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Encyclopedia > Stagecoach
Stagecoach in Switzerland
Stagecoach in Switzerland

A stagecoach is a type of four-wheeled enclosed passenger and/or mail coach, strongly sprung and drawn by four horses, widely used before the introduction of railway transport. Familiar images of the stagecoach are that of a Royal Mail coach passing through a turnpike gate, a Dickensian passenger coach covered in snow pulling up at a coaching inn, a highwayman demanding a coach to "stand and deliver", and a coach being chased by American Indians in a Western movie. The stagecoach was first developed in the British Isles during the 1500s, and only died out in the early 1900s in the United States. Coaching inns opened up throughout Europe to accommodate stagecoach passengers. Shakespeare's first plays were staged at coaching inns such as The George Inn, Southwark. The Royal Mail stagecoach hastened the improvement of the road system in the British Isles through the turnpike trust system. And the stagecoach was vital in the colonization of North America. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1846x1334, 759 KB) Postkutsche, aufgenommen im Innenhof Stockalperpalast Brig, 20. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1846x1334, 759 KB) Postkutsche, aufgenommen im Innenhof Stockalperpalast Brig, 20. ... A British pillar box. ... // Original meaning and etymology The original meaning of the term coach was: a horse-drawn vehicle designed for the conveyance of more than one passenger — and of mail — and covered for protection from the elements. ... Royal Mails logo Royal Mail is the national postal service of the United Kingdom. ... A toll road, turnpike or tollpike is a road on which a toll authority collects a fee for use. ... Charles Dickens used his rich imagination, sense of humour and detailed memories, particularly of his childhood, to enliven his fiction. ... In the United Kingdom, from approximately the mid-seventeenth century for a period of about 200 years, the Coaching Inn was a vital part of the inland transport infrastructure. ... Folk image of a mounted highwayman Highwayman was a term used particularly in Britain during the 17th and 18th centuries to describe robbers who targeted people travelling by stagecoach and other modes of transport along public highways. ... Native Americans are the indigenous peoples from the regions of North America now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska. ... Broncho Billy Anderson, from The Great Train Robbery The Western movie is one of the classic American film genres. ... The George pub, Southwark The pub sign depicts St George slaying a Dragon See also The George Inn (Derby). ... The Hyde Park Toll Gate, London. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from...

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Stagecoaches in Europe

Cabbies in their brightly coloured outfit, in Bucharest, around 1868. The cabbies foul language, curt features and firely temper, have become a motif in Romanian proverbs.

The stagecoach, with seats outside and in, was a public conveyance which was known in England from the 16th century. Until the railway systems of Europe drove the stagecoaches out of business they had regular routes (stages) all over Great Britain and the Continent. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (493x700, 46 KB) Permission PD ÄŒesky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski | Português | RomânÇŽ | Русский | Slovenščina | Српски | Sunda | 简体中文 | 正體中文 | Türkçe | Русский | Українська +/- File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (493x700, 46 KB) Permission PD ÄŒesky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski | Português | RomânÇŽ | Русский | Slovenščina | Српски | Sunda | 简体中文 | 正體中文 | Türkçe | Русский | Українська +/- File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages... Status Capital of Romania Mayor Adriean Videanu, since 2005 Area 228 km² Population (2003) 1,929,615[1] Density 9131. ... Profanity is a word choice or usage which many consider to be offensive. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... World map exhibiting the location of Europe. ...


In Britain stagecoaches became known as "mail coaches", a name generated from their role carrying the mail from 1784. Between 1765 and 1780, large mail coaches known as turgotines were developed in France by borat, Baron de Laune, who was finance minister under Louis XVI. These turgotines, along with improved roads and an increase in the number and frequency of staging posts significantly reduced cross country travel time, sometimes by up to fifty percent (Braudel 1984 fig 32). 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1765 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The finance minister is a cabinet position in a government. ... Louis XVI Louis XVI (August 23, 1754 - January 21, 1793), was King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then King of the French in 1791-1792. ...


The diligence, though not invariably with four horses, was the continental analogue for public conveyance, with other minor varieties such as the Stellwagen and Eilwagen. Stagecoaches could compete with canal boats, but they were rendered obsolete in Europe as the rail network expanded in the 19th century. This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Stagecoaches in the United States

Buffalo soldiers guard a Concord stagecoach. 1869
Buffalo soldiers guard a Concord stagecoach. 1869

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1481x532, 442 KB)Concord stagecoach in the American West, ca. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1481x532, 442 KB)Concord stagecoach in the American West, ca. ... Saddle and acessories of the Buffalo Soldier. ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...

Concord stagecoaches

The first Concord stagecoach was built in 1827. Abbot Downing Company employed leather strap braces under their stagecoaches which gave a swinging motion instead of the jolting up and down of a spring suspension. The company manufactured over 40 different types of carriages and wagons at the wagon factory in Concord, New Hampshire. The Concord Stagecoaches were built so solid that it became known that they didn't break down but just wore out. The Concord stagecoach sold throughout South America, Australia, and Africa. Over 700 Concord stagecoaches were built by the original Abbot Downing Company before it disbanded in 1847. Mark Twain stated in his 1861 book Roughing It that the Concord Stagecoach was like "a cradle on wheels". Naval Battle of Navarino by Carneray 1827 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Official website: www. ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humorist, satirist, writer, and lecturer. ...


The mail service

See also: George Chorpenning; Central Nevada Route; Pony Express; Wells Fargo; Butterfield Stage

At a time when sectional tensions were tearing the United States apart, stagecoaches provided regular transportation and communication between St. Louis, Missouri, in the East and San Francisco, California, in the West. Although the Pony Express is often credited with being the first fast mail line across the North American continent from the Missouri River to the Pacific Coast, stagecoach lines operated by George Chorpenning and the Butterfield Stage predated the Pony Express by nearly three years. George W. Chorpenning Jr. ... The Central Nevada Route (more commonly referred to as the Central Route, Simpsons Route, or the Egan Trail) was a transportation route through the mountains of central Nevada, the heart of the Basin and Range Province. ... Pony Express statue in St. ... A typical Wells Fargo branch, located in Berkeley, California Norwest redirects here. ... The Butterfield Stage, also known as Butterfield Overland Stage and Butterfield Overland Mail, was a stagecoach route in the United States, operating from 1857 to 1861. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Nickname: The City by the Bay; Fog City Location of the City and County of San Francisco, California Coordinates: Country United States of America State California City-County San Francisco  - Mayor Gavin Newsom Area    - City 122 km²  (47 sq mi)  - Land 121. ... Pony Express statue in St. ... George W. Chorpenning Jr. ... The Butterfield Stage, also known as Butterfield Overland Stage and Butterfield Overland Mail, was a stagecoach route in the United States, operating from 1857 to 1861. ...


Butterfield Overland Stage began rolling on September 15, 1858, when the twice-weekly mail service began. A Butterfield Overland Concord Stagecoach was started in San Francisco and another Overland Stage in Tipton, Missouri, they ran over the better roads. As the going got rougher, the passengers and mail were transferred to "celerity wagons" designed for the roughest conditions. Each run encompassed 2,812 miles and had to be completed in 25 days or less in order to qualify for the $600,000 government grant for mail service.


In March of 1860, John Butterfield was forced out because of debt. The beginning of the Civil War forced the Stage Company to stop using the ox bow route and to use the central overland road instead. The Eastern end of the central route, St. Louis to Denver, was taken over by Ben Holladay. Ben Holladay is characterized as a devoted, diligent, enterprising man who became known as the Stagecoach King. At the western end, Denver to San Francisco, the Stage Company was taken over by Wells Fargo due to large debts that Butterfield owed. Wells Fargo commandeered the monopoly over long-distance overland stage coach and mail service with a massive web of relay stations, forts, livestock, men, and stage coaches by 1866. Transcontinental stage-coaching came to an end with the completion of the transcontinental railroad in 1869. The Central Nevada Route (more commonly referred to as the Central Route, Simpsons Route, or the Egan Trail) was a transportation route through the mountains of central Nevada, the heart of the Basin and Range Province. ... A typical Wells Fargo branch, located in Berkeley, California Norwest redirects here. ...


Final American use: Short haul

The last American chapter in the use of the stage coaches took place between 1890 and about 1915. In the end, it was the motor bus, not the train, that caused the final disuse of these horse-drawn vehicles. After the main railroad lines were established, it was frequently not practical to go to a place of higher elevation by rail lines if the distance was short. A town 10 to 25 miles off the mail rail trunk, if it were 1000 or more feet higher, would be very difficult and expensive to serve by rail due to the grade incline. This final portion of the trip, during that 25-year period, was usually served by local stage lines, with a ride of less than a half day being typical. Once the mainline rail grid was in service, the railroad actually stimulated stage line operations well into the 20th century. These were eventually replaced by motorbuses, and so many local private bus lines were early-on called motor-stage lines. By 1918 stage coaches were only operating in a few mountain resorts or western National Parks as part of the "old west" romance for tourists. A tourist boat travels the River Seine in Paris, France Tourism can be defined as the act of travel for the purpose of recreation, and the provision of services for this act. ...


Some bus lines still have the word "stages" in their names, though it's difficult to say whether such usages come from actual corporate descent from predecessor stagecoach operators, or is just a marketing strategy.


A real danger for stagecoach travellers was the threat of robbery by highwaymen or bandits, right up into the early 20th century. Cash payrolls, and bank transfers were regularly carried by these scheduled stage lines, which operated without a telephone service to report robberies. A threat is a declaration of intention to inflict punishment or harm on another. ... Folk image of a mounted highwayman Highwayman was a term used particularly in Britain during the 17th and 18th centuries to describe criminals who robbed people travelling by stagecoach and other modes of transport along public highways. ... Butch Cassidy, a famous outlaw An outlaw, a person living the lifestyle of outlawry, is most familiar to contemporary readers as a stock character in Western movies. ...


See also

// Original meaning and etymology The original meaning of the term coach was: a horse-drawn vehicle designed for the conveyance of more than one passenger — and of mail — and covered for protection from the elements. ... Catherine IIs carved, painted and gilded Coronation Coach (Hermitage Museum) George VI and Queen Elizabeth in a landau with footmen and an outrider, Canada 1939 The classic definition of a carriage is a four-wheeled horse drawn private passenger vehicle with leaf springs (elliptical springs in the 19th century... In the United Kingdom, from approximately the mid-seventeenth century for a period of about 200 years, the Coaching Inn was a vital part of the inland transport infrastructure. ... A toll road, turnpike or tollpike is a road on which a toll authority collects a fee for use. ... Folk image of a mounted highwayman Highwayman was a term used particularly in Britain during the 17th and 18th centuries to describe robbers who targeted people travelling by stagecoach and other modes of transport along public highways. ...

External links

Reference

  • Braudel, Fernand, The Perspective of the World, vol. III of Civilization and Capitalism 1979 (in English 1984)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Stagecoach Group - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1410 words)
Stagecoach was born of deregulation in the British express coach market in the early 1980s, though its roots can be traced back to 1976 when Ann Gloag and her husband set up a small motor caravan and minibus hire business called Gloagtrotter.
Stagecoach also came in for criticism in 2000 over an attempt by Brian Souter to halt the repeal of Section 28 of the Local Govenment Act of 1986, which prohibits 'promotion' of homosexuality in schools.
A Stagecoach London vehicle, operating London Buses route 30, was destroyed in the 7 July 2005 London bombings and a second was targetted 21 July 2005 London bombings, operating London Buses route 26.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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