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Encyclopedia > St. Thomas Becket
Thomas Becket of Canterbury

13th century manuscript illumination, an early depiction of Becket's assassination
'Archbishop and Martyr'
Born December 21, 1117 in London
Died December 29, 1170 in Canterbury
Major shrine Canterbury Cathedral
Feast December 29
Attributes Sword, Being murdered
Patronage Exeter College Oxford; Portsmouth England; secular clergy
Saints Portal

St. Thomas Becket (December 21, 1117December 29, 1170) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1162 to 1170. He engaged in a conflict with King Henry II over the rights and privileges of the Church and was assassinated by followers of the king in Canterbury Cathedral. He is also commonly known as Thomas à Becket, although some consider this incorrect.[1] Image File history File links Thomas_Becket_Murder. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... An illuminated manuscript is a manuscript, often of a religious nature, in which the text is supplemented by the addition of colourful ornamentation, such as decorated initials, borders and the like. ... Assassin and Targeted killing redirect here. ... December 21 is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events May 3 - Merton Priory (Thomas Becket school) consecrated. ... full of cockneys. ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... Events December 29: Assassination of Thomas Beckett, Archbishop of Canterbury, in Canterbury cathedral City of Dublin captured by the Normans According to folklore, the Welsh prince Madoc sailed to North America and founded a colony. ... Statistics Population: 42,258 (2001) Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TR145575 Administration District: City of Canterbury Shire county: Kent Region: South East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Kent Historic county: Kent Services Police force: Kent Police Ambulance service: South East Coast Post office and... Eastern Orthodox shrine Buddhist shrine just outside Wat Phnom. ... Canterbury Cathedral from the southwest. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as that saints day. ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... Symbology of the Saints The Catholic Church has used symbols from its very beginnings. ... In several forms of the church of Christianity, but especially in Roman Catholicism, a patron saint has special affinity for a trade or group. ... Image File history File links Gloriole. ... December 21 is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events May 3 - Merton Priory (Thomas Becket school) consecrated. ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... Events December 29: Assassination of Thomas Beckett, Archbishop of Canterbury, in Canterbury cathedral City of Dublin captured by the Normans According to folklore, the Welsh prince Madoc sailed to North America and founded a colony. ... Arms of the see of Canterbury The Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior clergyman of the established Church of England and symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Events June 3 - Thomas Becket consecrated as Archbishop of Canterbury. ... Events December 29: Assassination of Thomas Beckett, Archbishop of Canterbury, in Canterbury cathedral City of Dublin captured by the Normans According to folklore, the Welsh prince Madoc sailed to North America and founded a colony. ... Henry II of England (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, and as King of England (1154–1189) and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland[citation needed], eastern Ireland, and western France. ... The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church (see Terminology below) is the Christian Church in full communion with the Bishop of Rome, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It traces its origins and sees itself as the same Church founded by Jesus of Nazareth and maintained through Apostolic Succession from the Twelve... This is an incomplete list of persons that were assassinated for political and other reasons, and who have individual entries. ... Canterbury Cathedral from the southwest. ...


One of Thomas's father's rich friends, Richer de L'aigle, was attracted to the sisters of Thomas. He often invited Thomas to his estates in Sussex. There, Thomas learned to ride a horse, hunt, behave, and engage in popular sports such as jousting. When he was 10, Becket received an excellent education in "Civil & Canon Law" at Merton Priory in England, and then overseas at Paris, Bologna, and Auxerre. Richer was later a signer at the Constitution of Clarendon against Thomas. Merton Priory was founded in 1114 by Gilbert a sheriff of Henry I. By 1117 the foundation was colonised by canons from the Augustinian priory at Huntingdon and re-sited close to the River Wandle. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country France Région ÃŽle-de-France Département Paris (75) Subdivisions 20 arrondissements Mayor Bertrand Delanoë  (PS) (since 2001) City Statistics Land... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Auxerre is a commune in the Bourgogne région of France, between Paris and Dijon. ...


Upon returning to the Kingdom of England, he attracted the notice of Theobald, Archbishop of Canterbury, who entrusted him with several important missions to Rome and finally made him archdeacon of Canterbury and provost of Beverley. He so distinguished himself by his zeal and efficiency that Theobald commended him to King Henry II when the important office of Lord Chancellor was vacant. Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right)1 Capital Winchester, then London from 11th century. ... Theobald (died April 18, 1161) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1138 to 1161. ... Arms of Beverley For other uses, see Beverley (disambiguation). ... Henry II of England (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, and as King of England (1154–1189) and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland[citation needed], eastern Ireland, and western France. ... This article or section needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ...


Henry, like all the Norman kings, desired to be absolute ruler of his dominions, both Church and State, and could find precedents in the traditions of the throne when he planned to do away with the special privileges of the English clergy, which he regarded as fetters on his authority. As Chancellor, Becket enforced the king’s danegeld taxes, a traditional medieval land tax that was exacted from all landowners, including churches and bishoprics. This created both a hardship and a resentment of Becket among the English Churchmen. To further implicate Becket as a secular man, he became an accomplished and extravagant courtier and a cheerful companion to the king's pleasures. Young Thomas was devoted to his master's interests with such a firm and yet diplomatic thoroughness that scarcely anyone, except perhaps John of Salisbury, doubted his allegiance to English royalty. The Norman dynasty is a series of four monarchs, who ruled England from the time of the Norman Conquest in 1066, until 1154. ... The Danegeld was an English tribute raised to pay off Viking raiders (usually led by the Danish king) to save the land from being ravaged by the raiders. ... A courtier is a person who attends upon, and thus receives a privileged position from, a powerful person, usually a head of state. ... John of Salisbury (c. ...


King Henry even sent his son Henry, later the "Young King", to live in Becket's household, it being the custom then for noble children to be fostered out to other noble houses. Later that would be one of the reasons his son would turn against him, having formed an emotional attachment to Becket as a foster-father. Henry the Young King was reported to have said Becket showed him more fatherly love in a day than his father did his entire life. Henry, the Young King Henry the Young King (February 28, 1155–June 11, 1183) was the second of five sons of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine. ...


Archbishop Theobald died April 18, 1161, and the chapter learned with some indignation that the king expected them to choose Thomas his successor. That election took place in May, and Thomas was consecrated on June 3, 1162, in accordance with the king's wishes. April 18 is the 108th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (109th in leap years). ... Events Bartholomew Iscanus becomes Bishop of Exeter. ... June 3 is the 154th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (155th in leap years), with 211 days remaining. ... Events June 3 - Thomas Becket consecrated as Archbishop of Canterbury. ...

Contents

Archbishop, 1162

 Becket in a window in Canterbury Cathedral
Becket in a window in Canterbury Cathedral

At once there took place before the eyes of the astonished king and country an unexpected transformation in the character of the new archbishop. Having previously been a merry, pleasure-loving courtier, Becket became an ascetic prelate in simple monastic garb, fully devoted to the cause of the hierarchy and prepared to do his utmost to defend it. Most historians agree that Becket begged the king not to appoint him archbishop, knowing that this would occur, and even warning the king that he could not be loyal to two masters. Henry could not believe that his closest friend would forsake their friendship, and appointed him to the archbishopric anyway—something he came to regret the rest of his life. Image File history File links Tomwindo. ... Canterbury Cathedral from the southwest. ... Ascetic redirects here. ... Look up prelate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


In the schism which at that time divided the Church, Becket sided with Pope Alexander III, a man whose devotion to the same strict hierarchical principles appealed to him, and from whom he received the pallium at the Council of Tours. Alexander III, né Orlando Bandinelli (c. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... In the medieval Roman Catholic church there were several Councils of Tours, that city being an old seat of Christianity, and considered fairly centrally located in France. ...


On his return to England, Becket proceeded at once to put into execution the project he had formed for the liberation of the Church in England from the very limitations which he had formerly helped to enforce. His aim was twofold: the complete exemption of the Church from all civil jurisdiction, with undivided control of the clergy, freedom of appeal, etc., and the acquisition and security of an independent fund of church property.


The king was quick to perceive the inevitable outcome of the archbishop's attitude and called a meeting of the clergy at Westminster (October 1, 1163) at which he demanded that they renounce all claim to exemption from civil jurisdiction and acknowledge the equality of all subjects before the law. The others were inclined to yield, but the archbishop stood firm. Henry was not ready for an open breach and offered to be content with a more general acknowledgment and recognition of the "customs of his ancestors." Thomas was willing to agree to this, with the significant reservation "saving the rights of the Church." But this involved the whole question at issue, and Henry left London in anger. Westminster is a district within the City of Westminster in London. ... October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events Owain Gwynedd is recognized as ruler of Wales. ...


The constitutions of Clarendon

Henry called another assembly at Clarendon for January 30, 1164, at which he presented his demands in sixteen constitutions. What he asked involved the abandonment of the clergy's independence and of their direct connection with Rome; he employed all his arts to induce their consent and was apparently successful with all but the Primate. January 30 is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Count Henry I of Champagne marries Marie de Champagne. ... Catholic Patriarchal (non cardinal) coat of arms Primate (from the Latin Primus, first) is a title or rank bestowed on some bishops in certain Christian churches. ...


Finally even Becket expressed his willingness to agree to the constitutions, the Constitutions of Clarendon; but when it came to the actual signature, he defiantly refused. This meant war between the two powers. Henry endeavoured to rid himself of his antagonist by judicial process and summoned him to appear before a great council at Northampton on October 8, 1164, to answer allegations of contempt of royal authority and malfeasance in the Lord Chancellor's office. The Constitutions of Clarendon were a set of legislative procedures passed by Henry II of England in 1164. ... Northampton Guildhall, built 1861-4, E.W. Godwin, architect Northampton is a large market town and a local government district in central England on the River Nene, and the county town of Northamptonshire, in the English East Midlands region. ... October 8 is the 281st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (282nd in leap years). ... Events Count Henry I of Champagne marries Marie de Champagne. ... This article or section needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ...

Depiction of Thomas Becket's assassination and funeral, from a French casket made about 1180 for Prior Benedict - a witness to the assassination - to take some of his relics to Peterborough Abbey when he became its Abbot
Depiction of Thomas Becket's assassination and funeral, from a French casket made about 1180 for Prior Benedict - a witness to the assassination - to take some of his relics to Peterborough Abbey when he became its Abbot

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2000x2000, 2712 KB) Description Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Thomas Becket Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2000x2000, 2712 KB) Description Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Thomas Becket Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Events April 13 - Frederick Barbarossa issues the Gelnhausen Charter November 18 - France Emperor Antoku succeds Emperor Takakura as emperor of Japan Afonso I of Portugal is taken prisoner by Ferdinand II of Leon Artois is annexed by France Prince Mochihito amasses a large army and instigates the Genpei War between... A relic is an object, especially a piece of the body or a personal item of someone of religious significance, carefully preserved with an air of veneration as a tangible memorial, Relics are an important aspect of Buddhism, some denominations of Christianity, Hinduism, shamanism, and many other personal belief systems. ... Peterborough Cathedral from the south east, circa 1898 Peterborough Cathedral - west prospect in the seventeenth century Peterborough Cathedral is dedicated to Saint Peter, Saint Paul and Saint Andrew, and is very unusual amongst medieval cathedrals in Great Britain because of its triple front (dominated by the statues of the three...

Becket leaves England

Becket denied the right of the assembly to judge him, appealed to the Pope, and, asserting that his life was too valuable to the Church to be risked, went into voluntary exile on November 2, 1164 embarking in a fishing-boat which landed him in France. He went to Sens, where Pope Alexander was, while envoys from the king hastened to work against him, requesting that a legate should be sent to England with Denary authority to settle the dispute. Alexander declined, and when Becket arrived the next day and gave him a full account of the proceedings, he was still more confirmed in his aversion to the king. November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... Events Count Henry I of Champagne marries Marie de Champagne. ... Inside the cathedral of Sens, Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot, c. ...


Henry pursued the fugitive archbishop with a series of edicts, aimed at all his friends and supporters as well as Becket himself; but Louis VII of France received him with respect and offered him protection. He spent nearly two years in the Cistercian abbey of Pontigny, until Henry's threats against the order obliged him to move to Sens again. Louis VII the Younger (French: Louis VII le Jeune) (1120 – September 18, 1180) was King of France from 1137 to 1180. ... The Order of Cistercians (OCist) (Latin Cistercenses), otherwise Gimey or White Monks (from the colour of the habit, over which is worn a black scapular or apron) are a Catholic order of monks. ... Choir of the abbey church of Pontigny Ground plan of the abbey church of Pontigny Pontigny Abbey, founded in 1114 as the second of the four great daughter houses of Cîteaux Abbey, was situated on the River Serein, in the present diocese of Sens and département of Yonne...


Becket regarded himself as in full possession of all his prerogatives and desired to see his position enforced by the weapons of excommunication and interdict. But Alexander, though sympathizing with him in theory, favoured a milder and more diplomatic way of reaching his ends. Differences thus arose between pope and archbishop, which became even more bitter when legates were sent in 1167 with authority to act as arbitrators. Disregarding this limitation on his jurisdiction, and steadfast in his principles, Thomas treated with the legates at great length, still conditioning his obedience to the king by the rights of his order. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The word interdict usually refers to an ecclesiastical penalty in the Roman Catholic Church. ...


His firmness seemed about to meet with its reward when at last (1170) the pope was on the point of fulfilling his threats and excommunicating the king, and Henry, alarmed by the prospect, held out hopes of an agreement that would allow Thomas to return to England and resume his place. However, both parties were holding to their former ground, and the desire for a reconciliation was only apparent. Events December 29: Assassination of Thomas Beckett, Archbishop of Canterbury, in Canterbury cathedral City of Dublin captured by the Normans According to folklore, the Welsh prince Madoc sailed to North America and founded a colony. ...


Assassination

A Seal of the Abbot of Arbroath, depicting murder of St Thomas. Arbroath Abbey was founded 8 years after the death of St Thomas and dedicated to him; it became the wealthiest abbey in Scotland.
Enlarge
A Seal of the Abbot of Arbroath, depicting murder of St Thomas. Arbroath Abbey was founded 8 years after the death of St Thomas and dedicated to him; it became the wealthiest abbey in Scotland.
The burial of Becket
The burial of Becket

The tension between the two men would only be relieved by catastrophe. Passionate words from the angry king (reputedly "Will no one rid me of this turbulent priest?", "Who will rid me of this meddlesome priest?", or even "What a band of loathsome vipers I have nursed in my bosom who will let their lord be insulted by this low-born cleric!") were interpreted as a royal command, and four knights—Reginald Fitzurse, Hugh de Moreville, William de Tracy, and Richard le Breton—set out to plot the murder of the archbishop. On Tuesday, December 29, 1170, they carried out their plan. Becket was murdered inside Canterbury Cathedral itself, in a spot near a door to the monastic cloister, the stairs into the crypt, and the stairs leading up into the quire of the cathedral, where the monks were chanting vespers. Several contemporary accounts of the murder exist; of particular note is that of Edward Grim, who was himself wounded in the attack. Seal on envelope A seal is an impression printed on, embossed upon, or affixed to a document (or any other object) in order to authenticate it, in lieu of or in addition to a signature. ... The ruined Arbroath Abbey, built from local red sandstone. ... Arbroath Abbey, showing distinctive sandstone colouring. ... Image File history File links Burialbecket. ... Image File history File links Burialbecket. ... Apocrypha (from the Greek word απόκρυφα meaning those having been hidden away[1]) are texts of uncertain authenticity or writings where the authorship is questioned. ... Hugh de Morvile, one of the four English knights who perpetrated the murder of Thomas à Becket. ... Sir William de Tracy (Traci) was born after 1135, and died about 1190. ... Categories: Historical stubs ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... Events December 29: Assassination of Thomas Beckett, Archbishop of Canterbury, in Canterbury cathedral City of Dublin captured by the Normans According to folklore, the Welsh prince Madoc sailed to North America and founded a colony. ... Edward Grim was a clerk from Cambridge who was visiting Canterbury Cathedral on Tuesday 29 December 1170 when Thomas Becket was murdered. ...


Most historians agree that Henry didn't actually intend for Becket to be murdered, despite his harsh words. Following his murder, it was discovered that Becket had worn a hairshirt under his archbishop's garments. Soon after, the faithful throughout Europe began venerating Becket as a martyr, and in 1173—barely three years after his death—he was canonized by Pope Alexander. On July 12, 1174, in the midst of the Revolt of 1173–1174, Henry humbled himself with public penance at Becket's tomb (see also St. Dunstan's, Canterbury), which became one of the most popular pilgrimage sites in England until it was destroyed during the Dissolution of the Monasteries (1538 to 1541). It has been suggested that hairshirt be merged into this article or section. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Events Canonization of Saint Thomas à Becket, buried at Canterbury August 9th - Construction starts on the Leaning tower of Pisa Castle at Abergavenny was seized by the Welsh. ... Canonization is the process of declaring someone a saint and involves proving that a candidate has lived in such a way that he or she qualifies for this. ... Alexander III, né Orlando Bandinelli (c. ... July 12 is the 193rd day (194th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 172 days remaining. ... Events Vietnam is given the official name of Annam by China. ... The Revolt of 1173–1174 was a rebellion against Henry II of England by three of his sons, his wife Eleanor of Aquitaine and rebel supporters. ... Penance (via Old French penance from the Latin Poenitentia, the same root as penitence, which in English means repentance, the desire to be forgiven, see contrition; in many languages only one single word is derived) is, strictly, repentance of sins as well as the actual name of the Catholic Sacrament... Church dedicated to St. ... For other uses of the word pilgrimage, see Pilgrimage (disambiguation). ... The Dissolution of the Monasteries, referred to by Roman Catholic writers as the Suppression of the Monasteries, was the formal process during the English Reformation by which King Henry VIII confiscated the property of the monastic institutions in England between 1538 and 1541. ...


In 1220, Becket's remains were relocated from this first tomb to a shrine in the recently completed Trinity Chapel. The pavement where the shrine stood is today marked by a lighted candle. Modern day archbishops celebrate the Eucharist at this place to commemorate Becket's martyrdom and the translation of his body from his first burial place to the new shrine. // The world in 1220 Middle Ages in Europe Fifth Crusade (1217-1221) Events Mongols first invade Abbasid caliphate - Bukhara and Samarkand taken End of the Kara-Khitan Khanate, destroyed by Genghis Khans Mongolian cavalry Dominican Order approved by Pope Honorius III Frederick II crowned Holy Roman Emperor by Pope... Eastern Orthodox shrine Buddhist shrine just outside Wat Phnom. ... For the death metal band from Sweden, see Eucharist (band) The Eucharist or Communion or The Lords Supper, is the rite that Christians perform in fulfilment of Jesus instruction, recorded in the New Testament,[1] to do in memory of him what he did at his Last Supper. ...

The movie version of Jean Anouilh's play Becket
The movie version of Jean Anouilh's play Becket

videotape cover becket File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... videotape cover becket File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Jean Anouilh (June 23, 1910 – October 3, 1987) was a French dramatist. ... Becket or the Honor of God is a Tony Award-winning play written in French by Jean Anouilh. ...

Aftermath and cultural references

Local legends in England connected with Becket arose after his canonization. Though they are typical hagiographical stories, they also display Becket’s particular gruffness. Becket’s Well, in Otford, Kent, is said to have been created after Becket had become displeased with the taste of the local water. Two springs of clear water are said to have bubbled up after he struck the ground with his crozier. The absence of nightingales in Otford is also ascribed to Becket, who is said to have been so disturbed in his devotions by the song of a nightingale that he commanded that none should sing in the town ever again. In the town of Strood, also in Kent, Becket is said to have caused that the inhabitants of the town and their descendants be born with tails. The men of Strood had sided with the king in his struggles against the archbishop, and to demonstrate their support, had cut off the tail of Becket’s horse as he passed through the town. Hagiography is the study of saints. ... Otford is a village and civil parish in the Sevenoaks District of Kent. ... Kent is a county in England, south-east of London. ... A crosier (crozier, pastoral staff) is the stylized staff of office carried by high-ranking Catholic prelates. ... Binomial name Luscinia megarhynchos (Brehm, 1831) This article is about the bird. ... Statistics Population: 33182 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TQ725695 Administration District: Medway Region: South East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Kent Historic county: Kent Services Police force: Kent Police Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: South East Coast Post office and telephone Post town: ROCHESTER...


Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales is set in a company of pilgrims on their way to the shrine of St. Thomas Becket in Canterbury Cathedral. Modern works based on the story of Thomas Becket include T. S. Eliot's play Murder in the Cathedral and Jean Anouilh's play Becket, which was made into a movie with the same title. In the 19th century, Conrad Ferdinand Meyer wrote the novella Der Heilige (The Saint) about Thomas Becket. Ken Follett's novel, The Pillars of the Earth is a fictional account of the struggles between the church and gentry, culminating in the assassination and martyrdom of Becket by Henry's men (the fictionalized account is very accurate - right down to the day of the week, and the wounding of Edward Grim, but adds one of the book's fictional villains as the fifth attacker). An episode of History Bites is set in the aftermath of Becket's assassination. Geoffrey Chaucer (c. ... Canterbury Tales Woodcut 1484 The Canterbury Tales is a collection of stories written by Geoffrey Chaucer in the 14th century (two of them in prose, the rest in verse). ... Canterbury Cathedral from the southwest. ... Thomas Stearns Eliot, OM (September 26, 1888 ? January 4, 1965) was a poet, dramatist and literary critic, whose works, such as The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock, The Waste Land, The Hollow Men, and Four Quartets, are considered defining achievements of twentieth century Modernist poetry. ... Becket in a window in Canterbury Cathedral Murder in the Cathedral is a poetic drama by T. S. Eliot that portrays the assassination of Archbishop Thomas Becket in Canterbury Cathedral in 1170. ... Jean Anouilh (June 23, 1910 – October 3, 1987) was a French dramatist. ... Becket or the Honor of God is a Tony Award-winning play written in French by Jean Anouilh. ... Conrad Ferdinand Meyer (October 11, 1825 - November 28, 1898), a poet and, as he was born in Zürich, is a fellow-townsman of Gottfried Keller. ... A novella is a short novel; a narrative work of prose fiction somewhat longer than a short story but shorter than a novel. ... Ken Follett Ken Follett (born June 5, 1949) is a British author of thrillers and historical novels. ... The cover art of Pillars of the Earth, US edition The Pillars of the Earth is a historical novel by Ken Follett about the building of a cathedral in Kingsbridge (a fictional town located roughly in the area of the present-day town of Marlborough, Wiltshire in England). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Historically, a martyr is a person who dies for his or her religious faith. ... History Bites was a television series on the History Television network that ran from 1998-2003. ...


W. J. Williams has suggested that the story of the murder of Thomas Becket may have inspired the masonic legend of the death of Hiram Abif. This theory included reference to a company of masons in the City of London making a procession to St Thomas's Chapel on his saint's day. He suggests that they may have been an emblematic performance concerning the death of Thomas on that day. They also supported St Thomas's Hospital which was the headquarters of the Knights of St Thomas, a military order, during the crusades which was very close to the Templars. ello moto hgbvfgdxr In late 2005, Thomas Becket was selected as one of the ten "Worst Britons," in a poll by the BBC History Magazine. The Masonic Square and Compasses. ... According to Masonic legend, Hiram Abif (or Abiff) was the master of the construction of King Solomons Temple. ... Coat of arms The City of London is a small area in Greater London. ... The Hospital of St Thomas of Acre was the medieval London headquarters of the Knights of St Thomas. ... The Hospitallers of St Thomas of Canterbury at Acre, usually called the Knights of St Thomas Acon was a Christian Military order. ... A military order is a Christian order of knighthood that is founded for crusading, i. ... The Seal of the Knights Templar This article is about the medieval military order. ... A list of the worst Britons in history, according to ten English historians, was compiled by the BBC History Magazine in late 2005. ... BBC History is a magazine devoted to history enthusiasts of all levels of knowledge and interest. ...


The Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, a nonprofit, nonpartisan, interfaith, legal and educational institute dedicated to protecting the free expression of all religious traditions, took its inspiration and namesake from Thomas Becket.[2] The Becket Fund for Religious Liberty is a nonprofit, nonpartisan, interfaith, legal and educational institute dedicated to protecting the free expression of all religious traditions. ...


Notes and references

  1. ^ He was allegedly given the "à" in his name many years after he died by uncertain sources perhaps with the subliminal intention of alluding to Thomas à Kempis (1380–1471), supposed author of "The Imitation of Christ" (ca. 1418; many other authorships have been ascribed)[citation needed]. However, the Oxford Dictionary of English, the New Oxford Dictionary for Writers and Editors and Chambers Biographical Dictionary all prefer St Thomas à Becket.
  2. ^ Becket Fund
  • Sudeley, The Rt.Hon.The Lord, Becket's Murderer - William de Tracy, in Family History magazine, Canterbury, August 1983, vol.13, no.97, pps: 3 - 36. Becket was a saint
  • Staunton, Michael (2006). Thomas Becket and his Biographers. Woodbridge: The Boydell Press. ISBN 1843832712.

Thomas à Kempis Monument on Mount Saint Agnes in Zwolle. ... The Imitation of Christ (or De imitatione Christi), by Thomas à Kempis is one of the most widely read Christian spiritual books in existence. ... Events May 19 - Capture of Paris by John, Duke of Burgundy September - Beginning of English Siege of Rouen Mircea the Old, ruler of Wallachia dies and is succeeded by Vlad I Uzurpatorul. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Thomas Becket


Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... The Internet History Sourcebooks Project is located at the Fordham University Center for Medieval Studies and is part of the Online Reference Book for Medieval Studies (ORB). ... The story of St George and the dragon is one of many stories of the saints preserved in the Golden Legend. ... Jacobus de Voragine (c. ... William Caxton (c. ...

Preceded by:
Robert of Ghent
Lord Chancellor
1155–1162
Succeeded by:
Geoffrey Ridel
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Medieval to Reformation: Lanfranc | Anselm | Ralph d'Escures | William de Corbeil | Theobald | Thomas Becket | Richard | Baldwin | Reginald Fitz-Jocelin | Hubert Walter | John de Gray | Stephen Langton | Walter d'Eynsham | Richard le Grant | Ralph Neville | John of Sittingbourne | John Blund | Edmund Rich | Boniface | William Chillenden | Robert Kilwardby | Robert Burnell | John Peckham | Robert Winchelsey | Thomas Cobham | Walter Reynolds | Simon Mepeham | John de Stratford | John de Ufford | Thomas Bradwardine | Simon Islip | William Edington | Simon Langham | William Whittlesey | Simon Sudbury | William Courtenay | Thomas Arundel | Roger Walden | Thomas Arundel | Henry Chichele | John Stafford | John Kemp | Thomas Bourchier | John Morton | Thomas Langton | Henry Deane | William Warham
Reformation to present: Thoms Cranmer | Reginald Pole | Matthew Parker | Edmund Grindal | John Whitgift | Richard Bancroft | George Abbot | William Laud | William Juxon | Gilbert Sheldon | William Sancroft | John Tillotson | Thomas Tenison | William Wake | John Potter | Thomas Herring | Matthew Hutton | Thomas Secker | Frederick Cornwallis | John Moore | Charles Manners-Sutton | William Howley | John Bird Sumner | Charles Thomas Longley | Archibald Campbell Tait | Edward White Benson | Frederick Temple | Randall Thomas Davidson | Cosmo Lang | William Temple | Geoffrey Fisher | Michael Ramsey | Donald Coggan | Robert Runcie | George Carey | Rowan Williams

  Results from FactBites:
 
Thomas à Becket - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1759 words)
Becket denied the right of the assembly to judge him, appealed to the Pope, and, feeling that his life was too valuable to the Church to be risked, went into voluntary exile on November 2, embarking in a fishing-boat which landed him in France.
In the town of Strood, also in Kent, Becket is said to have caused that the inhabitants of the town –and their descendants- be born with tails.
St Thomas of Canterbury remains the patron saint of Roman Catholic secular clergy.
St. Thomas Becket (656 words)
Thomas was born in London, England in 1117 or 1118.
Thomas was ordained to the priesthood and consecrated bishop by Henry of Blois, bishop of Winchester.
When Thomas refused, these bishops brought their grievance again to the king who in a spirit of frustration expressed a desire to be rid of this pest, referring to Thomas.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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