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Encyclopedia > St. Patrick's Cathedral, New York
St. Patrick's Cathedral, New York city
(U.S. National Historic Landmark)
View of the cathedral from Rockefeller Center.
View of the cathedral from Rockefeller Center.
Location: Manhattan, New York
Coordinates: 40°45′36″N 73°58′41″W / 40.76, -73.97806Coordinates: 40°45′36″N 73°58′41″W / 40.76, -73.97806
Built/Founded: 1858-78
Architect: James Renwick, Jr.
Architectural style(s): Gothic revival
Designated as NHL: December 8, 1976 [1]
Added to NRHP: December 8, 1976
NRHP Reference#: 76001250
Governing body: Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York

St. Patrick's Cathedral is a decorated Neo-Gothic-style Catholic cathedral in North America. It is the seat of the archbishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, and a parish church, located on the east side of Fifth Avenue between 50th and 51st Streets in midtown Manhattan. It faces Rockefeller Center. For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1944 × 2592 pixel, file size: 3. ... Rockefeller Center is a complex of 19 commercial buildings covering 22 acres between 48th and 51st Streets in New York City. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... This article is about the state. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... James Renwick, Jr. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin San Sebastian Church in Manila, Philippines made entirely of steel. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... St. ... Westminster Hall and its magnificent hammerbeam roof, pictured in the early 18th century. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin San Sebastian Church in Manila, Philippines made entirely of steel. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop. ... St. ... A parish church is the church which acts as the religious centre of a parish, the basic administrative unit of episcopal churches. ... Fifth Avenue redirects here. ... Midtown Manhattan viewed from the World Trade Center. ... Rockefeller Center is a complex of 19 commercial buildings covering 22 acres between 48th and 51st Streets in New York City. ...

Contents

History

Purchase of the Property

The land on which the present cathedral sits was purchased for $11,000 on March 6, 1810, as a site for a school for young Catholic men to be conducted by the Jesuits. This school failed, and in 1813 the land was sold again to Dom Augustin LeStrange, abbot of a community of Trappists (from the original monastery of La Trappe) who came to America fleeing persecution by French authorities. In addition to a small monastic community, they also looked after some 33 orphans. With the downfall of Napoleon in 1814, the Trappists returned to France, abandoning the property. The orphanage was maintained by the Diocese of New York into the late 1800s. (Some of the monks resettled to Canada and eventually founded St. Joseph's Abbey in Spencer. is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... New Melleray Abbey, near Peosta, Iowa. ... St. ...


Construction of the Cathedral

The Diocese of New York, created in 1808, was made an archdiocese by Pope Pius IX on July 19, 1850. On October 6, 1850, Archbishop John Joseph Hughes announced his intention to erect a new cathedral to replace the Old St. Patrick's Cathedral in downtown Manhattan. The "Old Cathedral" had been destroyed by fire in 1866 but was rebuilt and rededicated by 1868. In some Christian churches, the diocese is an administrative territorial unit governed by a bishop, sometimes also referred to as a bishopric or episcopal see, though more often the term episcopal see means the office held by the bishop. ... Pope Pius IX (May 13, 1792 – February 7, 1878), born Giovanni Maria Mastai-Ferretti, reigned as Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from his election in June 16, 1846, until his death more than 31 years later in 1878. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Archbishop John Joseph Hughes (June 24, 1797 - January 3, 1864) was the fourth bishop of the Roman Catholic diocese of New York. ... Saint Patricks Old Cathedral, or Old St. ... The term Downtown Manhattan may have different meanings to different people, especially depending on what part of New York City they live in. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...


The new cathedral was designed by James Renwick, Jr. in the Gothic Revival style. The cornerstone was laid on August 15, 1858, just south of the diocese's orphanage. At that time, midtown Manhattan was far north of the populous areas of New York City. James Renwick, Jr. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin San Sebastian Church in Manila, Philippines made entirely of steel. ... Architectural style is a way of classifying architecture largely by morphological characteristics - in terms of form, techniques, materials, etc. ... Look up cornerstone in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... // An orphanage is an institution or asylum for the care of a child bereaved of both father and mother; sometimes, also, a child who has but one parent living. ... Midtown Manhattan viewed from the World Trade Center. ...


Work was begun in 1858 but was halted during the Civil War and resumed in 1865. The cathedral was completed in 1878 and dedicated on May 25, 1879, its huge proportions dominating the midtown of that time. The archbishop's house and rectory were added from 1882 to 1884, and an adjacent school (no longer in existence) opened in 1882. The Towers on the West Facade were added in 1888, and an addition on the east, including a Lady Chapel, designed by Charles T. Mathews, was begun in 1901. The stained glass windows in the Lady Chapel were designed and made in Chipping Campden, England by Paul Vincent Woodroffe between 1912 and 1930. The cathedral was renovated between 1927 and 1931, when the great organ was installed and the sanctuary enlarged. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The rectory is the title usually given to the building inhabited, or formerly inhabited, by the rector of a parish. ... The chapel dedicated to the Blessed Virgin and attached to churches of large size. ... Strictly speaking, stained glass is glass that has been painted with silver stain and then fired. ... Chipping Campden is a Cotswold town in Gloucestershire, England, famous for its beautiful terraced High Street, dating from the 14th – 17th centuries. ...


The cathedral and associated buildings were declared a National Historic Landmark in 1976.[1][2][3] This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ...


Architectural features

Detail of facade.
Detail of facade.

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 3. ...

  • The cathedral is built of white marble quarried in New York and Massachusetts and can accommodate 2,200 people.
  • The cathedral is bounded by East 51st Street to the north, Madison Avenue to the east, East 50th Street to the south, and Fifth Avenue to the west.
  • The spires rise 330 feet (100 meters) from street level.
  • The windows were made by artists in Chartres, Birmingham and Boston. The great rose window is one of Charles Connick's major works.
  • The St. Michael and St. Louis altar was designed by Tiffany & Co.. The St. Elizabeth altar was designed by Paolo Medici of Rome.
The interior of the cathedral
  • The cathedral's Stations of the Cross won a prize for artistry at the World Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893.
  • The pietà is three times larger than Michelangelo's Pietà. It was sculpted by Araldo Perugi, who immigrated from Carrara, Italy.
  • A bust of Pope John Paul II is located in the rear of the cathedral, commemorating his visit to the city in 1979.
  • Archbishop Francis Spellman, later cardinal, undertook a major renovation of the main altar area of the cathedral in the late 1930s and early 1940s. The bronze baldachino in the sanctuary is part of this work, and the former high altar and reredos that stood there were removed and replaced. The original High Altar of St. Patrick's is now in the University Church of Fordham University at Rose Hill in the Bronx (Spellman's alma mater). Coincidentally, that church, built in the 1830s, is also home to stained glass windows donated by King Louis Philippe of France for the Old St. Patrick's Cathedral downtown when it was originally being built. The windows were installed in the Fordham church when it was discovered that they did not fit in the Old St. Patrick's. Clendenin James Ryan donated the Rose window.
  • In the 1980s, John Cardinal O'Connor undertook further renovation work, most notably the construction of a new stone altar in the middle of the sanctuary, closer and more visible to the congregation. It was built from sections of one of the side altars that was removed to reposition the baptismal font in the north transept.
  • The roof is made from slate from Monson, Maine.

For other uses, see Marble (disambiguation). ... This article is about the state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... A modern spire on the Lancaster University Chaplaincy Centre A spire is a tapering conical or pyramidal structure on the top of a building, particularly a church tower. ... Chartres is a town and commune of France, préfecture (capital) of the Eure-et-Loir département. ... See also Birmingham, USA, and other places called Birmingham. ... Boston redirects here. ... The rose window in Bristol Cathedral, Bristol, England, at the western end of the nave. ... Guido Renis archangel Michael (in the Capuchin church of Sta. ... Tiffany Blue seen here on a Tiffany gift box. ... The 12th Station of the Cross - Jesus dies on the Cross. ... One-third scale replica of The Republic, which once stood in the great basin at the exposition, Chicago, 2004 The World Columbian Exposition (also called The Chicago Worlds Fair), a Worlds fair, was held in Chicago in 1893 to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbuss discovery... A pietà (pl. ... This article is about the most famous Pietà Florentine Pietà (or Deposition), the Rondanini Pietà and the Palestrina Pietà The Pietà (1498–99) by Michelangelo is a marble sculpture in St. ... Bust of Richard Bently by Roubiliac A bust is a sculpture depicting a persons chest, shoulders, and head, usually supported by a stand. ... Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo II, Polish: Jan PaweÅ‚ II) born   []; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of... Francis Joseph Cardinal Spellman (4 May 1889–2 December 1967) was an American prelate, the ninth bishop and sixth archbishop of the Roman Catholic diocese of New York. ... The Grand Master of the Knights Hospitaller at Rhodes under a canopy of estate, on a dais: there is a cushion under his feet A baldachin, or baldaquin (Italian: baldacchino, baldachino), is a canopy of state over an altar or throne, It had its beginnings as a cloth canopy[1... Fordham University is a private, coeducational research university[3] in the United States, with three campuses located in and around New York City. ... For other uses, see The Bronx (disambiguation). ... Alma mater is Latin for nourishing mother. It was used in ancient Rome as a title for the mother goddess, and in Medieval Christianity for the Virgin Mary. ... Louis-Philippe of France (October 6, 1773–August 26, 1850), served as the Orleanist king of the French from 1830 to 1848. ... Saint Patricks Old Cathedral, or Old St. ... John Cardinal OConnor John Joseph Cardinal OConnor, (January 15, 1920 – May 3, 2000) was the eleventh bishop (eighth archbishop) of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, serving from 1984 until his death in 2000. ... Monson is a town located in Piscataquis County, Maine. ...

Organs

The nave of the cathedral
The nave of the cathedral

The original pipe organs, built by George Jardine & Son in the 19th century, have been replaced. The Chancel Organ, in the north ambulatory, was made by the St. Louis firm of George Kilgen & Son, and installed in 1928. It has 3920 pipes. The Grand Gallery Organ, by the same company, was installed in 1930, and has 5918 pipes. [1] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2500x1692, 2147 KB) Inside the St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2500x1692, 2147 KB) Inside the St. ... Links to full descriptions of the elements of a Gothic floorplan are also found at the entry Cathedral diagram. ... The baroque organ in Roskilde Cathedral, Denmark The pipe organ is a musical instrument that produces sound by forcing pressurized air (referred to as wind) through a series of pipes. ... The ambulatory (Med. ...


The combined organs, totaling 177 stops and 9838 pipes, can be played from either of two five-manual consoles installed in the early 1990s to replace the original Kilgen consoles.


Burials

  • The eight past archbishops of New York, six of them cardinals, are buried in a crypt under the former high altar, visible from the entrance to the Lady Chapel in the rear of the cathedral. Four cardinals' galeros are suspended from the ceiling, high above the back of the sanctuary. Cardinal Spellman's galero was also worn by Pope Pius XII when he was a cardinal. The other galeros were worn by Cardinals McCloskey, Farley and Hayes. In 1967, the ceremony of the consistory was revised by Pope Paul VI and therefore no galero was presented to Cardinal Cooke or any of his successors.
  • Pierre Toussaint helped to pay for the reconstruction of old St. Peter's Church (the first Catholic church in New York, founded 1785) after it burned and helped raise money for the construction of the Old St. Patrick's Cathedral. He was interred in the burial grounds at Old St. Patrick's Cathedral. When the cause for his canonization was opened by John Cardinal O'Connor, O'Connor had Toussaint's remains moved from the cemetery of Old St. Patrick's into the crypt below the main altar of the present St. Patrick's Cathedral. The process of canonization of Pierre Toussaint is underway.
    Sanctuary of the Cathedral.
    Sanctuary of the Cathedral.
  • Archbishop Fulton Sheen, most noted as host of a radio show, The Catholic Hour, and a television show, Life Is Worth Living, was an auxiliary bishop of the Archdiocese of New York from 1951 to 1966, while also serving as national director for the Society for the Propagation of the Faith, and was later bishop of the Diocese of Rochester. Upon his death in 1979, he was buried in the crypt of St. Patrick's. He was the first bishop who had not been archbishop of New York to be honored with a tomb in the crypt.
  • Archbishop John Maguire, a longtime official of the archdiocese and coadjutor archbishop of New York under Cardinals Spellman and Terence Cooke, is also interred in the crypt.
  • Also buried in the crypt is Msgr. Michael J. Lavelle, rector of the cathedral in the 1930s. An unverified and possibly apocryphal story frequently told by priests and historians of the Archdiocese of New York is that when then-Archbishop Spellman, who was born and raised in the Archdiocese of Boston, first announced his plans to renovate the cathedral sanctuary, Lavelle, a lifelong New Yorker and rector of the cathedral for many years, said that Spellman would do it "over my dead body." When Lavelle died, Spellman made a special exception to the intended use of the crypt for the Archbishops of New York and had Lavelle entombed there as well.
    The cathedral from the street
    The cathedral from the street

The crypt is not normally open to the public, but because of the presence of the tombs of three candidates for canonization — Pierre Toussaint, Fulton Sheen and Terence Cooke — it is possible to obtain special permission to visit, such as to pray for a special intention. For other uses, see Cardinal (disambiguation). ... Upon the death of a cardinal diocesan bishop, his galero is raised above the sanctuary of his cathedral church. ... Pius XIIs signature Pope Pius XII (Latin: ), born Eugenio Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Pacelli (March 2, 1876 – October 9, 1958), reigned as the 260th pope, the human head of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City, from March 2, 1939 until his death. ... John McCloskey, later John Cardinal McCloskey, (March 10, 1810 - October 10, 1885) born to Irish immigrants, in Brooklyn, was the fifth bishop (second archbishop) of the Roman Catholic diocese of New York. ... John Murphy Farley, later John Cardinal Farley, (April 20, 1842 - September 17, 1918) was the seventh bishop (fourth archbishop) of the Roman Catholic diocese of New York. ... Patrick Joseph Hayes, later Patrick Cardinal Hayes, (November 20, 1867–September 4, 1938) was the eighth bishop (fifth archbishop) of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York. ... // Antiquity Originally, the Latin word consistorium meant simply sitting together, just as the Greek syn(h)edrion (from which the Biblical sanhedrin was a corruption). ... Pierre Toussaint (1766 – June 30, 1853) or Venerable Pierre Toussaint was born a Catholic slave in Haiti. ... This article is about the process of declaring saints. ... John Cardinal OConnor John Joseph Cardinal OConnor, (January 15, 1920 – May 3, 2000) was the eleventh bishop (eighth archbishop) of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York, serving from 1984 until his death in 2000. ... Download high resolution version (768x1024, 445 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (768x1024, 445 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Bishop Sheen was known for his dynamic and thoughtful preaching Archbishop Fulton John Sheen (May 8, 1895 - December 9, 1979) became televisions first preacher of note on the airways in the late 1940s on the DuMont Television Network. ... Life Is Worth Living was a popular inspirational American television series which aired on the DuMont Television Network from 1952 to 1955, and then until 1957 on ABC. Hosted by Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen, the series consisted mainly of Sheen speaking to the camera and discussing moral issues of the... Bishop Richard Pates, current auxiliary bishop of the Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis and the Titular Bishop of Suacia. ... The Society for the Propagation of the Faith is an international association for the assistance by prayers and alms of Catholic missionary priests, brothers, and nuns engaged in preaching the Gospel in non-Catholic countries. ... Archbishop Jerome Hanus of the Archdiocese of Dubuque, Dubuque, Iowa. ... Terence James Cooke, later Terence Cardinal Cooke, (1 March 1921 - 6 October 1983) was an American cardinal, the tenth bishop (seventh archbishop) of the Roman Catholic diocese of New York. ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something. ...


Some notable people whose funeral Masses were said at the cathedral include New York Yankee greats Babe Ruth and Billy Martin, legendary football coach and Fordham University alumnus Vince Lombardi, singer Celia Cruz, United States Senator from New York Robert F. Kennedy, and New York Giants owner Wellington Mara. Special memorial Masses were held at St. Patrick's following the deaths of Andy Warhol, Joe DiMaggio, and author William F Buckley. The New York Yankees are a Major League baseball team based in The Bronx, New York City. ... This article is about the baseball player. ... Alfred Manuel Billy Martin (May 16, 1928 – December 25, 1989) was an American second baseman and manager in Major League Baseball. ... Fordham University is a private, coeducational research university[3] in the United States, with three campuses located in and around New York City. ... Old girl redirects here. ... Vincent Thomas Lombardi (June 11, 1913 – September 3, 1970) was one of the most successful head coaches in the history of American football. ... Celia Cruz (October 21, 1925 – July 16, 2003) was a three-time Grammy Award and four-time Latin Grammy winning Afro-Cuban-American salsa singer who spent most of her career living in New Jersey, and working in the United States and several Latin American countries. ... Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968), also called RFK, was one of two younger brothers of U.S. President John F. Kennedy and served as United States Attorney General from 1961 to 1964. ... This article is about the current National Football League team. ... Wellington Timothy Mara (August 14, 1916 – October 25, 2005) was the co-owner and co-CEO of the NFLs New York Giants. ... Andrew Warhola (August 6, 1928 — February 22, 1987), better known as Andy Warhol, was an American artist who was a central figure in the movement known as Pop art. ... Joseph Paul DiMaggio, born Giuseppe Paolo DiMaggio, Jr. ... William Frank Buckley Jr. ...


St. Patrick's in popular culture

View across Fifth Avenue of the cathedral and Lee Lawrie's colossal bronze statue of Atlas.
View across Fifth Avenue of the cathedral and Lee Lawrie's colossal bronze statue of Atlas.

In December 1989, approximately 5,000 protestors arrived at St. Patrick's Cathedral during Mass in a demonstration directed toward the Roman Catholic Archdiocese's public stand against AIDS education and condom distribution in the public elementary schools, as well as its opposition to abortion.[4] A short documentary about the protest, titled "Stop the Church", was originally scheduled to air on PBS. The documentary was eventually dropped from national broadcast by PBS, but still aired on public television stations in several major cities including New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles.[5] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (525x700, 117 KB) View of St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (525x700, 117 KB) View of St. ... Grill work from Education Building, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania Lee Oscar Lawrie (October 16, 1877 - January 23, 1963) was one of Americas foremost architectural sculptors and a key figure in the American art scene preceding World War II. His work includes the details on the Capitol building in Lincoln, Nebraska and... Lee Lawries colossal bronze Atlas, Rockefeller Center, New York For the Transformers character see King Atlas (Transformers). ... 1989 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 GMO USDA protest Protest expresses relatively overt reaction to events or situations: sometimes in favour, more often opposed. ... For other uses of Mass, see Mass (disambiguation). ... St. ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ... This article is about the male contraceptive device. ... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... PBS redirects here. ... Public broadcasting (also known as public service broadcasting or PSB) is the dominant form of broadcasting around the world, where radio, television, and potentially other electronic media outlets receive funding from the public. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ...


The cathedral, and the gravestones are featured in the Whitlams song When fondness makes the heart grow absent from the album Little Cloud. The Whitlams is an Australian band famous for songs such as No Aphrodisiacand Blow up the Pokies. The Whitlams sound can best be described as Piano rock founded in lyrics of charming cynicism. The bands name is a tribute to former Australian Prime Minister, Gough Whitlam. ... Little Cloud is the sixth studio album by Australian band The Whitlams, released by Black Yak through Warner in 2006. ...


Progressive heavy metal band Savatage's 1991 album Streets: A Rock Opera features a song called "St. Patrick's" during which the main character, DT Jesus, speaks to God in the cathedral demanding an explanation for his misfortunes. Progressive metal is a sub-genre of heavy metal music which blends the powerful, guitar-driven sound of metal with the complex compositional structures, odd time signatures, and intricate instrumental playing of progressive rock. ... Heavy metals, in chemistry, are chemical elements of a particular range of atomic weights. ... Savatage is a progressive heavy metal band founded by the brothers Jon and Criss Oliva in 1979. ... Streets: A Rock Opera is a concept album by Savatage, dealing with the rise and fall of the musician D.T. Jesus. ...


In August 2002, radio shock jocks "Opie and Anthony" broadcast a couple having sex in a vestibule in the cathedral. The DJs were suspended from WNEW-FM a week later and were subsequently cancelled.[6] August 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December // See also: Afghanistan timeline August 2002 Israeli-Palestinian conflict: A Palestinian suicide bombing claims 9 lives, near Safed; there is a shooting attack in Jerusalem, claiming 2; there is an attack upon a settler family, killing... A shock jock is a slang term used to describe a type of radio broadcaster (sometimes a disk jockey) who attracts attention using humor that a significant portion of the listening audience may find offensive. ... Opie (Gregg Hughes, b. ... WWFS is a New York City FM radio station operating at 102. ...


The cathedral appeared on the movie Spider-Man, when Spider-Man saves Mary Jane Watson and leaves her on a roof-garden near the cathedral. Spider-Man is a 2002 American superhero film based on the fictional Marvel Comics character Spider-Man. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... Mary Jane Watson is a fictional supporting character appearing in comic books published by Marvel Comics, primarily in the Spider-Man titles as a friend, love interest and in some continuities wife of the title character (specifically, his alter-ego, Peter Parker). ...


The cathedral features prominently in Nelson DeMille's 1981 novel, Cathedral, and James Patterson's 2007 novel, Step on a Crack. Nelson Richard DeMille (born August 23, 1943) is an American author. ... For other people named James Patterson, see James Patterson (disambiguation) James B. Patterson (born March 22, 1947) is an award-winning American author. ... Step on a Crack is the first novel in the Michael Bennett series by James Patterson and Michael Ledwidge featuring Detective Michael Bennett and his 10 kids. ...


The underground ruins were the setting for the climax of Beneath the Planet of the Apes where Taylor destroyed the Earth with the Alpha-Omega bomb. Beneath the Planet of the Apes (1970), is the first of four sequels to Planet of the Apes (1968), with James Franciscus, Kim Hunter, and Charlton Heston in a supporting role. ...


The cathedral was used as the venue for the wedding of Wilhelmina Slater to Bradford Meade in hit ABC prime-time show, Ugly Betty. Ugly Betty is a Emmy-winning[1] American television comedy-drama series starring America Ferrera, Eric Mabius, Rebecca Romijn and Vanessa Williams. ...


The cathedral ranked 11th out of 150 buildings in the recent list of America's Favorite Architecture. [7] 17499


See also

...

References

  1. ^ a b St. Patrick's Cathedral, Lady Chapel, Rectory and Cardinal's Residence. National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service (2007-09-18).
  2. ^ [http://pdfhost.focus.nps.gov/docs/NHLS/Text/76001250.pdf "St. Patrick's Cathedral, Lady Chapel, Rectory, and Cardinal's Residence". August 1976, by Carolyn PittsPDF (368 KiB) National Register of Historic Places Inventory-Nomination]. National Park Service (1976-08).
  3. ^ [http://pdfhost.focus.nps.gov/docs/NHLS/Photos/76001250.pdf St. Patrick's Cathedral, Lady Chapel, Rectory, and Cardinal's Residence--Accompanying 1 photo, exterior of church under construction.PDF (193 KiB) National Register of Historic Places Inventory-Nomination]. National Park Service (1976-08).
  4. ^ ACT UP. 10 Year Anniversary of "Stop the Church" Accessed 4 July 2007.
  5. ^ Steinfels, Peter. (September 13, 1991) Channel 13 to Show Film on AIDS Protest New York Times. Accessed 4 July 2007.
  6. ^ The Smoking Gun: Archive
  7. ^ FavoriteArchitecture.org

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
  • St. Patrick's Cathedral, New York is at coordinates 40°45′31″N 73°58′35″W / 40.7586, -73.9763 (St. Patrick's Cathedral, New York)Coordinates: 40°45′31″N 73°58′35″W / 40.7586, -73.9763 (St. Patrick's Cathedral, New York)
Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

 
 

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