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Encyclopedia > Stan Lee
Stan Lee

Stan Lee in 1999
Birth name Stanley Martin Lieber
Born December 28, 1922 (1922-12-28) (age 84)
New York City
Nationality American
Area(s) Writer, Editor, Publisher, Producer
Notable works Spider-Man
Fantastic Four
X-Men
The Hulk
Daredevil
Iron Man
Awards Comics Hall of Fame

Stan Lee (born Stanley Martin Lieber on December 28, 1922[1]) is an American writer, editor, former Chairman of Marvel Comics, and memoirist. Stan Lee aka Deathfist is a fictional character from the Judge Dredd comic strip in British comic 2000 AD. Lee is an expert in martial arts, hailing from the Radlands of Ji in China and trained by the outlaw Fighting Heart Kwoon, and a deadly assassin. ... Image File history File links Stangfdl. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... For other uses, see Fantastic Four (disambiguation). ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... Incredible Hulk, The Hulk and The Incredible Hulk redirect here. ... For other uses, see Daredevil (comics). ... Iron Man (Anthony Edward Tony Stark) is a fictional comic book superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... Editing is the process of preparing language, images, or sound for presentation through correction, condensation, organization, and other modifications. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... As a literary genre, a memoir (from the French: mémoire from the Latin memoria, meaning memory) forms a subclass of autobiography, although it is an older form of writing. ...


With several artist co-creators, most notably Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko, he co-created Spider-Man, the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, Hulk, Thor, Iron Man, Daredevil, Doctor Strange, and many other characters, introducing complex, naturalistic characters and a thoroughly shared universe into superhero comic books. He subsequently led the expansion of Marvel Comics from a small publishing house to a large multimedia corporation. Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds... Stephen Ditko (born 2 November 1927) is a renowned American comic book artist and writer best known as the co-creator of Spider-Man and Doctor Strange. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... For other uses, see Fantastic Four (disambiguation). ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... Incredible Hulk, The Hulk and The Incredible Hulk redirect here. ... Thor (often called The Mighty Thor) is a superhero appearing in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Iron Man (Anthony Edward Tony Stark) is a fictional comic book superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... For other uses, see Daredevil (comics). ... This article is about the Marvel comics superhero. ... Naturalism is a movement in theater, film, and literature that seeks to replicate a believable everyday reality, as opposed to such movements as Romanticism or Surrealism, in which subjects may receive highly symbolic, idealistic, or even supernatural treatment. ... A shared universe is a literary technique in which several different authors create works of fiction that share aspects such as settings or characters and that are intended to be read as taking place in a single universe. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... “Publisher” redirects here. ... Look up Multimedia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Corporation (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Biography

Early life and career

Lee was born in New York City, New York, in the apartment of his Romanian-born Jewish immigrant parents, Celia (Solomon) and Jack Lieber,[2] at the corner of West 98th Street and West End Avenue in Manhattan.[1] His father, trained as a dress cutter, worked only sporadically after the Great Depression, and the family moved further uptown to Fort Washington Avenue,[3] the cheaper Manhattan neighborhood of Washington Heights. When Lee was eight, his only sibling, brother Larry Lieber, was born. By the time Lee was in his teens, the family was living in a one-bedroom apartment at 1720 University Avenue in The Bronx. Lee described it as "a third-floor apartment facing out back", with he and his brother sharing a bedroom and his parents using a foldout couch.[4] New York, New York redirects here. ... Jewish Romanian history concerns the Jews of Romania and of Romanian origins. ... Immigration is the movement of people from one place to another. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... This article is about the neighborhood in New York City. ... Larry Lieber (born October 26, 1931) is a comic book artist and writer and is the younger brother of Marvel Comics writer/editor Stan Lee. ... For other uses, see The Bronx (disambiguation). ...


Lee attended DeWitt Clinton High School in The Bronx.[5] where his family had moved next. A voracious reader who enjoyed writing as a teen, he worked such part-time jobs as writing obituaries for a news service and press releases for the National Tuberculosis Center; delivering sandwiches for the Jack May pharmacy to offices in Rockefeller Center; working as an office boy for a trouser manufacturer; ushering at the Rivoli Theater on Broadway; and selling subscriptions to the New York Herald Tribune newspaper. He graduated high school early, at age 16½ in 1939, and joined the WPA Federal Theatre Project. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Obituary for World War I death An obituary is a notice of the death of a person, usually published in a newspaper, written or commissioned by the newspaper, and usually including a short biography. ... A news agency is an organization of journalists established to supply news reports to organizations in the news trade: newspapers, magazines, and radio and television broadcasters. ... A news release or press release is a written or recorded communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing something claimed as having news value. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... Lower Plaza at Rockefeller Center. ... A view of Broadway in 1909 Broadway, as the name implies, is a wide avenue in New York City. ... The New York Herald Tribune was a newspaper created in 1924 when the New York Tribune acquired the New York Herald. ... WPA Graphic The Works Progress Administration (later Work Projects Administration, abbreviated WPA), was created on May 6, 1935 by Presidential order (Congress funded it annually but did not set it up). ... Poster for Festival of American Dance, Los Angeles Federal Theatre Project, WPA, 1937 The Federal Theatre Project (FTP) was a New Deal project to fund theater and other live artistic performances in the United States during the Great Depression. ...

A text filler in Captain America Comics #3 (May 1941) was Lee's first published work. Cover art by Alex Schomburg.
A text filler in Captain America Comics #3 (May 1941) was Lee's first published work. Cover art by Alex Schomburg.

With the help of his uncle, Robbie Solomon, the brother-in-law of pulp magazine and comic-book publisher Martin Goodman,[6] Lee became an assistant at the new Timely Comics division of Goodman's company. Timely, by the 1960s, would evolve into Marvel Comics. Lee, whose cousin Jean[7] was Goodman's wife, was formally hired by Timely editor Joe Simon.[8] Image File history File links CaptAmerica3. ... Image File history File links CaptAmerica3. ... Alex Schomburg (born 1905, Puerto Rico; died 1998) was a prolific American commercial and comic book artist and painter whose career lasted over 70 years. ... This article is about inexpensive fiction magazines. ... “Publisher” redirects here. ... Martin Goodman (born 1910, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States; died June 6, 1992, Palm Beach, Florida) was an American publisher of pulp magazines, paperback books, mens adventure magazines, and comic books, launching the company that would become Marvel Comics. ... Timely Comics is the 1940s comic-book publishing company that would evolve into Marvel Comics. ... Joe Simon (born 1915) was a comic book author and cartoonist who created or co-created many memorable characters in the Golden Age. ...


Young Stanley Lieber's first published work, the text filler "Captain America Foils the Traitor's Revenge" in Captain America Comics #3 (May 1941), used the pseudonym "Stan Lee", which years later he would adopt as his legal name. Lee later explained in his autobiography and numerous other sources that he had intended to save his given name for more literary work. This initial story also introduced Captain America's trademark ricocheting shield-toss, which immediately became one of the character's signatures.[9] Captain America is a fictional comic book superhero published by Marvel Comics. ...


He graduated from writing filler to actual comics with a backup feature, "'Headline' Hunter, Foreign Correspondent", two issues later. Lee's first superhero co-creation was the Destroyer, in Mystic Comics #6 (Aug. 1941). Other characters he created during this period fans and historians call the Golden Age of comics include Jack Frost, debuting in USA Comics #1 (Aug. 1941), and Father Time, debuting in Captain America Comics #6 (Aug. 1941).[10] This article is about Marvel Comics superhero. ... Mystic has been used as the title of four comic-book series. ... Superman, the catalyst of the Golden Age, from Superman #14, January-February 1942. ... Jack Frost is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... USA Comics was a superhero comic-book anthology series published by Marvel Comics 1930-40s predecessor, Timely Comics, during the period fans and historians call the Golden Age of comic books. ... Father Time is a superhero from the Golden Age of Comic Books who appeared in Captain America Comics #6 (September 1941), published by Timely Comics (later Marvel Comics). ...


When Simon and his creative partner Jack Kirby left late in 1941, following a dispute with Goodman, the 30-year-old publisher installed Lee, just under 19 years old, as interim editor. The youngster showed a knack for the business that led him to remain as the comic-book division's editor-in-chief, as well as art director for much of that time, until 1972, when he would succeed Goodman as publisher. Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds...


Lee entered the U.S. Army in early 1942 and served stateside in the Signal Corps, writing manuals, training films, and slogans, and occasionally cartooning. His military classification, he says, was "playwright"; he adds that only nine men in the U.S. Army were given that title. Vincent Fago, editor of Timely's "animation comics" section, which put out humor and funny animal comics, filled in until Lee returned from his World War II military service in 1945. From then through 1947, he and his wife, Joan, rented the top floor of a brownstone in the East 90s in Manhattan.[11] They later bought two-story, three-bedroom home at 1084 West Broadway, in Woodmere, New York, on Long Island, living there from 1949 to 1952.[12] The family, which by this time included daughter Joan Celia, bought a home at 226 Richards Lane in the Long Island town of Hewlett Harbor, New York, living there from 1952 to 1980,[13] including the 1960s period when Lee and his artist collaborators would revolutionize comic books. The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... The Signal Corps is a military branch, usually subordinate to a countrys army. ... Cartoonist Jack Elrod at work. ... Vincenzo Francisco Gennaro Di Fago (born November 28, 1914, Yonkers, New York, United States; died June 13, 2002) was an American comic-book artist and writer who served as interim editor of Timely Comics, the Golden Age predecessor of Marvel Comics, while editor Stan Lee did his World War II... Look up Humour in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Bugs Bunny, a typical funny animal character Funny animal is a cartooning term for the genre of comics and animated cartoons in which the main characters are humanoid or talking animals. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... “Conscript” redirects here. ... This article is about the building material and the dwelling. ... Woodmere is a hamlet (and census-designated place) in Nassau County, New York, United States. ... This article is about the island in New York State. ... Hewlett Harbor is a village in Nassau County, New York in the USA. The population was 1,271 at the 2000 census. ...


In the mid-1950s, by which time the company was now generally known as Atlas Comics, Lee wrote stories in a variety genres including romance, Westerns, humor, science fiction, medieval adventure, horror and suspense. By the end of the decade, Lee had become dissatisfied with his career and considered quitting the field. Atlas Comics is the 1950s comic book publishing company that would evolve into Marvel Comics. ... A genre [], (French: kind or sort from Greek: γένος (genos)) is a loose set of criteria for a category of literary composition; the term is also used for any other form of art or utterance. ... As a literary genre, romance or chivalric romance refers to a style of heroic prose and verse narrative current in Europe from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. ... Cover of a book by Louis LAmour, one of Western fictions most prolific authors. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... Horror can mean several things: Horror (emotion) Horror fiction Horror film This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... Look up Suspense in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

The Fantastic Four #1 (Nov. 1961). Cover art by Jack Kirby (penciller) and unconfirmed inker
The Fantastic Four #1 (Nov. 1961). Cover art by Jack Kirby (penciller) and unconfirmed inker

Cover to Fantastic Four #1, November, 1961. ... Cover to Fantastic Four #1, November, 1961. ... The Fantastic Four is Marvel Comics flagship superhero team, created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby and debuting in The Fantastic Four #1 (Nov. ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds... A penciller (or penciler) is one of a number of artists working within the comic industry. ... The inker is one of the two line artists in a traditional comic book, or graphic novel. ...

Marvel revolution

In the late 1950s, DC Comics editor Julius Schwartz revived the superhero genre and experienced a significant success with its updated version of the Flash, and later with super-team the Justice League of America. In response, publisher Martin Goodman assigned Lee to create a new superhero team. Lee's wife urged him to experiment with stories he preferred, since he was planning on changing careers and had nothing to lose. Jack Kirby also suggested creating heroes with flaws, ones whose superpowers would not enable them to overcome personal problems such as relationships and money.[citation needed] DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Julius Julie Schwartz (June 19, 1915 – February 8, 2004) was a comic book and pulp magazine editor, and a science fiction agent and prominent fan. ... The Flash is a name shared by several DC Comics superheroes. ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds...


Lee acted on that advice, giving his superheroes a flawed humanity, a change from the ideal archetypes that were typically written for pre-teens. His heroes could have bad tempers, melancholy fits, vanity, greed, etc. They bickered amongst themselves, worried about paying their bills and impressing girlfriends, and even were sometimes physically ill. Before him, most superheroes were idealistically perfect people with no serious, lasting problems: Superman was so powerful that nobody could harm him, and Batman was a billionaire in his secret identity.[14] Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... A billionaire is a person who has a net worth of at least one billion units of currency, such as United States Dollars (USD), Pounds or Euros. ...


The first superhero group Lee and artist Jack Kirby created was the family of the Fantastic Four. Its immediate popularity led Lee and Marvel's illustrators to produce a cavalcade of new titles. With Kirby, Lee created the Incredible Hulk, Iron Man, the Mighty Thor and the X-Men; with Bill Everett, Daredevil; and with Steve Ditko, Doctor Strange and Marvel's most successful character, Spider-Man. For other uses, see Fantastic Four (disambiguation). ... The Incredible Hulk The Hulk, often called The Incredible Hulk, is a Marvel Comics superhero. ... Iron Man (Anthony Edward Tony Stark) is a fictional comic book superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Thor (often called The Mighty Thor) is a superhero appearing in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... Bill Everett (May 18, 1917 – February 27, 1973) was a comic book writer/illustrator most famous for the creation of Namor the Sub-Mariner and co-creating Daredevil for Marvel Comics. ... For other uses, see Daredevil (comics). ... Stephen Ditko (born 2 November 1927) is a renowned American comic book artist and writer best known as the co-creator of Spider-Man and Doctor Strange. ... This article is about the Marvel comics superhero. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ...


Comics historian Peter Sanderson wrote that in the 1960s,

DC was the equivalent of the big Hollywood studios: After the brilliance of DC's reinvention of the superhero ... in the late 1950s and early 1960s, it had run into a creative drought by the decade's end. There was a new audience for comics now, and it wasn't just the little kids that traditionally had read the books. The Marvel of the 1960s was in its own way the counterpart of the French New Wave.... Marvel was pioneering new methods of comics storytelling and characterization, addressing more serious themes, and in the process keeping and attracting readers in their teens and beyond. Moreover, among this new generation of readers were people who wanted to write or draw comics themselves, within the new style that Marvel had pioneered, and push the creative envelope still further.[15]

Stan Lee's Marvel revolution extended beyond the characters and storylines to the way in which comic books engaged the readership and built a sense of community between fans and creators. Lee introduced the practice of including a credit panel on the splash page of each story, naming not just the writer and penciller but also the inker and letterer. Regular news about Marvel staff members and upcoming storylines was presented on the Bullpen Bulletins page, which (like the letter columns that appeared in each title) was written in a friendly, chatty style. ... François Truffauts New Wave film Jules et Jim The New Wave (French: la Nouvelle Vague) was a blanket term coined by critics for a group of French filmmakers of the late 1950s and 1960s, influenced (in part) by Italian Neorealism. ... Bullpen Bulletins is the news and information page that appears in most regular monthly comic books from Marvel Comics. ...

Amazing Fantasy #15 (1962), the first appearance of Spider-Man. Cover art by Jack Kirby (penciller) & Steve Ditko (inker).
Amazing Fantasy #15 (1962), the first appearance of Spider-Man. Cover art by Jack Kirby (penciller) & Steve Ditko (inker).

Throughout the 1960s, Lee scripted, art-directed, and edited most of Marvel's series; moderated the letters pages; wrote a monthly column called "Stan's Soapbox"; and wrote endless promotional copy, often signing off with his trademark phrase, "Excelsior!" (which is also the New York state motto). To maintain his taxing workload yet still meet deadlines, he used a system that was used previously by various comic-book studios, but due to Lee's success with it, became known as the "Marvel Method" or "Marvel style" of comic-book creation. Typically, Lee would brainstorm a story with the artist and then prepare a brief synopsis rather than a full script. Based on the synopsis, the artist would fill the allotted number of pages by determining and drawing the panel-to-panel storytelling. After the artist turned in penciled pages, Lee would write the word balloons and captions, and then oversee the lettering and coloring. In effect, the artists were co-plotters, whose collaborative first drafts Lee built upon. Download high resolution version (486x738, 78 KB)Cover of Marvel Comics Amazing Fantasy #15, the first appearance of Spider-Man. ... Download high resolution version (486x738, 78 KB)Cover of Marvel Comics Amazing Fantasy #15, the first appearance of Spider-Man. ... Stephen Ditko (born 2 November 1927) is a renowned American comic book artist and writer best known as the co-creator of Spider-Man and Doctor Strange. ... Look up Excelsior in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the state. ... The Marvel Method, pioneered by and exemplified in the works of Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, is a method of comic book creation wherein the author (in this case, Stan Lee) would plot out the rough outline of a story, and the artist (Kirby), while drawing it, would help fill... Four different shapes of speech or thought balloons Speech balloons (also speech bubbles or word balloons) are a graphic convention used in comic books, strips, and cartoons to allow words (and much less often, pictures) to be understood as representing the speech or thoughts of a given character in the...


Because of this system, the exact division of creative credits on Lee's comics has been disputed, especially in cases of comics drawn by Kirby and Ditko. Although Lee has always effusively praised the Marvel artists, some historians argue[citation needed] that their contribution was greater than for which they are given credit. The dispute with Ditko over Spider-Man has sometimes been acrimonious[citation needed], although he and Lee are formally credited as co-creators in the credits of the 2000s Spider-Man films. The Spider-Man film series currently consists of three superhero films based on the fictional Marvel Comics character of the same name, portrayed by Tobey Maguire. ...


Lee's superheroes captured the imagination of teens and young adults who were part of the population spike known as the post World War II baby boom[citation needed]. Sales soared and Lee realized that he could have a meaningful and successful career in the medium after all[citation needed]. As is often the case with a big war, after the end of World War II many countries around the globe, notably those of Europe, Asia, North America, and Australasia experienced a baby boom. ...


In 1971, Lee indirectly reformed the Comics Code. The US Department of Health, Education and Welfare asked Lee to write a story about the dangers of drugs and Lee wrote a story in which Spider-Man's best friend becomes addicted to pills. The three-part story was slated to be published in Amazing Spider-Man #96-98, but the Comics Code Authority refused it because it depicted drug use; the story context was considered irrelevant. With his publisher's approval, Lee published the comics without the CCA seal. The comics sold well and Marvel won praise for its socially conscious efforts. The CCA subsequently loosened the Code to permit negative depictions of drugs, among other new freedoms. The Comics Code Authority (CCA) is an organization founded in 1954 to act as a de facto censor for American comic books. ... The United States Department of Health, Education and Welfare (also known as HEW) was a cabinet level department of the United States government from 1953 until 1979. ... The seal of the Comics Code Authority, which appears on the covers of approved comic books. ...


Lee also supported using comic books to provide some measure of social commentary about the real world, often dealing with racism and bigotry. "Stan's Soapbox," besides promoting an upcoming comic book project, also addressed issues of discrimination, intolerance or prejudice. In addition, Lee took to using sophisticated vocabulary for the stories' dialogue to encourage readers to learn new words. Lee has justified this by saying, "If a kid has to go to a dictionary, that's not the worst thing that could happen." This box:      Racism has many definitions, the most common and widely accepted is that members of one race are intrinsically superior or inferior to members of other races. ... A bigot is a prejudiced person who is intolerant of opinions, lifestyles, or identities differing from his or her own. ... A vocabulary is a set of words known to a person or other entity, or that are part of a specific language. ... For other uses, see Dictionary (disambiguation). ...


Later career

Lee at the 1973 San Diego Comic Con.
Lee at the 1973 San Diego Comic Con.

In later years, Lee became a figurehead and public face for Marvel Comics. He made appearances at comic book conventions around America, lecturing at colleges and participating in panel discussions, and by now owning a vacation home on Cutler Lane in Remsenburg, New York[16] and, from 1975 to 1980, a two-bedroom condominium on the 14th floor of 220 East 63rd Street in Manhattan.[17] He moved to California in 1981 to develop Marvel's TV and movie properties. He has been an executive producer for, and has made cameo appearances in Marvel film adaptations and other movies. He and his wife bought a home in West Hollywood, California previously owned by comedian Jack Benny's radio announcer, Don Wilson.[18] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (969x1382, 701 KB)Photo of Stan Lee at the 1973 San Diego comic con. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (969x1382, 701 KB)Photo of Stan Lee at the 1973 San Diego comic con. ... Comic-Con International is an annual comic book convention held in San Diego, California. ... Remsenburg, New York is an exclusive village in the Hamptons. ... This article refers to a form of housing. ... Nickname: WeHo Location of Los Angeles County in California and West Hollywood within Los Angeles County Country United States State California County Los Angeles Incorporated 1984  - City Council John Heilman (mayor) Sal Guarriello John J. Duran Abbe Land Jeffrey Prang Area    - City  1. ... Jack Benny (February 14, 1894 in Chicago, Illinois – December 26, 1974 in Beverly Hills, California), born Benjamin Kubelsky, was an American comedian, vaudeville performer, and radio, television, and film actor. ... Don Wilson may refer to any of the following individuals: Don Wilson (baseball player), Major League Baseball player and 1971 National League All-Star Don Wilson, former English cricketer Don Wilson, member of the surf rock band The Ventures Don W. Wilson, Archivist of the United States (1987-1993) Don...


Lee befriended a former lawyer named Peter Paul, who supervised the negotiation of a non-exclusive contract with Marvel Comics for the first time in Lee's lifetime employment with Marvel. This enabled Paul and Lee to start a new Internet-based superhero creation, production and marketing studio, Stan Lee Media, in 1998. It grew to 165 people and went public, but near the end of 2000, investigators discovered illegal stock manipulation by Paul and corporate officer Stephan Gordon.[19] Stan Lee Media filed for bankruptcy in February 2001, and Paul fled to São Paulo, Brazil.[20][21] He was extradited back to the U.S., and pled guilty to violating SEC Rule 10b-5 in connection with trading of his stock in Stan Lee Media.[22][23] Lee was never implicated in the scheme. This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... Stan Lee Media was an internet based creation, production and marketing company that created branded super hero franchises for applications in all media. ... This article is about the city. ... SEC Rule 10b-5 is one of the most important rules promulgated by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, pursuant to its authority granted under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. ...


Some of the Stan Lee Media projects included the animated Web series The 7th Portal where he voiced the character Izayus; The Drifter; and The Accuser. The 7th Portal characters were licensed to an interactive 3-D movie attraction in four Paramount theme parks. The 7th Portal is the name of a webisode series created by Stan Lee. ... In film, the term 3-D (or 3D) is used to describe any visual presentation system that attempts to maintain or recreate moving images of the third dimension, the illusion of depth as seen by the viewer. ... Ferris wheel Amusement park is the more generic term for a collection of amusement rides and other entertainment attractions assembled for the purpose of entertaining a fairly large group of people. ...


In the 2000s, Lee did his first work for DC Comics, launching the Just Imagine... series, in which Lee reimagined the DC superheroes Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern and the Flash. Just Imagine Stan Lees is a comic book published by DC Comics. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... The Flash is a name shared by several DC Comics superheroes. ...


Lee created the risqué animated superhero series Stripperella for Spike TV. In 2004, he announced plans to collaborate with Hugh Hefner on a similar superhero cartoon featuring Playboy Playmates.[citation needed] He also announced a superhero program that would feature Ringo Starr, the former Beatle, as the lead character.[24] Additionally, in August of that year, Lee announced the launch of Stan Lee's Sunday Comics,[25] hosted by Komikwerks.com, where monthly subscribers could read a new, updated comic and "Stan's Soapbox" every Sunday. The column has not been updated since Feb. 15, 2005. Stripperella Stripperella was an adult-oriented American animated television series created by Stan Lee. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Hugh Marston Hefner (born April 9, 1926 in Chicago, Illinois), also referred to colloquially as Hef, is the founder and editor-in-chief of Playboy magazine. ... For other uses, see Playboy (disambiguation). ... Richard Starkey Jr, MBE (born 7 July 1940), known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is an English musician, singer, songwriter and actor, best known as the drummer of The Beatles. ... The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ... Founded in 2000 by Shannon Denton and Patrick Coyle, Komikwerks is a comic publisher dedicated to publishing professional, high-quality, creator-owned, comics, distributed through traditional print means as well as more modern, technically advanced means like the web. ...


In 2005, Lee, Gill Champion and Arthur Lieberman formed POW! (Purveyors of Wonder) Entertainment to develop film, television and video game properties. The first film produced by POW! was the TV movie Lightspeed (also advertised as Stan Lee's Lightspeed), which aired on the Sci Fi Channel on July 26, 2006. POW! president and CEO Champion said in 2005 that Lee was creating a new superhero, Foreverman, for a Paramount Pictures movie, in tandem with producer Robert Evans and Idiom Films, with Peter Briggs hired to collaborate with Lee on the screenplay.[26] POW! (Purveyors of Wonder) Entertainment is an American media production company formed by Gill Champion, Arthur Lieberman and former Marvel Comics editor and publisher Stan Lee in 2001 as a limited liability company. ... A television movie (also TV movie, TV-movie, made-for-TV movie, etc. ... SCI FI (originally The Sci-Fi Channel, sometimes rendered SCI FI Channel when part of a longer phrase) is an American cable television channel, launched on September 24, 1992, specializing in science fiction, fantasy, horror, and paranormal programming. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... Robert Evans (born Robert J. Shapera June 29, 1930 in New York, New York) is an American film producer best known for his work on Rosemarys Baby, Love Story, The Godfather and Chinatown as well as his hedonistic lifestyle and seven marriages. ... Peter Briggs is a British screenwriter, responsible for many high-profile subjects, a number of which have suffered due to bad luck. Briggs hit the screenwriting scene in 1991 (after being a film cameraman for several years) with his ingenious Alien vs Predator screenplay, sold to 20th Century Fox. ...


Lee in 2005 filed a lawsuit against Marvel for his unpaid share of profits from Marvel movies, winning a settlement of more than $10 million.


Marvel, in 2006, commemorated Lee's 65 years with the company by publishing a series of one-shot comics starring Lee himself meeting and interacting with many of his creations, including Spider-Man, Dr. Strange, The Thing, Silver Surfer and Dr. Doom. These comics also featured short pieces by such comics creators as Joss Whedon and Fred Hembeck, as well as reprints of classic Lee-written adventures. Joss Hill Whedon (born Joseph Hill Whedon[3] on June 23, 1964 in New York) is an Academy Award-nominated American writer, director, executive producer, and creator of the well-known television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Angel, and Firefly. ... Fred Hembeck is an American cartoonist. ...


In 2007, POW! Entertainment started a series of direct-to-DVD animated films under the Stan Lee Presents banner. Each film focuses on a new superhero, created by Stan Lee for the series. The first two releases were Mosaic and The Condor. A film that is released direct-to-video (also straight-to-video) is one which has been released to the public on home video formats first rather than first being released in movie theaters. ... Mosaic is an animated action film featuring the voices of Anna Paquin, Kirby Morrow, and Cam Clarke. ... El Condor (also known as The Condor) is a superhero created by Stan Lee for an animated film of the same name. ...


In June 2007, Walt Disney Studios entered into an exclusive multi-year first look deal with Stan Lee and POW! Entertainment. "It's like the realization of a dream. Ever since I was a young boy, Disney represented the best and most exciting film fare to me. ... I look forward with indescribable enthusiasm to being a part of that world and contributing whatever I can to keep the legend alive and growing," said Lee.[27] The Walt Disney Studios refers to several different entities and locations associated with The Walt Disney Company: The Walt Disney Studios is one of the media empires four main operating units. ...


On March 15, 2007, Stan Lee Media's new President Jim Nesfield filed a lawsuit against Marvel Entertainment for $5 billion, claiming that the company is co-owner of the characters that Lee created for Marvel. is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Marvel Entertainment, Inc. ...


On June 9, 2007, Stan Lee Media sued Stan Lee, his newer company, POW Entertainment, subsidary QED Entertainment, and other former Stan Lee Media staff at POW. [28] June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... POW! (Purveyors of Wonder) Entertainment is an American media production company formed by Gill Champion, Arthur Lieberman and former Marvel Comics editor and publisher Stan Lee in 2001 as a limited liability company. ...


Personal life

On December 5, 1947, Lee married Joan Clayton. Joan Lee gave birth to Stan's two daughters: Joan Celia "J.C." Lee in 1950 and Jan Lee, who died three days after delivery in 1953. is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Interests

Lee's favorite authors include H. G. Wells, Mark Twain, Arthur Conan Doyle, William Shakespeare, Charles Dickens, and Harlan Ellison.[29] Herbert George Wells (September 21, 1866 – August 13, 1946), better known as H. G. Wells, was an English writer best known for such science fiction novels as The Time Machine, The War of the Worlds, The Invisible Man, The First Men in the Moon and The Island of Doctor Moreau. ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ... Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, DL (22 May 1859–7 July 1930) was a Scottish author most noted for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the field of crime fiction, and for the adventures of Professor Challenger. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... “Dickens” redirects here. ... Harlan Jay Ellison (born May 27, 1934) is a prolific American writer of short stories, novellas, teleplays, essays, and criticism. ...


Awards and honors

Lee has received several awards for his work, including being formally inducted into the Jack Kirby Hall of Fame in 1995. The Kirby Awards were a short lived set of awards given for achievement in comic books. ...


He is among the celebrities scheduled to receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2008.[30] Buskers perform on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. ...


Fictional portrayals

See also: List of comics creators appearing in comics

Jack Kirby, during his years of working for DC Comics in the 1970s, created the character Funky Flashman as a blatant parody[citation needed] of Stan Lee. With his hyperbolic speech pattern, gaudy toupee, and hip '70s-Manhattan style beard (as Lee sported at the time) this ne'er-do-well charlatan first appeared in the pages of Mister Miracle. . ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Funky Flashman is a fictional character in the DC Universe. ... Mister Miracle is a DC Comics superhero created by Jack Kirby, originally as part of The Fourth World series of titles. ...


Kirby later portrayed himself, Lee, production executive Sol Brodsky, and Lee's secretary Flo Steinberg as superheroes in What If #11, "What If the Marvel Bullpen Had Become the Fantastic Four?", in which Lee played the part of Mister Fantastic. Lee has also made numerous cameo appearances in many Marvel titles, appearing in audiences and crowds at many character's ceremonies and parties, and hosting an old-soldiers reunion in Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos #100 (July 1972). Lee appeared, unnamed, as the priest at Luke Cage and Jessica Jones' wedding in New Avengers Annual #1. He pays his respects to Karen Page at her funeral in the Daredevil "Guardian Devil" story arc,[issue # needed] and appears in The Amazing Spider-Man (June 1977). Sol Brodsky (born c. ... Flo Steinberg was one of the earliest publishers of independent comic books, with her underground / alternative hybrid Big Apple Comix in 1975. ... What If? Vol. ... Mr. ... For the French hip hop artist, see Nikkfurie. ... Luke Cage, born Carl Lucas and also called Power Man, is a fictional superhero appearing in comic books published by Marvel Comics. ... Jessica Campbell Jones is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe, created by writer Brian Michael Bendis and artist Michael Gaydos. ... Karen Page is a fictional character in Marvel Comics Daredevil series. ... For other uses, see Daredevil (comics). ... The Amazing Spider-Man is the title of a comic book published by Marvel Comics, a television program and a daily newspaper comic strip featuring the adventures of the superhero Spider-Man. ...


In Alan Moore's satirical miniseries 1963, based on numerous Marvel characters of the 1960s, Moore's alter ego "Affable Al" parodies Lee and his allegedly unfair treatment of artists. For other persons named Alan Moore, see Alan Moore (disambiguation). ... 1963 is a comic book by esteemed author Alan Moore. ...


The "Young Dan Pussey" stories by Daniel Clowes, collected in Pussey!, feature an exploitative publisher who relies on Lee's gung-ho style and "Bullpen" mythology to motivate his stable of naive and underpaid creators; the stories mainly satirize the state of mainstream comics in the 1990s, but also the subculture of young superhero fans that Lee helped to create. Daniel Gillespie Clowes (born April 14, 1961 in Chicago) is an American author, screenwriter and cartoonist of alternative comic books, including Eightball and Lloyd Llewellyn. ...


In Marvel's 1991 comic book adaptation of game Double Dragon, a character modeled after Stan Lee was specifically created for the comic and is introduced as the father of the protagonists, Billy and Jimmy Lee. The character is only referred by his first name, Stan, although the play on his name is obvious when one considers the Lee brothers' surname. Billy and Jimmy Lee, the protagonists of the Double Dragon series. ...


In X-Play on the cable network G4, the character Roger, dubbed "the fifth-best-thing next to Stan Lee", is a foul-mouthed, perverted stand-up comic parody of Lee. Roger's segments normally consist of him describing details of numerous unspeakable adult encounters, usually involving the wife of another Marvel veteran, Jack Kirby, with each encounter somehow leading to the creation of a well-known Marvel character. X-Play logo X-Play (previously Gamespot TV and Extended Play) is a video game review television show hosted by Adam Sessler and Morgan Webb. ... G4 is an American cable and satellite television channel originally geared toward male viewers aged 12–34, devoted to the world of video games and the video game lifestyle. ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds...


In Marvel's July 1997 "Flashback" event, a top-hatted caricature of Lee as a ringmaster introduced stories which detailed events in Marvel characters' lives before they became superheroes, in special "-1" editions of many Marvel titles. The "ringmaster" depiction of Lee was originally from Generation X #17 (July 1996), where the character narrated a story set primarily in an abandoned circus. Though the story itself was written by Scott Lobdell, the narration by "Ringmaster Stan" was written by Lee himself, and the character was drawn in that issue by Chris Bachalo. Bachalo's depiction of "Ringmaster Stan" was later used in the heading of a short-lived revival of the "Stan's Soapbox" column, which evolved into a question & answer format. The ringmaster is often the most important and most-visible performer in the modern circus. ... Generation X was a Marvel Comics superhero team, a 1990s-era X-Men junior team. ... Scott Lobdell (born 1963) is an American comic book writer. ... Chris Bachalo (born August 23,1965) is an American comic book illustrator known for his quirky, cartoon-like style. ...


In his given name of Stanley Lieber, Stan Lee appears briefly in Paul Malmont's 2006 novel "The Chinatown Death Cloud Peril".


Lee and other comics creators are mentioned in Michael Chabon's 2000 novel about the comics industry The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay. Michael Chabon (born May 24, 1963) is an American author and one of the most celebrated writers of his generation. ... The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay is a 2000 novel by Michael Chabon. ...


Film and television appearances

Marvel film properties

Stan Lee appeared in many (though not all) movies based on Marvel Comic characters he helped create. Image File history File links Fantastic1. ... Image File history File links Fantastic1. ... Willie Lumpkin is a fictional supporting character in the Marvel Universe, who is best known as the mailman of the Fantastic Four in their self-titled comic book. ... Fantastic Four is a 2005 superhero film based on the Marvel Comics comic Fantastic Four. ...

  • In the TV-movie The Trial of the Incredible Hulk (1989), Lee's first appearance in a Marvel movie or TV project is as jury foreman in the trial of Dr. David Banner.
  • Lee has cameo roles in the Fox Broadcasting Company telefilms Generation X (1996) and Nick Fury: Agent of Shield (1998)
  • In X-Men (2000), Lee appears a customer at a hotdog stand on the beach when Senator Kelly emerges naked onshore after escaping from Magneto.
  • He narrated the Troma film Citizen Toxie: The Toxic Avenger Part IV (2001) under the pseudonym "Peter Parker".
  • In Spider-Man (2002), he appeared during Spider-Man's first battle with the Green Goblin, pulling a little girl away from falling debris.
  • In Daredevil (2003), as a child, Matt Murdock, stops Lee from crossing the street and getting hit by a car.
  • In Hulk (2003), he appears walking alongside former TV-series Hulk Lou Ferrigno in an early scene, both as security guards at Bruce Banner's lab. It was his first speaking role in a film based on one of his characters.
  • In Spider-Man 2 (2004), Lee again pulls an innocent person away from danger during Spider-Man's first battle with Doctor Octopus.
  • In Fantastic Four (2005), Lee appears for the first time as a character from the comics, in a role credited as Willie Lumpkin, the mail carrier who greets the Fantastic Four as they enter the Baxter Building.
  • In X-Men: The Last Stand (2006), Lee and Chris Claremont appear as two of Jean Grey's neighbors in the opening scenes set 20 years ago. Lee, credited as "Waterhose man," is watering the lawn when Jean telekinetically redirects the water from the hose into the air.
  • In Spider-Man 3 (2007), Lee appears in a credited role as "Man in Times Square". He stands next to Peter Parker, both of them reading a news bulletin, and commenting to Parker that, "You know, I guess one person can make a difference". He then says his well-known phrase, "'Nuff said".
  • In Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer (2007), Lee appears at Reed Richards and Susan Storm's first wedding as a wedding guest who is turned away by the security guard there because he isn't on the guest list. And he tells the security guard his exact name: Stan Lee.

A television movie (also TV movie, TV-movie, made-for-TV movie, etc. ... The Trial of the Incredible Hulk is a 1989 TV movie sequel to the 1970s Incredible Hulk television series, featuring both the Hulk and fellow Marvel Comics character Daredevil. ... For jury meaning makeshift, see jury rig. ... Incredible Hulk, The Hulk and The Incredible Hulk redirect here. ... The Fox Broadcasting Company, usually referred to as just Fox (the company itself prefers the capitalized version FOX), is a television network in the United States. ... Generation X was a Marvel Comics superhero team, a 1990s-era X-Men junior team. ... X-Men is a 2000 superhero film, based upon the fictional characters the X-Men. ... Robert Kelly is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... Magneto (Eric Magnus Lensherr) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Troma is a film production and distribution company, started by Lloyd Kaufman and Michael Herz that, since 1974, has been producing low budget independent movies non-stop. ... The Toxic Avenger, first released in late 1985, is the most famous movie made by Troma Entertainment, known for producing low budget B-movies with campy concepts. ... Spider-Man is a 2002 superhero film based on the fictional Marvel Comics character Spider-Man. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... The Green Goblin is a Marvel Comics supervillain who is an enemy of Spider-Man. ... Daredevil is a 2003 movie directed by Mark Steven Johnson, who also wrote the screenplay. ... For other uses, see Daredevil (comics). ... Hulk is a 2003 superhero film based on the comic book series The Incredible Hulk published by Marvel Comics. ... Lou Ferrigno at Comicon 2007 Louis Jude Ferrigno (born November 9, 1951[1]) is an American bodybuilder and actor. ... This article is about the 2004 film. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Fantastic Four is a 2005 movie based on the Marvel Comics comic Fantastic Four, directed by Tim Story and released by 20th Century Fox. ... Willie Lumpkin is a fictional supporting character in the Marvel Universe, who is best known as the mailman of the Fantastic Four in their self-titled comic book. ... For other uses, see Fantastic Four (disambiguation). ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Jean Grey-Summers (born Jean Grey) is a fictional superheroine who lives in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... Spider-Man 3 is a 2007 American superhero film written and directed by Sam Raimi, with a screenplay by Ivan Raimi and Alvin Sargent. ...

Warner/DC properties

  • In the original broadcast airing of the Superman: The Animated Series episode "Apokolips... Now! Part 2", an animated Stan Lee is visible mourning the death of Daniel "Terrible" Turpin, a character based on Lee's collaborator Jack Kirby. The scene as well included such Marvel characters as the Fantastic Four, Nick Fury, and Peter Parker, as well as such Kirby DC characters as Big Barda, Scott Free, and Orion. This shot does not appear in the series' DVD.[31]

Superman: The Animated Series is the unofficial title given to Warner Bros. ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds... Big Barda is a fictional superhero published by DC Comics. ... Scott Free is not to be confused with Mister Miracle, the DC Comics character of the same name. ... Orion is a fictional deity published by DC Comics. ...

Other film, TV and video

  • One of Lee's earliest contributions to animation based on Marvel properties was narrating the 1980s Incredible Hulk animated series, always beginning his narration with a self-introduction and ending with "This is Stan Lee saying, Excelsior!" Lee had previously narrated the "Seven Little Superheroes" episode of Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends, which the Hulk series was paired with for broadcast.
  • Lee was executive producer of a 1990s animated TV series, titled Spider-Man: The Animated Series. He appeared, as animated character (and with his voice), in the series finale episode titled "Farewell, Spider-Man" . Spider-Man was teleported into the "real" world where he is a comic book hero. He swings Stan Lee around and drops him off on top of a building.
  • He also voices the character "Frank Elson" in an episode of Spider-Man: The New Animated Series series, broadcasted by MTV in 2003, and titled "Mind Games" (Parts 1 & 2, originally aired in Aug. 15 & 22, 2003).
  • Lee has an extensive cameo in the Kevin Smith film Mallrats. He, once again, plays himself, this time visiting "the" mall to sign books at a comic store. Later, he takes on the role of a sage-like character, giving Jason Lee's character, Brodie Bruce (a longtime fan of Lee's), advice on his love life. He also recorded interviews with Smith for the non-fiction video Stan Lee's Mutants, Monsters, and Marvels (2002).
  • Lee appeared as himself in an extended self-parodying sketch on the episode "Tapping a Hero" of Robot Chicken
  • In The Simpsons episode "I Am Furious Yellow" (April 28, 2002), Lee voices the animated Stan Lee, who is a prolonged visitor to Comic Book Guy's store ("Stan Lee came back?" "Stan Lee never left. I am starting to think his mind is no longer in mint condition.") He asks if Comic Book Guy is the stalker of Lynda Carter - the star of the 70s show Wonder Woman - and shows signs of dementia, such as breaking a customer's toy Batmobile by trying to cram a The Thing action figure into it (claiming that he "made it better"), hiding DC comics behind Marvel comics, and believing that he is the Hulk (and fails trying to become the Hulk, while Comic Book Guy comments he couldn't even change into Bill Bixby). In a later episode, Lee's picture is seen next to several others on the wall behind the register, under the heading "Banned for life".
  • Stan Lee narrates the 2000 video game Spider-Man and the 2001 sequel Spider-Man 2: Enter Electro.
  • Lee has made two appearances as a subject on To Tell the Truth: first in 1970, and again in 2001.
  • Lee voices characters in POW! Entertainment's direct-to-DVD "Stan Lee Presents" line of animated features. In Mosaic he voices the security guard Stanley at Interpol, and in The Condor he voices a candy-store owner whose granddaughter the Condor saves.

Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends is an animated series produced by Marvel Productions Ltd. ... A series finale is the very last installment of a television series, usually a sitcom or drama. ... Spider Wars is the two part series finale of Spider-Man: The Animated Series, consisting of the episodes I Really, Really Hate Clones and Farewell, Spider-Man. This episode deals with Spider-men from parallel universes, trying to stop Spider-Carnage from destroying all reality. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... For other persons named Kevin Smith, see Kevin Smith (disambiguation). ... Mallrats is a 1995 film written and directed by Kevin Smith. ... List of Robot Chicken episodes Tapping a Hero is the 44th episode of Robot Chicken. ... Robot Chicken is an Emmy Award-Winning American stop motion animated television series produced by Stoopid Monkey, ShadowMachine Films, Williams Street, and Sony Pictures Digital, currently airing in the US as a part of Cartoon Networks Adult Swim line-up, in the United Kingdom and Ireland as part of... The Larry Cohen Collection Larry Cohen (born 15 July 1941, Kingston, New York, USA) is an American film producer, director, and screenwriter. ... The Ambulance is a 1990 thriller film written and directed by Larry Cohen. ... Eric Anthony Roberts (born on April 18, 1956, in Biloxi, Mississippi) is an American film and stage actor. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... “I Am Furious Yellow” is the eighteenth episode of The Simpsons’ thirteenth season. ... Jeff Albertson, better known as Comic Book Guy, is a fictional character in the animated series The Simpsons. ... Jeff Albertson, better known as Comic Book Guy, is a fictional character in the animated series The Simpsons. ... For the two Marvel Comics nurse characters, see Night Nurse (comics). ... Wonder Woman is an American television series based on the DC Comics comic book character Wonder Woman (which was co-created by William Moulton Marston and Elizabeth (Sadie) Holloway Marston). ... The Batmobile is the fictional personal automobile of comic book superhero Batman. ... thing, see Thing (disambiguation). ... Zarbon action figure from Dragon Ball Z made by Bandai An action figure is a posable plastic figurine of a character, often from a movie, comic book, video game, or television program. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Incredible Hulk, The Hulk and The Incredible Hulk redirect here. ... Jeff Albertson, better known as Comic Book Guy, is a fictional character in the animated series The Simpsons. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Mark Richard Hamill (born September 25, 1951) is an American actor and voice actor. ... A film that is released direct-to-video (also straight-to-video) is one which has been released to the public on home video formats first rather than first being released in movie theaters. ... Comic-Con International is an annual comic book convention held in San Diego, California. ... The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement is a sequel of The Princess Diaries which was released in 2004. ... The Three Stooges were an American vaudeville and comedy act of the mid 20th century best known for their numerous short subject films. ... Short subject is an American film industry term that historically has referred to any film in the format of two reels, or approximately 20 minutes running time, or less. ... Spider-Man is an action game based upon the Marvel Comics character, Spider-Man. ... Reality television is a genre of television programming in which the fortunes of real life people (as opposed to fictional characters played by actors) are followed. ... Who Wants to Be a Superhero? is a reality show hosted by Stan Lee. ... SCI FI (originally The Sci-Fi Channel, sometimes rendered SCI FI Channel when part of a longer phrase) is an American cable television channel, launched on September 24, 1992, specializing in science fiction, fantasy, horror, and paranormal programming. ... Nipsey Russell, Peggy Cass, Bill Cullen and Kitty Carlisle from the 1969-78 version. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Broadcasting Company or NBC is an American television broadcasting company based in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... “Quiz show” redirects here. ... Identity is a game show, hosted by Penn Jillette and produced by Reveille where contestants can win money by matching 12 strangers one-by-one to phrases about their identities. ... Mosaic is an animated action film featuring the voices of Anna Paquin, Kirby Morrow, and Cam Clarke. ... El Condor (also known as The Condor) is a superhero created by Stan Lee for an animated film of the same name. ... Heroes is an American science fiction drama television series created by Tim Kring. ... Unexpected is the sixteenth episode of the NBC drama series Heroes. ... Hiro Nakamura is a fictional character on the NBC drama Heroes who possesses the ability to teleport, stop time, and travel through time by manipulating the space-time continuum. ...

Audio

  • Audio of Merry Marvel Marching Society record, including voice of Stan Lee
  • Radio Interview With Chris Comer & Rob Ervin April 1, 2005

Radio

  • Lee recorded a public service announcement for Deejay Ra's "Hip-Hop Literacy" campaign

Action figure

At the 2007 Comic-Con International, Marvel Legends introduced a Stan Lee action figure. The body, bearing removable cloth wardrobe, is processed from the mold used for a previously released Spider-Man action figure.[citation needed] Comic-Con International, commonly known as Comic-Con or the San Diego Comic-Con, is an annual multigenre fan convention founded as the Golden State Comic Book Convention and later the San Diego Comic Book Convention in 1970 by Shel Dorf and a group of San Diegans. ... Marvel Legends is an action figure line based on the characters of Marvel Comics, initially produced by Toy Biz then by Hasbro. ... Zarbon action figure from Dragon Ball Z made by Bandai An action figure is a posable plastic figurine of a character, often from a movie, comic book, video game, or television program. ...


Selected bibliography

Comics that Stan Lee has written or co-written include:

The Amazing Spider-Man is the title of a comic book published by Marvel Comics, a television program and a daily newspaper comic strip featuring the adventures of the superhero Spider-Man. ... The Avengers are a fictional superhero team appearing in comic books published by Marvel Comics. ... Captain America is a fictional comic book superhero published by Marvel Comics. ... For other uses, see Daredevil (comics). ... For other uses, see Fantastic Four (disambiguation). ... Journey into Mystery is a comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ... For the French hip hop artist, see Nikkfurie. ... The Silver Surfer as illustrated by Alex Ross on the cover of Marvels #3 (1994). ... Strange Tales was the name of several comic book anthology series that have been published by Marvel Comics. ... Tales to Astonish #44 Tales to Astonish is the name of several comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ... - ==References== - *Tales of Suspense #1-99 (Marvel Comics, January 1959 - March 1968) - *Marvel Select: Tales of Suspense #1 (1996) - - - - - - - - - Categories: | | ... Thor (often called The Mighty Thor) is a superhero appearing in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ a b Lee, Stan, and Mair, George. Excelsior!: The Amazing Life of Stan Lee (Fireside, 2002), p.5. ISBN 0-684-87305-2
  2. ^ FilmReference.com: Stan Lee
  3. ^ Lewine, Edward, "Sketching Out His Past", The New York Times Key Magazine Slide Show (Sept. 4, 2007), Image 1
  4. ^ Lewine, The New York Times, Image 2
  5. ^ StanLeeWeb.com: Biography
  6. ^ Per Timely Comics' wartime editor Vincent Fago in interview, Alter Ego vol. 3, #11 (Nov. 2001)
  7. ^ Lee and Mair, Excelsior, p.22
  8. ^ Lee's account of how he began working for Marvel's predecessor, Timely, has varied. He has said in lectures and elsewhere that he simply answered a newspaper ad seeking a publishing assistant, not knowing it involved comics, let alone his cousin's husband:

    "I applied for a job in a publishing company ... I didn't even know they published comics. I was fresh out of high school, and I wanted to get into the publishing business, if I could. There was an ad in the paper that said, "Assistant Wanted in a Publishing House." When I found out that they wanted me to assist in comics, I figured, 'Well, I'll stay here for a little while and get some experience, and then I'll get out into the real world.' ... I just wanted to know, 'What do you do in a publishing company?' How do you write? ... How do you publish? I was an assistant. There were two people there named Joe Simon and Jack Kirby – Joe was sort-of the editor/artist/writer, and Jack was the artist/writer. Joe was the senior member. They were turning out most of the artwork. Then there was the publisher, Martin Goodman... And that was about the only staff that I was involved with. After a while, Joe Simon and Jack Kirby left. I was about 17 years old [sic], and Martin Goodman said to me, 'Do you think you can hold down the job of editor until I can find a real person?' When you're 17, what do you know? I said, 'Sure! I can do it!' I think he forgot about me, because I stayed there ever since".IGN FilmForce (June 26, 2000): Stan Lee interview part 1 of 5 Vincenzo Francisco Gennaro Di Fago (born November 28, 1914, Yonkers, New York, United States; died June 13, 2002) was an American comic-book artist and writer who served as interim editor of Timely Comics, the Golden Age predecessor of Marvel Comics, while editor Stan Lee did his World War II...

    However, in his above-cited, 2002 autobiography, Excelsior! The Amazing Life of Stan Lee, he says:

    "My uncle, Robbie Solomon, told me they might be able to use someone at a publishing company where he worked. The idea of being involved in publishing definitely appealed to me. ... So I contacted the man Robbie said did the hiring, Joe Simon, and applied for a job. He took me on and I began working as a gofer for eight dollars a week...."

    Joe Simon, in his 1990 autobiography The Comic Book Makers (cited under References, below), gives the account slightly differently: Joe Simon (born 1915) was a comic book author and cartoonist who created or co-created many memorable characters in the Golden Age. ...

    "One day [Goodman's relative known as] Uncle Robbie came to work with a lanky 17-year-old in tow. 'This is Stanley Lieber, Martin's wife's cousin,' Uncle Robbie said. 'Martin wants you to keep him busy.'"

    In an appendix, however, Simon appears to reconcile the two accounts. He relates a 1989 conversation with Lee:

    Lee: I've been saying this [classified-ad] story for years, but apparently it isn't so. And I can't remember because I['ve] said it so long now that I believe it."
    ...
    Simon: "Your Uncle Robbie brought you into the office one day and he said, 'This is Martin Goodman's wife's nephew.' [sic] ... You were seventeen years old."

    Lee: "Sixteen and a half!"

    Simon: "Well, Stan, you told me seventeen. You were probably trying to be older.... I did hire you."

  9. ^ Thomas, Roy, Stan Lee's Amazing Marvel Universe (Sterling Publishing, New York, 2006), p. 11. ISBN-10 1-4027-4225-8; ISBN-13 978-1-4027-4225-5 The line reads: "With the speed of thought, he sent his shield spinning through the air to the other end of the tent, where it smacked the knife out of Haines' hand!" It became a convention starting the following issue, in a Simon & Kirby's comics story depict the following: "Captain America's speed of thought and action save Bucky's life — as he hurls his shield across the room".
  10. ^ Thomas, Stan Lee's Amazing Marvel Universe, pp. 12-13
  11. ^ Lewine, The New York Times, Image 3
  12. ^ Lewine, The New York Times, Images 4-5
  13. ^ Lewine, The New York Times, Images 6-7
  14. ^ Noted comic-book writer Alan Moore described the significance of this new approach in Comic Book Resources (Jan. 27, 2005): "Chain Reaction": "The DC comics were ... one dimensional characters whose only characteristic was they dressed up in costumes and did good. Whereas Stan Lee had this huge breakthrough of two-dimensional characters. So, they dress up in costumes and do good, but they've got a bad heart. Or a bad leg. I actually did think for a long while that having a bad leg was an actual character trait".
  15. ^ Sanderson, Peter. IGN.com (Oct. 10, 2003): Comics in Context #14: "Continuity/Discontinuity"
  16. ^ Lewine, The New York Times, Image 8
  17. ^ Lewine, The New York Times, Image 10
  18. ^ Lewine, The New York Times, Image 11
  19. ^ SEC Litigation Release No. LR-18828, August 11, 2004.
  20. ^ "Stan Lee Holder Peter Paul Flees to South America, According to Cohort's Affidavit", Inside.com, March 5, 2001
  21. ^ "Accusations Against Peter Paul Retracted and Corrected in Court Filing", MarketWatch.com, May 7, 2001
  22. ^ United States Attorney's Office, "Peter Paul, co-founder of Stan Lee Media, Inc., pleads guilty to securities fraud; Fraud scheme caused $25 million in losses to investors and financial institutions", press release, March 8, 2005.
  23. ^ April Witt, "House Of Cards: What do Cher, a Hollywood con man, a political rising star and an audacious felon have in common? Together they gave Bill and Hillary Clinton a night they'll never forget – no matter how hard they may try", The Washington Post, October 9, 2005, p. W10
  24. ^ "Ringo Starr to become superhero", BBC, Aug. 6, 2004. 
  25. ^ "Stan Lee Launches New Online Comic Venture", CBC, Aug. 6, 2004. 
  26. ^ The Hollywood Reporter (March 1, 2005): "Lee, Evans' POW! fields 'Foreverman'", by Liza Foreman
  27. ^ "Disney Studios Signs Exclusive Deal With Stan Lee", Magical Mountain. Retrieved on 2007-06-15. 
  28. ^ June 9: Stan Lee Media, Inc. Files Expected Lawsuit Against Stan Lee (html). Daily Blog. The Comic Reporter. Retrieved on 2007-09-22.
  29. ^ Stan's Soapbox, Bullpen Bulletins, October 1998
  30. ^ JustPressPlay.net (July 22, 2007): "Stan Lee Gets a Star on Walk of Fame!", by Arya Ponto
  31. ^ The original sketches for this scene appear in the book The Krypton Companion (TwoMorrows Publishing)

Roy Thomas (born November 22, 1940, Missouri, United States) is a comic book writer and editor, and Stan Lees first successor as editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics. ... Sterling Publishing Company, Inc. ... For other persons named Alan Moore, see Alan Moore (disambiguation). ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Stan Lee
  • Lee, Stan, Origins of Marvel Comics (Simon and Schuster, 1974; Marvel Entertainment Group, 1997 reissue, ISBN 0-7851-0551-4)
  • Lee, Stan, and Mair, George. Excelsior!: The Amazing Life of Stan Lee (Fireside, 2002) ISBN 0-684-87305-2
  • Ro, Ronin. Tales to Astonish: Jack Kirby, Stan Lee, and the American Comic Book Revolution (Bloomsbury USA, 2005 reissue) ISBN 1-58234-566-X
  • Raphael, Jordan, and Spurgeon, Tom. Stan Lee and the Rise and Fall of the American Comic Book (Chicago Review Press, 2003) ISBN 1-55652-506-0
  • The Unofficial Handbook of Marvel Comics Creators
  • POW! Entertainment (official site)
  • Stan Lee Web (fan site)

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Jean-François Millet Le Semeur (The Sower) Simon & Schuster logo, circa 1961. ...

External links

  • Stan Lee Finding Aid at the University of Wyoming
  • Stan Lee at the Internet Movie Database
  • Stan Lee video at the Peoples Archive (Stan Lee, telling his life story)
  • Framingham, Mass., Daily News (May 5, 2002): "Myth and the Hero's Journey: Big Screen Blockbusters — Star Wars, Spider-Man Tell Timeless Tales", by Chris Bergeron
  • Newsday (April 1, 2007): "Fast Chat: Stan Lee"
  • Stan Lee: Conversations (University Press of Mississippi)
Preceded by
Joe Simon
Marvel Comics Editor-in-Chief
1941–1942
Succeeded by
Vincent Fago
Preceded by
Vincent Fago
Marvel Comics Editor-in-Chief
1945–1972
Succeeded by
Roy Thomas
Preceded by
None
Fantastic Four writer
1961–1971
Succeeded by
Archie Goodwin
Preceded by
Archie Goodwin
Fantastic Four writer
1972
Succeeded by
Roy Thomas
Preceded by
None
Amazing Spider-Man writer
1962–1971
Succeeded by
Roy Thomas
Preceded by
Roy Thomas
Amazing Spider-Man writer
1972–1973
Succeeded by
Gerry Conway
Preceded by
None
Incredible Hulk writer
(including Tales to Astonish Vol. 1 stories)

1962–1968
Succeeded by
Gary Friedrich
Preceded by
Gary Friedrich
Incredible Hulk writer
1968–1969
Succeeded by
Roy Thomas
Preceded by
None
Thor writer
(including Journey into Mystery Vol. 1 stories)

1962–1971
(with Larry Lieber in 1962)
(with Robert Bernstein in 1963)
Succeeded by
Gerry Conway
Preceded by
None
Avengers writer
1963–1966
Succeeded by
Roy Thomas
Preceded by
None
(Uncanny) X-Men writer
1963–1966
Succeeded by
Roy Thomas
Preceded by
?
Captain America writer
(including Tales of Suspense Vol. 1 stories)

1964–1971
Succeeded by
Gary Friedrich
Preceded by
None
Daredevil writer
1964–1969
Succeeded by
Roy Thomas

  Results from FactBites:
 
Stan Lee - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3535 words)
Stan "The Man" Lee (born Stanley Martin Lieber on December 28, 1922, New York, New York) is an American writer, editor, Chairman Emeritus of Marvel Comics and memoirist, who — with several artist co-creators, especially Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko — introduced complex, naturalistic characters and a thoroughly shared universe into superhero comic books.
Lee's superheroes captured the imagination of teens and young adults who were part of the population spike known as the post World War II baby boom.
Stan Lee Media filed for bankruptcy in February 2001, and Paul fled to São Paulo, Brazil.
Talk:Stan Lee - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2513 words)
Stan Lee and Jack Kirby after then both worked on SS for the next several years giving flesh to the character, and because of that Stan Lee is officially credited as a co-creator.
Lee was born 12/28/22, and got his assistant job in mid-to-late 1939 at what he says was 16 1/2, after having graduated high school early (per his autobiography and other sources).
Stan Lee, was born into a jewish family, (originally named Stanley Lieber) but I don't know if he practices or not.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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