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Encyclopedia > St Malachy

St. Malachy (1094 - Nov. 2, 1148) was the appointed Archbishop of Armagh, who was attributed several miracles and of having a vision with the identity of the last ten Popes in the Vatican. He was canonized by Pope Clement III, on 6 July 1199.


St. Malachy, whose family name was O'Morgair, was born in Armagh in 1094. St. Bernard describes him as of noble birth. He was baptized Maelmhaedhoc (a name which has been Latinized as Malchy) and was trained under Imhar O'Hagan, subsequently Abbot of Armagh. After a long course of studies he was ordained priest by St. Cellach (Celsus) in 1119. In order to perfect himself in sacred liturgy and theology, he proceeded to Lismore, where he spent nearly two years under St. Malchus. He was then chosen Abbot of Bangor, in 1123. A year later, he was consecrated Bishop of Connor, and, in 1132, he was promoted to the primacy of Armagh. St. Bernard gives us many interesting anecdotes regarding St. Malachy, and highly praises his zeal for religion both in Connor and Armagh. In 1127 he paid a second visit to Lismore and acted for a time as confessor to Cormac MacCarthy, Prince of Desmond. While Bishop of Connor he continued to reside at Bangor, and when some of the native princes sacked Connor, he brought the Bangor monks to Iveragh, County Kerry, where they were welcomed by now King Cormac. On the death of St. Celsus (who was buried at Lismore in 1129), St. Malachy was appointed Archbishop of Armagh, 1132, which dignity he accepted with great reluctance. Owing to intrigues, he was unable to take possession of his see for two years; even then he had to purchase the Bachal Isu (Staff of Jesus) from Niall, the usurping lay-primate.


The influence of St. Malachy in Irish ecclesiastical affairs has been compared with that of Boniface in Germany. He reformed and reorganized the Irish Church and brought it into subjection to Rome; like Boniface, he was a zealous reformer and a promoter of monasticism.


During three years at Armagh, as Bernard of Clairvaux writes, St. Malachy restored the discipline of the Church, grown lax during the intruded rule of a series of lay-abbots, and had the Roman Liturgy adopted. St. Bernard continues: Having extirpated barbarism and re-established Christian morals, seeing all things tranquil he began to think of his own peace. He therefore resigned Armagh, in 1138, and returned to Connor, dividing the see into Down and Connor, retaining the former. He founded a priory of Austin Canons at Downpatrick, and was unceasing in his episcopal labours. Early in 1139 he journeyed to Rome, via Scotland, England, and France, visiting St. Bernard at Clairvaux. He petitioned Pope Innocent for palliums for the Sees of Armagh and Cashel, and was appointed legate for Ireland. On his return visit to Clairvaux he obtained five monks for a foundation in Ireland, under Chirstian, an Irishman, as superior: thus arose the great Abbey of Mellifont in 1142. St Malachy set out on a second journey to Rome in 1148, but on arriving at Clairvaux he fell sick, and died in the arms of St. Bernard, on 2 November.


St. Malachy 's feast is celebrated on 3 November, in order not to clash with the Feast of All Souls.


Prophecy of the Popes

The Prophecy of the Popes is a list of 112 short Latin phrases purporting to describe each of the Roman Catholic popes beginning with Pope Celestine II (elected in 1143) and concluding with a future pope described in the prophecy as "Peter the Roman", whose pontificate will end in the destruction of the city of Rome and the Last Judgment. The prophecy is purportedly based on a revelation experienced by Malachy.


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
St. Malachy (0 words)
On the death of St. Celsus (who was buried at Lismore in 1129), St. Malachy was appointed Archbishop of Armagh, 1132, which dignity he accepted with great reluctance.
St Malachy set out on a second journey to Rome in 1148, but on arriving at Clairvaux he fell sick, and died in the arms of St. Bernard, on 2 November.
Malachy was canonized by Pope Clement (III), on 6 July, 1199, and his feast is celebrated on 3 November, in order not to clash with the Feast of All Souls.
St. Malachy (0 words)
St Malachy of Armagh's chilling prophecy was that the world would end with the death of the 112th pope.
Malachy did not foresee the names of the future popes, but rather a distinguishing trait, or an allusion to a country, coat of arms, or insignia - given in Latin - of each of the 112 popes that were to succeed Celestine II, who was elected in 1130.
St. Malachy of Armagh made a chilling prophecy in 1139 that the world would end with the death of the 112th pope.
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