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Encyclopedia > St. Paul's School (U.S.)

St. Paul's School

This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ...

Headmaster The Right Reverend Craig B. Anderson
Established 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...1856
School type Private schools, in the United States, Australia, Scotland, and other English_speaking countries, are schools not administered by local or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public funds. ...Private
Religious affiliation The word Episcopal is derived from the Greek επισκοπος epískopos, which literally means overseer; the word however is used in religious terms to mean bishop. ...Episcopal
Location Concord state house Concord is the capital of New Hampshire, a state of the United States of America. ...Concord, State nickname: The Granite State Other U.S. States Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Governor John Lynch Official languages English Area 24,239 km² (46th)  _ Land 23,249 km²  _ Water 814 km² (3. ...NH, The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America¹, the States, or (archaically) Columbia — is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ...USA
Enrollment Apx. 530
Faculty ~100
Campus Rural areas are sparsely settled places away from the influence of large cities and towns. ...Rural
Mascot Pelican
School colors Red (Main), Black, White

St. Paul's School is a private, college_ In the United States a preparatory school, or prep school, is usually a private secondary school (or high school) designed to prepare a student for higher education. ...preparatory, coed A boarding school is a self_contained educational total institution where students not only study but where some or all students may live. ...boarding school in Concord state house Concord is the capital of New Hampshire, a state of the United States of America. ...Concord, New Hampshire, The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America¹, the States, or (archaically) Columbia — is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ...United States, affiliated with the The Episcopal Church may refer to several members of the Anglican Communion, including: Episcopal Church in the United States of America Scottish Episcopal Church Episcopal Church in Jerusalem and the Middle East Episcopal Church of Cuba idk of the Sudan Spanish Reformed Episcopal Church ...Episcopal Church It was founded in 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...1856 by Dr. George Cheyne Shattuck, Jr. The 2,000 acre (8 km²) New Hampshire campus currently serves just over 500 students. The school became co_educational in 1971 and is one of the few 100% residential boarding schools in the U.S. St. Paul's attracts students from all parts of the U.S., and has many students from countries outside the U.S. Many of the students are not Episcopalian.


Millville is the nickname given to the community of buildings that makes up the St. Paul's Campus. It is also a term that is used frequently on campus in reference to the school, especially when the rector addresses the student community regarding on_campus issues.


The school is known for its many longstanding traditions. For example, near the start of the school year—on a sunny, crisp Fall day—the Rector announces an unplanned "Cricket Holiday" in morning Chapel. Classes are cancelled for the day and the students participate in a variety of fun activities, plus rest and relaxation. The Cricket Holiday dates back to the first Rector, Henry Augustus Coit, who preferred cricket over baseball as a "more refined sport." Students who participate in "club" sports (intramural) at St. Paul's are assigned to one of three teams for their entire school careers—"Isthmian," "Delphian" or "Old Hundred." Student also are assigned to one of two "Boat Clubs""—Halcyon or Shattuck. The rivalry of the clubs has lasted for more than a century. If a graduate's descendent attends the school, he or she is assigned to the same clubs.


St. Paul's students once had a close relationship with the Jerry Garcia later in life The Grateful Dead was an American rock band, which was formed in 1965 in San Francisco from the remnants of another band, Mother McCrees Uptown Jug Champions. ...Grateful Dead and other jam bands. Several Jerry Garcia later in life The Grateful Dead was an American rock band, which was formed in 1965 in San Francisco from the remnants of another band, Mother McCrees Uptown Jug Champions. ...Grateful Dead histories make note of the "pyramid dialect" that was born at the school. Phish is not to be confused with Fish. ...Phish played in the Upper on May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ...May 19, 1990 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...1990.


The first Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ...ice hockey game ever played in the United States was played at St. Paul's School. The hockey program has enjoyed a long history with several notable alumni, including Hobey Baker (January 15, 1892 _ December 21, 1918), more fully Hobart Amory Hare Baker, was a noted sportsman. ...Hobey Baker and This article needs cleanup. ...Malcom Gordon. America’s first racquets and Squash racquet and ball Squash is an indoor racquet sport which was, until recently, called Squash Racquets, a reference to the squashable soft ball used in the game (compared with the harder ball used in its parent game Racquets-see below). ...squash courts were built at St. Paul’s in 1883. (The The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America¹, the States, or (archaically) Columbia — is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ...American sport of Racquetball racquet and ball Racquetball is a sport played with racquets and a hollow rubber ball on a special indoor court. ...racquetball is a fusion of Team handball (also known as field handball or Olympic handball) is a team sport where two teams of seven players each (six players and a goalkeeper) pass and bounce a ball trying to throw it in the goal of the opposing team. ...handball and the British game of squash). These first courts were the birthplace of Squash Tennis is a variant of Squash Racquets, but played with balls and racquets that are closer to the equipment used for Lawn Tennis, and with somewhat different rules. ...squash tennis. St. Paul's School built an updated squash facility in 1915, and the community enjoys 10 international squash courts.


St Paul's School won the Princess Elizabeth Challenge Cup in the 2004 A race taking place at Henley Regatta 2004 Henley Royal Regatta is a rowing event held every year on the river Thames by the town of Henley-on-Thames. ...Henley Royal Regatta, beating Winchester College is a public school situated in the city of Winchester in Hampshire, in the south of England. ...Winchester College, St Pauls School - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ...St Paul's School (UK), Pangbourne College is a public school located in the village of Pangbourne in the English county of Berkshire. ...Pangbourne College and Abingdon School. St. Paul's crews train on the School's beautiful "Turkey Pond," which includes a 2,000-meter rowing course.

File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Students Playing Hockey Beneath the Chapel of St. Peter and St. Paul
Students Playing Hockey Beneath the Chapel of St. Peter and St. Paul

Notable alumni

  • Hobey Baker (January 15, 1892 - December 21, 1918), more fully Hobart Amory Hare Baker, was a noted sportsman. ...Hobey Baker Famed Hockey and Football Star
  • Archibald Cox, Jr. ...Archibald Cox The Watergate building. ...Watergate Special Prosecutor
  • Annie Duke (born September 13, 1965 in Concord, New Hampshire) is a professional poker player and sister of poker pro Howard Lederer. ...Annie Duke Tournament Poker Champion
  • Edward Stephen Harkness (1854 _ 1940), was an American philanthropist. ...Edward Harkness Philanthropist
  • Frank T. Griswold III Presiding Bishop, The Episcopal Church may refer to several members of the Anglican Communion, including: Episcopal Church in the United States of America Scottish Episcopal Church Episcopal Church in Jerusalem and the Middle East Episcopal Church of Cuba idk of the Sudan Spanish Reformed Episcopal Church ...Episcopal Church
  • William Randolph Hearst (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper magnate, born in San Francisco, California. ...William Randolph Hearst Newspaper Publisher
  • John Vliet Lindsay (November 24, 1921–December 19, 2000) was an American politician who served as a Congressman (1959_1966) and mayor of New York City (1966_1973). ...John Lindsay Former This is an article about New York City; see also NYC, New York, and New York, New York. ...New York City Mayor
  • John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ...John Kerry U.S. Senator and 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...2004 The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ...Democratic Presidential candidate
  • James W. Kinnear Former President & CEO Texaco, Inc.
  • Howard Lederer (born in Concord, New Hampshire) is a professional poker player and brother of poker pro Annie Duke. ...Howard Lederer Tournament Poker Champion (brother of Annie Duke)
  • Bernard M. Makihara Former CEO Mitsubishi Corporation
  • Rick Moody is an American author of Ice storm (1994). ...Rick Moody, novelist, author of The Ice Storm is a novel by Rick Moody published in 1994, and also a dramatic motion picture released in 1997 and based on the book. ...The Ice Storm
  • J. Pierpont Morgan, Jr. Banker and Philanthropist
  • Rear Admiral Samuel Eliot Morison, USNR (July 9, 1887 _ May 15, 1976) was an American historian, notable for producing both authoritative scholarship and highly readable, an ability recognized with two Pulitzer Prizes. ...Samuel Eliot Morison Author, The Pulitzer Prize is a United States literary award given out each April. ...Pulitzer Prize Winner, Harvard, see Harvard (disambiguation) Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ...Harvard Professor
  • Robert Swan Mueller III (born August 7, 1944) is the current Director of the FBI. Mueller was born in New York City and grew up outside of Philadelphia. ...Robert Mueller Current director of the For other uses of the initials FBI, see FBI (disambiguation). ...FBI
  • Judd Asher Nelson or plain Judd Nelson (November 28, 1959 _ ) is an actor/writer born in Portland, Maine. ...Judd Nelson Actor
  • Catherine Oxenberg (born September 22, 1961) is an American actress, best known for her performance as Amanda Carrington on Dynasty and as a socialite of royal ancestry. ...Catherine Oxenberg Actress
  • Lewis Preston President World Bank
  • William Taylor (1765_1836) was a scholar, linguist and translator of German romantic literature. ...William Taylor Publisher Boston Globe
  • Jim Thompson (born 1906 in Greenville, Delaware) was an American businessman who helped revitalize Thailands silk and textile industry in the 1950s and 1960s. ...Jim Thompson Silk Trader (Thailand)
  • Garretson Beekman Trudeau (born July 21, 1948) is an American cartoonist. ...Garry Trudeau Cartoonist
  • Cornelius Vanderbilt III Cornelius Vanderbilt III (September 5, 1873 _ March 1, 1942) was a distinguished American military officer, inventor, engineer, and yachtsman, and a member of the prominent American Vanderbilt family. ...Cornelius Vanderbilt III
  • Owen Wister American Writer
  • Efrem Zimbalist, Jr. ...Efrem Zimbalist Jr. Film and Television Actor

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