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Encyclopedia > St. Augustine, Florida
St. Augustine, Florida

Seal
Nickname: Ancient City, Nation's Oldest City
Location in St. Johns and the state of Florida
Location in St. Johns and the state of Florida
Coordinates: 29°53′39.35″N 81°18′47.55″W / 29.8942639, -81.3132083
Country Flag of United States United States
State Florida
County St. Johns
Established 1565
Government
 - Mayor Joseph L. Boles
Area
 - City 27.8 km²  (10.7 sq mi)
 - Land 21.7 km² (2.4 sq mi)
 - Water 6.1 km² (2.4 sq mi)  21.99%
Elevation 1.52 m (5 ft)
Population (2004)
 - City 12,157
 - Density 534.7/km² (1,384.9/sq mi)
 - Metro 1,277,997
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Website: http://www.ci.st-augustine.fl.us/
Five flags have flown over the city since 1565. From left: U.S., Confederate, Spanish (after 1785) British, and the Spanish (before 1785) Burgundy Cross
Five flags have flown over the city since 1565. From left: U.S., Confederate, Spanish (after 1785) British, and the Spanish (before 1785) Burgundy Cross

St. Augustine is a city in St. Johns County, Florida, in the United States. It is the oldest continuously occupied European-established city in the United States. St. Augustine lies in a region of Florida known as The First Coast, which extends from Amelia Island in the north, south to Jacksonville, St. Augustine and Palm Coast. According to the 2000 census, the city population was 11,592; in 2004, the population estimated by the U.S. Census Bureau was 12,157 [1]. It is the county seat of St. Johns County.GR6 Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... // A nickname is a name of a person or thing other than its proper name. ... Adapted from Wikipedias FL county maps by Seth Ilys. ... St. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states, which are... Image File history File links Flag_of_Florida. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... Following is a list of counties in Florida. ... Image File history File links St_Johns_County_Fl_Seal. ... St. ... // Events March 1 - the city of Rio de Janeiro is founded. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Basic Definition In geography, the elevation of a geographic location is its height above mean sea level (or some other fixed point). ... The metre (American English:meter) is a measure of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Population density by country, 2006 Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... Metronome, a public art installation showing the time in New York City The Eastern Time Zone (ET) of the Western Hemisphere falls mostly along the east coast of Northern America and the west coast of South America. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Eastern Daylight Time or EDT is equal to: In North America, Eastern Standard Time + 1, or UTC − 4 hours. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 516 KB) Summary The five flags that flew over St. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 516 KB) Summary The five flags that flew over St. ... Union Jack. ... The Confederate States of America used several flags during its existence from 1861 to 1865. ... The Cross of Burgundy Flag was used by Spain from 1506-1785. ... Look up city, City in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... St. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... Location in the state of Florida Major cities Jacksonville Fernandina Beach St. ... Amelia Island is the southernmost of the Sea Islands, a chain of barrier islands stretching from North Carolina to Florida. ... The Jacksonville skyline and the Acosta Bridge. ... Palm Coast is a city located in Flagler County, Florida. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ...

Contents

History

Map of St. Augustine depicting Sir Francis Drake's attack on the city by Baptista Boazio, 1589
Map of St. Augustine depicting Sir Francis Drake's attack on the city by Baptista Boazio, 1589

St. Augustine was founded by the Spanish in 1565, and is the oldest city in the present-day United States of America. The first Christian worship service held in a permanent settlement in the current United States was a Catholic Mass celebrated in St. Augustine. A few settlements were founded prior to St. Augustine but all failed, including the original Pensacola colony in West Florida, founded by Tristán de Luna y Arellano in 1559, with the area abandoned in 1561 due to hurricanes, famine and warring tribes, and Fort Caroline in what is today Jacksonville, Florida in 1564. The city was founded by the Spanish admiral Pedro Menéndez de Avilés on September 8, 1565. Menéndez first sighted land on August 28, the feast day of Augustine of Hippo, and consequently named the settlement San Agustín. Martin de Arguelles was born here one year later in 1566, the first child of European ancestry to be born in what is now the United States. This came 21 years before the English settlement at Roanoke Island in Virginia Colony, and 42 years before the successful settlements of Santa Fe, New Mexico, and Jamestown, Virginia. In all the territory under the jurisdiction of the United States, only settlements in Puerto Rico are older than St. Augustine, with the oldest being San Juan, founded in 1512. Image File history File links Mapstaug. ... Image File history File links Mapstaug. ... Nickname: Location of Pensacola, Florida (top left) Coordinates: Country United States State Florida County Escambia Government  - Mayor John Fogg Area  - City 39. ... Map of East and West Florida in the early 1800s. ... Tristán de Luna y Arellano (1519 – 1571) was a Spanish conquistador of the 16th century. ... January 15 - Elizabeth I of England is crowned in Westminster Abbey. ... // Events The Edict of Orleans suspends the persecution of the Huguenots. ... Fort Caroline was the first permanent French colony in North America, located in present-day Jacksonville, Florida. ... Nickname: Motto: Where Florida Begins Location in the state of Florida Coordinates: , Country United States State Florida County Duval Government  - Mayor John Peyton (R) Area  - City  885 sq mi (2,264. ... Events March 27 — Naples bans kissing in public under the penalty of death June 22 — Fort Caroline, the first French attempt at colonizing the New World September 10 — The Battle of Kawanakajima Ottoman Turks invade Malta Modern pencil becomes common in England Conquistadors crossed the Pacific Spanish founded a colony... For other uses, see Admiral (disambiguation). ... Don Pedro Menéndez de Avilés, the founder of Saint Augustine, Florida Pedro Menéndez de Avilés (February 15, 1519 - September 17, 1574), was a sixteenth century Spanish admiral and pirate hunter, known most notably for his founding of St. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events March 1 - the city of Rio de Janeiro is founded. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with a saint, and referring to the day as the saints day of that saint. ... “Augustinus” redirects here. ... Martín de Arguelles, Jr. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total... Roanoke Island is an island in Dare County near the coast of North Carolina, United States. ... The 1609 charter for the Virginia colony from sea to sea The Virginia Colony refers to the English colony in North America that existed during the 17th and 18th centuries before the American Revolution. ... Nickname: The City Different Location in the State of New Mexico Coordinates: Country United States State New Mexico County Santa Fe Founded 1607  - Mayor David Coss Area    - City  37. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... Nickname: Location of San Juan within the island of Puerto Rico Coordinates: Country United States Territory Puerto Rico Founded 1508/1521 Area  - City 76. ...


In 1586 St. Augustine was attacked and burned by Sir Francis Drake. In 1668 it was plundered by pirates and most of the inhabitants were killed. In 1702 and 1740 it was unsuccessfully attacked by British forces from their new colonies in the Carolinas and Georgia. The most serious of these came in the latter year, when James Oglethorpe of Georgia allied himself with Ahaya the Cowkeeper, chief of the Alachua band of the Seminole tribe to lay siege to the city. 1586 was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ... Sir Francis Drake, c. ... 1668 (MDCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Pirates may refer to: A group of people committing any of these activities: Piracy at sea or on a river/lake. ... Events March 8 - William III died; Princess Anne Stuart becomes Queen Anne of England, Scotland and Ireland. ... Events May 31 - Friedrich II comes to power in Prussia upon the death of his father, Friedrich Wilhelm I. October 20 - Maria Theresia of Austria inherits the Habsburg hereditary dominions (Austria, Bohemia, Hungary and present-day Belgium). ... This article refers to a colony in politics and history. ... The Carolinas is a collective term used in the United States to refer to the states of North and South Carolina together. ... General James Oglethorpe James Edward Oglethorpe (22 December 1696 – 30 June 1785) was an English general, a philanthropist, and a founder of the state of Georgia. ... Cowkeeper (ca 1710 - 1783) is the Anglicized name of the first recorded chief of the Alachua band of Seminole tribe. ... The Flag of the Seminoles of Florida, adopted in 1979 The Seminole are a Native American people originally of Florida, and now residing in that state and in Oklahoma. ...

St. Augustine in 1760, while under Spanish control
St. Augustine in 1760, while under Spanish control

In 1763, the Treaty of Paris ended the French and Indian War and gave Florida and St. Augustine to the British, an acquisition the British had been unable to take by force and keep due to the strong fort there. St. Augustine came under British rule and served as a Loyalist (pro-British) colony during the American Revolutionary War. A Treaty of Paris in 1783 gave the American colonies north of Florida their independence, and ceded Florida to Spain in recognition of Spanish success during the war. Download high resolution version (878x657, 61 KB)St Augustine, Florida, in 1760. ... Download high resolution version (878x657, 61 KB)St Augustine, Florida, in 1760. ... 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Treaty of Paris, often called the Peace of Paris, or the Treaty of 1763, was signed on February 10, 1763, by the kingdoms of Great Britain, France and Spain, with Portugal in agreement. ... Combatants France First Nations allies: * Algonquin * Lenape * Wyandot * Ojibwa * Ottawa * Shawnee Great Britain Iroquois Confederacy American Colonies Strength 3,900 regulars 7,900 militia 2,200 natives (1759) 50,000 regulars and militia (1759) The French and Indian War was the nine-year North American chapter of the Seven Years... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Combatants United States France Spanish Empire Dutch Republic Oneida Tuscarora Polish volunteers Quebec volunteers Prussian volunteers Kingdom of Great Britain Iroquois Confederacy Hessian mercenaries Loyalists Commanders George Washington Nathanael Greene Gilbert de La Fayette Comte de Rochambeau Bernardo de Gálvez Tadeusz KoÅ›ciuszko Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben King George... Painting by Benjamin West depicting (from left to right) John Jay, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Henry Laurens, and William Temple Franklin. ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Naval operations in the American Revolutionary War. ...


Florida was under Spanish control again from 1784 to 1821. During this time, Spain was being invaded by Napoleon and was struggling to retain its colonies. Florida no longer held its past importance to Spain. The expanding United States, however, regarded Florida as vital to its interests. In 1821, the Adams-Onís Treaty peaceably turned the Spanish colonies in Florida and, with them, St. Augustine, over to the United States. 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Adams-Onís Treaty of 1819 (formally titled the Treaty of Amity, Settlement, and Limits Between the United States of America and His Catholic Majesty, and also known as the Transcontinental Treaty of 1819, and sometimes the Florida Purchase Treaty) was a historic agreement between the United States and...

Florida was a United States territory until 1845 when it became a U.S. state. In 1861, the American Civil War began and Florida seceded from the Union and joined the Confederacy. Days before Florida seceded, state troops took the fort at St. Augustine from a small Union garrison (January 7, 1861). However, federal troops loyal to the United States Government quickly reoccupied the city (March 11, 1862) and remained in control throughout the four-year-long war. In 1865, Florida rejoined the United States. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 255 pixelsFull resolution (5487 × 1748 pixel, file size: 5. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 255 pixelsFull resolution (5487 × 1748 pixel, file size: 5. ... The Castillo de San Marcos is a Spanish built fort located in the city of St. ... This article is about the various forms of the jurisdiction of the United States. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of the... 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar) // January 1 - Benito Juárez captures Mexico City January 2 - Friedrich Wilhelm IV of Prussia dies and is succeeded by... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar) // January 1 - Benito Juárez captures Mexico City January 2 - Friedrich Wilhelm IV of Prussia dies and is succeeded by... March 11 is the 70th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (71st in leap years). ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ...


Spanish Colonial era buildings still existing in the city include the fortress Castillo de San Marcos. The fortress successfully repelled the British attacks of the 18th century, served as a prison for the Native American leader Osceola in 1837, and was occupied by Union troops during the American Civil War. It was removed from the Army's active duty rolls in 1900 after 205 years of service under five different flags. It is now the Castillo de San Marcos National Monument. Fortifications (Latin fortis, strong, and facere, to make) are military constructions designed for defensive warfare. ... The Castillo de San Marcos is a Spanish built fort located in the city of St. ... Native Americans in the United States are the indigenous peoples from the regions of North America now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska. ... Osceola Osceola (1804 – January 20, 1838) was a war chief of the Seminole Indians in Flo. ... Castillo de San Marcos National Monument, often simply called the Castillo, is a U.S. National Monument located in St. ...


In the late 19th century the railroad came to town, and led by northeastern industrialist Henry Flagler, St. Augustine became a winter resort for the very wealthy. A number of mansions and palatial grand hotels of this era still exist, some converted to other use, such as housing parts of Flagler College and museums. Flagler went on to develop much more of Florida's east coast, including his Florida East Coast Railway which eventually reached Key West in 1912. This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Business magnate. ... Henry Morrison Flagler (January 2, 1830 – May 20, 1913) was a United States tycoon, real estate promoter, railroad developer and Rockefeller partner. ... Resorts combine a hotel and a variety of recreations, such as swimming pools. ... Mansion near Almelo, The Netherlands Introduction A mansion is a large and stately dwelling house. ... A hotel is an establishment that provides lodging, usually on a short-term basis. ... Flagler College, simply known as Flagler, is a private four-year liberal arts college in St. ... A museum is a non-profit making, permanent institution in the service of society and of its development, open to the public, which acquires, conserves, researches, communicates and exhibits, for purposes of study, education and enjoyment, the tangible and intangible evidence of people and their environment. ... The Florida East Coast Railway (AAR reporting marks FEC) is a Class II railroad operating in the U.S. state of Florida; in the past, it has been a Class I railroad. ... Map of Key West Key West is a city located in Monroe County, Florida. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


The city is a popular tourist attraction, for the rich Spanish Colonial Revival Style architectural heritage as well as elite 19th century architecture. In 1938 the theme park Marineland opened just south of St. Augustine, becoming one of Florida's first themed parks and setting the stage for the development of this industry in the following decades. A tourist boat travels the River Seine in Paris, France Tourism can be defined as the act of travel for the purpose of recreation, and the provision of services for this act. ... The Spanish Colonial Revival Style was an architectural movement that came about in the early 20th century after the opening of the Panama Canal and the overwhelming success of the novel Ramona. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Theme Park is a simulation computer game designed by Bullfrog Productions, released in 1994, in which the player designs and operates an amusement park. ... Dolphin Show, Marineland of Florida, 1964. ...

Public Square, St. Augustine, ca. 1858

In addition to being a national tourist destination and the nation’s oldest city St. Augustine was also a pivotal site for the civil rights movement in 1964. Despite the 1954 Supreme Court act in Brown v. Board of Education, which ruled that the "separate but equal" legal status of public schools made those schools inherently unequal, St. Augustine still had only 6 black children admitted into white schools. The homes of two of the families of these children were burned by local segregationists while other families were forced to move out of the county because the parents were fired from their jobs and could find no work. Download high resolution version (1520x1009, 413 KB)Public Square, St. ... Download high resolution version (1520x1009, 413 KB)Public Square, St. ... A town square is an open area commonly found in the heart of a traditional town used for community gatherings. ...


In 1963 a “sit-in” protest at a local diner ended in the arrest and imprisonment of 16 young black protestors and 7 juveniles. Four of the children, two of which were 16 year old girls, were sent to “reform” school and retained for 6 months. In 1964, the Ku Klux Klan abducted Dr. Robert B. Hayling, a local dentist, SCLC representative and NAACP coordinator then broke his right arm and fingers to prevent him from working (despite the fact that almost half of his clientele were white). In the summer of 1964 a massive non-violent direct action campaign was led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Ralph Abernathy, Andrew Young, and other major civil rights leaders intent on changing the horrific conditions of blacks in St. Augustine. The Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) (first known as Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Nonviolent Integration) is a civil rights organization founded in January 1957 by Martin Luther King Jr. ... Martin Luther King Jr. ... Ralph Abernathy at National Press Club luncheon. ... Andrew Jackson Young, Jr. ...


From May until July of 1964 protestors endured abuse, beatings, and verbal assaults without any retaliation. By absorbing the violence and hate instead of striking back the protestors gained national sympathy and, it is thought, were the deciding factor in passing the 1964 Civil Rights Act. King planned nightly marches down King Street and around the old "Slave Market”. The protestors were met by white segregationists and verbal and physical assault on the marchers that resulted in hundreds of arrests and jail sentences. Because of the huge numbers of demonstrators in the jail people were kept in a stockade during the day in the hot sun with no shade. When attempts were made to integrate the beaches of Anastasia Island demonstrators were beaten and driven into the water by police and segregationists. Some of the protestors could not swim and had to be saved from drowning by other demonstrators. (Redirected from 1964 Civil Rights Act) President Johnson signs the Civil Rights Act of 1964. ...


The demonstrations came to a climax when a group of black and white protesters jumped into the swimming pool at the Monson Motel, an entirely white hotel where several other protests had been held. In response to the protest the owner of the hotel, Mr. James Brock, who was a usually shy and passive man, was photographed pouring muriatic acid into the pool to get the protestors out. Photographs of this, and of a policeman jumping into the pool to arrest them, were broadcast around the world and became some of the most famous images of the entire Civil Rights Movement. The photos became fodder for communist countries, who used the images to discredit America’s claims of democracy and freedom.


Geography and climate

St. Augustine is located at 29°53′39″N, 81°18′48″W (29.894264, -81.313208)GR1.


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 27.8 km² (10.7 mi²). 21.7 km² (8.4 mi²) of it is land and 6.1 km² (2.4 mi²) of it (21.99%) is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


Access to the Atlantic Ocean is via the St. Augustine Inlet of the Matanzas River. Matanzas River is a body of water located in St. ...


Demographics

View from Plaza de la Constitution

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 11,592 people, 4,963 households, and 2,600 families residing in the city. The population density was 534.7/km² (1,384.6/mi²). There were 5,642 housing units at an average density of 260.3/km² (673.9/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 81.21% White, 15.07% African American, 0.41% Native American, 0.72% Asian, 0.09% Pacific Islander, 0.88% from other races, and 1.61% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.11% of the population. Image File history File linksMetadata Cathedral_Square_in_St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Cathedral_Square_in_St. ... 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 4,963 households out of which 18.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 37.4% were married couples living together, 12.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 47.6% were non-families. 36.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.11 and the average family size was 2.76. For the record label, see Marriage Records. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 16.1% under the age of 18, 15.3% from 18 to 24, 23.9% from 25 to 44, 25.2% from 45 to 64, and 19.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 84.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.4 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $32,358, and the median income for a family was $41,892. Males had a median income of $27,099 versus $25,121 for females. The per capita income for the city was $21,225. About 9.8% of families and 15.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 25.8% of those under age 18 and 10.0% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Points of interest

Flagler College
Flagler College
Lightner Museum and City Hall
Lightner Museum and City Hall

ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1626x1118, 516 KB) Summary Flagler College St. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1626x1118, 516 KB) Summary Flagler College St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2126x2818, 1467 KB) Summary City Hall of w:St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2126x2818, 1467 KB) Summary City Hall of w:St. ... The St. ... Hikers on the Old Spanish Quarry Trail Anastasia State Recreation Area is a Florida State Park located off SR A1A, about 1. ... The Bridge of Lions is a bascule bridge that spans the Intracoastal Waterway in St. ... The Casa Monica Hotel is a historic hotel located in St. ... The Castillo de San Marcos is a Spanish built fort located in the city of St. ... The Cathedral Basilica of St. ... Flagler College, simply known as Flagler, is a private four-year liberal arts college in St. ... Created in 1924, Fort Matanzas National Monument is a United States National Monument run by the National Park Service. ... The Florida School for the Deaf and Blind is a state-supported boarding school for deaf and blind children established in 1885, in St. ... Fort Mose Historic State Park (originally known as Gracia Real de Santa Teresa de Mose) is a U.S. National Historic Landmark (designated as such on October 12, 1994), located two miles north of St. ... The Fountain of Youth by Lucas Cranach the Elder The Fountain of Youth is a legendary spring that reputedly restores the youth of anyone who drinks of its waters. ... The Gonzalez-Alvarez House (also known as The Oldest House) is a historic home in St. ... The Grace United Methodist Church is a historic church which Henry Flagler had constructed in St. ... Tower detail of the Lightner Museum in St. ... The Old St. ... The Oldest Wooden Schoolhouse is a wooden structure near the city gates of St. ... For the TV series, see Ripleys Believe It or Not (TV series). ... The St. ... Trinity Episcopal Church is a generic name for hundreds of churches. ... // The World Golf Hall of Fame is located in St. ... World Golf Village is a unique village located north of St. ... Villa Zorayda (also known as the Zorayda Castle) is a scaled-down version of the 12th-century Moorish Alhambra Palace in Granada, Spain. ...

Sister cities

See also: List of sister cities in Florida

This is a list of sister states, regions, and cities in the U.S. state of Florida. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... Capital Avilés Area  - total  - % of Asturias Ranked 71st 25. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Colombia. ... Nickname: The Heroic City The Walled City The Diplomatic City The Key of the West Indies The Walled Kingdom Best Fortified City of the Americas Historical Heritage of Mankind The Stone Coral Region Caribbean Region (Colombia) Department Bolívar Department* Foundation 1533 Mayor Nicolás Francisco Curi Vergara Area    - City...

Education

St. Johns County School District operates local public schools.


Florida School for the Deaf and Blind, a public residential school operated by the state of Florida, is located in St. Augustine [2]. The Florida School for the Deaf and Blind is a state-supported boarding school for deaf and blind children established in 1885, in St. ...


Notable residents

Jim Albrecht, (December 8, 1949 - October 16th, 2003), was born in St. ... Richard Boone often played in Westerns and action films. ... Ray Charles was the stage name of Ray Charles Robinson (September 23, 1930 – June 10, 2004), a pioneering American pianist and soul musician who shaped the sound of rhythm and blues. ... See also Agueybana Hayuya Jumacao Discoverer of the Americas Categories: People stubs | 1460 births | 1521 deaths | History of Puerto Rico | Conquistadores ... Henry Morrison Flagler (January 2, 1830 – May 20, 1913) was a United States tycoon, real estate promoter, railroad developer and Rockefeller partner. ... Lindy Infante (b. ... Sunny Lane (born March 2, 1980 in Georgia) is an American pornographic actress and nude model. ... Stetson Kennedy (born October 5, 1916 in Jacksonville, Florida) is an award-winning author and human rights activist from Florida. ... Scott Lagasse Jr. ... Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... Johnny Mize (January 7, 1913 - June 2, 1993) was a baseball player who was a first baseman for the St. ... Painting of Prince Murat. ... Osceola (1804-January 20, 1838) was a leader of the Seminole Indians in Florida. ... The Castillo de San Marcos is a Spanish built fort located in the city of St. ... The Castillo de San Marcos is a Spanish built fort located in the city of St. ... Scott Darwin Player (born December 17, 1969 in St. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... Thomas Earl Tom Petty (born October 20, 1950) is a singer and guitarist. ... Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings photo taken by Carl Van Vechten, 1953 Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings (August 8, 1896 – December 14, 1953) was an American author who lived in remote rural Florida and wrote novels with rural themes and settings. ... Steven Orr Spurrier (born April 20, 1945 in Miami Beach, Florida) is a former American football player and currently the head coach of the University of South Carolina football team. ... Portrait of Edmund Kirby Smith during the Civil War Edmund Kirby Smith (May 16, 1824 – March 28, 1893) was a career U.S. Army officer, an educator, and a general in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War, notable for his command of the Trans-Mississippi Department of the... William Wing Loring 1818-1886 was an soldier from North Carolina who served in the American, Confederate, and Egyptian Armies. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

See also

This is a list of Florida paved bike trails and paths for bicycles. ... Ghost tours are a siteseeing activity, usually in tourist-friendly cities, where one hears ghost stories and other types of paranormal tales and legends. ... Seagull at Guana River State Park Guana River State Park is a former Florida State Park located on barrier island between the Atlantic Ocean and the Tolomato River, on State Highway A1A between St. ... Nickname: Motto: Where Florida Begins Location in the state of Florida Coordinates: , Country United States State Florida County Duval Government  - Mayor John Peyton (R) Area  - City  885 sq mi (2,264. ... Dolphin Show, Marineland of Florida, 1964. ... ... The carcass as it appeared after being dug out of the sand. ... Washington Oaks Gardens State Park is a Florida State Park located near Palm Coast, Florida, along Highway A1A. The park is most famous for its formal gardens, however it also preserves the original habitat of a northeast Florida barrier island. ... // The World Golf Hall of Fame is located in St. ...

External links

Information

Government resources

Historical

Higher education

  • Maps and aerial photos for 29°53′39″N 81°18′48″W / 29.894264, -81.313208Coordinates: 29°53′39″N 81°18′48″W / 29.894264, -81.313208

Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

References

  • Abbad y Lasierra, Iñigo, "Relación del descubrimiento, conquista y población de las provincias y costas de la Florida" - "Relación de La Florida" (1785); edición de Juan José Nieto Callén y José María Sánchez Molledo.
  • Fairbanks, George R. (George Rainsford), "History and antiquities of St. Augustine, Florida" (1881), Jacksonville, Fla., H. Drew.
  • Reynolds, Charles B. (Charles Bingham), "Old Saint Augustine, a story of three centuries", (1893) St. Augustine, Fla. E. H. Reynolds.

Images


Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ...

Cities and communities of St. Johns County, Florida
County seat St. Augustine Location of St. Johns County
Incorporated places Hastings | Marineland | St. Augustine | St. Augustine Beach
Unincorporated places Armstrong | Butler Beach | Crescent Beach | Elkton | Flagler Estates | Fruit Cove | Palm Valley | Sawgrass | Spuds | St. Augustine Shores | St. Augustine South | Switzerland | Vermont Heights | Vilano Beach
Adjacent Counties Flagler | Putnam | Clay | Duval


Look up city, City in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with unincorporated. ... St. ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... Image File history File links St_Johns_County_Florida. ... An incorporated place, as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau, is a type of governmental unit incorporated under state law as a city, town (except the New England states, New York, and Wisconsin), borough (except in Alaska and New York), or village and having legally prescribed limits, powers, and... Hastings is a town located in St. ... Marineland is a town located in both Flagler and St. ... St. ... In United States law, a region of land is unincorporated if it is not a part of any municipality. ... Armstrong is a town in St. ... Butler Beach is a census-designated place located in St. ... Crescent Beach is an unincorporated census-designated place located in St. ... Elkton is a town in St. ... The welcome sign at Flagler Estates Boulevard and St. ... Fruit Cove is a census-designated place located in St. ... Palm Valley is a census-designated place located in St. ... Sawgrass is a census-designated place located in St. ... Spuds is a town in St. ... St. ... St. ... Vermont Heights is a town in St. ... Vilano Beach is a census-designated place located in St. ... United States of America, showing states, divided into counties. ... Flagler County is a county located in the U.S. state of Florida. ... Putnam County is a county located in the state of Florida. ... Clay County is a county located in the U.S. state of Florida. ... Duval County is a county located in the U.S. state of Florida. ...


 
 

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