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Encyclopedia > St David's College
University of Wales, Lampeter

Image:1822lamp.gif


Motto Gair Duw Goreu Dysg
The word of God is the best teacher
Established 1822
Chancellor (UW) HRH the Prince of Wales
Pro-Chancellor (UW) Dafydd Wigley
Vice-Chancellor Professor Robert A Pearce
Location Lampeter, Wales, UK
Students 2,000
Member of University of Wales, ACU, Universities UK
Homepage www.lamp.ac.uk

  A motto is a phrase or collection of words intended to describe the motivation or intention of a sociological grouping or organization. ... 1822 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The University of Wales is a federal university founded in 1893. ... His Royal Highness The Prince Charles, Prince of Wales (Charles Philip Arthur George Mountbatten-Windsor) (born 14 November 1948), the eldest son of HM Queen Elizabeth II and HRH The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, is Heir Apparent to the thrones of the United Kingdom and over a dozen Commonwealth... The University of Wales is a federal university founded in 1893. ... The Right Honourable Dafydd Wigley (born April 1, 1943) is a Welsh politician. ... Lampeter (Welsh: Llanbedr Pont Steffan) is a town in Ceredigion, Wales, United Kingdom, lying on the River Teifi, which meets the Irish Sea at Cardigan. ... National motto: Cymru am byth (Welsh: Wales for ever) Waless location within the UK Official languages English and Welsh Capital Cardiff Largest city Cardiff First Minister Rhodri Morgan Area  - Total Ranked 3rd UK 20,779 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 3rd UK 2,903,085 140/km² NUTS... The University of Wales is a federal university founded in 1893. ... The Association of Commonwealth Universities represents over 480 universities from Commonwealth countries. ... Universities UK began life as the Committee of Vice-Chancellors and Principals of the Universities of the United Kingdom (CVCP) in the nineteenth century when there were informal meetings involving Vice-Chancellors of a number of universities and Principals of university colleges. ...

University of Wales, Lampeter is a university in Lampeter, Wales, the oldest degree awarding institution in Wales, and the third oldest in England and Wales after Oxford and Cambridge. The university started life in 1822 as St David's College, becoming St David's University College in 1971. It is now part of the federal University of Wales. With under 2,000 full-time undergraduates, it is one of the smallest public universities in Europe. In many ways, then, it is miraculous that the university has survived in the increasingly competitive atmosphere of the British Higher Education sector, and the institutions financial health is often a cause for concern. Principal J.R. Lloyd Thomas's decision to lead the institution into the University of Wales rescued the college from bankruptcy once, in the 1970s, and more recently, the college has had to pioneer foundation degrees and distance learning through its Voluntary Sector studies and Welsh language departments, which may have rescued the college once more from failure. Through this adversity, however, the university continues to rate highly in its teaching and research, particularly the Theology, Religious Studies and English Literature and Language departments which received the top rating in the 2001 Research Assessment Exercise. The campus' beautiful setting in the Ceredigion hills, on the banks of the River Teifi attract a high proportion of mature students and students from outside Wales, who wish to escape the urban environments of the majority of the other British universities. A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... Lampeter (Welsh: Llanbedr Pont Steffan) is a town in Ceredigion, Wales, United Kingdom, lying on the River Teifi, which meets the Irish Sea at Cardigan. ... National motto: Cymru am byth (Welsh: Wales for ever) Waless location within the UK Official languages English and Welsh Capital Cardiff Largest city Cardiff First Minister Rhodri Morgan Area  - Total Ranked 3rd UK 20,779 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 3rd UK 2,903,085 140/km² NUTS... National motto: Cymru am byth (Welsh: Wales for ever) Waless location within the UK Official languages English and Welsh Capital Cardiff Largest city Cardiff First Minister Rhodri Morgan Area  - Total Ranked 3rd UK 20,779 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 3rd UK 2,903,085 140/km² NUTS... The University of Oxford, situated in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world (after Oxford). ... 1822 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The University of Wales is a federal university founded in 1893. ... A public university is an institution of higher education that is funded by public means through a national or regional government. ... World map showing location of Europe A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... The University of Wales is a federal university founded in 1893. ... Events and trends Although in the United States and in many other Western societies the 1970s are often seen as a period of transition between the turbulent 1960s and the more conservative 1980s and 1990s, many of the trends that are associated widely with the Sixties, from the Sexual Revolution... The Foundation Degree is a vocational qualification introduced by the UK government in September 2001. ... Distance Learning is learning carried out apart from the usual classroom setting. ... The voluntary sector of a nations economy consists of those entities which are not for profit and yet, at the same time, are not agencies of the state - i. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... The Research Assessment Exercise is an attempt by the government of the United Kingdom to evaluate the quality of research undertaken by British Universities. ... Ceredigion is a county in Wales. ... River Teifi is a river in West Wales flowing into the sea below Cardigan town. ...

Contents

History

When Thomas Burgess was appointed Bishop of St David's in 1803 he almost immediately identified the need to establish a College in which young men could train for the Ministry of the Church. Many people have been named Thomas Burgess, including: An English philosopher and author; see Thomas Burgess (philosopher). ... The Bishop of Saint Davids is the Ordinary of the Church in Wales Diocese of Saint Davids. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Burgess had no Welsh connections; he was born in England in 1756 and after Winchester and Oxford he had short stays in Salisbury and Durham before being appointed to his first bishopric in Wales in 1803. Originally Burgess intended to build his new college to train priests in Llanddewi Brefi, which at the time was similar in size to Lampeter, but ten kilometres from it, and with an honoured place in the Christian history of Wales. When Burgess was staying with his friend the Bishop of Gloucester in 1820, however, he met John Scandrett Harford, a wealthy landowner from Gloucestershire, who donated the three acre (12,000 m²) site called Castle Field in Lampeter. so called for the Norman castle once contained in the field. This is the site on which the present University stands. 1756 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Location within the British Isles. ... Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). ... Salisbury is the name of a number of places: Salisbury, Wiltshire, England in the United States of America: Salisbury, Connecticut Salisbury, Maryland Salisbury, Massachusetts Salisbury, Missouri Salisbury, New Hampshire Salisbury, Herkimer_County,_New_York Salisbury, Nassau_County,_New_York Salisbury, North Carolina Salisbury, Pennsylvania Salisbury, Vermont Salisbury Township, Pennsylvania Salisbury, South Australia Salisbury, Canada... Durham (IPA: ) is a small city in the north east of England. ... National motto: Cymru am byth (Welsh: Wales for ever) Waless location within the UK Official languages English and Welsh Capital Cardiff Largest city Cardiff First Minister Rhodri Morgan Area  - Total Ranked 3rd UK 20,779 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 3rd UK 2,903,085 140/km² NUTS... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Llanddewi Brefi is a small village in Ceredigion, Wales. ... Gloucester (pronounced ) is a city in south-west England, close to the Welsh border. ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Gloucestershire (pronounced [ ˈglɒstəʃəʳ]; GLOSS-ter-sher) is a ceremonial and administrative county in southwest England. ... This article talks about the Norman people. ... The Alcázar of Segovia, Spain A castle (from the Latin castellum, diminutive of castra, a military camp, in turn the plural of castrum or watchpost), is a fort, a camp and the logical development of a fortified enclosure. ...

Enlarge
Engraving of Bishop Burgess

St David's College was thus founded just outside Lampeter in 1822. Burgess left St. David's in 1825 to become Bishop of Salisbury, but work on the college continued, largely supervised by Harford. The £16,000 required to erect the college had been raised from public donations, a government grant, and highly publicised gifts, including one from King George IV. The main college building was completed in 1827, and the college officially opened on St. David's Day of that year, welcoming its first 26 students. As such, after the ancient universities of Oxford and Cambridge, and those in Scotland, it is the oldest university institution in Britain, receiving its first charter in 1828. In 1852, the college gained the right to award the degree of Bachelor of Divinity, (BD), and in 1865 the degree of Bachelor of Arts (BA), long before the other colleges in Wales gained their own degree awarding powers. 1822 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1825 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... George IV King of the United Kingdom George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762–26 June 1830) was King of the United Kingdom and Hanover from 29 January 1820. ... 1827 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Saint Davids Day (Welsh: Dydd Gŵyl Dewi Sant - Day of the Festival of Saint David) is the day that the patron saint of Wales, Saint David, is celebrated. ... Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). ... The city of Cambridge is an old English university town and the regional centre of the county of Cambridgeshire. ... Scotland (Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is a country or nation and former independent kingdom of northwest Europe, and one of the four constituent parts of the United Kingdom. ... 1828 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... A Bachelor of Divinity is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a courses taken in the study of divinity or related disciplines, such as theology or, rarely, religious studies. ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ...


Although it continued as a centre of clergy training until 1978, there was always a considerable proportion of students who did not intend to be ordained - The 1896 charter specifically stated that the college could accept anyone, regardless of whether they intended to take Holy Orders. In 1971, after years of discussion, Principal J.R. Lloyd Thomas led the college into the federal University of Wales, and suspended its own degree-awarding powers. It became St David's University College (SDUC). By the this time, the college had begun shifting its specialisms, and whilst Religious Studies continued to be a strong point, students could choose from a much wider range of liberal arts subjects. In 1996 the Privy Council - in response to a petition from the University - agreed to change its title again to the University of Wales, Lampeter in line with moves elsewhere in the University and the recognition of its growth and changing status. 1971 is a common year starting on Friday (click for link to calendar). ... The University of Wales is a federal university founded in 1893. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ...


Today, the university specialises in Theology, Religious Studies, Philosophy, Classics Anthropology, Archaeology, English and History. In the early 1990s there also existed a hugely influencial Human Geography department at the college. This was closed in 2001, but the diaspora of the Lampeter Geography School continue to have an influence on their field. Theology is literally rational discourse concerning God (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, rational discourse). By extension, it also refers to the study of other religious topics. ... Religious studies can describe any course of study that examines the characteristics of major religions, the nature of the rites and rituals, and so on. ... Philosophy (from a combination of the Greek words philos meaning love and sophia meaning wisdom), as a practice, aims at some kind of understanding, knowledge or wisdom about fundamental matters such as reality, knowledge, meaning, value, being and truth. ... Classics, particularly within the Western University tradition, when used as a singular noun, means the study of the language, literature, history, art, and other aspects of Greek and Roman culture during the time frame known as classical antiquity. ... Anthropology (from the Greek word άνθρωπος = human) consists of the study of humankind (see genus Homo). ... Archaeology or archæology or sometimes in American English archeology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of cultural and environmental data, including architecture, artefacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... In literary criticism, the term English studies is occasionally used to refer to the critical study of English literature. ... History is a term for information about the past. ... Events and trends Technology Explosive growth of the Internet; decrease in the cost of computers and other technology Reduction in size and cost of mobile phones leads to a massive surge in their popularity Year 2000 problem (commonly known as Y2K) Microsoft Windows operating system becomes virtually ubiquitous on IBM... Human geography, also known as anthropogeography, is a branch of geography that focuses on the systematic study of patterns and processes that shape human interaction with the environment. ... 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Lampeter Geography School was an important collection of academics based at the Geography department of the University of Wales, Lampeter. ...


University buildings

The Old College

Enlarge
The St David's Building at the University of Wales, Lampeter

C.R. Cockerell designed the original college, now called the Saint David's Building in the centre of the Campus. It contains lecture rooms, common rooms, student residential accommodation and the following three main areas:


The Old Hall was the refectory until the present one came into use - in 1969 - and fell into disuse until 1991 when it opened after much restoration; it is now used as one of the main public rooms for meetings, conferences and use by outside organisations. It is also used for examinations. 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... 1991 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


St David's Chapel was originally consecrated in 1827. In 1879 it was closed and rebuilt according to the specifications of the architect Thomas Graham Jackson of Cambridge. It re-opened on the June 24 1880. It was then refurbished again during the 1930s mainly by the provision of a new reredos in 1933 and a major overhaul of the organ in 1934. 1880 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Events and trends Technology Jet engine invented First atom was split with a particle accelerator Golden Age of radio begins in U.S. Science Nuclear fission discovered by Otto Hahn, Lise Meitner and Fritz Strassmann Pluto, the ninth planet from the Sun, is discovered by Clyde Tombaugh British biologist Arthur... An altar and reredos from University Church, Dublin A reredos is a screen or decoration behind the altar in a church, usually depicting religious iconography or images. ... 1933 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1934 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ...


The Founders' Library was the library until the new library opened in 1966 and now houses the University's oldest printed books (1470-1850) and manuscripts (the earliest from the thirteenth century), given to Lampeter from 1822 onwards, as well as the archives of the university. It is a priceless collection unique to Lampeter. Named after its founders - Thomas Burgess (1756-1837), Thomas Bowdler (1754-1825) and Thomas Phillips (1760-1851) - it is a fundamental resource for teaching, research and scholarship within the University. 1966 was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... Events May 15 - Charles VIII of Sweden who had served three terms as King of Sweden dies. ... 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Many people have been named Thomas Burgess, including: An English philosopher and author; see Thomas Burgess (philosopher). ... Thomas Bowdler (July 11, 1754 – February 24, 1825), an English physician, has become (in)famous as the editor of a childrens edition of William Shakespeare, the Family Shakespeare, in which he endeavoured to remove every thing that could give just offence to the religious and virtuous mind. ... Thomas Phillips (October 18, 1770 - April 20, 1845) was an English portrait and subject painter. ...


Recent additions

Enlarge
The Original Canterbury Building

There have been a number of notable additions to the university in recent times


The Canterbury Building was originally built to house a growing number of students at the end of the 19th Century. The foundation stone was laid by the Archbishop of Canterbury in 1885, and the building was officially opened on June 24, 1887. It contained a physical science laboratory, two lecture rooms, and new accommodation. Structural problems forced the university to demolish the original building in the Summer of 1971, however. The current Canterbury Building was opened on October 20 1973 by the Vice-Chancellor or the University of Kent at Canterbury and now houses the History and English departments. The Archbishop of Canterbury is the most senior bishop of the state Church of England and of the worldwide Anglican Communion, outranking the other English archbishop, the Archbishop of York. ... 1885 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1887 is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar). ... 1971 is a common year starting on Friday (click for link to calendar). ... 1973 was a common year starting on Monday. ... The University of Kent (originally titled University of Kent at Canterbury and still often referred to as UKC) is a Glass Plate University in the United Kingdom. ... History is a term for information about the past. ...


The New Library was opened on July 7, 1966 by the then Chancellor of the University of Wales, the Duke of Edinburgh. It was extended, and then reopened by the Prince of Wales on June 21 1984. 1966 was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... The Duke of Edinburgh is a British dukedom. ... The eldest son of the reigning monarch ofEngland/Great Britain is traditionally invested with the title of Prince of Wales. ... 1984 is a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Arts Building was opened by The Rt. Hon Peter Thomas, Secretary of State for Wales on October 4, 1971, in time for it to house the new Geography department. The Archaeology and Anthropology department has since moved into the building. Peter John Mitchell Thomas, Baron Thomas of Gwydir, PC, (July 31, 1920-) was a Welsh Conservative politician. ... The post of Secretary of State for Wales came into existence in October of 1964, the first incumbent being Jim Griffiths, MP for Llanelli. ... 1971 is a common year starting on Friday (click for link to calendar). ... Archaeology or archæology or sometimes in American English archeology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of cultural and environmental data, including architecture, artefacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... Anthropology (from the Greek word άνθρωπος = human) consists of the study of humankind (see genus Homo). ...


The Cliff Tucker Theatre, on the banks of the River Dulas, was officially opened by Sir Anthony Hopkins in 1996 and incorporates teaching rooms and lecture theatres, and a large computer room. Sir Anthony Hopkins, CBE (born December 31, 1937) is a British_born American actor who was born Philip Anthony Hopkins in Margam, near Port Talbot, Wales to Richard and Muriel. ... 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ...


The Sheikh Khalifa Building completed in 1997, and named after Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahayan, a benefactor of the university, is the new purpose-built home of the Department of Theology, Religious Studies and Islamic Studies, one the biggest departments of its kind in the United Kingdom. 1997 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Reef. ... Khalifa bin Zayed, president of the UAE. His Highness Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahayan (خليفة بن زايد بن سلطان آل نهيان, born 1948) is the current president of the United Arab Emirates (UAE). ...


Academic robes

Lampeter currently awards University of Wales degrees, and as such, the academic dress matches that of the University of Wales - graduates wear a black stuff gown, with bell sleeves and a mazarin blue shot green. The traditional Lampeter academic dress differs from this slightly. The University of Wales was chartered in 1893, and consisted of three colleges that had existed for some time before - at Aberystwyth (founded 1872), Bangor (founded 1884) and Cardiff (founded 1883); they had awarded external degrees of the university of London. ...


Undergraduates wore a black stuff gown, with bell-sleeves, with the whole sleeve split open in front.


Bachelor of Divinity. A black gown, of MA pattern (long closed sleeves), with a double crescent cut at the end of each sleeve. A black silk hood, lined with dark violet silk, and bound with 1" white silk. Originally, it could be made in either the Oxford or the Cambridge shape, but Cambridge became the norm. A Bachelor of Divinity is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a courses taken in the study of divinity or related disciplines, such as theology or, rarely, religious studies. ...


Bachelor of Arts. A black stuff gown of Cambridge BA pattern. A black silk hood, part-lind and bound with 'miniver' - white fur with black spots. (Rabbit was usually used, with 'stick-on' spots, on account of the cost of real miniver!). As with the BD, it could be made in either the Oxford or the Cambridge shape, but Cambridge became the norm. A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ...


There was also a two-year course for those who could not afford the full three-year one. From 1884, this was called the License in Divinity (LD). Holders wore the undergraduate gown, with a black stuff hood, lined with black stuff, and bound for 1" with white silk. This was always Cambridge shape. The LD was not awarded after about 1940, and in 1969 the hood was used for the DipTh, which was awarded until the College ceased clergy training in 1978. 1884 is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar). ... 1940 was a leap year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... 1978 was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ...


The College currently awards a number of Licences (Theology, Religious Studies, Islamic Studies, Latin, Classical Greek): holders may wear the University of Wales BA gown, with the old Lampeter BD hood. The University of Wales was chartered in 1893, and consisted of three colleges that had existed for some time before - at Aberystwyth (founded 1872), Bangor (founded 1884) and Cardiff (founded 1883); they had awarded external degrees of the university of London. ...


Sports

The university owns a sports hall with badminton and squash courts, and a multigym with weight training equipment. For outdoor sports, the University has tennis courts, a cricket field and facilities for football and rugby. This article is about the racquet sport badminton. ... Squash racquet and ball Squash is an indoor racquet sport which was, until recently, called Squash Rackets, a reference to the squashable soft ball used in the game (compared with the harder ball used in its parent game Racquets or Rackets--see below). ... A complete weight training workout can be performed with a pair of adjustable dumbbells and a set of weight disks (plates). ... A tennis courts dimension A tennis court is where a game of tennis is played. ... For more coverage of cricket, go to the Cricket Portal. ...


Lampeter has active Hockey, Soccer and Rugby football teams, all of whom play in the traditional college colours of black and gold. Hockey is any of a family of sports in which two teams compete by trying to maneuver a puck (a flat, 6 oz. ... The striker (wearing red jersey) has run past the defender (in white jersey) and is about to take a shot at the goal, while the goalkeeper positions himself to stop the ball. ... This article discusses the sport Rugby. For other uses see Rugby. ...


Rugby

Rugby was introduced to Lampeter by Vice-Principal Rowland Williams around 1850, and as such Lampeter Rugby Football Club can claim to be the oldest Rugby football team in Wales. The club was one of the founder members of the Welsh Rugby Union in 1881, but following trouble at a match against the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth, in 1933, were reprimanded from the union. The team continues to be one of the more successful sports team at Lampeter, however. The club's nicknames are Mad Pilgrims and Fighting Parsons, the latter reflecting Lampeter's history as a theological college. 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... This article discusses the sport Rugby. For other uses see Rugby. ... The Welsh Rugby Union (WRU) is the governing body of the rugby union in Wales, recognised by the International Rugby Board. ... 1881 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... University of Wales, Aberystwyth   The University of Wales, Aberystwyth, a Member Institution of the federal University of Wales, was the first university institution to be established in Wales. ... 1933 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


The College Yell

Taken from the Student Handbook 1938-39


Hip Hip Hooray
Hip Hip Hooray
Hip Hip Hooray
Nawr Dewi. Nawr Dewi. Nawr Dewi.
Dy Blant. Dy Blant. Dy Blant.
Backshe Odinthorog. Backshe Odinthorog.
Niri Giri Wari. Niri Giri Wari.
Zey Zey Zey
Bing Bang Odin. Bing Bang Odin.
Io Dewi. Io Dewi. Io Dewi.
Dewi Sant. Dewi Sant. Dewi Sant.
Hooray!


Notable academics

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Reverend Professor Rowland Williams

Important Academics Past and Present:

Thomas Frederick Tout (1855-1929) was an important 19th and 20th Century historian. ... Dan Cohn-Sherbok is a rabbi of Reform Judaism, and a prominent author on the subject of his religion. ... Professor Paul Badham is Professor of Theology and Religious Studies at the University of Wales, Lampeter He is a graduate of both Oxford and Cambridge universities, and received his PhD from the University of Birmingham. ... Michael Shanks is a British archaeologist who has been at the forefront of post-processualism in archaeology. ... Professor Nigel Thrift is head of the Life and Environmental Sciences Division and Professor of Geography at the University of Oxford. ...

Alumni

Famous alumni include:

(Edward) Archie Markham (born 1939) is a poet and writer, born in Harris, Montserrat, and mainly resident in the United Kingdom since 1956. ... Christopher Herbert is the present Bishop of St Albans. ... Sulak Sivaraksa (Thai สุลักษณ์ ศิวรักษ์, born March 27, 1933 in Thailand) is founder and director of the Thai NGO Sathirakoses-Nagapradeepa Foundation“. Besides being the initator of a number of social, humanitarian, ecological and spiritual movemnts and organizations in Thailand, like the College SEM (Spirit in Education Movement) Sulak Sivaraksa... A graduate of the University of Wales, Lampeter, Sue Slipman went on to teacher training at the University of London, and began her career as President of the National Union of Students between 1977 and 1978. ... The National Union of Students (NUS) is a representative body for the students unions that exist inside the United Kingdom. ... Rhodri Glyn Thomas AM was born in 1953 at Wrexham, Clwyd, north Wales. ... Duke University is a private university located in Durham, North Carolina in the United States. ...

Academic departments

Archaeology or archæology or sometimes in American English archeology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of cultural and environmental data, including architecture, artefacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... Anthropology (from the Greek word άνθρωπος = human) consists of the study of humankind (see genus Homo). ... Classics, particularly within the Western University tradition, when used as a singular noun, means the study of the language, literature, history, art, and other aspects of Greek and Roman culture during the time frame known as classical antiquity. ... Film refers to the celluloid media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as part of the entertainment industry. ... The term English literature refers to literature written in the English language, or literature composed in English by writers who are not necessarily from England. ... History is a term for information about the past. ... Management (from Old French ménagement the art of conducting, directing, from Latin manu agere to lead by the hand) characterises the process of leading and directing all or part of an organization, often a business, through the deployment and manipulation of resources (human, financial, material, intellectual or intangible). ... Categories: Information technology ... Philosophy (from a combination of the Greek words philos meaning love and sophia meaning wisdom), as a practice, aims at some kind of understanding, knowledge or wisdom about fundamental matters such as reality, knowledge, meaning, value, being and truth. ... Theology is literally rational discourse concerning God (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, rational discourse). By extension, it also refers to the study of other religious topics. ... Religious studies can describe any course of study that examines the characteristics of major religions, the nature of the rites and rituals, and so on. ... Islamic Studies is the academic discipline which focuses on Islamic issues. ... The voluntary sector of a nations economy consists of those entities which are not for profit and yet, at the same time, are not agencies of the state - i. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ...

References

  • D T W Price, A History of Saint David's University College, Lampeter, University of Wales Press, Cardiff. Volume One, to 1898 (ISBN 0-7083-0606-3) Volume Two 1898-1971 (ISBN 0-7083-1062-1).
  • D T W Price, Yr Esgob Burgess a Choleg Llanbedr: Bishop Burgess and Lampeter College, University of Wales Press, Cardiff (ISBN 0-7083-0965-8)
  • Nicholas Groves Academical robes of Saint David's College Lampeter (1822-1871), University of Wales, Lampeter Special Publications.

See also

The Lampeter Geography School was an important collection of academics based at the Geography department of the University of Wales, Lampeter. ... The University of Wales is a federal university founded in 1893. ... Lampeter (Welsh: Llanbedr Pont Steffan) is a town in Ceredigion, Wales, United Kingdom, lying on the River Teifi, which meets the Irish Sea at Cardigan. ...

External link

  • University of Wales, Lampeter website (http://www.lamp.ac.uk)

 
 

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