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Encyclopedia > St. Olaf College
St. Olaf College

Motto: Fram! Fram! Kristmenn, Krossmenn
(Adapted from the Old Norse battle cry of St. Olav, King of Norway: "Forward! Forward! Men of Christ, Men of the Cross")
Established: 1874
Type: Private liberal arts college
Endowment: $315.5 Million [1]
President: David R. Anderson '74, Ph.D.
Students: 3007 undergraduates (approximation)
Location: Northfield, Minnesota, USA
Campus: 3.72 km² (920 acres)[1]
Colors: Black and Old Gold
Nickname: "Oles" (Oh'-lees)
Mascot: St. Olaf Lion
Affiliations: MIAC, ELCA.
Website: www.stolaf.edu

St. Olaf College is a coeducational, residential, four-year private liberal arts college in Northfield, Minnesota, affiliated with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA). It was founded in 1874 by a group of Norwegian-American immigrant pastors and farmers, led by Pastor Bernt Julius Muus. Image File history File links Source:http://www. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... Olaf II Haraldsson (995 – July 29, 1030), king from 1015–1028, (known during his lifetime as the Stout or Thick (Olav Digre) and after his canonization as Saint Olaf), was born in the year in which Olaf Tryggvason came to Norway. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... Northfield is a city in Rice County, Minnesota. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... The Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (MIAC) is an College Athletic Conference which competes in the NCAAs Division III. As the name implies, member schools are located in the state of Minnesota; also, all of the member schools are private, with all but two having a religious affiliation. ... The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) is a mainline Protestant denomination headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... Northfield is a city in Rice County, Minnesota. ... The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) is a mainline Protestant denomination headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. ... Norwegian Americans or (Norwegian norskamerikaner) are an ethnic group in the United States. ... Bernt Julius Muus (1832-1900) led a group of Norwegian-American immigrant pastors and farmers, to found St. ...


An average of six St. Olaf students are awarded the Fulbright Scholarship each year. Additionally, the college has produced nine Rhodes Scholars since 1910, including two in 2007.[2] The Fulbright Program is program of educational grants (Fulbright Fellowships) sponsored by the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the United States Department of State. ... Rhodes House in Oxford Rhodes Scholarships were created by Cecil John Rhodes. ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


St. Olaf ranks as one of the top 20 small colleges (those with 5,000 or fewer students) for the number of students who go on to serve in the Peace Corps. It has been suggested that Crisis corps be merged into this article or section. ...


St. Olaf College is listed in Loren Pope's Colleges That Change Lives. Loren Pope is a nationally renown college advisor with several national publicatons on colleges and universities in the United States. ... Colleges That Change Lives (Penguin, 2000) is a best-selling book by nationally renowned college advisor Loren Pope. ...

Contents

History of the college

Founding of the college

Many Norwegian immigrants arrived in Rice County, Minnesota, and the surrounding area in the late 19th century. With nearly all the immigrants being Lutheran Christians, they desired a non-secular post-secondary institution in the Lutheran tradition that offered classes in all subjects in both Norwegian and English. The catalyst for founding St. Olaf was the Reverend Bernt Julius Muus, and he sought out the help of the Rev. N.A. Quammen and H. Thorson. Together they petitioned their parishes and others to raise money in order to buy a plot of land on which to build this new institution. The three men succeeded in receiving around $10,000 in pledges, and thus went on to form a corporation and to buy a plot of land and four buildings (old Northfield schoolhouses) for accommodations for the school. The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... This article is about the religous people known as Christians. ... Post-secondary education is a form of secondary education that is taken after first attending a secondary school, such as a high school. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Bernt Julius Muus (1832-1900) led a group of Norwegian-American immigrant pastors and farmers, to found St. ... For other uses, see Corporation (disambiguation). ... Northfield is a city in Rice County, Minnesota. ...


St. Olaf, then called St. Olaf's School, opened on January 8, 1875 at its first site under the leadership of its first president, Thorbjorn Mohn. In 1887 the Manitou Messenger was founded as a campus magazine and has since evolved into the college's student newspaper. is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


Overview of the campus

Old Main
Old Main
The center of St. Olaf's campus.
The center of St. Olaf's campus.
St. Olaf's wind turbine, which directly powers one-third of the campus.

Ecology and sustainability are top priorities on the 300-acre (1.2 km²) St. Olaf campus, which includes woodland, prairie and wetlands. The college also owns 600 adjacent acres of no-till farmland. The newest landmark on campus is the 350-foot (107 m) tall, 1.6 megawatt wind turbine that began generating one third of the college’s electricity in fall 2006. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 687 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,340 × 1,170 pixels, file size: 183 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 687 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,340 × 1,170 pixels, file size: 183 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1894x1263, 1321 KB) Summary Taken by Daniel Edwins on top of Larson Hall at St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1894x1263, 1321 KB) Summary Taken by Daniel Edwins on top of Larson Hall at St. ... Image File history File links StOlafTurbine1WEB.jpg‎ A photo of the 1. ... Image File history File links StOlafTurbine1WEB.jpg‎ A photo of the 1. ... The Earth Day flag includes a NASA photo. ...


A new Science Complex is scheduled to open in fall 2008. It will join some 14 academic and administrative buildings and 11 residence halls spread across the "Manitou Heights" hilltop on the western edge of Northfield. Many St. Olaf students also live in 18 “honor” houses on the campus periphery. These home-like residences offer students the chance to develop personal interests through local volunteer work or through such organizations as Jewish Student Outreach, the Story House and St. Olaf Cancer Connection. Other honor houses, such as the French, German, Russian, and Asian Studies houses, allow students to further immerse themselves in academics.


Two buildings on the campus are listed on the National Register of Historic Places: Old Main, designed by Long and Haglin (#76001073); and Steensland Library, designed by Omeyer & Thori (#82003020). A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ...


Academics

Curriculum

Before graduating, St. Olaf students complete nearly 20 required courses in foundation studies (writing, a second language, oral communication, mathematical reasoning, physical well-being) and core studies that include studies in Western culture, human behavior and society, biblical and theological studies, artistic and literary studies, and studies in natural science. Many of the courses are, by nature, interdisciplinary. St. Olaf offers 41 major areas of study for the bachelor of arts degree, four for the bachelor of music degree and fourteen areas of concentration.


The average student-to-faculty ratio is 13:1. The average class size is 23 students.


Study abroad

St. Olaf College is recognized nationally for the quality of its international studies programs. It is ranked 1st nationally out of bachelor-degree institutions in the number of students who study abroad (according to statistics from the "Chronicle of Higher Education"). Seventy-eight percent of the class of 2006 studied off- campus; 71% studied abroad. The college offers more than 120 international and U.S. off-campus study programs in Hong Kong, Japan, Costa Rica, Vietnam, the Czech Republic, London, Florence, Oxford, Aberdeen, Manhattan, Russia and many other locations. Unique study abroad programs offered by the college include the "Global Semester", "Term in the Middle East", and "Term in Asia". Students participating in these programs visit several different countries during the course. They are accompanied by a St. Olaf faculty member and complete academic coursework relevant to the destinations they visit. The Chronicle of Higher Education is a newspaper that is a source of news, information, and jobs for college and university faculty and administration. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Florence (or Firenze, Florentia and Fiorenza) is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany, and of the province of Florence. ... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... For other uses, see Aberdeen (disambiguation). ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ...


Academic distinctions

According to the National Research Council’s "Survey of Earned Doctorates", St. Olaf ranks eighth among bachelor degree colleges in the number of graduates who go on to earn doctoral degrees. (This represents the years 1995–2004.) St. Olaf was also first among baccalaureate colleges in mathematics, second in religion and theology, seventh in chemistry, third in foreign languages, third in art and music and fifth in life sciences as an undergraduate supplier of Ph.D.s.-1...


U.S. News & World Report's “America’s Best Colleges 2007” ranked St. Olaf among the nation’s top liberal arts colleges in graduation rate performance (33rd), academic reputation (35th), freshman retention (25th) and percentage of incoming students who graduated in the top 10 percent of their high school class (53rd). U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


Campus Life

Student organizations

The college is home to over 130 student organizations, including an on-campus organic farm, an improv comedy troupe (Scared Scriptless), and an EMT (Emergency Medical Technician) organization that is the first responder for campus emergencies. There are 16 religious organizations, over a dozen multicultural organizations, and many academic, service and political groups. [3] And, two-thirds of students on campus participate in at least one intramural sport.[4]


Student government

One of the most visible student organizations on campus, St. Olaf’s Student Government Association (SGA) organizes a variety of extracurricular experiences and represents the student body to members of the faculty, administration, and the Board of Regents.


SGA operates through ten branches, each of which is managed by an elected executive. Each branch serves a unique purpose, such as organizing volunteer programs, diversity events and campus entertainment, fostering political dialogue and providing financial support to other student organizations. Student Senate, one of the largest branches, consists of elected student senators who represent their constituency in the assembly.


SGA also maintains Oleville.com [2], a student-oriented portal site which contains updates on campus events, news feeds from local and national sources, and blogs by administrators and student leaders.


Music at St. Olaf

St. Olaf's music program, founded by F. Melius Christiansen in 1903, is world-renowned. Its band, choir and orchestra tour the continental U.S annually and have made many critically-acclaimed international tours. International tours regularly occur every three years. The St. Olaf Band, currently under the direction of Dr. Timothy Mahr, was the first American college musical organization to conduct a concert tour abroad when it traveled to Norway in 1906. The orchestra was the first college orchestra ever to be a part of the Community Concert series. F. Melius Christiansen (Lutheran choral tradition) Though this son of Norways first love was the violin, he received international fame as director of the St. ... The St. ...


The St. Olaf Choir, currently directed by Anton Armstrong '78, was founded by Christiansen in 1907 as the St. John's Lutheran Church Choir in Northfield, and is regarded as the pioneer a cappella college choir in the United States. It is recognized as one of the premier collegiate ensembles in the United States. [3]It has toured Europe several times, as well as China, Korea, and Australia, performing before heads of state and producing over a dozen recordings. The choir performs in the nationally broadcast annual St. Olaf Christmas Festival, along with the St. Olaf Orchestra and four of the college's other choirs. The St. Olaf Choir can also be heard performing Mozart's Requiem with the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra in the new Nike commercial "Jordan XXII-Takeover". In 2005, the St. Olaf Choir was invited to perform at the White House on May 5 for President George W. Bush, First Lady Laura Bush and guests to commemorate The National Day of Prayer. The St. ... Anton Armstrong is currently the Harry R. and Thora H. Tosdal Professor of Music at St. ... This article is about the vocal technique. ... This article is about the Korean civilization. ...


Other student musical ensembles include Chapel Choir, Cantorei, Manitou Singers, Viking Chorus, Collegiate Chorale, Philharmonia, Norseman Band and many smaller vocal and instrumental ensembles. One of the many student-run music ensembles at St. Olaf that has received the most recognition is the men's a capella group known as the Limestones, though it operates independently from the college.


In 2005 the St. Olaf Band, St. Olaf Orchestra and St. Olaf Choir toured throughout Norway to help that country celebrate its centennial of independence from Sweden.


A few ensembles that sprouted their roots at St. Olaf include the Minnesota Symphonic Winds and the a cappella choral groups Cantus, Inpulse and Magnum Chorum. Magnum Chorum is a chamber choir based out of the Twin Cities of Minnesota. ...


Athletics

St. Olaf College is a member of the Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (MIAC). St. Olaf athletic teams and students are nicknamed the "Oles." St. Olaf's Swimming and Diving team is traditionally the strongest of its sports teams, having won a majority of its MIAC conference championships, and is strongly competitive at the national level, often finishing within the top ten NCAA Division III schools at nationals. St. Olaf competes in the following sports: The Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (MIAC) is an College Athletic Conference which competes in the NCAAs Division III. As the name implies, member schools are located in the state of Minnesota; also, all of the member schools are private, with all but two having a religious affiliation. ... Swimmer redirects here. ... For other uses, see Dive. ...

Fall Sports:

Winter Sports: The Minnesota State Highschool Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... This article is about the sport. ... Soccer redirects here. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ...

Spring Sports : Alpine skier carving a turn on piste Alpine skiing (or downhill skiing) is a recreational activity and sport involving sliding down snow-covered hills with long, thin skis attached to each foot. ... This article is about the sport. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Indoor Track is a sport very similar to track and field, except that it takes place indoors. ... Swimmer redirects here. ... For other uses, see Dive. ... Nordic skiing is a winter sport that encompasses all types of skiing where the heel of the boot cannot be fixed to the ski. ... This article is about collegiate wrestling. ...

St. Olaf also has many student coached club and intramural teams that compete within the student body and also intercollege. Most notable is the St. Olaf ultimate team The Berzerkers, which makes an annual trip to a national collegiate tournament (Spring Ultimax) in North Carolina. This article is about the sport. ... Softball is a team sport popular especially in the United States. ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... The term intramural is most commonly associated with sports within a school. ... Ultimate (sometimes called ultimate Frisbee in reference to the trademarked brand name) is a non-contact competitive team game played with a 175 gram flying disc. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ...


Rivalry with Carleton College

St. Olaf is a traditional athletic rival of its crosstown neighbor, Carleton College. Each year in American football, Carleton and St. Olaf compete in a contest recently dubbed the "Cereal Bowl" in honor of the Malt-O-Meal production facility that is located in Northfield. In this contest, the Oles have not lost to Carleton since 1995, and hence have retained both the "Goatrophy" (created by a St. Olaf carpenter in 1931) and the silver Cereal Bowl trophy that are awarded annually to the winning team. The rivalry between St. Olaf and Carleton, which began with a Carleton victory over St. Olaf in 1919, is one of the oldest in all of college football, and the only to feature two colleges from the same ZIP code. , Carleton College is an independent, non-sectarian, coeducational, liberal arts college in Northfield, Minnesota, USA. The school was founded on November 14, 1866, by the Minnesota Conference of Congregational Churches as Northfield College. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Malt-O-Meal is a brand of breakfast cereals manufactured by The Malt-O-Meal company. ... Mr. ...


A lesser known fact about the Cereal Bowl is that Northfield's veterans' memorial (located in Bridge Square) features an eagle that is turned to face the college that wins the annual football match between the two schools.


These football teams are also significant for constituting the only NCAA-sanctioned metric football game in history (which St. Olaf won). The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...


College fight song

Based on a Norwegian folk tune, the college song, Um Yah Yah, is the only college fight song in the United States to be in 3/4 (waltz) meter. It is also one of the few college songs to mention another college in its lyrics. Other fight songs that mention rival schools include those of Texas A&M University, the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), the University of Alabama, the University of Texas, and Georgetown University. For the single by Marilyn Manson, see The Fight Song. ... Texas A&M University redirects here. ... The University of California, Los Angeles (generally known as UCLA) is a public research university located in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... The University of Alabama (also known as Alabama, UA or colloquially as Bama) is a public coeducational university located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA. Founded in 1831, UA is the flagship school of the University of Alabama System. ... The University of Texas System comprises fifteen educational institutions in Texas, of which nine are general academic universities, and six are health institutions. ... Georgetown University is a Jesuit private university located in Georgetown, Washington, D.C. Father John Carroll founded the school in 1789, though its roots extend back to 1634. ...


The lyrics to the St. Olaf song include the unofficial St. Olaf "battle cry" - "Um Ya Ya!". The most common version uses the name of traditional cross-town rival, Carleton College, but the current opposing institution's name is inserted when sung at athletic competitions. , Carleton College is an independent, non-sectarian, coeducational, liberal arts college in Northfield, Minnesota, USA. The school was founded on November 14, 1866, by the Minnesota Conference of Congregational Churches as Northfield College. ...

We come from St. Olaf, we sure are the real stuff.
Our team is the cream of the colleges great.
We fight fast and furious, our team is injurious.
Tonight Carleton College will sure meet its fate.
Um Ya Ya! Um Ya Ya!
Um Ya Ya! Um Ya Ya!
Um Ya Ya! Um Ya Ya! Um Ya Ya YA!
Um Ya Ya! Um Ya Ya!
Um Ya Ya! Um Ya Ya!
Um Ya Ya! Um Ya Ya! Um Ya Ya YA!

Presidents of the college

St. Olaf has had 11 presidents since its founding:

  • Thorbjorn N. Mohn 1874-1899
  • John N. Kildahl 1899-1914
  • Lauritz A. Vigness 1914-1918
  • Lars W. Boe 1918-1942
  • Clemens M. Granskou 1943-1963
  • Sidney A. Rand 1963-1980
  • Harlan F. Foss, Ph.D. 1980-1985
  • Melvin D. George, Ph.D. 1985-1994
  • Mark U. Edwards Jr., Ph.D. 1994-2000
  • Christopher M. Thomforde, D.Min. 2001-2006
  • David R. Anderson, Ph.D. 2006 to Present

2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Church affiliation

[4]

The Synod of the Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, commonly called the Norwegian Synod, was founded in February 1853 in Iowa. ... Anti-Missourian Brotherhood was the name of a group of Lutheran pastors and churches in the United States that left the Norwegian Synod in 1887. ... The United Norwegian Lutheran Church of America was the result of the union formed between the Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran Augustana Synod, the Conference of the Norwegian-Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church of America, and the Anti-Missourian Brotherhood in 1890. ... The Evangelical Lutheran Church or ELC was formed in 1917 as the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America (NLCA). ... The American Lutheran Church (ALC) was a Christian Protestant denomination in the United States that existed from 1960 to 1987. ... The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) is a mainline Protestant denomination headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. ...

Notable alumni

See also Category:St. Olaf College alumni

Russell A. Anderson (born May 28, 1942 in Bemidji, Minnesota) is currently the Chief Justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court. ... The Minnesota Supreme Court is the highest court in the U.S. state of Minnesota and consists of seven members. ... August Herman Andresen (Newark, Illinois, October 11, 1890 – 1958) was a Republican U.S. Representative from Minnesota, serving the third district from 1925 – 1933, and the first district from 1935 – 1958. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Anton Armstrong is currently the Harry R. and Thora H. Tosdal Professor of Music at St. ... The St. ... Luther College This Luther College article is not to be confused with the Luther College associated with the University of Regina in Saskatchewan. ... Robert Bly (born December 23, 1926 in Madison, Minnesota) is a poet, author, and leader of the Mythopoetic Mens Movement in the United States. ... Dean L. Buntrock (born 1931) is the founder and former chairman and CEO of Waste Management, Inc. ... Waste Management, Inc. ... Dr. René Clausen (b. ... Jason DeRose works out of Chicago Public Radio. ... Arlen Ingolf Erdahl was born in Minnesota, February 27, 1931 and attended St. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Professor David F. Grose (1944-2004) was a world-renowned authority on the classification of early ancient glass from the Roman period. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Harold Christian Hagen (1901-1957) was born in Crookston, Polk County, Minnesota on November 10, 1901. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Sam Hanson (born August 26, 1939, in Mankato, Minnesota) is an Associate Justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court. ... The Minnesota Supreme Court is the highest court in the U.S. state of Minnesota and consists of seven members. ... Einar Ingvald Haugen (April 19, 1906 - June 20, 1994) was a linguist and Professor at University of Wisconsin and Harvard University. ... Siri Hustvedt is a writer, born February 19th 1955 in Northfield, Minnesota, United States. ... Kenneth Jennings (b. ... The St. ... Bruce Laingen was the senior American official held hostage during the Iran hostage crisis. ... Ernest Orlando Lawrence (August 8, 1901 - August 27, 1958) was an American physicist and Nobel laureate best known for his invention of the cyclotron. ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... David R. Minge (born March 19, 1942), is an American politician. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Mark W. Olson (official Federal Reserve portrait). ... The Federal Reserve System is headquartered in the Eccles Building on Constitution Avenue in Washington, DC. The Federal Reserve System (also the Federal Reserve; informally The Fed) is the central bank of the United States. ... Al Quie Albert Harold Quie (born September 18, 1923) is an American politician. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... The Governor of Minnesota is the chief executive of the U.S. state of Minnesota, leading the states executive branch. ... Christopher Raschka is an American author, illustrator, and violist. ... Ole Edvart Rølvaag Ole Edvart Rølvaag (spelled Rolvaag in the United States) (April 22, 1876 - November 5, 1931) was a Norwegian-American writer and professor, well known for his writings on the immigrant experience. ... George Thompson (July 6, 1918 in Ellsworth, Wisconsin- November 11, 1982 in Wilbraham, Massachusetts) was Attorney General of Wisconsin 1963-1965. ... This is a list of attorneys general from the U.S. state of Wisconsin. ... Cover of Time Magazine (March 29, 1926) Andrew John Volstead (October 31, 1860 – January 20, 1947) was a member of the United States House of Representatives from Minnesota from 1903 to 1923. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... The Volstead Act is the popular name for the National Prohibition Act (1919). ... The Dale Warland Singers were a highly successful and critically acclaimed 40-person choral group of the United States. ...

St. Olaf College in popular culture

St. Olaf is mentioned in the works of Minnesota author F. Scott Fitzgerald. His character Jay Gatsby of The Great Gatsby attended the college briefly and worked as a janitor. It also is mentioned in Garrison Keillor's radio program A Prairie Home Companion. Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American Jazz Age author of novels and short stories. ... The cover of the Scribner Paperback Fiction Edition, 1995. ... This article is about the novel. ... Garrison Keillor (born Gary Edward Keillor on August 7, 1942 in Anoka, Minnesota) is an American author, storyteller, humorist, columnist, musician, satirist, and radio personality. ... This article is about the radio show. ...


The fictional Minnesota city of St. Olaf was the hometown of Rose Nylund in the TV show The Golden Girls. In the TV show the fictional city's sister city was St. Gustav, Minnesota, a nod to Gustavus Adolphus College, located nearby in St. Peter, Minnesota. Betty White, the actress who played Rose, visited the St. Olaf campus on one occasion and was given a honorary membership in St. Olaf's chapter of the theater honorary society. St. ... Information Age 55 Date of birth 1930 Occupation Grief Counselor TV associate producer Family Gunter Lindstrom, father Alma Lindstrom, mother Holly Lindstrom, sister Lily Lindstrom, sister Spouse(s) Charlie Nylund (1948-1980) Children Kirsten Nylund Charlie Nylund Jr. ... See TV (disambiguation) for other uses and Television (band) for the rock band European networks National In much of Europe television broadcasting has historically been state dominated, rather than commercially organised, although commercial stations have grown in number recently. ... For the Hong Kong film, see The Golden Girls (1995 film). ... Gustavus Adolphus College is a private liberal arts college of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America in St. ... St. ...


References

  1. ^ St. Olaf College | Northfield, Minnesota, USA
  2. ^ Ferraro, Nick. "Education / Apple Valley woman named Rhodes Scholar", Pioneer Press, November 18, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-11-21. 
  3. ^ St. Olaf College Student Organizations. St. Olaf College (2007). Retrieved on 2007-05-08.
  4. ^ Good Game. St. Olaf College (2007). Retrieved on 2007-05-08.

is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Coordinates: 44°27′34″N 93°10′50″W / 44.45944, -93.18056 Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


 
 

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