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Encyclopedia > St Asaph

St Asaph (Welsh: Llanelwy) is a town in Denbighshire, Wales on the River Elwy. It has a population of around 3,500 people.


The town developed around a 6th-century Celtic shrine founded by Saint Kentigern, and is now home to the small 14th-century St Asaph's Cathedral, the smallest in Britain. This is dedicated to Saint Asaph, its second bishop.


As the seat of an ancient cathedral and diocese, St Asaph historically had city status. The 1911 Encyclopedia refers to it as a city, but it is no longer considered as such.


St Asaph applied for restoration of city status in the 2000 and 2002 competitions, but was passed over, in favour of Newport.


  Results from FactBites:
 
Strathclyde (1005 words)
There are dedications to him at St Asaphs and elsewhere in north Wales, and also many dedications in Cumbria.
Secondly, Glasgow remained obscure as the cult centre of St Kentigern, until it was revived by Earl David between 1113 and 1124.
A road leads from the churchyard to Doomster Hill, a large earthen mound used as an assembly place, in a manner similar to that found at Tynwald in the Isle of Man, where, the church of St John is linked to the Manx parliament hill by a straight processional route.
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