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Encyclopedia > St. Paul's Cathedral
Download high resolution version (768x1044, 807 KB)South face of St. Pauls Cathedral, London - from the avenue leading to the London Millennium Bridge. Photograph © Andrew Dunn, 19 September 2004. See also St Pauls Cathedral Dome St Pauls Cathedral West Portico St Pauls from Paternoster Square File...
Download high resolution version (768x1044, 807 KB)South face of St. Pauls Cathedral, London - from the avenue leading to the London Millennium Bridge. Photograph © Andrew Dunn, 19 September 2004. See also St Pauls Cathedral Dome St Pauls Cathedral West Portico St Pauls from Paternoster Square File... Enlarge
St Paul's Cathedral from the south. Cleaning work has reached the right hand side of the photo
St. Pauls Cathedral from Ludgate Hill. Part of the façade is covered over for repair work. Taken by Adrian Pingstone in November 2004 and released to the public domain. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version...
St. Pauls Cathedral from Ludgate Hill. Part of the façade is covered over for repair work. Taken by Adrian Pingstone in November 2004 and released to the public domain. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version... Enlarge
St Paul's Cathedral from Ludgate Hill is a hill in the City of London, near the old Ludgate, a gate to the City that was taken down, with its attached jail, in 1780. Ludgate Hill is the site of St Pauls Cathedral, traditionally said to have been the site of a Roman temple... Ludgate Hill during cleaning in 2004.

St Paul's Cathedral is a cathedral on Ludgate Hill is a hill in the City of London, near the old Ludgate, a gate to the City that was taken down, with its attached jail, in 1780. Ludgate Hill is the site of St Pauls Cathedral, traditionally said to have been the site of a Roman temple... Ludgate Hill, in the The City of London forms the historic and financial centre of Greater London. It is often referred to as just the City or as the Square Mile (from its area), but never simply as which means Great Fire. Elections The programme examined the preparedness of Britains emergency services for... City of London in London — containing the City of London — is the capital of the United Kingdom and of England and a major world city. With over seven million inhabitants (Londoners) in Greater London area, it is amongst the most densely populated areas in Western Europe. Founded as The city of was... London, and the seat of the The current Bishop of London is Richard John Carew Chartres, who is the 132nd Bishop, and was installed on January 26, 1996. The Diocese of London covers 177 square miles (458 km²), and 17 London boroughs. It is third in importance in the Church of England after the Archdioceses of... Bishop of London. The present building dates from the (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. During this period, the power of England and the United Provinces increased; while that of Spain and Portugal declined. Similarly, the power... 17th century, and is generally reckoned to be London's fourth St Paul's Cathedral, although the number is even higher if every major medieval reconstruction is counted as a new cathedral.

Contents

The previous cathedrals

The see of London dates from 604 CE, and its cathedral has always been situated on Ludgate Hill is a hill in the City of London, near the old Ludgate, a gate to the City that was taken down, with its attached jail, in 1780. Ludgate Hill is the site of St Pauls Cathedral, traditionally said to have been the site of a Roman temple... Ludgate Hill and dedicated to Saint Paul, or Paul of Tarsus, is a Christian saint, who has lent his name to a number of places and things: Buildings and institutions Churches St Pauls Cathedral in London, England, designed by Christopher Wren St Pauls Cathedral (Macau) in Macau St Pauls Cathedral, Melbourne in... St Paul. Ludgate Hill itself has long been associated with religion. It is believed that it was originally the site of an ancient Megalithic tomb, Mane Braz, Brittany A megalith is a large stone which has been used to construct a structure or monument either alone or with other stones. comes from the Ancient Greek and , where he proposed a Celtic stone cult. This completely unfounded connection between druids and megaliths has haunted... megalith and then later a temple dedicated to the goddess Diana was the equivalent in Roman mythology of the Greek Artemis (see Roman/Greek equivalency in mythology for more details). She was the daughter of Jupiter and Latona, and the twin sister of Apollo. Diana was the goddess of the hunt, associated with wild animals and forests. She was also... Diana, in alignment with the Apollo Temple which once stood at Westminster is the name of a city that covers much of central London, located to the west of the ancient City of London, and which has been the principal seat of government in England for more than nine hundred years. Both cities, and much of the surrounding conurbation, are collectively... Westminster.


The first cathedral was built by the The Saxons were a large and powerful Germanic people located in what is now northwestern Germany and the eastern Netherlands (but not in the area that is known as Saxony today). They are first mentioned by the geographer Ptolemy as a people of southern Jutland and present-day Schleswig-Holstein... Saxons in wood. It burned down in 675 CE and was rebuilt, again in wood, ten years later. After this version was sacked by the Viking (disambiguation). The name Viking is a loan from the native Scandinavian term for the Norse seafaring warriors who raided the coasts of Scandinavia, the British Isles, and other parts of Europe from the late 8th century to the 11th century, the period of European history referred to as the... Vikings in 962, the "second" St Paul's built, this time mainly in stone.


The third St Paul's (known as Old St Paul's), was begun by the The Normans (adapted from the name Northmen or Norsemen) were Scandinavian invaders (especially Danish Vikings) who began to occupy the northern area of France now known as Normandy in the latter half of the 9th century. Under the leadership of Hrolf Ganger, who adopted the French name Rollo, they swore... Normans aftered the late Saxon cathedral suffered in a fire of 1087. Work took over two hundred years, and a great deal was lost in a fire in 1136. Nonetheless the roof was once more built of wood, which was ultimately to doom the building. The church was "completed" in 1240 but a change of heart soon led to the commencement of an enlargement programme, which was not completed until 1314. The cathedral was however consecrated in 1300. It was the third longest church in Europe at 596 feet (181 metres) and boasted one of Europe's tallest spires at some 489 feet (149 metres).


By the 16th century the building was decaying. Under Henry VIII King of England and Ireland by Hans Holbein the Younger His Grace King Henry VIII (28 June 1491–28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. He was the second monarch of the... Henry VIII and Edward VI King of England and Ireland Edward VI (12 October 1537–6 July 1553) was King of England and King of Ireland from 28 January 1547 until his death. Edward, the third monarch of the Tudor dynasty, was Englands first Protestant ruler. Although his father and predecessor... Edward VI, the The Dissolution of the Monasteries (referred to by Roman Catholic writers as the Suppression of the Monasteries) was the formal process, taking place between 1536 and 1540, by which King Henry VIII confiscated the property of the Roman Catholic institutions in England and arrogated them to himself, as the new... Dissolution of the Monasteries and Chantries Acts led to the destruction of "papistical" interior ornamentation in the cathedral as well as the is sometimes used as a synonym for monastery. See also: The Cloisters, one of the museums of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. Categories: Stub ... cloisters, charnels, In medieval terms, a crypt (from the Latin crypta and the Greek kryptē) is a stone chamber or vault, usually beneath the floor of a church, usually containing tombs of important people such as saints or saints relics. Typically below ground, churches were occasionally raised above ground level to... crypts, A chapel is a church other than a parish church, often attached to a larger institution such as a college, a hospital, a palace, or a prison. One of the best known is that at Kings College, Cambridge, which has a renowned choir. Another famous chapel is Sistine Chapel... chapels, Eastern Orthodox shrine Buddhist shrine just outside Wat Phnom. A shrine is a holy or sacred place sometimes dedicated towards a certain god, goddess, saint, or similar religious figure. As distinguished from a temple, a shrine is usually located because it houses a particular relic or cult image which is... shrines, Chantry is a shrine or chapel where someone had paid an endowment to have the monks say (or chant) prayers on a fixed schedule for someone who had died. The same term is also used for the endowenent itself, as well as for the monks or priests so endowed. Categories... chantries and various other buildings in the churchyard. Many of these former religious sites in Paul's Yard, having been seized by the crown, were sold as shops and rental properties, especially to printers and booksellers who were often Evangelical has several distinct meanings: In its original sense, it means belonging or related to the Gospel (Greek: euangelion - good news) of the New Testament. In the United States, it usually refers to adherents of Evangelicalism. In Europe, especially in the German speaking countries, Evangelical (evangelisch) is a general designation... evangelical Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. It generally refers to those that separated from the Catholic Church in the Reformation, their offshoots, and those that share similar doctrines or ideologies. It is commonly considered one of the three major branches of Christianity, along with Catholicism and Eastern... Protestants. Crowds were drawn to the northeast corner of the yard, St. Paul's Cross, where open air preaching took place. It was there in the Cross Yard in 1549 that radical Protestant preachers incited a mob to destroy many of the cathedral's interior decorations. In 1561 the spire was destroyed by lightning and it was not replaced; this event was taken by Protestants and Catholics alike as a sign of God's displeasure of the other side's actions.


England's first The word classical has several meanings: Pertaining to the societies of the classical antiquity, ancient Greece or Rome. For example, the Greek and Latin languages, classical architecture and the cult of the Olympian gods. See also Greek mythology and Roman mythology. The study of all the foregoing may bear the... classical architect Sir Inigo Jones, by Sir Anthony van Dyck Inigo Jones (July 15, 1573 - June 21, 1652) is regarded as the first significant English architect. He also made valuable contributions to stage design. Beyond the fact that he was born in the vicinity of Smithfield in central London, the son of a... Inigo Jones added the cathedral's new west front in the 1630s, but there was much defacement and mistreatment of the building by Parliamentarian forces during the Puritan Revolution. "Old St Paul's" was finally ruined in the The Great Fire of London was a major fire that swept through the City of London from September 2nd to September 5th, 1666, and resulted more or less in the destruction of the city. (Before this fire, the fire of 1212, which destroyed a large part of the city, was... Great Fire of London of 1666. While it might have been salvagable, albeit with almost complete reconstruction, a decision was taken to build a new cathedral in a modern style instead. Indeed this had been contemplated even before the fire.


Wren's St Paul's

The task of designing a replacement structure was assigned to Christopher Wren. Sir Christopher Wren (October 20, 1632 _ February 25, 1723) was an English architect of the seventeenth century, famous for his role in the re_building of Londons churches after the Great Fire of London of 1666. Life and Times Wren is particularly known for his design for... Christopher Wren in Events January - The Triple Alliance of 1668 is formed. February 13 Lisbon - Peace Treaty between Afonso VI of Portugal and Carlos II of Spain, by mediation of Charles II of England where it is recognized the legitimity of the Portuguese monarch. Portugal yields Ceuta to Spain. The first Treaty of... 1668, along with over fifty other churches. His first design (to build a replacement on the foundations of the old cathedral) was rejected in Events Samuel Pepys stopped writing his diary. The Mogul Emperor Aurangzeb destroys several Hindu temples and banned the whole religion, so Hindus rebel. Antonio Stradivari makes his first violin Famine in Bengal kills 3 million people The Hanseatic League, formed 400 years ago, holds its final meeting Ottoman Turks take... 1669. The second design, in the shape of a A cross is a geometrical figure consisting of two lines or bars crossing each other at a 90° angle, dividing one or two of the lines in half. It is one of the most ancient human symbols and crosses are symbols of many religions. Crosses as markings The Roman numeral... Greek cross (circa Events January 21 – Highwayman Claude Duval is executed in Tyburn, Middlesex April - Pope Clement X is elected. May 2 - The Hudsons Bay Company is formed in England. May 26 - In Dover, Charles II of England and Louis XIV of France secretly sign a treaty ending hostilities between their... 1670- Events England, France, Munster and Cologne invade the United Provinces, therefore this name is know as ´het rampjaar´ (the disaster year) in the Netherlands. March 15 - Charles II of England issues the Royal Declaration of Indulgence. June 28 - William III of Orange appointed Stadtholder of Holland, Zeeland and Utrecht. Births... 1672) was rejected as too radical, as was a revised design which resulted in the 1:24 scale "Great Model", currently on display in the crypt of the cathedral. The 'warrant' design was accepted in Events January 5 - The Battle of Turckeim August 10 - Building of the Royal Greenwich Observatory began November 11 - Guru Gobind Singh becomes the Tenth Guru of the Sikhs. Cassini discovers Saturns Cassini Division Battle of Fehrbellin Births March 31 - Pope Benedict XIV Emperor Higashiyama of Japan Deaths May 19... 1675 and building work began in June. This design included a smaller dome with a spire on top, however Charles II King of England, Scotland and Ireland Charles II (29 May 1630–6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 30 January 1649 (, he did not pardon the judges and officials involved in his fathers trial and execution. Some of the regicides were... King Charles II had given Wren permission to make "ornamental" changes to the approved design, and Wren took the liberty to radically rework the design to the current form, including the large central dome and the towers at the West end. The cathedral was completed on October 20 is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 72 days remaining. Events 1700-1899 1740 - Maria Theresa takes the throne of Austria. France, Prussia, Bavaria and Saxony refuse to honour the Pragmatic Sanction and the War of the Austrian Succession... October 20, Events March 23 - James Francis Edward Stuart lands at the Firth of Forth Kandahar conquered by Mir Wais In Masuria one third of the population die during the plague September 28: Peter the Great defeats the Swedes at the Battle of Lesnaya J.S. Bach appointed as chamber musician and... 1708, Wren's 76th birthday (although the first service was held on December 2 is the 336th day (337th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 29 days remaining. Events 1409 - The University of Leipzig opened. 1755 - The second Eddystone Lighthouse is destroyed by fire. 1804 - At Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, Napoleon Bonaparte is crowned as... December 2, Events September 20 - The Treaty of Ryswick December 2 – St Pauls Cathedral opened in London Peter the Great travels in Europe officially incognito as artilleryman Pjotr Mikhailov Use of palanquins increases in Europe Christopher Polhem starts Swedens first technical school. The royal castle Tre Kronor in Stockholm... 1697), and has survived until the present day, despite being targeted during The Blitz, a popular English contraction of the German word , it was not an example of lightning war. The Blitz was partially in revenge for a bombing raid the RAF carried out on Berlin, which was itself ordered because a German bomber had accidentally bombed on London. The Blitz against... the Blitz (it was struck by a bomb on October 9 is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in Leap years). There are 83 days remaining. Events 1000 - Leif Ericson discovers Vinland, becoming the first known European to set foot in North America. 1238 - James I of Aragon conquered Valencia and founded the Kingdom of Valencia. 1446 - The... October 9, 1940 was a leap year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). Events January-February January 5 - FM radio is demonstrated to the FCC for the first time. January 6 - World War II: Mass execution of Poles, committed by Germans in the Poznan, Warthegau. January 12 - World War... 1940 but survived).

Photo of St. Pauls Cathedral during the bombing of London. Original caption: Standing up gloriously out of the flames and smoke of surrounding buildings, St. Pauls Cathedral is pictured during the great fire raid of Sunday December 29th. London, 1940. From http://teachpol.tcnj.edu/amer_pol_hist/thumbnail361.html...
Photo of St. Pauls Cathedral during the bombing of London. Original caption: Standing up gloriously out of the flames and smoke of surrounding buildings, St. Pauls Cathedral is pictured during the great fire raid of Sunday December 29th. London, 1940. From http://teachpol.tcnj.edu/amer_pol_hist/thumbnail361.html... Enlarge
St. Paul's Cathedral during the bombing of London.

The cathedral is built of Portland Stone is limestone from the Jurassic period quarried on the Isle of Portland, Dorset. It is well known and has been extensively used thoughout the UK, notably in the rebuilding of London after the Great Fire. It has been and continues to be exported to many countries, and was... Portland stone in a late By Region: Italian Renaissance Northern Renaissance -French Renaissance -German Renaissance -English Renaissance The Renaissance was a great cultural movement which brought about a period of scientific revolution and artistic transformation, at the dawn of modern European history. It marks the transitional period between the end of the Middle Ages and... Renaissance to Prometheus , by Nicolas-Sébastien Adam, 1737 (Louvre): a hectic tour-de-force of violent contrasts of stress, multiple angles and viewpoints, and extreme emotion Germinal ideas of the Baroque can also be found in the work of Michelangelo. Some general parallels in music make the expression Baroque music useful... Baroque style. Its impressive dome was inspired by Interior view, with the nave of the Cattedra in the back St. Peters Basilica ( Italian ), built between 1656 and 1667, in the center of which is a 25.5 meter tall obelisk. The obelisk was moved to its present location in 1585 by order of Pope Sixtus V. The... St. Peter's Basilica in The Roman Colosseum Rome (Italian and Latin ). Romulus and Remus were allegedly sons of the god Mars and the priestess Rhea Silvia, daughter of Numitor, king of Albalonga. The boys were abandoned to save them from the hate of Amulius, a pretender to Albalongas throne, and taken care of... Rome, rising 108 metres (365 feet to the cross at its summit, i.e. one foot for each day of the year), making it a famous London landmark. Wren achieved a pleasing appearance by actually building three domes: the tall outer dome is non-structural but impressive to view, the lower inner dome provides an artistically balanced interior, and between the two is a structural cone which supports the apex structure and the outer dome panelling. During the building of its later stages, Wren was said to have been hauled up to the rafters in a basket to inspect the artwork.

Enlarge
St Paul's Cathedral dome from Paternoster Square is an urban development north of St Pauls Cathedral in the City of London. In 1942, the area, which takes its name from Paternoster row — a street down which the monks of the medieval St Pauls would walk, chanting the Lords Prayer ( by Dame Elisabeth... Paternoster Square

The A cathedral is a Christian church building, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy (such as the Roman Catholic Church or the Anglican churches), which serves as the central church of a bishopric. As cathedrals are often particularly impressive edifices, the term is sometimes also used loosely as a... cathedral runs west to east from the Great West Door. The Romanesque nave of the abbey church of Saint-Georges-de-Boscherville, Normandy, France In Romanesque and Gothic Christian abbey, cathedral and church architecture, the nave ( Medieval Latin ). The height of the nave provided space for clerestory windows above the aisle roofs, which gave light to the interior. The architectural antecedents... nave has three small chapels in the two adjoining In a modern church an aisle is thought of as a row down the middle of the church with a set of pews on each side. In a cathedral-type church building, an aisle is a passageway usually on both sides of the nave and separated from the nave by... aisles - All Souls and St Dunstan's in the north aisle and the Chapel of the On the Orders insignia, St Michael is often depicted subduing Satan. The Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George is a British order of chivalry founded on 28 April 1818 by George, Prince of Wales (later George IV) whilst he was acting as Prince Regent for his... Order of St Michael and St George in the south aisle. The main space of the cathedral is centred under the Dome, it rises 108.4 metres from the cathedral floor and holds three circular galleries - the internal Whispering Gallery, the external Stone Gallery and the external Golden Gallery. The The word choir can refer to: A musical choir. In orchestras, a group of similar instruments is often called a choir. For example, in a symphony orchestra, the group of brass instruments is called the Categories: Disambiguation ... Quire extends to the east of the Dome and holds the stalls for the ] clergy [Latin: the disused ), are the 4 minor orders (ostiary, lectorate, order of exorcists, order of acolytes), the 3 major orders (subdiaconate, diaconate, and presbyterate) and finally the episcopate, which is defined in Catholic doctrine as the fullness of Holy Orders. Minor orders are today mainly a symbolic passage and... clergy and the choir as well as the cathedral's ) or various electrical/electronical devices (see found primarily in houses of worship is optimized for liturgical purposes such as congregational singing, and is probably what comes immediately to the mind of most people when the term pipe organ is mentioned. It is this instrument that is sometimes called the king... organ. The organ was first commissioned in Events February 6 - The colony Quilombo dos Palmares is destroyed. July 27 - A Royal Charter is granted to the Bank of England. December 22 - The Triennial Bill became law. December 28 - Queen Mary II of England died; King William III of England, Scotland and Ireland is now sole ruler after... 1694 and the current instrument is the third biggest in Britain with 7,189 pipes and 138 stops; it is enclosed in an impressive case built by One of the many bookcase carvings Gibbons made for the Wren Library, Cambridge. Master wood carver Grinling Gibbons (4 April 1648-3 August 1721) was born in Rotterdam in the Netherlands, but moved to England in about 1667. An extremely talented wood carver, some have said that he was the... Grinling Gibbons. To the north and south of the dome are the transepts of the North Quire and the South Quire. The cathedral has a very substantial crypt holding over 200 memorials as well as the Commanders Badge of the Order of the British Empire The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is an order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions, in order of seniority: Knight or Dame Grand Cross... OBE Chapel and the Treasury; Christopher Wren. Sir Christopher Wren (October 20, 1632 _ February 25, 1723) was an English architect of the seventeenth century, famous for his role in the re_building of Londons churches after the Great Fire of London of 1666. Life and Times Wren is particularly known for his design for... Christopher Wren was the first person to be interred (in Events February 16 - Louis XV of France attains his majority Births February 24 - John Burgoyne, British general. March 31 - King Frederick V of Denmark April 30 - Mathurin Jacques Brisson, French zoologist and natural philosopher (died 1806) June 5 - Adam Smith, Scottish economist (baptized this day, exact date of birth unknown... 1723). The cathedral has very few treasures, many have been lost and in 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). Events January 10 - Marriage of Napoleon and Josephine is annulled January 20 - Tyrolean rebel leader Andreas Hofer executed March 11 - Napoleon marries Marie-Louise of Austria April 19 - Venezuela achieves home rule: Emparan, Governor of the Captaincy General... 1810 a major robbery took almost all of the remaining precious artefacts.


Within the cathedral are plaques, carvings, monuments and statues dedicated to a wide range of people. The bulk are related to the British military with several lists of servicemen who died in action - the most recent being the , that Iraq was right about the CIA-Kuwait plot. The plot, Blum argues, was in response to increasing Iraqi warnings about American hegemony in the Gulf region, as well as to help stanch expected cuts in defense spending and boost President Bushs domestic popularity. Invasion of Kuwait Iraqi troops... Gulf War. There are special monuments to Lord Nelson Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson (September 29, 1758 – October 21, 1805) was a British admiral who won fame as a leading naval commander. He is famous for his participation in the Napoleonic Wars, most notably in the Battle of Trafalgar, where he lost his life. He became... Admiral Nelson and to the Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington (1 May 1769–14 September 1852) was an Anglo-Irish soldier and statesman, widely considered one of the leading military and political figures of the 19th century. He came from an established family of noblemen – his father was the Earl of Mornington... Duke of Wellington in the south transept and north aisle, respectively. Also remembered are poets, painters, clergy and residents of the local parish. There are also lists of the Bishops and cathedral Deans for the last thousand years.


The cathedral has been the site for many famous funerals, including those of Lord Nelson Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson (September 29, 1758 – October 21, 1805) was a British admiral who won fame as a leading naval commander. He is famous for his participation in the Napoleonic Wars, most notably in the Battle of Trafalgar, where he lost his life. He became... Horatio Nelson, the Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington (1 May 1769–14 September 1852) was an Anglo-Irish soldier and statesman, widely considered one of the leading military and political figures of the 19th century. He came from an established family of noblemen – his father was the Earl of Mornington... Duke of Wellington and The Right Honourable Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill KG, OM, CH, FRS ( November 30, 1874 – January 24, 1965) was a British statesman, best known as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom during World War II. At various times an author, soldier, journalist, and politician, Churchill is generally regarded as... Winston Churchill. The British Royal Family hold most of their important marriages, funerals and other religious and celebratory functions at The Abbey at night, from Deans Yard. Artificial light reveals the exoskeleton formed by flying buttresses. The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster (Westminster Abbey), a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral, is the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English monarchs. It is... Westminster Abbey, but St Paul's was used for the marriage of His Royal Highness The Prince Charles, Prince of Wales (Charles Philip Arthur George Mountbatten-Windsor) (born 14 November 1948), the eldest son of HM Queen Elizabeth II and HRH The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, is Heir Apparent to the thrones of the United Kingdom and over a dozen Commonwealth... Charles, Prince of Wales and Diana, Princess of Wales (Diana Frances Mountbatten-Windsor, née Spencer) ( 1 July 1961 - 31 August 1997), was the first wife of HRH The Prince Charles, Prince of Wales. From her marriage in 1981 to her divorce in 1996 she was Her Royal Highness The Princess of Wales and... Lady Diana Spencer.


Sir Christopher Wren said "I'll dine with some men.
If anyone calls, tell them I'm designing St Pauls."

        A A clerihew is a humorous verse, rather similar to a limerick, that generally uses the name of a well known person at the end of the first or second line. The form was invented by and is named for Edmund Clerihew Bentley. The clerihew is usually whimsical, showing the subject... Clerihew on Christopher Wren. Sir Christopher Wren (October 20, 1632 _ February 25, 1723) was an English architect of the seventeenth century, famous for his role in the re_building of Londons churches after the Great Fire of London of 1666. Life and Times Wren is particularly known for his design for... Christopher Wren


The cathedral is open to the public, though there is a charge for non-worshipping visitors. In 2000 - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes.css; @import /skins/monobook/IE55Fixes.css; @import /skins/monobook/IE60Fixes.css; /**/ 2000 From Wikipedia 2000 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. Popular culture also holds the year 2000 as the first year of the 21st century and the 3rd... 2000, the cathedral began a major Categories: Buildings and structures stubs ... restoration programme, scheduled for completion in 2008 is a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. Predicted events January January 15 _ NASAs MESSENGER spacecraft makes the first of three flybys of Mercury. February February 1 _ Sweden plans to cease analog television broadcasts February 3 _ Super Bowl XLII to be held... 2008, to celebrate the 300th anniversary of its opening. The restoration programme is expected to cost £40 million, and involves not only repair and cleaning of the building, but also improvement of visitor facilities - such as accessibility for the disabled, and provision of additional educational facilities.


St. Paul's in the movies and popular culture

Model of St Pauls Cathedral in London, as seen in Legoland Windsor, 2003-11-01. Copyright © 2003 Kaihsu Tai File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. Click on date to download the file or see the...
Model of St Pauls Cathedral in London, as seen in Legoland Windsor, 2003-11-01. Copyright © 2003 Kaihsu Tai File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. Click on date to download the file or see the... Enlarge
A model of St Paul's Cathedral can be seen in Legoland Windsor, made from Lego bricks. The London Eye in the background is also made of Lego bricks.

Because of its prominent and recognizable form on the skyline, St. Paul's is often used in movies as part of an "establishing" shot to place the viewers in London.


It also features specifically in:

  • Mary Poppins (right, behind) as portrayed in the most famous adaptation of the character. , published 1934 (A good copy of the first edition of this book now sells for over 700 US dollars.) , published 1975 , published 1982 , published 1988 The 1964 film The first book was the main basis for... Mary Poppins, where it is the setting of the song Feed the Birds
  • Thomas Edward Lawrence (August 16, 1888 – May 19, 1935), also known as Lawrence of Arabia, and (apparently, among his Arab allies) Aurens or El Aurens, became famous for his role as a British liaison officer during the Arab Revolt of 1916–1918. His fame as a soldier was... Lawrence of Arabia as the venue of Lawrence's funeral.
  • at the Internet Movie Database Categories: Movie stubs | 2004 films | Animated films | Japanese films | Steampunk ... Steamboy, seen in scenes with the cathedral.
  • (which in turn was based on Dodie Smiths 1956 novel stars Glenn Close as the villainous Cruella De Ville. Unlike the earlier versions of the story, none of the animals talk. There is a sequel, , made in 2000. See also Dalmatian External links 101 Dalmatians at the Internet Movie... 101 Dalmatians, all the 101 dalmatians that have the cathedral.
  • Peter Pan is a fictional character created by J. M. Barrie, and the name of a stage play, a childrens book, and various adaptations of them. The character is a little boy who refuses to grow up, and spends his time having magical adventures. Storyline Spoiler warning: In both... Peter Pan, maybe the cathedral was seen.
  • H.G. Wells' The War of the Worlds, seen?
  • Team America: World Police came from the British television series , Stone said, Trey and I loved that with puppets to be released simultaneously with the real film. A second idea was to create an R-rated version of , neither Bush nor Kerry appear in the film nor are they even... Team America: World Police, maybe the cathedral was seen.
  • The cathedral was prominent in all The classic Thames Television logo (1969 - 1989), featuring a geographically incorrect montage of London landmarks. Thames Television is a British television production company, and between 1968 and 1992 was the weekday ITV company serving London. In 1967 the Independent Television Authority decided to award the London weekday franchise to Associated... Thames Television idents from 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). Events Undated Booker Prize for Fiction is established by Booker plc. 1968 is known as the year of the Prague Spring and also the year of the Paris riots. The ASCII character code is... 1968 until 1992 is a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. Events January January - The Internet Society is formed. January 1 Boutros Boutros-Ghali of Egypt replaces Javier Pérez de Cuéllar of Peru as United Nations Secretary-General George H. W. Bush becomes the first... 1992 and prominent in its logo until 1997 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the Bryant Gumbel signs off for the last time January 8 - Mister Rogers receives a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame January 9 - Yachtsman Tony Bullimore found alive five days after his boat capsized... 1997

See also

  • London has many famous churches and cathedrals, in a density unmatched anywhere else in England. Before the Great Fire of London in 1666, the City of London alone had over 107 churches in an area of only one square mile (2.6 km²). Of the 86 destroyed by the Fire... List of churches and cathedrals of London
  • Paternoster Square is an urban development north of St Pauls Cathedral in the City of London. In 1942, the area, which takes its name from Paternoster row — a street down which the monks of the medieval St Pauls would walk, chanting the Lords Prayer ( by Dame Elisabeth... Paternoster Square
  • 30 St. Mary Axe London is a city with strict limits to building height and with protected views of certain buildings from particular locations (notably St Pauls). Permission to build skyscrapers in the centre of the city is granted on a case-by-case basis. For this reason, tall... Tall buildings in London

External links

  • St Paul's Cathedral homepage (http://www.stpauls.co.uk/)
  • Explore St Paul's Cathedral (http://www.explore-stpauls.net) FREE Online Virtual Tour -- 360° panoramas, movies, photos, music, MS Word files for schools
  • Composition of St Paul's Cathedral (http://www.aiwaz.net/stpauls/)
Download high resolution version (1000x408, 52 KB)The West Portico of St Pauls Cathedral, London. Panorama assembled from three photographs taken by Michael Reeve, 8 June 2002. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. Click on...
The West Portico of St Paul's Cathedral, with the statue of Anne Queen of Great Britain and Ireland Anne (6 February 1665–1 August 1714), became Queen of England and Scotland on 8 March 1702. On 1 May 1707, when England and Scotland combined into a single Kingdom, Anne became the first Sovereign of Great Britain. She continued to reign... Queen Anne, before restoration

  Results from FactBites:
 
St Pauls Cathedral- London, United Kingdom - VirtualTourist.com (1518 words)
Paul's Cathedral is a Renaissance Church and Sir Christopher Wren's masterpiece, which took 35 years to build.
The current Cathedral, started in 1669, is the fourth and was built after a fire destroyed 4/5th of all of London in 1666, destroying 13,200 houses and 89 churches (including the St. Paul's Cathedral).
paul's cathedral is a prominent landmark in central london.
Chinese Architecture: St. Pauls Cathedral, Macau (145 words)
The most dramatic symbol of Macau is the towering facade of the Jesuit church of the Mother of God (Madre de Deus), commonly known as St. Paul's (Sao Paulo).
This was the church of the adjoining St. Paul's college, the first western college in east Asia--where the noted Jesuits Matteo Ricci and Adam Schall and other studied.
A fire that started in the kitchen of the college in 1835, however, destroyed both the college and the church, so that all that remains today is the facade with its marvelous statues and reliefs.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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