was President of Rice University (Pitzer). The Provost is the University's chief academic and budget officer. The Provost and the President together conduct Stanford's relationships with the neighboring community and other schools and organizations. Provost is the title of a senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States and Canada, the equivalent of Vice-Chancellor at certain UK universites such as UCL, and the head of certain Oxbridge colleges (e. ... Contrasting with heir presumptive, an heir apparent is one who cannot be prevented from inheriting by the birth of any other person. ... For other uses, see University of Chicago (disambiguation). ... Lovett Hall William Marsh Rice University (commonly called Rice University and opened in 1912 as The William Marsh Rice Institute for the Advancement of Letters, Science and Art) is a private, comprehensive research university located in Houston, Texas, USA, near the Museum District and adjacent to the Texas Medical Center. ...

  1. Douglas M. Whitaker (1952–1955)
  2. Frederick E. Terman (1955–1965)
  3. Richard Wall Lyman (1967–1970)
  4. William F. Miller (1971–1978)
  5. Gerald J. Lieberman (1979–1979)
  6. Donald Kennedy (1979–1980)
  7. Albert M. Hastorf (1980–1984)
  8. James N. Rosse (1984–1992)
  9. Gerald J. Lieberman (1992–1993)
  10. Condoleezza Rice (1993–1999)
  11. John L. Hennessy (1999–2000)
  12. John W. Etchemendy (2000–present)

Frederick Emmons Terman (born June 7, 1900 in English, Indiana; died December 19, 1982) is widely credited (together with William Shockley) with being the father of Silicon Valley. ... Richard Wall Lyman (born 1923) was a U.S. educator and historian. ... Donald Kennedy is an American scientist, public administrator and academic. ... Condoleezza Rice (born November 14, 1954) is the 66th United States Secretary of State, and the second in the administration of President George W. Bush to hold the office. ... John LeRoy Hennessy, the founder of MIPS Computer Systems Inc. ... John W. Etchemendy is Stanford Universitys twelfth and current Provost. ...

Notable alumni, faculty, and staff

This is a list of encyclopedic persons (students, alumni, faculty or academic affiliates) associated with Stanford University in the United States. ...

Admission and rankings

History

Vintage Stanford University postcard

Associated Students of Stanford University (ASSU) Vice-President, Nicholas Thompson, founded FUNC or "Forget U.S. News Coalition" in 1996 as a show of support for Reed College's decision not to participate in the U.S. News and World Report survey. [24], [25] FUNC eventually spread to other colleges and universities and was composed of a "group of students at universities across the country who argue that ranking something as complex and variable as a college education with a single number is an oversimplification. FUNC claims that the process makes college administrations focus on numerical rankings rather than on educating students." [26] Stanford Banner Postcard, 1920 This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Stanford Banner Postcard, 1920 This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Criticism of college and university rankings refers to various movements in Canada and the United States which have critiqued rankings of universities and liberal arts colleges. ... Reed College is a private, independent liberal arts college located in Portland, Oregon. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


FUNC also involved then-Stanford President Gerhard Casper. On 23 September 1996, Casper sent a letter to James Fallows, editor of U.S. News & World Report, stating, "As the president of a university that is among the top-ranked universities, I hope I have the standing to persuade you that much about these rankings - particularly their specious formulas and spurious precision—is utterly misleading." [27] Gerhard Casper (born 1937) is a constitutional scholar who is currently a faculty member at Stanford University. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...


In February 1997, Stanford contemplated not filling out the ranking survey, a move advocated by FUNC. [28] On 18 April 1997, Casper issued a letter critical of U.S. News and World Report college rankings titled "An alternative to the U.S. News and World Report College Survey"[29] Casper's letter circulated among college presidents and led to a decision by Stanford that it will "submit objective data to U.S. News, but will withhold subjective reputational votes." [30] Stanford also announced at this time that it would post information about the University on its website. [31] In 1998, Stanford posted an alternative database on its website, stating: "This page is offered in contrast to commercial guides that purport to "rank" colleges; such rankings are inherently misleading and inaccurate. Stanford believes the following information, presented without arbitrary formulas, provides a better foundation for prospective students and their families to begin comparing and contrasting schools."[32] It has since been posted annually as the "Stanford University Common Data Set."[33] FUNC eventually disbanded and Stanford currently participates in the survey. [34] is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


Current

  • Stanford University's undergraduate program is ranked fourth among national universities by U.S. News and World Report (USNWR).[35], [36]
  • Stanford University is ranked second among world universities and second among universities in the Americas by Shanghai Jiao Tong University,[37] nineteenth among world universities in the THES-QS World University Rankings,[38][39], seventh among national universities by The Washington Monthly,[40] second among "global universities" by Newsweek,[41] and in the first-tier among national universities by The Center for Measuring University Performance.[42] Stanford University also participates in the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU)'s University and College Accountability Network (U-CAN).
  • Stanford received $911 million in private donations for the year ended August 31, 2006, the most of all U.S. universities and seventh highest of all charities.[43]
  • Stanford announced recently that it would use some of its endowment to cover the $36,000-a-year tuition for students whose families make under $100,000 a year. For students with family income under $60,000, living costs will also be paid.[44]

U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Shanghai Jiao Tong University (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; abbreviated Jiao Da (交大) or SJTU), located in Shanghai, is one of the oldest and most influential universities in China. ... The THES - QS World University Rankings is an annual publication of university rankings around the world, published by The Times Higher Education Supplement (THES) and Quacquarelli Symonds (QS). ... The Washington Monthly is a monthly magazine of United States politics and government that is based in Washington, DC. Its founder is Charles Peters, who started the magazine in 1969 and continues to write columns occasionally. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... Founded in 1976, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) is an organization of private US colleges and universities. ... The University and College Accountability Network (U-CAN) is a network planned to compare private colleges and universities across a wide variety of characteristics. ...

Selectivity

Stanford is one of the most selective universities in the U.S. In 2006, Stanford's undergraduate admission rate was 10.8 percent, from a pool of 22,223 applicants—the lowest rate of undergraduate admission in the history of the university.[45]The acceptance rates at the university's law school (7.7 percent), medical school (3.3 percent), and business school (10 percent) are also among the lowest in the country. College admissions in the United States play an important sociological role, determining (in part) the quality of education a person will receive as well as his or her career track. ...


For the Class of 2011, Stanford admitted 10.29 percent of an undergraduate applicant pool of 23,956 students. The entering transfer class of 2009 was 20 students, with a selectivity rate of 1.4 percent.[46] College transfer is the movement of students from one higher education institution to another and the process by which academic credits are accepted or not accepted by a receiving institution. ... The word selectivity has more meanings: Selectivity, the ability to notice/distinguish small differences. ...


For the Class of 2012, Stanford admitted 2,400 students from a undergraduate applicant pool of 25,298 candidates, resulting in an overall admissions rate of 9.49%, the lowest percentage in University history.[47]


Notes

  1. ^ Casper, Gerhard. "Die Luft der Freiheit weht - On and Off" (1995-10-05).
  2. ^ Stanford University History. Stanford University. Retrieved on 2007-04-26.
  3. ^ "Stanford Management Company report issued", Stanford News Service, September 28, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-09-30. 
  4. ^ Stanford Facts 2007 (The Stanford Faculty). Stanford University. Retrieved on 2007-04-26.
  5. ^ a b Stanford Facts 2007. Stanford University. Retrieved on 2007-04-26.
  6. ^ Stanford University History. Stanford University.
  7. ^ Cornell/Stanford Connection
  8. ^ Dave Revsine, One-sided numbers dominate Saturday's rivalry games, ESPN.com, November 30, 2006.
  9. ^ Quick Facts about Duke. Duke News & Communications. Duke University.
  10. ^ Second College Grant. Dartmouth Outing Club. Retrieved on 2007-10-30.
  11. ^ Dartmouth College: College Life. America's Best Colleges 2008. U.S. News & World Report (2007).
  12. ^ About Dartmouth: Facts. Dartmouth College. Retrieved on 2007-10-30.
  13. ^ "The Life and work of Felix Bloch", Guide to the Felix Bloch Papers, 1931-1987. Stanford, California: Stanford University Archives. “For the next few months, Bloch stayed mostly at his home in Zurich, but he also traveled to France, Holland, and Denmark. During his summer visit to Copenhagen to see Niels Bohr, he received his first offer from the chairman of the Stanford University physics department, David Locke Webster. Originally, Bloch later confessed, he knew nothing about Stanford so he mentioned the offer to Bohr and Heisenberg and asked for their advice. Heisenberg knew only that Stanford was in California and that the students from Stanford and another school nearby stole each other's axes. Bohr's opinion was definitive: Stanford was a good school; he should go.” 
  14. ^ Johnston, Theresa. "Strictly Ballroom", Stanford Magazine, Stanford Alumni Association, May 2002. 
  15. ^ The 37th Annual Stanford Powwow May 9-11, 2008
  16. ^ Degree of Uncommon Man and Uncommon Woman Award. Stanford Alumni Association.
  17. ^ Stanford University - Residential Education
  18. ^ Stanford | Living at Stanford | Theme Houses
  19. ^ Stanford University - Residential Education
  20. ^ Greek Life @ Stanford
  21. ^ NorPac. i2i Interactive (2007). Retrieved on 2007-06-08.
  22. ^ Cardinal boasts golden history - The Stanford Daily Online
  23. ^ Forty-two athletes try living up to Stanford’s Olympic legacy - The Stanford Daily Online
  24. ^ Thompson, Nick (25 October 1996). Down With Rankings!. Summit: Stanford's Newsmagazine of Progressive Politics.
  25. ^ Stanford Students Attack"U.S. News" College Rankings. Chronicle of Higher Education (25 October 1996).
  26. ^ Garigliano, Jeff (15 March 1997). U.S. News college rankings rankle critics - Forget U.S. News Coalition is pressuring U.S. News and World Report to cease publishing overall rankings for colleges. Folio.
  27. ^ Casper, Gerhard (18 April 1997). Letter from Casper Gerhard to James Fallows, editor of U.S. News & World Report. Stanford University.
  28. ^ "STANFORD: University mulls over ratings", Palo Alto Online, Palo Alto Online, 1997-02-19. Retrieved on 2007-06-22. 
  29. ^ Casper, Gerhard (18 April 1997). An alternative to the U.S. News and World Report College Survey. Stanford University.
  30. ^ Ray, Elaine (May/June 1997). Can a College Education Really Be Reduced to Numbers?. Stanford University.
  31. ^ Rankings: Round Two. Stanford University (April 23, 1997).
  32. ^ Stanford University Statistics for Prospective Undergraduate Students. Stanford University.
  33. ^ Stanford University Common Data Set. Stanford University.
  34. ^ Stanford Fourth in US News Rankings. Stanford University (22 September 2006).
  35. ^ America's Best Colleges 2007. U.S. News & World Report (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-15.
  36. ^ Stanford Fourth in US News Rankings. Stanford University (22 September 2006).
  37. ^ Academic Ranking of World Universities 2006. Institute of Higher Education, Shanghai Jiao Tong University (2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-15.
  38. ^ World University Rankings. The Times Higher Educational Supplement (2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-15.
  39. ^ [1] — A 2007 ranking from the THES - QS of the world's research universities.
  40. ^ The Washington Monthly College Rankings. The Washington Monthly (2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-15.
  41. ^ "The World's 100 Most Global Universities" . Newsweek. Retrieved on 2007-04-15. 
  42. ^ The Top American Research Universities: 2006 Annual Report (2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-15.
  43. ^ "The Philanthropy 400", The Chronicle of Philanthropy, November 1, 2007. 
  44. ^ Korber, Dorothy (March 2, 2008), "Stanford tilts playing field with free tuition pledge", Sacramento Bee, <http://www.sacbee.com/101/story/753472.html>. Retrieved on 3 March 2008
  45. ^ IvySuccess.com
  46. ^ 1,745 sign with SU - The Stanford Daily Online
  47. ^ [2]

Gerhard Casper (born 1937) is a constitutional scholar who is currently a faculty member at Stanford University. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, United States. ... The Dartmouth Outing Club (DOC) is the oldest and largest collegiate outing club in the United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Felix Bloch (October 23, 1905 – September 10, 1983) was a Swiss physicist, working mainly in the USA. // A stamp from Guyana commemorating Felix Bloch. ... Stanford is a census-designated place (CDP) located in Santa Clara County, California. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for May, 2002. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... The Chronicle of Higher Education is a newspaper that is a source of news, information, and jobs for college and university faculty and administration. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with The Times Higher Education Supplement. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... The Sacramento Bee is a daily newspaper published in Sacramento, California. ...

Further reading

  • Stuart W. Leslie, The Cold War and American Science: The Military-Industrial-Academic Complex at MIT and Stanford, Columbia University Press 1994
  • Rebecca S. Lowen, R. S. Lowen, Creating the Cold War University: The Transformation of Stanford, University of California Press 1997

University of California Press, also known as UC Press, is a publishing house associated with the University of California that engages in academic publishing. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Stanford prison experiment was ostensibly a psychological study of human responses to captivity and its behavioral effects on both authorities and inmates in prison. ... Muybridges The Horse in Motion. ... [email protected] (also known as FAH or [email protected]) is a distributed computing project designed to perform computationally intensive simulations of protein folding and other molecular dynamics. ...

External links

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ...

Stanford publications and other media outlets

  • The Stanford Daily (The student newspaper)
  • The Cardinal Inquirer
  • Stanford Review (The conservative student newspaper)
  • Stanford Progressive (The liberal student publication)
  • Stanford Report (The official university newspaper)
  • KZSU 90.1 FM Stanford Radio
  • Stanford Chaparral Official Website (A student humor magazine)
  • Stanford Scientific Magazine (The student-run science, ethics, and policy publication)
  • Stanford Journal of International Relations (A student-run journal publishing undergraduate work in International Relations)

For the visitor

  • Stanford Events Calendar
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  • Searchable Campus Map
  • Stanford University is at coordinates 37°25′47″N 122°10′10″W / 37.429847, -122.169447 (Stanford University)Coordinates: 37°25′47″N 122°10′10″W / 37.429847, -122.169447 (Stanford University)
The Association of Pacific Rim Universities (or APRU) is an organisation of leading universities from around the Pacific Rim. ... The Australian National University, or ANU, is a public university located in Canberra, Australia. ... The University of Melbourne, is a public university located in Melbourne, Victoria. ... The University of Sydney, established in Sydney in 1850, is the oldest university in Australia. ... The University of British Columbia (UBC) is a Canadian public research university with campuses in Vancouver and Kelowna. ... Fudan University (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), located in Shanghai, China, is one of the oldest leading and most selective universities in the Peoples Republic of China. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... Peking University (traditional Chinese: ; simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ), colloquially known in Chinese as Beida (北大, BÄ›idà), was established in 1898. ... 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The University of Malaya (or Universiti Malaya in Malay; commonly abbreviated as UM) is the oldest university in Malaysia, and is situated on a 750 acre (3. ... UNAM redirects here. ... The University of Auckland (Māori: Te Whare Wānanga o Tāmaki Makaurau) is New Zealands largest research-based university. ... This is a listing of colleges and universities in the Republic of the Philippines. ... The following is a list of universities in Russia: Universities offering broad range of degrees 1724—Saint Petersburg State University 1755—Moscow State University 1804—Kazan State University 1880—Tomsk State University 1899—Far Eastern National University, successor of Oriental Institute in Vladivostok, Russia 1909—Saratov State University 1915—Rostov... Far Eastern National University (Russian: ) is an institution of higher education located in Vladivostok, Russia. ... Malay name Malay: Universiti Nasional Singapura Tamil name Tamil: சிங்கப்பூர் தேசிய பல்கலைக்கழகம் University Cultural Centre The National University of Singapore (Abbreviation: NUS) is Singapores oldest university. ... National Taiwan University (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Tongyong Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kuo2-li4 tai2-wan1 ta4-hsüeh2; POJ: Kok-li̍p Tâi-ôan Tāi-ha̍k; abbreviation NTU)[2] is a national university in Taipei City, Taiwan. ... Chulalongkorn University is the oldest university in Thailand [1] and has long been considered one of the countrys most prestigious universities. ... This List of colleges and universities in the United States includes colleges and universities in the U.S. that grant four-year baccalaureate and/or post-graduate masters and doctorate degrees. ... The California Institute of Technology (commonly referred to as Caltech)[1] is a private, coeducational research university located in Pasadena, California, in the United States. ... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... The University of California, Davis, commonly known as UC Davis, is one of the ten campuses of the University of California, and was established as the University Farm in 1905. ... The University of California, Irvine is a public research university primarily situated in suburban Irvine, California, USA. Founded in 1965, it is one of ten University of California campuses and is commonly known as UCI or UC Irvine. ... The University of California, Los Angeles (generally known as UCLA) is a public research university located in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... The University of California, San Diego (popularly known as UCSD, or sometimes UC San Diego) is a highly selective, research-oriented[1] public university located in La Jolla, a seaside resort community of San Diego, California. ... The University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) is a coeducational public university located on the Pacific Ocean in Santa Barbara County, California, USA. It is one out of 10 campuses of the University of California. ... The University of Oregon is a public university located in Eugene, Oregon. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... The University of Washington, founded in 1861, is a public research university in Seattle, Washington. ... For the Nintendo 64 game, see Space Station Silicon Valley. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Campbell is a city located in Santa Clara County, California, part of Silicon Valley. ... 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Location in Santa Clara County and the state of California Coordinates: , Country State County Santa Clara Government  - Mayor Yoriko Kishimoto[1] Area  - City 25. ... For other uses, see San José. Nickname: Location of San Jose within Santa Clara County, California. ... Location of Santa Clara within Santa Clara County, California. ... Saratoga (IPA: ) is a city in Santa Clara County, California, USA. It is located on the west side of the Santa Clara Valley, in the San Francisco Bay Area. ... Location in Santa Clara County and the state of California Coordinates: , Country State County Santa Clara Government  - Mayor Otto Lee Area  - Total 22. ... Redwood City is a suburb located on the San Francisco Peninsula in the San Francisco Bay Area of California. ... San Mateo is a city in San Mateo County, California, in the San Francisco Bay Area. ... Northwestern Polytechnic University (NPU) is a private institution of higher education accredited to award bachelors and masters degrees in science, technology and management. ... Carnegie Mellon University is a private research university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. ... San José State University, commonly shortened to San José State and SJSU, is the founding campus of what became the California State University system. ... The Santa Clara Mission is a notable on-campus landmark. ... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... “UCSC” redirects here. ... Adobe Systems (pronounced a-DOE-bee IPA: ) (NASDAQ: ADBE) (LSE: ABS) is an American computer software company headquartered in San Jose, California, USA. Adobe was founded in December 1982[1] by John Warnock and Charles Geschke, who established the company after leaving Xerox PARC in order to develop and sell... AMD redirects here. ... 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Established in 1961 in Silicon Valley, Memorex is today a consumer electronics brand of Imation specializing in recordable media (CD & DVD Drives), travel drives, flash storage, computer accessories and other electronics. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... For the web browser produced by this corporation, see Netscape (web browser). ... For other meanings, see Next. ... Nintendo Corporation, Limited (Japanese: 任天堂; Ninten is translated roughly as leave luck to heaven or in heavens hands, do is a common suffix for names of shops or laboratories; TSE: NTDOY) was originally founded in 1889 by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce handmade hanafuda cards, for use in a Japanese... Logo of Opera Software. ... OPPO Digital, Inc. ... Palm, Inc. ... Categories: Companies traded on NASDAQ | Electronics companies of the United States | Corporation stubs ... eBays North First Street satellite office campus (home to PayPals corporate headquarters) PayPal is an e-commerce business allowing payments and money transfers to be made through the Internet. ... This article is about the company. ... Redback Networks, Inc. ... SAP AG (ISIN: DE0007164600, FWB: SAP, NYSE: SAP) is the largest European software enterprise and the third largest in the world, with headquarters in Walldorf, Germany. ... Silicon Graphics, Inc. ... Silicon Image makes computer chips that implement transfer protocols such as DVI and SATA. They are based out of Sunnyvale, California. ... Sony Corporation ) is a Japanese multinational corporation and one of the worlds largest media conglomerates with revenue of $66. ... 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  Results from FactBites:
 
All About the Stanford University and the Stanford Campus - www.Stanford-b.com (1421 words)
The Leland Stanford Junior University, commonly known as Stanford University (or simply Stanford), is a private university located approximately 37 miles (60 kilometers) southeast of San Francisco in an unincorporated part of Santa Clara County.
Stanford hosts programs and a teaching hospital in addition to various community outreach and volunteer initiatives.
Each year, half of the departments in that school are invited to choose usually one to three of their graduate student teachers (depending on the department's size) to be honored with the designation Centennial Teaching Assistant.
Stanford University - tScholars.com (2452 words)
Stanford University is governed by a board of trustees, in conjuction with the university president, provosts, faculty senate, and the deans of the various schools.
Stanford University is home to the Cantor Center for Visual Arts museum with 24 galleries, sculpture gardens, terraces, and a courtyard first established in 1891 by Jane and Leland Stanford as a memorial to their only child.
Stanford is the university behind [email protected], one of the most widely disseminated distributed computing projects in the life sciences field, allowing hobbyists and enthusiasts to participate in scientific research by donating unused computer processor cycles.
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