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Encyclopedia > Standard for the Uniform Scheduling of Drugs and Poisons

The Standard for the Uniform Scheduling of Drugs and Poisons, abbreviated SUSDP, is a document used in the regulation of drugs and poisons in Australia. It is produced by the National Drugs and Poisons Scheduling Committee (NDPSC), a committee of the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA). The SUSDP contains the decisions of the NDPSC in the aim of standardising the scheduling and packaging/labelling of substances throughout Australia, where such regulation lies within the jurisdiction of the individual State governments. The SUSDP is only a recommendation to the States, however, and differences still exist in the regulation of drugs and poisons between Australian states. The Therapeutic Goods Administration or TGA is the regulatory body for drugs and therapeutic goods in Australia. ... A state is a set of institutions that possess the authority to make the rules that govern the people in one or more societies, having internal and external sovereignty over a definite territory. ...

Contents

Schedules

There are eight schedules included in the SUSDP:


Schedule 1 (Defunct)

This schedule is no longer used. Section 8(2) of the Poisons and Therapeutic Goods Act 1966 (NSW) describes Schedule 1 as, "substances which are of such extreme danger to life as to warrant their being supplied only by medical practitioners, nurse practitioners authorised...pharmacists, dentists, veterinary surgeons or persons licensed..."


Schedule 2 Pharmacy Medicine

Schedule 2 (S2) poisons, otherwise known as Pharmacy Medicines, are substances and preparations for therapeutic use -

  • which are substantially safe in use but where advice or counselling is available if necessary
  • for minor ailments or symptoms which -
    • can be easily recognised by the consumer
    • do not require medical diagnosis or management

Some examples include:

Dextromethorphan (DM or DXM) is an antitussive drug that is found in many over-the-counter cold and cough preparations, usually in the form of dextromethorphan hydrobromide. ...

Schedule 3 Pharmacist Only Medicine

Schedule 3 (S3) poisons, otherwise known as Pharmacist Only Medicines, are substances and preparations for therapeutic use -

  • which are substantially safe in use but require professional advice or counselling by a pharmacist
  • the use of which requires pharmacist advice, management or monitoring
  • which are for ailments or symptoms which -
    • can be identified by the consumer and verified by a pharmacist
    • do not require medical diagnosis or only require initial medical diagnosis, and do not require close medical management

In some states, there are subsets of Schedule 3 with additional requirements (see below).


Some examples include:

Codeine (INN) or methylmorphine is an opiate used for its analgesic, antitussive and antidiarrheal properties. ... Paracetamol (INN) (IPA: ) or acetaminophen (USAN), is a common analgesic and antipyretic drug that is used for the relief of fever, headaches, and other minor aches and pains. ... Pseudoephedrine (commonly abbreviated as PSE) is a sympathomimetic amine commonly used as a decongestant. ... Salbutamol (INN) or albuterol (USAN) is a short-acting β2-adrenergic receptor agonist used for the relief of bronchospasm in conditions such as asthma and COPD. Salbutamol sulfate is usually given by the inhaled route for direct effect on bronchial smooth muscle. ...

Schedule 4 Prescription Only Medicine

Schedule 4 (S4) poisons, otherwise known as Prescription Only Medicines, are substances and preparations for therapeutic use -

  • the use of which requires professional medical, dental or veterinary management or monitoring
  • which are for ailments or symptoms that require professional medical, dental or veterinary diagnosis or management
  • the safety or efficacy of which may require further evaluation
  • which are new therapeutic substances

In some states, there are subsets of Schedule 4 with additional requirements (see below).


Some examples include:

Epinephrine (INN) or adrenaline (BAN) is a hormone and a neurotransmitter. ... Co-amoxiclav is the British Approved Name, in the British Pharmacopoeia, for the combination antibiotic containing amoxicillin and clavulanic acid. ... Co-trimoxazole (abbreviated SXT) is a bacteriostatic antibiotic combination of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole, in the ratio of 1 to 5, used in the treatment of a variety of bacterial infections. ... Ephedrine (EPH) is a sympathomimetic amine similar in structure to the synthetic derivatives amphetamine and methamphetamine. ... Ergotamine is a vasoconstrictor used for migraine prevention and is sometimes mixed with caffeine. ... Fluticasone proprionate is a glucocorticoid often prescribed as treatment for asthma and allergic rhinitis. ... Pseudoephedrine (commonly abbreviated as PSE) is a sympathomimetic amine commonly used as a decongestant. ... Salmeterol is a long-acting beta2-adrenergic receptor agonist drug that is currently prescribed for the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease COPD. It is currently available in both dry-powder inhalers (DPIs) and pressurised metered dose inhalers (pMDIs). ...

Schedule 5 Caution

Schedule 5 (S5) poisons are substances and preparations which -

  • have low toxicity or a low concentration
  • have a low to moderate hazard
  • are capable of causing only minor adverse effects to human being in normal use
  • require caution in handling, storage or use

Schedule 6 Poison

Schedule 6 (S6) poisons are substances and preparations -

  • with moderate to high toxicity
  • which may cause death or severe injury if ingested, inhaled or in contact with the skin or eyes

Schedule 7 Dangerous Poison

Schedule 7 (S7) poisons are substances and preparations -

  • with high to extremely high toxicity
  • which can cause death or severe injury at low exposures
  • which require special precautions in their manufacture, handling or use
  • which may require special regulations restricting their availability, possession or use
  • which are too hazardous for domestic use or use by untrained persons

Schedule 8 Controlled Drug

Schedule 8 (S8) poisons, otherwise known as Controlled Drugs, are substances and preparations for therapeutic use -

  • which are dependence producing
  • which are likely to be abused or misused

Schedule 9 Prohibited Substance

Schedule 9 (S9) poisons are substances and preparations which, by law, may only be used for research purposes. The sale, distribution, use and manufacture of such substances are strictly prohibited under the law.


Some examples include:

Look up Cannabis in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Cocaine (or crack in its impure freebase form) is a crystalline tropane alkaloid that is obtained from the leaves of the coca plant. ... Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (4-hydroxybutanoic acid, C4H8O3) is both a drug and a naturally occurring compound found in the mammalian brain, where it might function as a neurotransmitter. ... Heroin, also known as diamorphine (BAN) or diacetylmorphine (INN), is a semi-synthetic opioid. ... For other uses, see LSD (disambiguation). ... Mescaline (3,4,5-trimethoxyphenethylamine) is a hallucinogenic alkaloid of the phenethylamine class. ... Methamphetamine (methylamphetamine or desoxyephedrine), popularly shortened to meth, is a psychostimulant drug used primarily for recreational purposes, but also prescribed for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder or narcolepsy under the brand name Desoxyn. ... ecstasy and religious ecstasy MDMA, most commonly known today by the street name ecstasy, is a synthetic entactogen of the phenethylamine family whose primary effect is to stimulate the brain to rapidly secrete large amounts of serotonin, causing a general sense of openness, empathy, energy, euphoria, and well-being. ... Psilocin, sometimes misspelled psilocine or psilotsin, is a psychedelic (hallucinogenic) mushroom alkaloid. ... Psilocybin (also known as psilocybine), is a psychedelic alkaloid of the tryptamine family. ...

Interstate variations

New South Wales

In New South Wales, poisons are proclaimed in the Poisons List by the Poisons Advisory Committee, under the authority of the Poisons and Therapeutic Goods Act 1966 (NSW). NSW legislation refers to S2 as "medicinal poisons", S3 as "potent substances", S4 as "restricted substances" and S8 as "drugs of addiction". Capital Sydney Government Const. ...


Schedule 3 Recordable

Schedule 3 Recordable (S3R), or "recordable potent substances", refers to Pharmacist Only Medicines where supply is recorded as for Schedule 4 drugs. S3R drugs are those which may have an increased risk of illegal diversion or abuse. These are specified in Clause 23 of the Poisons and Therapeutic Goods Regulation 2002 (NSW). As of January 2006, all pseudoephedrine-containing preparations are S3R.-1...


Schedule 4 Appendix D

Schedule 4 Appendix D (S4D) refers to Prescription Only Medicines which do not have sufficient addictiveness or risk of abuse to be classified as S8, but for which a significant addiction/abuse risk exists. As such, S4D drugs are subject to additional prescription and recording requirements over S4. These drugs are referred to as "prescribed restricted substances" under the Poisons and Therapeutic Goods Regulation 2002 (NSW) and are listed in Appendix D of the Regulation. Drugs included in Appendix D include benzodiazepines and anabolic steroids. A subset of Appendix D are the Appendix B substances, which are subject to similar requirements as S8 drugs. Alprazolam 2mg tablets The benzodiazepines (pronounced , or benzos for short) are a class of drugs with sedative, hypnotic, anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, amnestic and muscle relaxant properties. ... Chemical structure of the natural anabolic hormone testosterone, 17b-hydroxy-4-androsten-3-one. ...


South Australia

Recordable S3 products (Schedule G)

In South Australia, supply of certain S3 preparations listed in Schedule G of the Controlled Substances (Poisons) Regulations 1996 (SA) are recordable under Regulation 14(2). As of 2006, Schedule G products specified are: adrenaline (in metered aerosols), dihydrocodeine (in cough preparations), doxylamine (in preparations also containing codeine), promethazine (in preparations also containing codeine), and pseudoephedrine. Emblems: Hairy Nosed Wombat (faunal); Leafy Seadragon (marine); Piping Shrike (bird: unofficial); Sturts Desert Pea (floral); Opal (gemstone) Motto: United for the Common Wealth Slogan or Nickname: Festival State Other Australian states and territories Capital Adelaide Government Const. ... Adrenaline redirects here. ... Dihydrocodeine, also called DHC and Paracodeine and by the brand names of SS Bron, Drocode, Paracodin, Codidol, Didor Continus, Dicogesic, and DF-118 amongst others, is a semi-synthetic opioid analgesic prescribed for postoperative pain, severe dyspnea, or as an antitussive. ... This article or section may be confusing or unclear for some readers, and should be edited to rectify this. ... Codeine (INN) or methylmorphine is an opiate used for its analgesic, antitussive and antidiarrheal properties. ... // General Remarks and Pharmacology Promethazine (sold as Phenergan and Promethegan) is a first-generation H1 receptor antagonist antihistamine and antiemetic|anti-nausea medication available by medical prescription|prescription in the United States, and over-the-counter in the United Kingdom, Switzerland, Australia, South Africa, New Zealand and many other countries. ...


Western Australia

Recordable S3 products (Appendix J)

In Western Australia, supply of certain S3 preparations listed in Appendix J of the Poisons Regulations 1965 (WA) are recordable under Regulation 35A. As of 2006, Appendix J products specified are: hydrocortisone, hydrocortisone acetate, and nicotine preparations where included in Schedule 3. Capital Perth Government Const. ... Hydrocortisone is a synthetic corticosteroid drug which may be given by injection or by topical application. ... Not to be confused with Niacin, which is the oxide of Nicotine, and has a very different biological effect. ...


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