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Encyclopedia > St Helens, Merseyside
St Helens


The Town Hall at Victoria Square Image File history File links Question_book-new. ... St Helens is a Metropolitan Borough in Merseyside, North West England. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ...


St Helens shown within Merseyside
Population 102,629
OS grid reference SJ505955
Metropolitan borough St Helens
Metropolitan county Merseyside
Region North West
Constituent country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town ST HELENS
Postcode district WA11, WA10, WA9
Dialling code 01744
Police Merseyside
Fire Merseyside
Ambulance North West
European Parliament North West England
UK Parliament St Helens North
St Helens South
List of places: UKEnglandMerseyside

Coordinates: 53°27′16″N 2°44′46″W / 53.4543, -2.7461 Image File history File links Size of this preview: 504 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 714 pixel, file size: 407 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... Merseyside is a metropolitan county in North West England, with a population of 1,365,900. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... St Helens is a Metropolitan Borough in Merseyside, North West England. ... Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties are one of the four levels of English administrative division used for the purposes of local government. ... Merseyside is a metropolitan county in North West England, with a population of 1,365,900. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... -1... // Constituent country is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a historical, currently non-legally officially recognised country makes up a part of a larger entity or grouping. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This list of sovereign states, alphabetically arranged, gives an overview of states around the world with information on the extent of their sovereignty. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The WA postcode area, also known as the Warrington postcode area[2], is a group of postal districts in North West England that are sub-divisions of nine post towns. ... +44 redirects here. ... There are a number of policing agencies in the United Kingdom. ... Merseyside Merseyside Police is the police force covering Merseyside in North West England. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service Is the fire service covering the county of Merseyside in north-west England and is the statutory firfighting and rescue service responsible for all 999 fire brigade calls in Sefton, Knowsley, St Helens, Liverpool and Wirral. ... Emergency medical services in England are almost all provided by the National Health Service - the public health service in England. ... The North West Ambulance Service NHS Trust was formed on 1 July 2006 as part of Health Minister Lord Warners plans to reduce the number of NHS ambulance service trusts operating in the United Kingdom to 12. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... The constituency within England. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... St Helens North is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... St Helens South is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in England Lists of places within counties List of places in Bedfordshire List of places in Berkshire List of places in Buckinghamshire List of places in Cambridgeshire List of places in Cheshire List of places in Cleveland List of places... This is a list of cities, towns and villages in the ceremonial county of Merseyside, England. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


St Helens (pronunciation ) is a large town in Merseyside, England. It is the largest settlement of the Metropolitan Borough of St Helens with a population of just over 100,000 of an urban area with a total population of 176,843 at the time of the 2001 census.[1]. Image File history File links En-uk-StHelens. ... Merseyside is a metropolitan county in North West England, with a population of 1,365,900. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... St Helens is a Metropolitan Borough in Merseyside, North West England. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ...


Historically a part of Lancashire, the area grew during the 18th and 19th century as a significant centre for coal mining[2][3] and glassmaking[4][5]. Both prior and during this time it was also home to a cotton and linen industry (notably sail making[6]) that did not last through the mid 19th century as well as salt[2], lime and alkali pits[6], copper[7] smelting[8][7], and brewing[9]. The historic counties of England are ancient subdivisions of England. ... Lancashire is a non-metropolitan county of historic origin in the North West of England, bounded to the west by the Irish Sea. ... Surface coal mining in Wyoming in the United States of America. ... Glass can be made transparent and flat, or into other shapes and colors as shown in this sphere from the Verrerie of Brehat in Brittany. ... This article is about common table salt. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Alkaline redirects here. ... The most commonly present source of copper ore is chalcopyrite (CuFeS2), which accounts for about 50% of copper production. ... This article is about beer. ...


The town and borough is notable for being the site of the first fully man made canal opened in autumn 1757[10], and also the first competition for steam locomotives (in Rainhill Trials[11]). The Rainhill Trials were an important competition in the early days of steam locomotive railways, run in October of 1829 near Rainhill (just outside Liverpool). ...


Today, St Helens is very much a commercial town. The main industries have since left, become outdated, or have been outsourced leaving the float and patterned rolled glass producer Pilkingtons, a world leader in their industry, as the town's one remaining large industrial employer. Previously the town had been home to Beechams (now part of GlaxoSmithKline), Ravenhead glass (bought out by the Belgian nationalised Durobor[12]), United Glass Bottles (U.G.B.), Triplex (owned by Pilkington, farmed out to India), Daglish Foundry (closed and demolished 1939[13]), and Greenall's (now located in nearby Warrington). Pilkington plc is the largest glass manufacturer in the United Kingdom. ... GlaxoSmithKline plc (LSE: GSK NYSE: GSK) is a United Kingdom-based pharmaceutical, biological, and healthcare company. ... Ravenhead Glass was a glassworks near Ravenhead Colliery, Merseyside, North West England. ... Greenalls Brewery started in 1762. ... This article is about the Borough in the north-west of England. ...

Contents

History

The origin of the name St. Helens stretches back to a "chapel of ease"[2], dating back to at least the 16th century (earliest reference 1552), dedicated to St. Elyn[14]. The Chapel was noted as "consisting only of a 'challis and a lytle bell".[2] The chapel was at the crux of the townships on the major thoroughfare for traffic between the River Mersey and northern Lancashire, and also between the port town of Liverpool, and the landlocked Manchester townships.[2] Windle itself is recorded on some maps as "Windhull" in 1201 suggesting the land had been occupied for at least 300 hundred years prior. The River Mersey is a river in north west England. ...


Predominately arable land[2] the area was also noted for its large swathes of moss, heath and bog land and was covered elsewhere in parts of the greater Mersey Forest[2] (though the larger "Community Forest" was not established until much later[15]). Virgin boreal acid bogs at Browns Lake Bog, Ohio A bog is a wetland type that accumulates peat, a deposit of dead plant material. ...


As late as the start of the 19th century, St Helens did not exist as a town in its own right. It was formed from the townships of Eccleston, Windle, Parr and Sutton, townships of the parish of Prescot which became civil parishes on their own in 1866. Census figures from 1801 suggest the population of the township area to be 12,500[16] which by 1860 had reached 50,000. Incorporation as a borough was granted on the 2nd February, 1868 when Queen Victoria granted St. Helens a municipal charter. 20 years later St. Helens became a county borough. Eccleston is a Civil Parish and historic township within the Metroplitan Borough of St Helens,Merseyside. ... Windle is a suburb of St. ... Parr is a former village, now situated within St. ... The term township generally means the district or area associated with a town. ... Prescot is a town with the status of civil parish, 8 miles to the east of Liverpool in northwest England. ... Victoria Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819–22 January 1901) was a Queen of the United Kingdom, reigning from 20 June 1837 until her death. ...


Until the mid 1700's the local industry was almost entirely based on small scale home based initiatives such as linen weaving. The landscape was dotted by similarly small scale mining operations, notably for coal and it's the coal to which the town owes its initial growth and development[2] and (subsequently) the symbiotic relationship shared with the coal dependent glass industry.


The town was built both physically and metaphorically on coal: the original motto on the borough coat of arms was "Ex Terra Lucem" and local collieries employed up to 5,000 men as late as the 1970s, whilst during the boom years of the British coal industry (1913 being the peak year of production with 1 million employed in UK mining) the St.Helens division of the Lancashire and Cheshire Miners' Federation (the local miners' union) had the largest membership (10%) of that federation. Owing primarily to the abundance of winnable coal reserves, the quality of local sand, the near availability of Cheshire salt and the transport revolution -- first the Sankey Canal and then the railways from 1830 onwards -- a glass and chemical industry was established in St Helens. The Sankey Canal was opened in 1757 to transport coal from the pits in Haydock and Parr to the River Mersey. An extension to the canal (the St.Helens section) was made in 1775 linking the canal to St Helens. In the 1830s, the St Helens and Runcorn Gap Railway was built for the same purpose. The Sankey Canal, also known as the Sankey Brook Navigation, is a disused canal in Lancashire, in the north-west of England. ... Haydock is a ward within of the Metropolitan Borough of St Helens, Merseyside, England and is in the historic County of Lancashire. It was one of the United Kingdoms richest areas in coal and coal mining. ... The River Mersey is a river in north west England. ... St Helens and Runcorn Gap Railway was an early railway company that acted as a feeder to the original Liverpool and Manchester Railway. ...


The town served as a hub for the growth of Liverpool providing raw materials chiefly due to its location. Initially Liverpool petitioned for the extension of the turnpike road (The "Tollbar" area in St. Helens still retaining the significant reference), but subsequently resulted in the creation of an entirely new waterway. The original concept was to make the Sankey Brook navigable, but its eventual result was a full man made canal linking St. Helens to the River Mersey and the city of Liverpool. The Liverpool and Manchester Railway was finished in 1830 passing through the southern edge of the town at Rainhill and St Helens Junction, and furthering its economic development as a centre of industry. Inaugural journey of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway The Liverpool and Manchester Railway (L&MR) was the worlds first intercity passenger railway in which all the trains were timetabled and operated for most of the distance solely by steam locomotives. ...


Its clock tower originally had a steeple but this was destroyed in a fire in 1913. In the centre of the modern town centre, adjacent to the town hall, is the Gamble Institute, built in 1896 and named after Sir David Gamble, who was the first mayor and who also gifted the land for the building. Today, the Gamble Institute building serves as the central library and also houses other municipal offices and archives. Other buildings of note are the Friends' Meeting House, the Beecham Clock Tower - which is now part of St Helens College - and St Mary's Lowe House Catholic Church. The town, and old county borough, included the suburbs of Clock Face, Sutton and part of Windle. Clock Face is an area of St. ...


The glass industry is no longer the major employer it once was, however it still employs over a thousand people in the town.[17] The large Pilkington Brothers works, founded in 1826, dominates the town's industrial quarter and still produces all the UK's output of flat glass. Pilkington Glass is a well-known British glass manufacturer. ...


Major investment is currently transforming the quarter into a retail and communications hub with former industrial land being reclaimed for use as hotels, shopping areas and housing. The many coal mines on the outlying districts of St.Helens, (most of which were closed before St.Helens borough was created and were, therefore, never in St.Helens) including Clock Face, Ravenhead, Sutton Manor, Bold, Wood Pit (Haydock), Lyme Pit (Haydock), Old Boston (Haydock) and Lea Green, were closed between the 1950s and early 1990s. The last colliery in the modern Metropolitan Borough and in the St.Helens area of the South Lancashire Coalfield, was Parkside, in Newton-le-Willows, which was closed in 1992. Wyoming coal mine Coal mining is the mining of coal. ... Clock Face is an area of St. ... Bold is a civil parish in the Metropolitan Borough of St Helens in Merseyside, England. ... Haydock is a ward within of the Metropolitan Borough of St Helens, Merseyside, England and is in the historic County of Lancashire. It was one of the United Kingdoms richest areas in coal and coal mining. ... Haydock is a ward within of the Metropolitan Borough of St Helens, Merseyside, England and is in the historic County of Lancashire. It was one of the United Kingdoms richest areas in coal and coal mining. ... Haydock is a ward within of the Metropolitan Borough of St Helens, Merseyside, England and is in the historic County of Lancashire. It was one of the United Kingdoms richest areas in coal and coal mining. ... A metropolitan borough (or metropolitan district) is a type of local government district in England, covering urban areas within metropolitan counties. ... For the village, see Newton-le-Willows, North Yorkshire. ...


Governance

St. Helens coat of arms, "Ex Terra Lucem" - "From the Ground, Light"
St. Helens coat of arms, "Ex Terra Lucem" - "From the Ground, Light"

In 1868, St Helens was incorporated as a borough, and was then made a county borough in 1889. The town hall was built between 1872 and 1876. As a county borough, St Helens was, from 1889 to 1974,outside the administrative county of Lancashire but remained within the geographical county palatine. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ... The division into counties is one of the larger divisions of England. ... Lancashire is a non-metropolitan county of historic origin in the North West of England, bounded to the west by the Irish Sea. ...


In 1974, under the provisions of the Local Government Act 1972, St Helens became the administrative centre of the Metropolitan Borough of St Helens in the newly created Merseyside Metropolitan county. The Local Government Act 1972 (1972 c. ... St Helens is a Metropolitan Borough in Merseyside, North West England. ... Merseyside is a metropolitan county in North West England, with a population of 1,365,900. ... The six metropolitan counties shown within England The metropolitan counties are a type of county-level subnational entity in current use in England. ...


Geography

'Billinge Lump' is the highest point in St Helens and Merseyside
'Billinge Lump' is the highest point in St Helens and Merseyside

The St Helens Borough covers roughly 30 km² over an area of soft rolling hills used primarily for agricultural purposes, mainly arable. The highest point in the Metropolitan Borough of St Helens is Billinge Hill, 3¾ miles (6 km) north from the town centre. The town is landlocked with a stream running through, Mill Brook/Windle Brook running through Eccleston and connecting with the (disused) St. Helens Branch/Section of the Sankey Canal in the town centre. St Helens is around 160 feet (50 m) above sea level. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 186 KB)The beacon tower on Billinge Hill. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 186 KB)The beacon tower on Billinge Hill. ... St Helens is a Metropolitan Borough in Merseyside, North West England. ... Farming, ploughing rice paddy, in food, feed, fiber and other desired products by cultivation of certain plants and the raising of domesticated animals (livestock). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Billinge Hill is the highest point of the St Helens unitary authority. ... The Sankey Canal, also known as the Sankey Brook Navigation, is a disused canal in Lancashire, in the north-west of England. ...


Demography

Christianity is the main religion in St Helens, being about 87% according to the 2001 census. This makes St Helens the "most Christian town in Britain".[1]. There is very little ethnic minority representation in the St Helens population, one of the lowest levels in the country. 98.8% of the St Helens population is White British.


Transport

Road

St Helens lies in close proximity to the motorway network with the M6 running a few miles to the eastern side of the town, with Junction 23 at Haydock. The M62 runs a couple of miles to the south of the town with Junction 7 at Rainhill Stoops. The M57's Junction 2 lies several miles south west of St.Helens, at Prescot. The M58 is several miles north of St.Helens. The A580 East Lancashire Road runs north of the town centre alongside Eccleston, Moss Bank and Haydock. It is a former trunk road taking traffic from Manchester to the Liverpool Docks. It was built between 1929 and 1934 and was opened by King George V. It was intended to take pressure away from the A58, a major road running from Prescot (M57) through St.Helens to the M1 at Wetherby, Yorkshire. The Rainford By-Pass A570 is the transport route from Southport and west Lancashire through St Helens and the M62 at Rainhill Stoops. A major development in communication was the opening of the St Helens Linkway (classified as part of the A570) in 1994, which linked the town directly with the M62 and, by proxy, an alternative connection to the M6. The A572 takes traffic from the town centre through Parr to Earlestown and Newton-le-Willows. This article concerns the M6 motorway in England. ... Haydock is a ward within of the Metropolitan Borough of St Helens, Merseyside, England and is in the historic County of Lancashire. It was one of the United Kingdoms richest areas in coal and coal mining. ... The M62 motorway is a west-east trans-Pennine motorway in northern England, connecting the cities of Liverpool and Hull. ... , Rainhill is a village in the Borough of St Helens, Lancashire, United Kingdom about 10 miles away from Liverpool. ... The M57 motorway, also known as the Liverpool Outer Ring Road, is a motorway in England. ... The M58 motorway is a motorway in England. ... The A580, the Liverpool-East Lancashire Road (abbreviated to East Lancs Road) was designed and built to provide better access to the Port of Liverpool for East Lancashire and Manchester. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... The A58 is a major road in England. ... The A570 is a primary route in northern England, that runs from St Helens to Southport. ... For other uses, see Southport (disambiguation). ... The numbering zones for A-roads in Great Britain List of A roads beginning with 5 in Great Britain starting north/east of the A5, west of the A6, south of the Solway Firth/Eden Estuary. ... Earlestown Town Hall The Viaduct seen from the Sankey Valley Country Park Detail of the viaduct from third arch Earlestown forms the western part of the former urban district of Newton-le-Willows, but is now in the Metropolitan Borough of St Helens, Merseyside, England. ... For the village, see Newton-le-Willows, North Yorkshire. ...


Rail

Rail is an important means of transport in the borough. St Helens Central serves as the town's main railway station, which lies on the Wigan to Liverpool line. Other stations on this line in the town are Thatto Heath and Eccleston Park. The Liverpool to Manchester line serves St Helens at Rainhill, St Helens Junction and Lea Green which was opened in 2000 in order to bring people away from the now dilapidated St Helens Junction Station[citation needed], which was opened on 15 September 1830 by the pioneering Liverpool and Manchester Railway. St Helens Central is recently finished a major redevelopment at a cost of £6 million, which the Council hopes will encourage investment, create more jobs and improve the gateway into the town. railroads redirects here. ... St Helens Central railway station serves the town of St Helens, Merseyside United Kingdom. ... , Wigan is a town in Greater Manchester, England. ... Thatto Heath railway station is located in St Helens, Merseyside. ... Eccleston Park railway station Serves the area of Eccleston Park in St Helens, Merseyside External links Train times and station information for Eccleston Park railway station from National Rail Map of Eccleston Park railway station from Multimap. ... St Helens Junction railway station serves the town of St Helens, Merseyside United Kingdom. ... Lea Green railway station is a railway station in St Helens, Merseyside, England, around three miles from the town centre near to the suburb of Clock Face. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Inaugural journey of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway The Liverpool and Manchester Railway (L&MR) was the worlds first intercity passenger railway in which all the trains were timetabled and operated for most of the distance solely by steam locomotives. ... St Helens Central railway station serves the town of St Helens, Merseyside United Kingdom. ...


Air and sea

The Sankey Canal (photograph taken in Newton-le-Willows.
The Sankey Canal (photograph taken in Newton-le-Willows.

St Helens has no airport. The nearest airport is Liverpool John Lennon Airport, serving European destinations, located about 12 miles (19 km) south-west of the town, and is connected with a direct bus service. Manchester Airport is approximately 25 miles (40 km) away and has numerous direct flights to Europe, North America, the Middle East and Asia. St Helens is a landlocked town, but with easy access to the ports of Liverpool, on the River Mersey and Mostyn, North Wales, on the River Dee. The Sankey Canal, including the St.Helens section, is no longer used for transporting goods, constisting of several short sections only, the remainder being drained and filled. Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 1365 KB)Sankey Canal, photograph taken by Lmno on 9 Oct 2004 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 1365 KB)Sankey Canal, photograph taken by Lmno on 9 Oct 2004 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For the village, see Newton-le-Willows, North Yorkshire. ... For City Airport Manchester, UK, see City Airport Manchester. ...


Town twinning

Flag of Germany Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg, Germany Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Image File history File links Coat_of_arms_of_Stuttgart. ... For other uses, see Stuttgart (disambiguation). ... Location Coordinates , , Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DE1 Capital Stuttgart Minister-President Günther Oettinger (CDU) Governing parties CDU / FDP Votes in Bundesrat 6 (of 69) Basic statistics Area  35,752 km² (13,804 sq mi) Population 10,741,000 (11/2006)[1]  - Density...


Education

Primary Schools

The Borough of St Helens has one nursery school, one infant school, one junior school and fifty two primary schools. Performance in the Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2 SATs has been consistently above national averages over the past 5 years. An example of a primary school is St Thomas of Canterbury RCP.


Special schools

There are three special schools in St Helens - Penkford, Mill Green and Lansbury Bridge.


Secondary schools

The Borough of St Helens has eleven secondary schools. These are Cowley Language College,Cowley Hard Lane Site, Cowley Broadway Site, De La Salle St Helens, St Augustine's, St Aelred's, Newton-Le-Willows Community High School, Haydock Sports College, Sutton High Sports College, Rainhill, Rainford High Technology College and St Cuthbert's. Cowley Language College is a community secondary school and sixth form college located in St Helens, Merseyside, England. ... Saint Jean-Baptiste de la Salle, founder of the De La Salle Brothers // Lasallian educational institutions are educational institutions affiliated with the Institute of the Brothers of the Christian Schools, also known as the De La Salle Brothers or the De La Salle Christian Brothers, a Roman Catholic religious teaching... Augustine is the name of two important Saints: Augustine of Hippo (354-430) -- philosopher and theologian, author of The City of God, Confessions Augustine of Canterbury (d. ... Aelred of Hexham, Abbot of Rievaulx, is a Christian saint of noble descent who was born in Hexham, England, in 1110. ... Sutton High Sports College is a school in the Sutton area of St. ... , Rainhill is a village in the Borough of St Helens, Lancashire, United Kingdom about 10 miles away from Liverpool. ... St Cuthberts Catholic Community College of Business and enterprise is a high school situated in St Helens, Merseyside, England. ...


Further education

The town has seven educational institutions offering post-16 education in Cowley Language College, Rainford High Technology College, Rainhill High, St Alred's High, Sutton High (all 11-18 secondary schools), Carmel College (a sixth form college) and St Helens College (a general FE college). Carmel College is a leading college in the country with a value added score of 328. The college is an associate of the University of Liverpool. St Helens College offers a wide variety of Higher and Further Education courses including degree courses, foundation degrees, BTECs and professional qulaifications at the college's Business School. The college has a growing reputation for its standards and achievements. There is no university in St Helens; locals who stay in the area and go to university often take advantage of the surrounding universities such as Edge Hill (Ormskirk), Liverpool, Manchester, Salford and Chester. Cowley Language College is a community secondary school and sixth form college located in St Helens, Merseyside, England. ... The University of Liverpool is a university in the city of Liverpool, England. ... Edge Hill University is situated in Ormskirk in Lancashire, England. ... Ormskirk is a market town in North West England, situated thirteen miles north of Liverpool and fifteen miles south of Preston. ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... For other uses, see Salford (disambiguation). ... For the larger local government district, see Chester (district). ...


Media

St Helens has no television or radio broadcasters. However 102.4 Wish FM gives the second part of its name (sh) to St Helens while the first half goes to Wigan (Wi), where it is based. There are two local weekly newspapers which are freely distributed. These are the St Helens Star and the St Helens Reporter. 102. ...


St Helens College has previously broadcasted temporary, limited service radio broadcasts from their Town Centre Campus, headed by the late Paul Dempsey, who previously worked as a presenter on BBC Radio.


A new internet station is under development and will be launched soon at Radio St.Helens


Leisure & investment

Investment and local arts

The past twenty years have seen major redevelopments in the town centre. This has included mass pedestrianisation of much of shopping area, with traffic being directed around the town centre on existing roads. There have been several noteworthy theatres in St.Helens. The first Theatre Royal was built on Bridge Street and was a large wooden barn. This was open for several seasons until heavy snow caused the roof to collapse. It was then replaced by a new Theatre Royal on Milk Street. This building can still be seen today, in its newer guise as The Citadel arts centre. The Theatre Royal on Milk Street consisted of stalls, two balconies and an ornate interior. It became extremely popular with touring theatre and music hall, playing host to the likes of Vesta Tilley and George Formby and some of the best known theatre productions of the day. Most of its popularity was due to the manager, Wallace Revill. Due to the growing audience figures, Revill built a new theatre on Corporation street and transferred the Theatre Royal name to this, and the Theatre Royal remains on the site to this day. The Milk Street theatre was then purchased by the Salvation Army where it was more or less completely re-built internally. It was re named SA Citadel. It remained in this use for nearly 90 years, until the Salvation Army moved to a newer site. It was then opened as The Citadel arts centre in 1988, and was completely refurbished again in 2000. Today it is an extremely popular venue for live music, dance, drama and art.


The Corporation St Theatre Royal opened by Revill, was relatively shortlived as it was destroyed by fire. It was then replaced by the current building which was designed by perhaps the greatest theatre architecht in history, Frank Matcham. The theatre was designed with a baroque style with ornate balconies, chandiliers and boxes. It was hit by disaster again in the 1940s when part of the cieling collapsed, with several fatalities as a result. In the 1960s the theatre was purchased by Pilkingtons and was gutted internally leaving it in the rather drab state it is seen in today. The beautiful auditorium was destroyed as was the ornate frontage, simply replaced with a huge glass sheet. The theatre has remained open ever since and is today a very popular venue with top class touring acts and of course, the annual Pantomime. The front of the theatre was refurbished in 2001, however the inside of the theatre still remains a grey painted reminder of a catastrophic decision in the 1960's which destroyed a masterpiece of theatre architecture.


The George Street Quarter regeneration programme left an impressive stamp on the town. The George Street area receives foot traffic from the railway station so the area was enhanced to leave a positive impression on tourists. Major improvements were made to building exteriors, parking, security, street furniture and paving. This has attracted several new businesses to the quarter including award-winning restaurants. The surrounding areas are now receiving attention, with the Hardshaw Centre receiving a new car park exit stairway into the George Street quarter. The stairway spirals around a tall pointed metal structure and is named 'The Needle'. However this new and modern looking stairway is in stark contrast to the brown, square and brick built 'Hardshaw' Centre. The main shopping areas, Church Street and Church Square, are currently undergoing extensive regeneration and there is a proposal for Duke Street, which extends into the town centre, to also receive funding. The main problem in St.Helens has been the virtual elimination of all the old buildings in the 1960s and 1970s, leaving the town with a large selection of grey, square blots and few traditional buildings. It is due to its 'fragmented' town centre, the results of years of poor planning in the 1960s - 1980s that it is not as well appreciated as the neighbouring towns of Wigan and Warrington. The current council is working hard to solve these problems with good results. Urban Renewal redirects here. ...


Each year many youngsters from the Scout and Guide Movement perform at the annual St. Helens Scout and Guide Gang Show. The show has been nationally recognised as being of a high standard and is often used by other gang shows worldwide as a form of inspiration to get ideas or acts or dance etc. The show is usually held in mid April at the Theatre Royal on Corporation Street. The show has a lovely mixture of dance, song and act which proves a huge hit year after year and due to its nature it is deemed one of the most family friendly shows in St. Helens. A Gang Show is an amateur theatrical performance, generally of a high standard, where the cast is made up of principally youth members of Scouts and Guides and a minority of adult leaders. ...


The Catholic church of St. Anns and Blessed Dominic is a site of pilgrimage for Roman Catholics. The Victorian missionary Blessed Dominic Barberi is buried in the church on Monastery Road. It was he who received John Henry Cardinal Newman into the Catholic Church. Alongside Blessed Dominic Father Ignatius Spencer is buried. The son of the 2nd Earl Spencer he was a famed convert to the Catholic faith. Elizabeth Prout, foundress of the religious order, the Sisters of the Cross and Passion is also buried with them. Blessed Dominic of the Mother of God, born Dominic Barberi, a member of the Passionist Congregation and theologian, born near Viterbo, Italy, 22 June, 1792; died near Reading, England, 27 August, 1849. ... Father Ignatius of St. ... Servant of God Elizabeth Prout, known as Mother Mary Joseph of Jesus, born September 2 1820, died January 11 1864. ...


Museums & parks

The World of Glass Museum, which opened in 2000, incorporating the Pilkington Glass Museum, has received many awards including North West Attraction of the Year. The North West Museum of Road Transport is another museum located in the town. The Smithy is a small museum in Eccleston about the works of a local blacksmith. The North West Museum of Road Transport (formerly St. ... Eccleston, Chorley, Lancashire Eccleston is a village located in Chorley Borough, Lancashire. ... For other uses, see Blacksmith (disambiguation). ...


The borough of St Helens has several major parks and open spaces. These include the historic Taylor Park with opened in 1893. Sherdley Park is a modern park in Sutton, the park features a petting zoo and annuanly holds a funfair usually in July, called the St Helens Show. Other open spaces include the Sankey Valley Country Park and Colliers Moss Common. [18] For the Korean family name Park, see Korean name. ... Sutton may mean: // Sutton, meaning south settlement in Saxon, is a very common place name. ... A petting zoo (often called, and/or part of, a childrens zoo) features a combination of domestic animals and some wild species that are docile enough to touch and feed. ... A travelling funfair has many attractions, including adult or thrill rides, childrens rides, and sideshows consisting of games of skill, strength, or luck. ...


Nightlife and social scene

Traditionally, the town is known for its social clubs, mainly connected with the Labour Party and the Roman Catholic Church. In recent years, the boom in Britain's 'binge drinking' culture in the mid 1990s has fuelled the nightlife industry over the past 10 years. The town centre has exploded over this time with many new or relaunched drinking establishments. Many of the new bars including Boudoir, Bar Java, Cafe Chloe and Zoo are centred around Westfield Street and Bridge Street in the town centre. Several bars such as Panama Joes, Zoo Bar and Dali Bar have licences to serve alcohol until 3am. Drinking too much alcohol may qualify as binge drinking if it leads to at least two days of inebriation and the drinker neglects usual responsibilities The British Medical Association states that there is no consensus on the definition of binge drinking. ...


The town no longer has any major nightclubs, the infamous Club Nexus which was the towns main club ceased trading on February 1, 2008 [19]. The club which opended in the mid 1990's began to gain a bad reputation in the early 2000s for underage drinking, drug dealing and aesthetics. It previously lost it licence on two occasions in 2006 and 2007. A second nightclub was planned for Bridge Street, with building work being completed for the end of 2002, but it has remained closed since completion. The building was up for sale for many months and has recently been bought for around the sum of 3Million Pounds and is going to be transformed from a Club/Cafebar to a shopping precinct. is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Many nations have a legal drinking age, or the minimum age one must be to drink alcohol. ... Retail selling Street selling is the bottom of the chain and can be accomplished through purchasing from prostitutes, through cloaked retail stores or refuse houses for users in the act located in red-light districts which often also deal in paraphernalia, dealers marketing merriment at night clubs and other events... Aesthetics is commonly known as the study of sensory or sensori-emotional values, sometimes called judgments of sentiment and taste. ...


There are several restaurants in the town centre with an increasingly mixed cuisine on offer. The George Quarter alone has Italian, Spanish, French/Modern British at Le Frog, Chinese and Thai cuisine on offer. A local newspaper, The St Helens Reporter, awarded its 2005 'Restaurant of the Year' prize to The Griffin Inn, Eccleston. [20]


Hospitality

The principal hotel is the four star Park Inn, formely Hilton Hotel, built during a period of massive commercial augmentation in the town during the mid-1990s. Other large hotels are the Holiday Inn, Travelodge and Thistle Hotel in Haydock. There are numerous smaller hotels, inns and B&Bs across the borough. The Hilton Hotel chain is owned by Hilton Hotels Corporation and is based in Beverly Hills, California. ... Tourists of various nationalities chatting over breakfast at a B&B in Quebec City. ...


Sport

The St Helens squad, 2006

St Helens rugby league club's (St Helens RLFC) stadium is located in Eccleston in Dunriding Lane/Knowsley Road's residential area. During the summer, the 100 year-old stadium receives thousands of fans from St Helens and England's other rugby league towns, although it faces an uncertain future due to the rugby league club's intention to build a new modern stadium on the edge of the town with better transport links and parking facilities. The club has won the Challenge Cup eleven times and has played in many finals, the latest of which took place at the newly refurbished Wembley Stadium, where they beat Catalans Dragons on August 25, 2007. The club was crowned World Club Champions in 2001 and again in 2007. In 2006 season the club won all three major honours in the domestic game, the Challenge Cup, League Leaders Shield, the League Leaders Shield and the Super League Grand Final. At the start of the 2007 season, the club also won the World Club Challenge, defeating Australian side Brisbane Broncos to add to the honours acquired the previous season. Other honours won by the club this year include, Daniel Anderson Coach of the Year, Paul Wellens Man of Steel and Players' Player and James Graham Young Player of the Year. Image File history File links Saints_Team_2006_PS.jpg‎ Sought and obtained use for my personal use. ... Image File history File links Saints_Team_2006_PS.jpg‎ Sought and obtained use for my personal use. ... Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... St Helens Rugby League Football Club or simply Saints are a professional rugby league club from St Helens, England, United Kingdom. ... The home of St Helens Rugby League football Club since 1890, Knowsley Road is one of the most famous grounds in Rugby League. ... Eccleston is a civil parish and historic township within the Metropolitan Borough of St Helens, Merseyside. ... The Challenge Cup (currently known as the Carnegie Challenge Cup for sponsorship reasons) is a knockout cup competition for rugby league clubs across Europe. ... For the old stadium, see Wembley Stadium (1923). ... The Catalans Dragons (sometimes referred to as Les Catalans, Les Cats or the Dragons) are a professional rugby league club based in Perpignan, in Northern Catalonia. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The 2007 WCC logo. ... The League Leader’s Shield is a trophy awarded to the team finishing the season top of Super League (Europe) in the sport of rugby league. ... The 2007 WCC logo. ... Daniel Anderson (born May 3, 1967) is a rugby league coach. ... Paul Wellens, born 27th February, 1980 in St Helens, Lancashire, is an English rugby league player. ... James (born September 10, 1985 in Liverpool) is a Prop Foward who plays for St. ...


In December 2006 St Helens were awarded with the BBC Sports Personality of the Year Team Award at the Annual BBC Sports Personality of the Year Ceremony, this accolade recognises the best team in any sport within the United Kingdom. At the same ceremony Daniel Anderson was given the BBC Sports Personality of the Year Coach Award - this was the first time a rugby league coach had won the award.


The town is also home to a large number of amateur rugby league teams. Most notable of these are Thatto Heath Crusaders, Pilkington Recs, Blackbrook, Haydock, Haresfinch, Bold Miners and Clock Face. Most of these teams and others in the area compete in the BARLA North West Counties league (although Thatto Heath compete in the higher ranked National Conference League). There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The National Conference League is the top league in the pyramid of amateur rugby leagues run by the British Amateur Rugby League Association (BARLA). ...


The continued success and achievement of these teams at the grass roots level is important to the town, and have provided many players who have gone on to play for the 'Saints' and other professional and semi-professional clubs. Thatto Heath is known locally as a rugby league hotbed, having a number of amateur teams. It is the birthplace of many famous players including Alex Murphy, the Chisnall brothers, Paul Forber and St. Austins Primary School. Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... Alex Murphy (born St Helens 22nd April 1939) was an English rugby league footballer and coach who enjoyed a prodigious career as a scrum-half, often as controversial as he was prolific. ...


St Helens Town FC is an English football club, currently playing in the first division of the North West Counties Football League. The club, based in St. Helens, play their home games at Knowsley Road, the home of St Helens RLFC, the town's rugby league club. St Helens Town FC currently play in the North West Counties Football League in England. ... Soccer redirects here. ... The North West Counties Football League is a football league in the north west of England. ...


The town also has its own amateur football league, the St Helens Combination which has been running since the 1917/18 season. The combination was formed on 4th August 1917 when Ernest Worrall distributed notices to several of his friends & colleagues calling a meeting in the old. ...


An example of a cricket club in the town is St Helens Cricket Club. St Helens Cricket Club[1] is an amateur cricket club based in St Helens, Merseyside. ...


Retail

The town's shopping area is centred on the parish church around which Church Square was built in the early 1970s. Church Street, the main shopping street, runs parallel to Church Square. The town centre has two indoor shopping centres. The oldest is the Hardshaw Centre which includes a Marks & Spencer. Church Square forms two shopping centre, which includes a Bhs and an indoor Market. Other main shopping streets include Bridge Street, Westfield Street and Duke Street. St Helens has been criticised by residents for not attracting major chain stores; this has been due to many chain stores unable to find suitable premises. This is generally because of the small units on offer in both shopping centres. Marks & Spencer Group plc (also M&S, Marks and Sparks and Marks) is a British retailer, with 760 stores in more than 30 countries around the world. ... For other uses of the abbreviation, see BHS Bhs (also trading as British Home Stores and formerly BHS and BhS) is a stalwart department store of the British High Street, selling clothing and household items (such as bedlinen, cutlery, crockery and lighting). ...


St Helens has two retail parks, one on either side of the St Helens Linkway. The older of these, St Helens Retail Park, is home to discount stores and wholesale retailers, while Ravenhead Retail Park houses more mainstream retail stores, such as Currys, Next, B&Q and Boots. The town has several supermarkets. Currys is an electrical retailer in the UK and Republic of Ireland, and is owned by DSG International plc. ... Next on Oxford Street Next PLC is a British clothes retailer, with its headquarters in Enderby, Leicestershire, England. ... This article is about a former British company which has now merged to form Alliance Boots, as a result, information on this page may be out of date. ...


Notable people

Beechams

The Beecham dynasty is one of the most notable families to be associated with St. Helens. Thomas Beecham founded what was to become the world's largest pharmaceutical producer, Beechams in St. Helens. His son Joseph Beecham built up the business and promoted classical music in the town. Conductor Sir Thomas Beecham, son of Joseph, was born in St Helens. Beechams was the family business of Thomas Beecham, a chemist. ... Sir Joseph Beecham (1848-1916) the eldest son of Thomas Beecham (1820-1907) played a large part in the growth and expansion of his fathers medicinal pill business which he joined in 1866. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Pilkingtons

Main article: Pilkington
Pilkingtons one of the largest glass companies in the world
Pilkingtons one of the largest glass companies in the world

Pilkington plc is the largest glass manufacturer in the United Kingdom. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 364 pixelsFull resolution (1723 × 784 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 364 pixelsFull resolution (1723 × 784 pixel, file size: 1. ...

Entertainment

The town has a long history of association with the film industry. St. Helens-born George Groves is credited with being Hollywood's first "sound man", as he was the recording engineer on the seminal Al Jolson picture, The Jazz Singer (1927), as well as many other early talkies. Herbert Mundin found fame as a character actor in 1930s Hollywood. Actor, dancer and singer Robert Dorning had a career in film and television spanning from 1940 until his death in 1989. More recently, former boxer and model Gary Stretch has turned to acting, starring in films including Dead Man's Shoes, Alexander and World Trade Center. // Who he was Sound pioneer George R. Groves (1901 - 1976) George Robert Groves (1901 - 1976) was a film sound pioneer who played a significant role in developing the technology that brought sound to the silent screen. ... The Jazz Singer (1927) is a U.S. movie musical and the first feature-length motion picture with talking sequences. ... A sound film (or talkie) is a motion picture with synchronized sound, as opposed to a silent movie. ... Mundin monkeys around as the servant Rawlins in Tarzan Escapes (1936) Herbert Mundin (1898 - 1939) was an English-born Hollywood character actor. ... Robert Dorning as the bank inspector Mr. ... Gary Stretch (born 4 November 1968, St. ... For the episode of The Twilight Zone, see Dead Mans Shoes (The Twilight Zone). ... Alexander is a 2004 epic film, based on the life of Alexander the Great. ... World Trade Center is a dramatic film based on the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center towers of New York City(NY), USA, released by Paramount Pictures on August 9, 2006. ...


Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix had two St. Helens-born men amongst its production team - director David Yates and choreographer Paul Harris. Yates is also directing its follow-up, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is a 2007 fantasy adventure film, based on the novel of the same name, by J. K. Rowling. ... David Yates (born 1963 in St Helens, Merseyside) is an English film and television director. ... Paul Harris is an English Choreographer in film, television and theatre whose best known work to date is probably the laser scenes for Catherine Zeta-Jones in the movie Entrapment. He has choreographed several BAFTA winning television dramas including the BBCs landmark Bleak House and he is the choreographer... Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince is a 2008 fantasy adventure film, based on the novel of the same name by J. K. Rowling. ...


Two actresses on the popular TV series Hollyoaks are from St. Helens - Emma Rigby and Carley Stenson. Pauline Yates, best known for playing Elizabeth Perrin in the BBC television sitcom The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin is also from the town. Actor Matthew Crompton, of The Bill, Coronation Street and Brookside fame, was born and raised in St. Helens. Hollyoaks is a British television soap opera, first broadcast on 23 October 1995, on Channel 4. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Carley Stenson (born 1986 in Billinge, Wigan, Greater Manchester, is a British actress best known for playing Steph Dean in the Channel 4 soap Hollyoaks. ... Pauline Yates (born June 16, 1929 in St Helens) is an English actress best known for playing Elizabeth Perrin in the BBC television sitcom The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin. ... BBC Television is a service of the British Broadcasting Corporation which began in 1932. ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin is a novel and British sitcom starring Leonard Rossiter in the title role. ... Matthew Crompton (b. ... This article is about the British TV series. ... Coronation Street is an award-winning British soap opera. ... For other uses, see Brookside (disambiguation). ...


Johnny Vegas, the comedian and actor, was born and raised in St. Helens, and maintains close ties with the town. He is not the only comedian to come from the town - ostrich-jockey Bernie Clifton is also from St. Helens. Johnny Vegas (b. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Distribution of Ostriches. ... Bernie Clifton (born in St Helens, Merseyside) is a British comedian and entertainer who appeared on the BBC television series Crackerjack with Michael Aspel, Peter Glaze, Don Maclean and Jan Hunt in the 1970s. ...


St. Helens has had several notable musicians, mostly in bands based elsewhere. For example, Haydock-born guitarist Nick McCabe found fame in Wigan's The Verve. Drummer Peter Clarke (better known as 'Budgie') played in Liverpool bands The Spitfire Boys(formed by St Helens guitarist David Littler) and Big in Japan before moving to London and joining Siouxsie & the Banshees. He was married to Banshees vocalist Siouxsie Sioux for a time, but they are now divorced. One-time Beautiful South vocalist Jacqui Abbott is from St. Helens. Beautiful South frontman Paul Heaton reportedly heard her singing at a party in the town and asked her to join the band. Haydock is a ward within of the Metropolitan Borough of St Helens, Merseyside, England and is in the historic County of Lancashire. It was one of the United Kingdoms richest areas in coal and coal mining. ... Nick McCabe (born Nicholas Jonathon Nick McCabe on July 14, 1971 in St. ... , Wigan is a town in Greater Manchester, England. ... Not to be confused with The Verve Pipe. ... Peter Clarke, (born August 21, 1957), better known as Budgie, is an English drummer. ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... The Spitfire Boys were the first Liverpool punk band to release a single (Mein Kampf c/w British Refugee). The Spitfire Boys were mainly notable for including in their line-up Budgie (aka Pete Clarke), who went on to drum for The Slits and later Siouxsie & the Banshees (as well... Image:Bij. ... Siouxsie and the Banshees were a British rock band that formed in 1976. ... Susan Janet Ballion (born May 27, 1957 in Bromley, London), better known by her stage name, Siouxsie Sioux (IPA: , pronounced the same way as Susie Sue), is the lead singer of both the influential rock band Siouxsie & the Banshees and of its splinter group The Creatures. ... The Beautiful South were an English pop group formed at the end of the 1980s by former members of Hull group The Housemartins - Paul Heaton and Dave Hemingway. ... Jacqui Abbott (born Jacqueline Abbott, on 10 November 1973, in Merseyside) was the female lead singer with the band, The Beautiful South after 1994, following the departure of Briana Corrigan. ... Paul David Heaton (born May 9, 1962) is an English singer-songwriter. ...


Jeffrey Walker, best known for playing bass in Carcass is from St. Helens. He formed his first band Electro Hippies in the town. Jeffrey Walker is a bass guitarist and singer from St Helens, UK. He is best known for his work with the death metal/grindcore band Carcass for which he was also the main lyricist. ... Carcass were a British band formed by Napalm Death guitarist Bill Steer together with drummer Ken Owen in 1985. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Recently local band The Loungs have come to some degree of prominence, releasing an album and three singles on the Manchester-based Akoustik Anarkhy label. Despite favourable reviews in the press and online they have yet to break the charts. The Loungs are a six-piece indie rock band from St Helens, Merseyside, in the North-West of England. ...


St Helens' contribution to the media has not been limited to comedy and music however; recently Owen Roberts, who is an expert on fraud and personal finance, has been featured on all the major broadcast outlets including BBC Breakfast, ITV1 and Channel Five, providing advice and information to consumers. While he does not have a discernable St Helens accent he keeps close ties to the area.


Sports

Rugby league has a large following in St. Helens. The town's major club St Helens RLFC are currently in Super League. Their home ground is Knowsley Road. Notable rugby league players from the town include Saints players Paul Wellens, James Roby and Matty Smith; Huddersfield Giants centre Kevin Brown; and Alex Murphy, who had a long and successful career playing for Saints, Leigh and Warrington, and later as a coach. League referee Steve Ganson is also from the town, as is BBC Rugby League commentator Ray French. Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... St Helens Rugby League Football Club or simply Saints are a professional rugby league club from St Helens, England, United Kingdom. ... Super League (Europe) began in March 1996 and is the only full-time professional rugby league competition operating in the northern hemisphere. ... The home of St Helens Rugby League football Club since 1890, Knowsley Road is one of the most famous grounds in Rugby League. ... St Helens Rugby League Football Club or simply Saints are a professional rugby league club from St Helens, England, United Kingdom. ... Paul Wellens, born 27th February, 1980 in St Helens, Lancashire, is an English rugby league player. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... Matty Smith is an English rugby league footballer who plays for St Helens. ... Huddersfield Giants are a professional rugby league club (from Huddersfield, West Yorkshire) who play in the Super League. ... Kevin Brown (born 2 October 1984) is an English rugby league player. ... Alex Murphy (born St Helens 22nd April 1939) was an English rugby league footballer and coach who enjoyed a prodigious career as a scrum-half, often as controversial as he was prolific. ... Leigh Centurions are a professional rugby league club based in Leigh, in the Metropolitan Borough of Wigan, Greater Manchester, United Kingdom. ... Warrington Wolves are a professional rugby league team in the town of Warrington, Cheshire in England. ...


In football St Helens Town F.C. compete in the North West Counties Football League and share Knowsley Road with the rugby club. St. Helens has also supplied the world with several notable football players - former leading women's football player Lily Parr, Manchester United players Bill Foulkes (one of the Busby Babes and survivor of the Munich plane crash), Tommy O'Neill and Phil Marsh and Manchester City player Gary Owen. City goalkeeper Bert Trautmann was originally from Germany but settled in St Helens after World War 2. St Helens Town FC are an English football club, currently playing in the first division of the North West Counties Football League. ... The North West Counties Football League is a football league in the north west of England. ... The home of St Helens Rugby League football Club since 1890, Knowsley Road is one of the most famous grounds in Rugby League. ... Lily Parr(Lillian) was born in 1899(1905?) in St Helens, Merseyside and became one of the greatest British Female Football legends that ever lived. ... Manchester Uniteds emblem Manchester United F.C. (often abbreviated to Man United or just Man U, pronounced man-yoo) is an English football club based at Old Trafford in Greater Manchester. ... Phil Marsh (born November 11, 1986 in St Helens, England) is a footballer. ... Manchester City F.C. is a football club based in Manchester, United Kingdom. ... Gary Owen (born July 7, 1958) is a retired English footballer. ... Bernhard Carl Bert Trautmann OBE (born October 22, 1923 in Bremen, Germany) is a German football goalkeeper who played for Manchester City for many years. ... German soldiers at the Battle of Stalingrad World War II was the most extensive and costly armed conflict in the history of the world, involving the great majority of the worlds nations, being fought simultaneously in several major theatres, and costing tens of millions of lives. ...


Premier League football referee Chris Foy is also from the town. For other sports leagues which may be referred to by this name, see list of professional sports leagues. ... Christopher J. Foy is an English football referee. ...


World champion Grand Prix motorcycle road racer Geoff Duke is from St. Helens, as is darts player Alan Tabern. The latter is an avid Saints supporter, and has 'The Saints Are Coming' by The Skids as his entrance music as a tribute to the team. Grand Prix motorcycle racing refers to the premier category of motorcycle grand prix currently divided into three distinct classes: 125 cc, 250 cc and MotoGP. Grand prix motorcycles are purpose-built racing machines that are neither available for general purchase nor can be legitimately ridden on public roads; this contrasts... For other uses, see Motorcycle (disambiguation). ... Road racing can be a term involving road running, road bicycle races, or automobile races. ... Geoffrey Ernest (Geoff) Duke OBE (born 29 March 1923 in St. ... For the British doo-wop revival band of the 1970s and 1980s, see Darts (band). ... Alan Tabern (born 29 September 1966) is an English darts player who was born in St Helens, Merseyside and is nicknamed Tabby. He made his PDC World Darts Championship debut in 2005 with a surprising win over Alex Roy. ... The Skids The Skids were an art-punk/punk rock and new wave band from Dunfermline, Scotland, founded in 1977 by Stuart Adamson (1958 - 2001, guitars / vocals / keyboards), Richard Jobson (vocals / guitar), Thomas Kellichan (drums) and William Simpson (bass guitar / vocals). ...


Amateur boxer Ronnie "No Mercy" Mercer was named ABA light fly weight champion in 1996. Nicknamed "Lord of the Flies", Ronnie went on to box for England. He was later forced to retire early from boxing due to a detached retina.


Former Cage Rage Heavyweight Champion Rob Broughton also comes from St Helens. With notable wins over Butterbean and James Thompson in the cage. Rob is currently ranked third at super heavyweight in the world.


[2]


Art

St. Helens has produced three notable artists. Stuckist Allan Ferguson (better known as Arfius Arf) was born and raised in the town. Although now based in Northern Ireland, Jim Manley was also born in the town. Writer and artist Mike Philbin, (a.k.a. Hertzan Chimera) was born in Haydock. The logo on the Stuckism International web site Stuckism is an art movement that was founded in 1999 in Britain by Billy Childish and Charles Thomson to promote figurative painting in opposition to conceptual art. ... Arfius Arf (born April 3, 1981) is a British artist from the industrial town of St. ... This article is about the constituent country. ... Born 17 January 1934 in St Helens, Lancashire, England. ... Haydock is a ward within of the Metropolitan Borough of St Helens, Merseyside, England and is in the historic County of Lancashire. It was one of the United Kingdoms richest areas in coal and coal mining. ...


Other

Richard Seddon, who went on to become Prime Minister of New Zealand, was from St. Helens. He is currently the country's longest-serving Prime Minister, holding the office from 1893 until 1906. Richard John Seddon (1845 - 1906), sometimes known as King Dick, was the longest serving Prime Minister of New Zealand. ...


Other people born in the town include Victorian philanthropist John Rylands, Independent theatre reviewer Paul Taylor, glamour model Louise Glover, 1950's theatre actor Paul Walsh[citation needed], businessman and philanthropist Michael Smurfit, and Harold Dacre Robinson Lowe (1886-1952), who had dinosaur Monoclonius lowei named after him by CM Sternberg in 1940, Businessman and philanthropist Kevin O'Brien John Rylands (February 7, 1801 - December 11, 1888) was a British weaver and entrepreneur. ... Louise Glover (born on 8 February 1983 in St Helens, Merseyside, England) is a photographer and model, and the first British model to be named Model of the Year in Playboy Special Editions. ... Sir Michael Smurfit, KBE, LL.D (Honourary), (born 1936 in St Helens, Lancashire, England) is a businessman holding dual Irish and British citizenship. ... Species See text. ...


Mike Clarke, known locally as the godfather of St Helens, still resides in this town.


Trivia

  • A famous Punch cartoon had Napoleon lamenting, "Oh, no! I've been banished to St Helens!" This was a pun on St. Helena, the South Atlantic island to which Napoleon was exiled.
  • Residents of St Helens are known variously as "St Helensers" (often corrupted to "Sintelleners") or, at times derisively by some residents of the neighbouring city of Liverpool, as "Woolybacks", though this term originally refers to those who would unload American cotton in the Liverpool docks.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Punch was a British weekly magazine of humour and satire published from 1841 to 1992 and from 1996 to 2002. ... Napoléon I, Emperor of the French (born Napoleone di Buonaparte, changed his name to Napoléon Bonaparte)[1] (15 August 1769; Ajaccio, Corsica – 5 May 1821; Saint Helena) was a general during the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... Saint Helena refers to both an island and administrative unit in the South Atlantic Ocean 2,800 km off the west coast of Angola, and to the British Overseas territory that includes it and the dependencies of Ascension and Tristan da Cunha; this article describes both. ... The Burgies (or Burgy Bank) are a set of two slag heaps located in the Islands Brow area of St Helens. ...

References

Notes

  1. ^ Census 2001. "Census 2001: St.Helens population". statistics.gov.uk.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h T.C. Barker, T.C & Harris, J.R. (1994). Merseyside Town in the Industrial Revolution: St. Helens, 1750-1900. Routledge, Page 3-11. 
  3. ^ St. Helens Choral Society. "Origin of St. Helens". sthelenschoral.org.uk.
  4. ^ T.C. Barker, T.C & Harris, J.R. (1994). Merseyside Town in the Industrial Revolution: St. Helens, 1750-1900. Routledge, Page 108-120. 
  5. ^ T.C. Barker, T.C & Harris, J.R. (1994). Merseyside Town in the Industrial Revolution: St. Helens, 1750-1900. Routledge, Page 202-223. 
  6. ^ a b T.C. Barker, T.C & Harris, J.R. (1994). Merseyside Town in the Industrial Revolution: St. Helens, 1750-1900. Routledge, Page 120-131. 
  7. ^ a b T.C. Barker, T.C & Harris, J.R. (1994). Merseyside Town in the Industrial Revolution: St. Helens, 1750-1900. Routledge, Page 223-246. 
  8. ^ T.C. Barker, T.C & Harris, J.R. (1994). Merseyside Town in the Industrial Revolution: St. Helens, 1750-1900. Routledge, Page 75-90. 
  9. ^ T.C. Barker, T.C & Harris, J.R. (1994). Merseyside Town in the Industrial Revolution: St. Helens, 1750-1900. Routledge, Page 90-108. 
  10. ^ T.C. Barker, T.C & Harris, J.R. (1994). Merseyside Town in the Industrial Revolution: St. Helens, 1750-1900. Routledge, Page 11-23. 
  11. ^ T.C. Barker, T.C & Harris, J.R. (1994). Merseyside Town in the Industrial Revolution: St. Helens, 1750-1900. Routledge, Page 181-193. 
  12. ^ House of Commons report. "Ravenheads cause taken to Parliament, 2001". parliament.uk.
  13. ^ Stephen Daglish. "The Daglish Foundry, St. Helens". daglishfamily.blogspot.com.
  14. ^ St. Helens Parish Church. "The history of St.Helens Parish Church". sthelensparishchurch.org.
  15. ^ The Mersey Forest. "The Mersey Forest overview". merseyforest.org.uk.
  16. ^ Vision Edina. "St Helens District: Total Population". vision.edina.ac.uk.
  17. ^ Taken from St Helens Casino Bid Background Information 1.4.1
  18. ^ Countryside Walks - Visit St. Helens, Merseyside
  19. ^ http://www.sthelensreporter.co.uk/st-helens-news/Nexus-nightclub-forced-to-close.3748818.jp
  20. ^ Where To Eat In St Helens (July 2003) - Liverpool dining articles - restaurant features & stories

Bibliography

  • T.C. Barker & J.R. Harris (1994, 1st Ed 1954). A Merseyside Town in the Industrial Revolution: St. Helens, 1750-1900. Routledge. ISBN 978-0-7146-4555-1. 

External links

  • www.sthelens.gov.uk St Helens Council website.
  • St Helens - Historical information
  • Windle Parish - St Helens Parish of Windle
  • Eccleston Parish - St Helens Parish of Eccleston
  • St Helens CVS
  • St Helens RLFC-St Helens Rugby League Team website
  • My St Helens - St Helens site with pictures and links to other St Helens sites
  • Pilkington Glass - Major employer and supporter within St Helens
The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Merseyside is a metropolitan county in North West England, with a population of 1,365,900. ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... Knowsley is a metropolitan borough in the metropolitan county of Merseyside, England. ... See Sefton, New South Wales for the suburb of Sydney, Australia. ... St Helens is a Metropolitan Borough in Merseyside, North West England. ... Wirral is a metropolitan borough in Merseyside, North West England, which occupies the northern part of the Wirral Peninsula, more commonly known as The Wirral. ... , Bebington is a small town and electoral ward within the Metropolitan Borough of Wirral, in Merseyside, England. ... For other uses, see Birkenhead (disambiguation). ... Bootle is a town on the Mersey Estuary, North West England. ... For other uses, see Crosby. ... , Formby is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Sefton in Merseyside, England. ... Great Crosby, commonly known as just Crosby is a town in Sefton, Merseyside, North West England. ... Halewood is a town (population c 22,000) in the Metropolitan Borough of Knowsley, Merseyside, England, situated to the south-east of Liverpool. ... , Heswall is a town on the Wirral Peninsula, Merseyside, England. ... , Hoylake beach, looking towards Hilbre Island Arms of the former Hoylake Urban District Council Hoylake is a seaside town in Merseyside, England, a few miles to the west of Liverpool. ... , Huyton is a town within the Metropolitan Borough of Knowsley, in Merseyside, England. ... Arms of the former Kirkby Urban District Council Kirkby (pronounced - the second k is silent) is a new town in the Metropolitan Borough of Knowsley, Merseyside, England. ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... Maghull is a town in Sefton, Merseyside, England, within the traditional borders of Lancashire, and on the West Lancashire Coastal Plain. ... For the village, see Newton-le-Willows, North Yorkshire. ... Prescot is a town with the status of civil parish, 8 miles to the east of Liverpool in northwest England. ... , Rainhill is a village in the Borough of St Helens, Lancashire, United Kingdom about 10 miles away from Liverpool. ... For other uses, see Southport (disambiguation). ... Wallasey is a large town on the mouth of the River Mersey, at the north-eastern corner of the Wirral. ... , Whiston is a town in Knowsley, Merseyside, England. ... . This is a list of civil parishes in Merseyside, England. ... This article is about the British river Alt. ... For other Rivers Dee in the UK, see River Dee. ... The River Mersey is a river in north west England. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
St helens, Merseyside (253 words)
The borough of St Helens was formed in the mid-seventies when Newton-le-Willows, Rainford and Eclleston were merged with the town of St Helens itself.
The area has a long history of settlement, the earliest known reference to which came in a document from the 16th century where the chapel of St Helens is mentioned, although it is thought that some sort of significant structure has existed on the site since the 1300's.
St Helens has strong links to the early days of steam travel: it was here that Stephenson's "Rocket", widely accepted as the world's first steam locomotive, was put through it's paces in a series of trials in 1829.
St Helens, Merseyside, Pictures (243 words)
St Helens is a large industrial town lying between Manchester and Liverpool.
The opening in 1762 of the Sankey Navigation (canal) joining St Helens to the River Mersey was a major boost to the town's growth; the canal is now disused.
Haydock Park, a major racecourse, is in the town as is the home ground of St Helens rugby league team, who are one of the country's premier clubs; Knowsley Safari Park is on the town's boundary.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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