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Encyclopedia > St Martin in the Fields
St Martin-in-the-Fields, London
St Martin-in-the-Fields, London
Interior of St Martin-in-the-Fields
Interior of St Martin-in-the-Fields
St Martin-in-the-Fields and Charing Cross, circa 1562
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St Martin-in-the-Fields and Charing Cross, circa 1562
The ceiling of the café in the crypt
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The ceiling of the café in the crypt
St. Martin-in-the-Fields by night, from Trafalgar Square
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St. Martin-in-the-Fields by night, from Trafalgar Square

St Martin-in-the-Fields is a Church of England church at the north east corner of Trafalgar Square in the City of Westminster, London. St Martin-in-the-Fields, exterior view Image by ChrisO File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... St Martin-in-the-Fields, exterior view Image by ChrisO File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Interior of St Martin-in-the-Fields, London Image by ChrisO File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Interior of St Martin-in-the-Fields, London Image by ChrisO File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Victorian Eleanor Cross at Charing Cross The name Charing Cross, now given to a district of central London in the City of Westminster, comes from the original hamlet of Charing, where King Edward I placed a memorial to his wife, Eleanor of Castile. ... Events Earliest English slave-trading expedition under John Hawkins. ... Crypt is also a commonly used name of water trumpets, aquatic plants. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... Trafalgar Square is a square in central London that commemorates the Battle of Trafalgar (1805), a British naval victory of the Napoleonic Wars. ... The City of Westminster is a London borough with city status, situated to the west of the City of London and north of the River Thames. ... The Houses of Parliament and the clock tower containing Big Ben Part of the London skyline viewed from the South Bank London is the capital city of England and the United Kingdom. ...


The earliest reference to the church is recorded in 1222, with a dispute between the Abbot of Westminster and the Bishop of London as to who had control over it. It was decided in favour of Westminster, and used by the monks of Westminster Abbey. The church was rebuilt by Henry VIII in 1542. At this time, it was literally "in the fields" in an isolated position between the cities of Westminster and London. Centuries: 12th century - 13th century - 14th century Decades: 1170s 1180s 1190s 1200s 1210s - 1220s - 1230s 1240s 1250s 1260s 1270s Years: 1217 1218 1219 1220 1221 1222 1223 1224 1225 1226 1227 See also: 1222 state leaders Events Foundation of the University of Padua Completion of the Cistercian convent in Alcobaca... The Abbey at night, from Deans Yard. ... Arms of the Bishop of London The Bishop of London is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of London in the Province of Canterbury. ... The Abbeys western façade The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to as Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral, in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... Events War resumes between Francis I of France and Emperor Charles V. This time Henry VIII of England is allied to the Emperor, while James V of Scotland and Sultan Suleiman I are allied to the French. ... For London as a whole, see the main article London. ...


The church survived the Great Fire of London due to its isolated position, but was replaced with a new building, designed by James Gibbs in 1721. The design was criticised widely at the time but subsequently became extremely famous, being copied particularly widely in the United States. The church is essentially rectangular, with a great pediment in the Classical style supported by a row of huge Corinthian columns. The high steeple is topped with a gilt crown. Gibbs was certainly inspired by Sir Christopher Wren as the interior is very similar to St James's in Piccadilly. London, as it appeared from Bankside, Southwark, During the Great Fire — Derived from a Print of the Period by Visscher The Great Fire of London was a major conflagration that swept through the City of London from September 2 to September 5, 1666, and resulted more or less in the... St Martins-in-the-Fields, London, is the prototype of many New England churches. ... // Events Pope Innocent XIII becomes pope Johann Sebastian Bach composes the Brandenburg Concertos April 4 - Robert Walpole becomes the first prime minister of Britain September 10 - Treaty of Nystad is signed, bringing an end to the Great Northern War November 2 - Peter I is proclaimed Emperor of All the Russias... From the point of view of modern times, the ancient civilizations of the Mediterranean sometimes seem to blend smoothly into one melange we call the Classical. ... The Corinthian order as used for the portico of the Pantheon, Rome provided a prominent model for Renaissance and later architects, through the medium of engravings. ...


The church has a close relationship with the Royal Family – King George I was a churchwarden and Queen Mary attended regularly – and with the Admiralty, which falls within its parish. The White Ensign of the Royal Navy hangs above the altar, accompanied by the flag of the Admiralty Board. Traditionally the church's bells are rung to proclaim a naval victory. George I (Georg Ludwig) (28 May 1660 – 11 June 1727) was Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) from 23 January 1698, and King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 1 August 1714, until his death. ... A Churchwarden is a lay official in an Anglican parish. ... Mary of Teck Mary of Teck (Victoria Mary Augusta Louise Olga Pauline Claudine Agnes) (26 May , 1867 – 24 March 1953), later Queen Mary, was the Queen consort of George V of the United Kingdom. ... Old Admiralty House, Whitehall, London, Thomas Ripley, architect, 1723-26, was not admired by his contemporaries and earned him some scathing couplets from Alexander Pope The Admiralty was historically the authority in the United Kingdom responsible for the command of the Royal Navy. ... The White Ensign. ... The Royal Navy of the United Kingdom is the senior service of the British armed services, being the oldest of its three branches. ... The Admiralty Board is a committee of the Defence Council of the United Kingdom responsible for the administration of the Royal Navy. ...


A number of notables are buried in the church, including Robert Boyle, Nell Gwynne, William Hogarth, Sir Joshua Reynolds, Jack Sheppard and Thomas Chippendale. Robert Boyle The Honourable Robert Boyle (January 25, 1627 - December 30, 1692) was an Anglo-Irish natural philosopher, noted for his work in physics and chemistry. ... Nell Gwyn (or Gwynn or Gwynne), was born Eleanor Gwynne, (February 1650 - 14 November 1687), the most famous of the many mistresses of King Charles II, was called pretty, witty Nell by Samuel Pepys. ... William Hogarth, self-portrait, 1745 William Hogarth (November 10, 1697 – October 26, 1764) was a major British painter, engraver, pictorial satirist, and editorial cartoonist who has been credited as a pioneer in western sequential art. ... Sir Joshua Reynolds Sir Joshua Reynolds (July 16, 1723–February 23, 1792) was the most important and influential of eighteenth-century English painters, specialising in portraits and promoting the Grand Style in painting which depended on idealization of the imperfect. ... Jack Sheppard in Newgate Prison Jack Sheppard (1702-16 November 1724) was a notorious English robber, burglar and thief of early 18th century London. ... Thomas Chippendale, the elder (June 5, 1718 - November 1779) was a furniture designer and maker from Otley, West Yorkshire. ...


Because of its prominent position, St Martin-in-the-Fields is possibly the most famous non-cathedral church in London. It is well known for its "open door" policy under which the church is open to the public at all times of the day and night, its work for the homeless, and its occasional free lunchtime concerts. Many today famous ensembles performed at the church, including the Academy of St Martin-in-the-Fields and New Trinity Baroque. A homeless man pushes a cart down the street. ... The Academy of St. ... New Trinity Baroque is an American orchestra based in Atlanta. ...


There is a popular café in the Crypt, where jazz concerts are held. All profits from this goes to the activities of the church with the homeless. The Crypt is also home to the London Brass Rubbing Centre, and art gallery and a book and gift shop. Jazz master Louis Armstrong remains one of the most loved and best known of all jazz musicians. ... Brass rubbing was originally a British mania for reproducing brasses -- commemorative embossed brass reliefs found in church memorials from the 14th and 15th centuries -- onto paper. ...


In mid 2005 work began on a £34 million restoration and expansion project. This includes cleaning and repair to the church itself and redevelopment and expansion of its visitor, music and hostel facilities, which emcompass not only the crypt of the church itself, but a row of houses to the north and some underground spaces in between. The funding includes a grant of £14.69 million from the Heritage Lottery Fund. For details of notes and coins, see British coinage and British banknotes. ... A play here! sign outside a newsagent, incorporating the National Lotterys logo of a stylised hand with crossed fingers. ...


See also

London has many famous churches and cathedrals, in a density unmatched anywhere else in England. ... The Academy of St. ...

External link

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St Martin-in-the-Fields
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