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Encyclopedia > St Albans
St Albans

St Albans shown within Hertfordshire
Population 64,038 [1]
OS grid reference TL148073
District St Albans
Shire county Hertfordshire
Region East
Constituent country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town ST ALBANS
Postcode district AL1, AL2, AL3, AL4
Dialling code 01727
Police Hertfordshire
Fire Hertfordshire
Ambulance East of England
European Parliament East of England
UK Parliament St Albans
List of places: UKEnglandHertfordshire

Coordinates: 51°45′18″N 0°20′10″W / 51.755, -0.336 Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... For the similarly named county in the West Midlands region, see Herefordshire. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... The City and District of St Albans is a local government district, in Hertfordshire, England. ... Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties are one of the four levels of English administrative division used for the purposes of local government. ... For the similarly named county in the West Midlands region, see Herefordshire. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... The East of England is one of the nine official regions of England. ... // Constituent country is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a historical, currently non-legally officially recognised country makes up a part of a larger entity or grouping. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This list of sovereign states, alphabetically arranged, gives an overview of states around the world with information on the extent of their sovereignty. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The AL postcode area, also known as the St Albans postcode area[1], is a group of ten postal districts in central Hertfordshire which are subdivisions of five post towns. ... +44 redirects here. ... There are a number of policing agencies in the United Kingdom. ... Hertfordshire Constabulary is the Home Office police force responsible for policing the county of Hertfordshire in England. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... The (Hertfordshire) fire and rescue service with 29 stations across the county they are : * Baldock and Letchworth Fire Station * Berkhamsted Fire Station * (Bishops Stortford Fire Station) * Borehamwood Fire Station * Buntingford Fire Station * Bushey Fire Station * Cheshunt Fire Station * Garston Fire Station * Harpenden Fire Station * Hatfield Fire Station * Hemel Hempstead Fire... Badge of the East of England Ambulance Service The East of England Ambulance Service NHS Trust is the authority responsible for providing NHS ambulance services in Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, Essex, Hertfordshire, Luton, Norfolk, Peterborough, Southend-on-Sea, Suffolk and Thurrock, in the East of England region. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... East of England is a constituency of the European Parliament. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... St Albans is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in England Lists of places within counties List of places in Bedfordshire List of places in Berkshire List of places in Buckinghamshire List of places in Cambridgeshire List of places in Cheshire List of places in Cleveland List of places... This is a list of settlements in the ceremonial county of Hertfordshire, England. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


St Albans is the main urban area of the City and District of St Albans in southern Hertfordshire, England, around 22 miles (35 km) north of central London. It was originally named Verlamion by the Ancient British, Catuvellauni tribe. It was the first major town on the old Roman road of Watling Street for travellers heading north and became the Roman city of Verulamium. After the Roman withdrawal, and prior to becoming known as St Albans, the town was called Verlamchester or Wæclingacaester. The City and District of St Albans is a local government district, in Hertfordshire, England. ... For the similarly named county in the West Midlands region, see Herefordshire. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Belgae were a group of nations or tribes living in north-eastern Gaul, on the west bank of the Rhine, in the 1st century BC, and later also attested in Britain. ... The Catuvellaunii (meaning probably good in battle) were one of the Celtic tribes living in the British Isles, before the Roman invasion of Britain. ... Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... The modern Watling Street crossing the Medway at Rochester near the Roman and Celt crossings Watling Street is the name given to an ancient trackway in England and Wales that was first used by the Celts mainly between the modern cities of Canterbury and St Albans. ... Remains of the city walls Verulamium was the third largest city in Roman Britain. ...

Contents

The locality

A map of St Albans from 1944

Apart from its historic core, St Albans is highly suburban in character, with much of its housing stock built in the inter-war years and during post-war expansion. Now entirely surrounded by the Metropolitan Green Belt, it is seeing significant 'infill' development and pressure to relax the Green Belt restrictions. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2336x2112, 695 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): St Albans ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2336x2112, 695 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): St Albans ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... In city planning, the Green Belt is a concept for controlling metropolitan growth introduced around London, England by minister of housing Duncan Sandys via a Government Circular. ...


St Albans District (which also includes Harpenden) has house prices considerably above the national average. The most recent figures give an average house price of £328,820[2] against a national average of £199,184. St Albans city, according to figures from Nationwide Building Society, is currently considered to be the most expensive place to live in the UK outside Central London.[3][2] This is largely due to fast commuting to London, especially the City, by train. The local road transport network is another factor: St Albans is at the meeting point of the A5183 (the old A5 or Watling Street) and the A1081 (the old A6); the M25 runs east-west just south of the city; and both the M1, only a few miles to the west, and the A1(M), five miles (8 km) to the east, can provide fast connections to London and the north. , Harpenden is a town in the City and District of St Albans of Hertfordshire in the South East of England. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state Constituent country Region Greater London Status City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor David Lewis  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - Total 1. ... The A5183 road is the A5 road in disguise. ... The A5 is a major road in the United Kingdom. ... The modern Watling Street crossing the Medway at Rochester near the Roman and Celt crossings Watling Street is the name given to an ancient trackway in England and Wales that was first used by the Celts mainly between the modern cities of Canterbury and St Albans. ... The A1081 road in England broadly follows and replaces the former route of the A6 south of Luton. ... This article is about the A6 road in England. ... The M25 motorway looking south between junctions 14 and 15, near Heathrow Airport. ... The M1 motorway heading south towards junction 37 at Barnsley, South Yorkshire. ... This page is about the A1 road in Great Britain. ...


The council estimates that 20% of the working population travel to London to work, while local business provides 46,000 jobs of which around 46% are filled by inward commuters. The local economy is made up mainly of offices, small enterprises, retailing and tourism-based enterprises, 80% of which employ fewer than 10 staff. In the working population, 33% are employed in professional and managerial occupations. Self-employment in Hertfordshire runs at 15% of the workforce, compared with a UK average of 12%. For the similarly named county in the West Midlands region, see Herefordshire. ...

Arms of St Albans City and District Council
Arms of St Albans City and District Council

There are two railway stations in St Albans. The City Station is about 820 yards (750 m)[4] east of the city centre and is served by the Thameslink railway line, with trains (operated since April 2006 by First Capital Connect) to Bedford, Luton, London Luton Airport, London, Sutton, Wimbledon, London Gatwick Airport, and Brighton. The Abbey Station is about half a mile (1 km)[4] south of the city centre and is served by the "Abbey Flyer", operated by London Midland. A single train runs between St Albans and Watford Junction, starting a new round trip every 45 minutes during most of the day. This line is a historical accident, the result of the Earl of Verulam refusing to sell land to the railway company then driving North from Watford. Until 1964, there was a third station, St Albans (London Road), which served a former branch line to Hatfield. East Midlands Mainline 'intercity' services run through at speed from places such as Leicester, Nottingham, Lincoln, Sheffield and Leeds. They do not stop so connections have to be made at Luton or St Pancras International. Uno buses route S4 and Green Line route 724 are the city's major bus services. Arms of St Albans City and District Council, Herts. ... Arms of St Albans City and District Council, Herts. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... St Albans railway station is one of two railway stations in St Albans, Hertfordshire, England. ... Thameslink is a fifty-station line in the British railway system running 225 km (140 miles) north to south across London from Bedford to Brighton through the Snow Hill tunnel. ... For other uses, see Train (disambiguation). ... First Capital Connect is a train operating company in England that began its passenger operations on the National Rail network at 02:00 BST 1 April 2006. ... Bedford is the county town of the English county of Bedfordshire. ... For other uses, see Luton (disambiguation). ... London Luton Airport (IATA: LTN, ICAO: EGGW) (previously called Luton International Airport)[3] is an international airport located on the edge of the town of Luton, Bedfordshire, England approximately north of London. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... , Sutton is the principal town in the London Borough of Sutton. ... , This article is about the district of London. ... Gatwick Airport (IATA: LGW, ICAO: EGKK) is Londons second largest airport and the second busiest airport in the United Kingdom after Heathrow. ... For other places with the same name, see Brighton (disambiguation). ... St Albans Abbey railway station is situated about 1 km south of St Albans town centre. ... The St Albans Abbey Branch Line is a railway line from Watford Junction to St Albans Abbey railway station. ... For the former British Railways region, see London Midland Region (British Railways). ... Watford Junction station is a railway station in Watford, United Kingdom. ... The Great Northern Railway (GNR) was a British railway company, founded by the London & York Railway Act of 1846. ... Hatfield railway station serves the town of Hatfield in Hertfordshire. ... Norwich will be at the eastern tip of the franchise area. ... This article discusses Leicester in England. ... For other uses, see Nottingham (disambiguation). ... Lincoln (pronounced //) is a cathedral city and county town of Lincolnshire, England. ... For other uses, see Sheffield (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation) and Leeds City (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Luton (disambiguation). ... St Pancras railway station, now officially known as St Pancras International, is a major station located in the St Pancras area of central London, between the new British Library building to the west and Kings Cross station to the east. ... Autobus redirects here. ...


There is easy access to London Luton Airport by both rail and road. London Heathrow Airport is around a 30 to 45 minute road journey. London Luton Airport (IATA: LTN, ICAO: EGGW) (previously called Luton International Airport)[3] is an international airport located on the edge of the town of Luton, Bedfordshire, England approximately north of London. ... Heathrow redirects here. ...


GCSE results for District schools show 63% of pupils achieving 5 A* - C grades, against a national average of around 46%. Schools include St Albans School,Francis Bacon School, St Albans High School for Girls, St Albans Girls' School (generally referred to as STAGS), Sandringham School, Beaumont School, Loreto College, Verulam School, Nicholas Breakspear RC School, St Columba's College and Townsend C of E School. The Abbey Gateway, now home to the schools History, Economics and Classics departments. ... St Albans High School is a private (independent) Church of England girls day school founded in 1889 for girls aged 4 to 18, located in the city of St Albans, Hertfordshire. ... Beaumont School is a state maintained mixed school located in St Albans, Hertfordshire, England. ... Loreto College is an 11-18 Voluntary Aided Comprehensive Catholic Girls school located near the centre of St Albans, Hertfordshire. ... Verulam school is a state secondary school for boys in St Albans, Hertfordshire, UK. it was in the past named St Albans Boys Grammar School. ... Nicholas Breakspear RC School is situated on the rural fringe of St Albans, an old Roman city in Hertfordshire, England. ... St Columbas College, St Albans, is a Catholic independent school for boys at King Harry Lane, St Albans, Hertfordshire, England, refounded in the year 1955 by the Brothers of the Sacred Heart. ...

The Norman Cathedral & Abbey Church tower
The Norman Cathedral & Abbey Church tower

The centre of the city suffers significant road traffic congestion because of the city's many small surrounding streets, high car use, inadequate roads, poor take-up and provision of local public transport, to persuade motorists to drive around rather than through the centre. The council estimates that 75% of traffic entering the city is through-traffic. From 2004 the problem was heavily exacerbated by a bungled series of road works, prompting severe criticism of Hertfordshire County Council's Hertfordshire Highways agency. In 2006 the Agency received further criticism for their incompetence and lack of accountability in the multi-million pound overspend and late delivery of works to the St Peter's Street area. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (480x640, 85 KB)Photograph by IXIA, 2004 I took this photograph myself and it may be used by Wikipedia. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (480x640, 85 KB)Photograph by IXIA, 2004 I took this photograph myself and it may be used by Wikipedia. ... Norman conquests in red. ... The City and District of St Albans is a local government district, in Hertfordshire, England. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the similarly named county in the West Midlands region, see Herefordshire. ... In the British Isles, a county council is a council that governs a county. ...


A street market is held in Market Place and St Peter's Street on Wednesdays and Saturdays, as it has been for many hundreds of years. There is also a monthly farmers' market, normally on the second Sunday, and a French market every four months. A street market is an outdoor market such as traditionally held in a market square in a market town, and are often held only on particular days of the week. ...


St Albans is one of several places that, by repute, has the most pubs per square mile in the country (Edinburgh, Norwich, Nottingham, Otley and Rochdale are other claimants). It also claims to have the oldest pub in England (in which Sir Walter Raleigh is said to have stayed), named Ye Olde Fighting Cocks (Nottingham again providing a counter-claimant in Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem). A public house, usually known as a pub, is a drinking establishment found mainly in the Great Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and other countries influenced by British cultural heritage. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... This article is about the English city. ... For other uses, see Nottingham (disambiguation). ... Otley on a market day, looking up Kirkgate with The Chevin in the background Otley is a town in northern England by the River Wharfe. ... For other uses, see Rochdale (disambiguation). ... This article is about the sixteenth-century explorer. ... Ye Olde Fighting Cocks - the view along the River Ver Thorn Olde Fighting Cocks is a public house in St Albans, Hertfordshire, which is one of several that lay claim to being the oldest in England. ... Front of Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem Ye Olde Trip To Jerusalem is one of the 20 public houses (including three in Nottingham) which claim to be the oldest drinking establishment in Great Britain. ...


The main free local weekly newspapers are The Herts Advertiser, and the St Albans and Harpenden Review. The sister title of the Review is the paid-for St Albans Observer, which also has an edition for Harpenden. The Herts Advertiser celebrated its 150th anniversary in 2005. Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


History

Main article: History of St Albans
The 15th century Clock Tower
The 15th century Clock Tower
The west end of the Cathedral & Abbey Church
The west end of the Cathedral & Abbey Church
Ye Olde Fighting Cocks public house
Ye Olde Fighting Cocks public house
The Old Town Hall and Market Place, viewed from St Peter's Street
The Old Town Hall and Market Place, viewed from St Peter's Street
Kingsbury watermill
Kingsbury watermill

The St Albans area has a long history of settlement. The Celtic Catuvellauni tribe had a settlement at Prae Hill a mile or so to the west. The Roman town of Verulamium, second-largest town in Roman Britain after Londinium, was built alongside this in the valley of the River Ver a little nearer to the present town centre. St Albans is in southern Hertfordshire, England, around 22 miles (35. ... Download high resolution version (300x622, 50 KB)Clock tower in St Albans, 11 October 2003. ... Download high resolution version (300x622, 50 KB)Clock tower in St Albans, 11 October 2003. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 3213 KB) The St. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 3213 KB) The St. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 2165 KB) Ye Olde Fighting Cocks File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 2165 KB) Ye Olde Fighting Cocks File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 2171 KB) St. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 2171 KB) St. ... Kingsbury Watermill Museum, St Albans. ... Kingsbury Watermill Museum, St Albans. ... The Catuvellaunii (meaning probably good in battle) were one of the Celtic tribes living in the British Isles, before the Roman invasion of Britain. ... Remains of the city walls Verulamium was the third largest city in Roman Britain. ... Londinium may refer to: An ancient Roman name for London (see History of London) Londinium (movie) A song by Catatonia A fictional planet in the TV show Firefly, (see moons and planets in Firefly) Londinivm, a free MMORPG. Londinium (album), an album by the band Archive This is a disambiguation... River Ver in St Albans The River Ver is a river in Hertfordshire. ...


The mediaeval town grew up on the hill to the east of this around the Benedictine foundation of St Albans Abbey. This is the spot where tradition has it that St Alban, the first British Christian martyr, was beheaded sometime before AD 324. It was, at one time, the principal abbey in England and the first draft of Magna Carta was drawn up there, reflecting its political importance. The Abbey Church, now St Albans Cathedral (formally the Cathedral & Abbey Church of St Alban but still known locally as The Abbey) became the parish church when it was bought by the local people in 1553, soon after the priory was dissolved in 1539. It was made a cathedral in 1877 when the City Charter was granted. There is evidence that the original site was somewhat higher up the hill than the present building and there had certainly been successive abbeys before the current building was started in 1077. For the college, see Benedictine College. ... Abbey gateway St Albans Abbey was an abbey at St Albans, Hertfordshire, England, dissolved in 1539 during the Dissolution of the Monasteries. ... For related place names see Alban Saint Alban was, along with saints Julius and Aaron, one of three Christian martyrs in Britain. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Events Constantine becomes the sole emperor of the Roman Empire. ... Bold textTHIS IS THE PAGE THAT A.S. REALLY NEEDS!! THIS IS NOW MARKED!!! ] ps i like A.O. This article is about an abbey as a Christian monastic community. ... This article is about the English charter issued in 1215. ... St Albans Cathedral from the west. ... For other uses of the term dissolution see Dissolution. ... Events May 30 - In Florida, Hernando de Soto lands at Tampa Bay with 600 soldiers with the goal to find gold. ...


St Albans School, a public school which occupies a site to the west of the Abbey and which includes the 14th century Abbey Gateway, was founded in AD 948 and is the only school in the English-speaking world to have educated a Pope (Adrian IV). It numbered amongst its buildings until comparatively recently a converted former hat factory, a link with the town's industrial past. Nearby Luton was also a notable centre for the hat making industry. The Abbey Gateway, now home to the schools History, Economics and Classics departments. ... The term public school has three distinct meanings: In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials. ... For other uses, see Pope (disambiguation). ... Pope Adrian IV (c. ... For other uses, see Luton (disambiguation). ...


The road between the Abbey and the school, running down to the River Ver and Verulamium park (on part of the site of Roman Verulamium), is called Abbey Mill Lane. On this road are the palaces of the Bishops of St Albans and Hertford. The Fighting Cocks public house is at the Verulamium Park end of this road. Also on the River Ver is Kingsbury watermill, which is now maintained as a museum. River Ver in St Albans The River Ver is a river in Hertfordshire. ... Verulamium park in summer Verulamium park is a park in St Albans, Hertfordshire. ... A list of the Anglican bishops of the Diocese of St Albans 1877 - Thomas Leigh Chaughton 1890 - John Wogan Festing 1903 - Edgar Jacob 1920 - Michael Bolton Furse 1944 - Philip Henry Loyd 1950 - Edward Michael Gresford Jones 1970 - Robert Runcie 1980 - John Bernard Taylor 1995 - Christopher William Herbert Categories: Religion stubs... The Suffragan Bishop of Hertford is a post in the Church of England, responsible to the Bishop of St Albans, together with the Suffragan Bishop of Bedford. ... Ye Olde Fighting Cocks - the view along the River Ver Thorn Olde Fighting Cocks is a public house in St Albans, Hertfordshire, which is one of several that lay claim to being the oldest in England. ...


The growth of St Albans was generally slow before the 20th century, reflecting its status as a rural market town, a pilgrimage site, and the first overnight coaching stop of the route to and from London - a fact which also accounts for its many inns, many dating from Tudor times. In the inter-war years it became a popular centre for the electronics industry. In the post-World War II years it was expanded significantly as part of the post-War redistribution of population out of Greater London that also saw the creation of new towns. Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China Rural areas (also referred to as the country, countryside) are settled places outside towns and cities. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Surface mount electronic components Electronics is the study of the flow of charge through various materials and devices such as semiconductors, resistors, inductors, capacitors, nano-structures and vacuum tubes. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Greater London is the top-level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... See New Town for places with that name. ...


The city today shows evidence of building and excavation from all periods of its history and it is a tourist destination. Notable buildings include the Abbey and the early 15th century Clock Tower (pictured). The clock tower is one of only two similar towers in England; it is also the site of an Eleanor cross, which was pulled down in 1703 due to neglect, replaced by the town pump. A fountain was erected in its place in 1874, now relocated to Victoria Place. The popular singer Donovan is rumoured to have learnt to play the guitar outside the Clock Tower.[citation needed] The Eleanor Cross at Charing Cross The Eleanor crosses are lavishly decorated stone monuments in the shape of a cross that Edward I of England erected in memory of his wife Eleanor of Castile. ... For other uses, see Donovan (disambiguation). ...


Running into St Albans from the south is Holywell Hill (generally pronounced "holly-well hill"), its name taken from the story of St Alban: legend has it that his severed head rolled down the hill from the execution site and into a well at the bottom (some versions have a well springing from the site at which the head stopped).


The mixed character of St Albans and proximity to London has made it a popular filming location. The Abbey and Fishpool Street areas were used for the pilot episode of the 1960s' ecclesiastical TV comedy All Gas and Gaiters. The area of Romeland, directly north of the Abbey Gateway and the walls of the Abbey and school grounds, can be seen masquerading as part of an Oxford college in some episodes of Inspector Morse (and several local pubs also appear). Fishpool Street, running from Romeland to St Michael's village, stood in for Hastings in some episodes of Foyle's War. Life Begins was filmed largely in and around St Albans. The Lady Chapel in the Abbey itself was used as a location for at least one scene in Sean Connery's 1995 film First Knight, whilst the nave of the Abbey was used during a coronation scene as a substitute for Westminster Abbey in Johnny English starring Rowan Atkinson. The 19th century gatehouse of the former prison near the mainline station appeared in the title sequence of the TV series Porridge, starring Ronnie Barker. The 2001 film Birthday Girl starring Ben Chaplin and Nicole Kidman was also partly filmed in St Albans. More recently, several scenes from the upcoming film Incendiary, starring Michelle Williams, Ewan McGregor and Matthew Macfadyen, were filmed in St Albans, focusing in particular on the Abbey and the Abbey Gateway. All Gas and Gaiters was a popular British sitcom which ran on BBC from 1966 to 1971. ... Morse (left) as played by John Thaw in the television adaption (with Kevin Whately as Lewis (right)). Detective Chief Inspector Morse is a fictional character, who features in a series of thirteen detective novels by British author Colin Dexter, though he is better known for the 33 episode TV series... For other uses, see Hastings (disambiguation). ... Foyles War is a detective television programme created by screen-writer and author Anthony Horowitz, and commissioned by ITV after the long-running detective series Inspector Morse came to an end in 2000. ... Life Begins is a British television drama broadcast on ITV1, starring Caroline Quentin. ... Sir Thomas Sean Connery (born August 25, 1930) is a Academy Award, Golden Globe, and BAFTA Award-winning Scottish actor and producer who is perhaps best known as the first actor to portray James Bond in cinema, starring in seven Bond films. ... First Knight is a 1995 film based on Arthurian legend. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... Johnny English is a British comic film parodying the James Bond secret agent genre, released in 2003. ... Rowan Sebastian Atkinson (born 6 January 1955) is an English comedian, actor and writer, famous for his title roles in the British television comedies Blackadder and Mr. ... St Albans railway station is one of two railway stations in St Albans, Hertfordshire, England. ... Porridge was a British BBC television sitcom (1974–1977), written by Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais and starring Ronnie Barker and Richard Beckinsale. ... Ronald William George Barker, OBE (25 September 1929 – 3 October 2005), popularly known as Ronnie Barker was an English comic actor and writer. ... Birthday Girl is a 2001 British Film Four-backed film featuring Nicole Kidman as a Russian mail-order bride. ... Ben Chaplin (born Benedict Greenwood on 31 July 1970, Sunderland) is an English actor who first came to public attention for his performance as Matthew Malone in the first series of the sitcom Game On. ... Nicole Mary Kidman, Order of Australia (born 20 June 1967 in Honolulu) is an Academy Award-winning Australian/American[1] actress. ... Incendiary is a film currently in production and slated for release in 2008. ... Michelle Ingrid Williams (born September 9, 1980) is an Academy Award-nominated American actress. ... Ewan Gordon McGregor (born March 31, 1971; pronounced )[1] is a Scottish actor who has had significant success in mainstream, indie, and art house films. ... Matthew Macfadyen Matthew Macfadyen (born 1974) is a British theatre and film actor, best known for his role as MI5 agent Tom Quinn in the BBC television drama series Spooks. ...


Twinning

St Albans is twinned with: Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

In addition, there are friendship links with: Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Country Italy Region Marche Province Pesaro e Urbino (PU) Mayor Stefano Aguzzi (since June 2004) Elevation 12 m Area 121 km² Population  - Total (as of December 31, 2004) 61,675  - Density 512/km² Time zone CET, UTC+1 Coordinates Gentilic Fanesi Dialing code 0721 Postal code 61032 Frazioni Bellocchi, Camminate... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary. ... Nyíregyháza (IPA: /ɲireÉŸhazÉ’/; approximate pronunciation: nyee-redy-haa-zah ) is a city in North-east Hungary and the county capital of Szabolcs-Szatmár-Bereg. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Palais Ducal Nevers (Latin: Noviodunum, later Nevirnum and Nebirnum) is a commune of central France, the préfecture (capital) of the Nièvre département, in the former province of Nivernais. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Denmark. ... Odense is the third largest city in Denmark with 145,554 inhabitants (Odense city January 1, 2004) and the capital of the island of Funen. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Wormser Dom Worms (pronounced ) is a city in the southwest of Germany. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... The old hulsterplas in Nieuwleusen. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Bangladesh. ... Sylhet (previously Shilhat and Jalalabad; Sylheti: Bengali: সিলেট, Sileţ) is a major city in north-eastern Bangladesh. ... Image File history File links Naval_Ensign_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... HMS (F83) is a Type 23 frigate of the Royal Navy. ...

Sport

In December 2006, Jack Ridley won the St. Albans triple cump competition. Sport England published a survey which revealed that residents of St Albans were the 9th most active in England in sports and other fitness activities. 26.8% of the population participate at least 3 times a week for 30 minutes.[5] Sport England logo Sport England (formerly the English Sports Council) is the body responsible for distributing funds and providing strategic guidance for sporting activity in England. ...


St Albans is home to one of the country's oldest and finest indoor skateparks, the Pioneer Skatepark in Heathlands Drive, next to the former fire station. Its ramps are available to all skateboarders and inliners. A new outside mini ramp was built in March 2005. A skateboarder in the middle of a trick Skateboarding is the act of rolling on or interacting with a skateboard. ... Skateboarders Skateboarding is the act of riding on and performing tricks with a skateboard. ... Bont ZX2 inline speed skates Inline skates are a type of roller skate, used for inline skating. ...


The local football team is St Albans City FC: its stadium is on the edge of Clarence Park and the team won promotion from the Conference South League in 2005-06. It played in the Nationwide Conference Division of the Football Conference for the 2006-07 season, but finished at the bottom of the table and was relegated.[6] St Albans City F.C. (nicknamed The Saints) is a football club based in St Albans, Hertfordshire, England. ... Conference South (currently billed as Blue Square Southern for sponsorship reasons) is one of the second divisions of the Football Conference in England, taking its place immediately below the Conference National. ... Conference National (currently billed as the Blue Square Premier for sponsorship reasons) [1] is the top division of the Football Conference. ... The Football Conference is a football league at the top of the National League System of non-League football in England. ...


St Albans Centurions rugby league club play at Colney Heath; they play in the Rugby League Conference Premier South division. There is also the Old Albanian Rugby Football Club, a rugby union club which has a large facility known as the Old Albanian sports complex or the Woollam Playing Fields to the north of the city centre and which is also the home of the Saracens A team and Zurich A League and OA Saints Women's Rugby Club (formally St Albans Women's RFC). St Albans RFC play at Boggymead Spring in Smallford, and Rugby Club (formerly Old Verulamians) play at Cotlandswick in London Colney. St Albans Centurions is a rugby league team based in St Albans, Hertfordshire. ... Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... Colney Heath is a small village south-east of St Albans, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom. ... The Rugby League Conference (RLC) (also known as the Co-operative Rugby League Conference as a result of sponsorship from United Co-operatives is a series of regionally based divisions of amateur rugby league teams spread throughout England, Scotland and Wales. ... Old Albanian Rugby Football Club (OAs) is a rugby club based in St Albans, Hertfordshire, England. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Official website www. ... London Colney is a village in Hertfordshire, England. ...


St Albans is also home to St Albans Hockey Club,[7] based in Clarence Park. The club is represented at National league level by both women's and men's teams, as well as other local league competitions. The club's nickname is The Tangerines. Clarence Park is a multi-use stadium in St Albans, England. ...


Clarence Park also plays host to St Albans Cricket Club.[8] The club currently runs four Saturday sides, playing in the Saracens Hertfordshire Cricket League and also two Sunday sides in the Chess Valley Cricket League.


Schools

The secondary schools in the area are:

Independent
Beaumont School is a state maintained mixed school located in St Albans, Hertfordshire, England. ... Francis Bacon School is a mixed sex state school located in St Albans in South Hertfordshire. ... Loreto College is an 11-18 Voluntary Aided Comprehensive Catholic Girls school located near the centre of St Albans, Hertfordshire. ... Marlborough School is a secondary school in St Albans, Hertfordshire, England. ... Nicholas Breakspear RC School is situated on the rural fringe of St Albans, an old Roman city in Hertfordshire, England. ... Sandringham School is a Secondary School in St Albans, Hertfordshire. ... Verulam school is a state secondary school for boys in St Albans, Hertfordshire, UK. it was in the past named St Albans Boys Grammar School. ...

St Albans is the location of two campuses of Oaklands College and of a campus of the University of Hertfordshire. St Albans High School is a private (independent) Church of England girls day school founded in 1889 for girls aged 4 to 18, located in the city of St Albans, Hertfordshire. ... The Abbey Gateway, now home to the schools History, Economics and Classics departments. ... St Columbas College, St Albans, is a Catholic independent school for boys at King Harry Lane, St Albans, Hertfordshire, England, refounded in the year 1955 by the Brothers of the Sacred Heart. ... Oaklands College is a Further education college in Hertfordshire, England in the United Kingdom. ... The University of Hertfordshire is a modern university based largely in Hatfield, in the county of Hertfordshire, United Kingdom, from which the university takes its name. ...


Trivia

  • The Royal Navy has used six vessels with the name HMS St Albans. As the current vessel is a Duke Class Type 23 frigate, its name is taken from the Duke of St Albans, rather than the city.
  • The first meeting of the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) was held in St Albans on 20th November 1972, at the Farriers Arms pub which has a blue plaque commemorating the event. The organisation still has its head office in Hatfield Road. The local branch holds an annual beer festival in St Albans. In recent years this has been a four day event starting on a Wednesday near the end of September.
  • An experimental water tank was built alongside London Road, St Albans for the Vickers shipbuilding company in 1912 on a site measuring 680 feet (210 m) by 100 feet (30 m). Three years later in 1915, the first private wind tunnel was also built here, but moved to their Weybridge works shortly after the First World War. From December 1918 the test tank was used in developing fuselage profiles for amphibious aircraft, such as the Vickers Type 54 Viking, completed during 1919.
  • The 1957 April Fool's Day spoof edition of BBC documentary series Panorama, which dealt with the fictitious Swiss spaghetti harvest, was filmed partly at the (now closed) Pasta Foods factory on London Road, St Albans.
  • The 2001 film Birthday Girl, featuring Nicole Kidman and Ben Chaplin, is set in St Albans.
  • From 1808 to 1814 St Albans hosted a station in the shutter telegraph chain which connected the Admiralty in London to its naval ships in the port of Great Yarmouth.
  • Chiswell Green, directly south of the City, is home to the Royal National Rose Society.
  • A number of places across the world are named after the City of St Albans, most notably in Australia, New Zealand & the United States.
  • St Albans was the name of a planet in the cult science-fiction television series Firefly.
  • In September 2007, St Albans replaced Mayfair as the most expensive square on a special UK Here and Now Edition Monopoly board, having won an internet vote.
  • Until recently, St Albans was noted for having the most pubs per square mile in Britain.

This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... There have been six vessels of the Royal Navy bearing the name St Albans. ... The Type 23 frigate is a class of warship serving with the Royal Navy, also known as the Duke class. ... The title Duke of St Albans was created in the Peerage of England in 1684 for the 1st Earl of Burford when he was fourteen years old. ... The Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) is an independent, voluntary, consumer organisation in the United Kingdom whose main aim is promoting real ale and the traditional British pub. ... A blue plaque showing information about The Spanish Barn at Torre Abbey in Torquay. ... For other uses, see Beer (disambiguation). ... Vickers was a famous name in British engineering that existed through many companies from 1828 until 2004. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... NASA wind tunnel with the model of a plane A wind tunnel is a research tool developed to assist with studying the effects of air moving over or around solid objects. ... , Weybridge is a town in the Elmbridge district of Surrey in South East England. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... An amphibious or amphibian aircraft is an aircraft that can land on either land or water. ... this is an article about the single-engined amphibian Vickers Viking of 1918. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Panorama is a long-running current affairs documentary series on BBC television, launched on 11 November 1953 and focusing on investigative journalism. ... A photo of a woman harvesting spaghetti in the BBC programme The Spaghetti tree is a fictitious tree; a joke designed to fool those who do not know how spaghetti is produced. ... Birthday Girl is a 2001 British Film Four-backed film featuring Nicole Kidman as a Russian mail-order bride. ... Nicole Mary Kidman, Order of Australia (born 20 June 1967 in Honolulu) is an Academy Award-winning Australian/American[1] actress. ... Ben Chaplin (born Benedict Greenwood on 31 July 1970, Sunderland) is an English actor who first came to public attention for his performance as Matthew Malone in the first series of the sitcom Game On. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Great Yarmouth, often known to locals simply as Yarmouth, is an English coastal town in the county of Norfolk. ... Chiswell Green is a village near St Albans, Hertfordshire with a population of approximately 2,800, in the City and District of St Albans It is situated 2 miles south of St Albans on the A405 road. ... The Royal National Rose Society is dedicated to the cultivation and appreciation of roses. ... Firefly is an American science fiction television series created by writer/director Joss Whedon, creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel, under his Mutant Enemy Productions. ... For other uses, see Mayfair (disambiguation). ... This article is about the board game. ...

Notable people

Kate Allan (b. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image:Rod Argent. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Zombies, formed in 1961 in St Albans, were an English rock band. ... Colin Edward Michael Blunstone (born June 24, 1945 in Hatfield, Hertfordshire) is an English pop singer/songwriter, best known as a member of pop group, The Zombies. ... Chris White (born Christopher Taylor White, 7 March 1943) was the bass guitarist with the 1960s English band The Zombies. ... Paul Atkinson - born Paul Ashley Warren Atkinson, 19 March 1946, in Cuffley, Hertfordshire was a pop guitarist in the legendary pop/rock band The Zombies. ... For other persons named Francis Bacon, see Francis Bacon (disambiguation). ... // Events The Edict of Orleans suspends the persecution of the Huguenots. ... Events September 30 - Nurhaci, chieftain of the Jurchens and founder of the Qing Dynasty dies and is succeeded by his son Hong Taiji. ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... Old Gorhambury House located near St Albans, Hertfordshire, England is an Elizabethan mansion, built in 1563-8 by Sir Nicholas Bacon, Lord Keeper, and twice visited by Queen Elizabeth. ... For a bill proposed in USA in 1998, see Bill 1618. ... Sir Nicholas Bacon (Unknown artist, 1579) Sir Nicholas Bacon (1509–February 20, 1579) was an English politician during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I of England, notable as Lord Keeper of the Great Seal, and as the father of philosopher/statesman Sir Francis Bacon. ... 1509 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 6 - The Union of Atrecht united the southern Netherlands under the Duke of Parma, governor in the name of king Philip II of Spain. ... The Lord Keeper of the Great Seal of England, and later of Great Britain was formerly an officer of the English Crown charged with physical custody of the Great Seal of England. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ... Old Gorhambury House located near St Albans, Hertfordshire, England is an Elizabethan mansion, built in 1563-8 by Sir Nicholas Bacon, Lord Keeper, and twice visited by Queen Elizabeth. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Source Direct is a Drum and bass band from St. ... Rubble is a 20-volume collection of compilation albums of mostly late-1960s British psychedelic rock compiled by Bam-Caruso Records, St Albans, Herts, England by Phil Lloyd-Smee. ... This article is about the British comedian. ... Ali G (Alistair Leslie Graham) is a satirical fictional character invented and played by English comedian Sacha Baron Cohen. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... St Columbas College, St Albans, is a Catholic independent school for boys at King Harry Lane, St Albans, Hertfordshire, England, refounded in the year 1955 by the Brothers of the Sacred Heart. ... The Haberdashers Askes Boys School is a British independent school in Elstree, near Borehamwood, in Hertfordshire. ... Elstree is a small village in Hertsmere borough of Hertfordshire on the A5, north of London. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the popular-music magazine, see Musician (magazine). ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Strubenholm, the home of the SA College of Music The South African College of Music, abbreviated as SACM, is a department of the Faculty of Humanities at the University of Cape Town. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Adrian IV (also known as Hadrian IV), born Nicholas Breakspear ( 1100 - September 1, 1159) was pope from 1154 to 1159. ... August 5 - Henry I becomes King of England. ... In the Roman Catholic Church, Cardinals are given the right of election of the Pope. ... Pope Adrian IV (c. ... Cheryl Campbell (born 22 May 1949 in St Albans) is an English actress of stage, film and television. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Paul Gerald Cattermole (born March 7, 1977) is an English musician. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... S Club 7 (later re-named S Club after the departure of Paul Cattermole from the band) were an English pop group created by former Spice Girls manager Simon Fuller, who rose to fame via their own BBC television programme. ... Ralph Nicholas Chubb (8 February 1892 - 14 January 1960) was a British poet, printer, and artist. ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, c. ... // Events January 1 - Colonel George Monck with his regiment crosses from Scotland to England at the village of Coldstream and begins advance towards London in support of English Restoration. ... // Events The third French and Indian War, known as King Georges War, breaks out at Port Royal, Nova Scotia The First Saudi State founded by Mohammed Ibn Saud Prague occupied by Prussian armies Ongoing events War of the Austrian Succession (1740-1748) Births January 10 - Thomas Mifflin, fifth President... John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough (26 May 1650 – 16 June 1722) (O.S)[1] was an English soldier and statesman whose career spanned the reigns of five monarchs throughout the late 17th and early 18th centuries. ... Anne (6 February 1665 – 1 August 1714) became Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland on 8 March 1702, succeeding William III of England and II of Scotland. ... Chris Clark is an English electronic musician creating in the genre of IDM currently signed to Warp Records. ... Clarence Park is a multi-use stadium in St Albans, England. ... William Cowper, 1st Earl Cowper (c. ... Year 1665 (MDCLXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Events February 16 - Louis XV of France attains his majority Births February 24 - John Burgoyne, British general (d. ... Enter Shikari (pronounced ) are a British post-hardcore band that make heavy use of dance music patircularly Trance and Drum and Bass. ... David Essex OBE (born David Albert Cook, 23 July 1947, in Plaistow, East London (now Greater London), [2] is an English actor and singer, who has enjoyed a varied show business career. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Siobhan Fahey (born Siobhan Máire Deirdre Fahey on September 10, 1958) was a founding member of the 1980s British girl group Bananarama, and later founded the musical outfit Shakespears Sister. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Bananarama are a British girl group who have had success on the pop and dance charts since 1982. ... Fahey and Detroit on the cover of the Hormonally Yours album Shakespears Sister (sometimes written with the apostrophe) was a band consisting of Siobhan Fahey and Marcella Detroit. ... Leslie Les Ferdinand MBE (born December 18, 1966 in Paddington, London) is a former English footballer. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Bricket Wood is a village in the county of Hertfordshire, England, approximately three miles from St Albans. ... Nigel Gibbs (born November 20, 1965 in St Albans), was a English footballer, who played for Watford during his playing career, who played as a right-back. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that Harry the Hornet be merged into this article or section. ... John Gosling (born 6 February 1948, in Paignton, South Devon), is a classically trained organist and pianist. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Kinks were an English rock group formed in 1963 by lead singer-songwriter Ray Davies, his brother, lead guitarist and vocalist Dave Davies, and bassist Pete Quaife. ... Edmund Beckett Edmund Beckett, 1st Baron Grimthorpe, Q.C. (May 12, 1816, Carlton Hall, Nottinghamshire, England - April 29, 1905), known previously as Sir Edmund Beckett, 5th Baronet was a lawyer, amateur horologist, and architect. ... Year 1816 (MDCCCXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... Horology is the study of the science and art of timekeeping devices. ... For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ... St Albans Cathedral from the west. ... Big Ben redirects here. ... Willis Hall (6 April 1929 - 7 March 2005) was an English playwright and radio and television writer who drew on his working class Leeds roots in much of his material. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... St Albans City F.C. (nicknamed The Saints) is a football club based in St Albans, Hertfordshire, England. ... Tim Hart (born 9th January, 1948) is a retired English folk singer, most well known as a founding member of Steeleye Span. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Steeleye Span are a British folk-rock band, formed in 1969 and remaining active today. ... John Hartson (born April 5, 1975, in Swansea, Wales) is a professional footballer,currently playing for Norwich City on loan from West Bromwich Albion. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Current season Celtic Football Club are a football club from Glasgow, Scotland, who currently play in the Scottish Premier League, the highest form of competition in Scotland. ... Wimbledon (full name AFC Wimbledon) is a semi-professional English football club, affiliated to both the London and Surrey FAs, and representing the area of Wimbledon in south London. ... West Bromwich Albion Football Club is an English football club formed by workers from Salters Spring Works in West Bromwich, West Midlands in 1878. ... Stephen William Hawking, CH, CBE, FRS, FRSA, (born 8 January 1942) is a British theoretical physicist. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Abbey Gateway, now home to the schools History, Economics and Classics departments. ... Christopher Herbert is the present Bishop of St Albans. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A list of the Anglican bishops of the Diocese of St Albans 1877 - Thomas Leigh Chaughton 1890 - John Wogan Festing 1903 - Edgar Jacob 1920 - Michael Bolton Furse 1944 - Philip Henry Loyd 1950 - Edward Michael Gresford Jones 1970 - Robert Runcie 1980 - John Bernard Taylor 1995 - Christopher William Herbert Categories: Religion stubs... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Alfred Hawthorn Hill (21 January 1924 – 19 April 1992), better known as Benny Hill, was a prolific English comic, actor and singer, best known for his television programme, The Benny Hill Show. ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... This page is about the English footballer and television personality. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ian Scott Holloway (born 12 March 1963 in Kingswood, Bristol) is an English former professional football midfielder. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... For details of the current season, see Plymouth Argyle F.C. season 2007-08 Plymouth Argyle Football Club (commonly known as the Pilgrims, the Greens, the Green Army or simply Argyle) are an English football team, playing in the Football League Championship. ... Matthew Holness is an English comedian. ... For the documentary about Jerry Seinfeld, see Comedian (film). ... Garth Marenghi is a fictional horror author created by English comedians Matthew Holness and Richard Ayoade, and played by Holness. ... It is proposed that this article be deleted, because of the following concern: Notability not really established If you can address this concern by improving, copyediting, sourcing, renaming or merging the page, please edit this page and do so. ... For the jurisprudence of courts, see Case law. ... Kurt Jackson is a leading English painter whose large canvases reflect a concern with natural history, ecology and environmental issues. ... Francis Bacon School is a mixed sex state school located in St Albans in South Hertfordshire. ... The Reverend Dr Jeffrey Philip Hywel John, MA DPhil (born 1953) is a Church of England cleric, and the current Dean of St Albans. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A dean, in a church context, is a cleric holding certain positions of authority within a religious hierarchy. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Kubrick redirects here. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... The term auteur (French for author) is used to describe film directors (or, more rarely, producers or writers) who are considered to have a distinctive, recognizable vision, because they (a) repeatedly return to the same subject matter, (b) habitually address a particular psychological or moral theme, (c) employ a recurring... The manor house. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Sir Stephen Lander (b. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... MI-5 redirects here. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Christopher Andrew Lewis - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A dean, in a church context, is a cleric holding certain positions of authority within a religious hierarchy. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Philip Madoc (born 5 July 1934 in Merthyr Tydfil) is a Welsh actor who has had many television and film roles. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Full-page portrait of Sir John Mandeville. ... Nigel Marven (born 1960) is a British wildlife presenter, television producer, author, and hobby ornithologist. ... Discovery Channel is a cable and satellite TV channel founded by John Hendricks which is distributed by Discovery Communications. ... For other uses, see ITV (disambiguation). ... Francis Bacon School is a mixed sex state school located in St Albans in South Hertfordshire. ... YOUR MUM (1874-1961) was a British film maker who witnessed the birth of the movies as an assistant/cameraman of Birt Acres (1854-1918) who, in 1895, developed the first British 35 mm moving picture camera. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Michael Andrew Bridge Morpurgo OBE (born 5 October 1943) is a British writer. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Albert Moses, a UK based Sri Lankan actor, started acting over 30 years ago in India where he appeared in 7 films. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mind Your Language is a British comedy television series originally shown on ITV between 1977 and 1979. ... John Walker Motson OBE (born 10 July 1945, Salford, Lancashire), known as Motty, is an English football commentator. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... , Harpenden is a town in the City and District of St Albans of Hertfordshire in the South East of England. ... Mundin monkeys around as the servant Rawlins in Tarzan Escapes (1936) Herbert Mundin (1898 - 1939) was an English-born Hollywood character actor. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hollywood redirects here. ... The Abbey Gateway, now home to the schools History, Economics and Classics departments. ... Michael Cormac Newell (born 28 March 1942) is an English director and producer of motion pictures for the screen and for television. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Starring Daniel Radcliffe Rupert Grint Emma Watson Produced by Chris Columbus et al. ... The Abbey Gateway, now home to the schools History, Economics and Classics departments. ... Ayan Panja (b. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Street Doctor is a prime time health series which was first shown in January 2007 on BBC One. ... BBC One (or BBC1 as it was formerly styled) is the oldest United Kingdom, and indeed, the world. ... Self portrait of Matthew Paris from the original manuscript of his Historia Anglorum (London, British Library, MS Royal 14. ... Events University of Paris receives charter from Philip II of France The Kanem-Bornu Empire was established in northern Africa around the year 1200 Mongol victory over Northern China — 30,000,000 killed Births Al-Abhari, Persian philosopher and mathematician (died 1265) Ulrich von Liechtenstein, German nobleman and poet (died... For broader historical context, see 1250s and 13th century. ... For the college, see Benedictine College. ... Generally a chronicle (Latin chronica) is historical account of facts and events in chronological order. ... St Albans Cathedral from the west. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Photek is Rupert Parkes (born 1972, St Albans, England), a Los Angeles based record producer and DJ. He joined the drum and bass scene relatively early (his first release was in 1992, a collaboration with Rob Solomon a. ... For other meanings of DJ, see DJ (disambiguation). ... Allan Prior (born 1924 in Newcastle-upon-Tyne) is a British television script writer and novelist, with over 300 television scripts to his name since the 1950s. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Z-Cars (sometimes written as Z Cars, and always pronounced zed, never zee) was a British television drama series centred around the work of regular beat police officers in the fictional town of Newtown, based on Kirkby near Liverpool, in the north-west of England. ... Maddy Prior is a British folk singer. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Christopher Mark Wells Read (born 10 August 1978 in Paignton, Devon) is an English cricketer, a wicket-keeper. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For the womens version of the game, see Womens Test cricket. ... A wicket keeper in characteristic position, ready to face a delivery. ... Sir Timothy Miles Bindon Rice (born 10 November 1944) is an English Academy Award, Golden Globe Award, Tony Award and Grammy Award winning lyricist, author, radio presenter and television gameshow panelist. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Abbey Gateway, now home to the schools History, Economics and Classics departments. ... Ian Ridley (born February 15, 1934) is a former Australian rules footballer who played for Melbourne in the VFL. Ridley was a rover who was handy around goals and a 5 time premiership player with Melbourne. ... This article is about the album. ... St Albans City F.C. (nicknamed The Saints) is a football club based in St Albans, Hertfordshire, England. ... Jim Rodford, born in St Albans, Hertfordshire, England on 7 July 1941 [1], is a musician who played with The Kinks, and was a founding member of Argent. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Argent was the name of a rock band founded in 1969 by Rod Argent after his previous band, The Zombies, broke up. ... The Kinks were an English rock group formed in 1963 by lead singer-songwriter Ray Davies, his brother, lead guitarist and vocalist Dave Davies, and bassist Pete Quaife. ... Image:Rod Argent. ... Robert Alexander Kennedy Runcie, Baron Runcie of Cuddesdon PC MC (October 2, 1921 – July 11, 2000) was the 102nd Archbishop of Canterbury from 1980 to 1991. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar. ... This article contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Ryder Cup is a golf trophy contested biennially in an event called the Ryder Cup Matches by teams from Europe and the United States. ... The chapel of St Johns College, Cambridge is characteristic of Scotts many church designs Sir George Gilbert Scott (July 13, 1811 – March 27, 1878) was an English architect of the Victorian Age, chiefly associated with the design, building and renovation of churches, cathedrals and workhouses. ... For the US Federal Agent designation, see Special agent. ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... St Albans Cathedral from the west. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... John Sessions (born January 11, 1953) is a Scottish actor and comedian. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Verulam school is a state secondary school for boys in St Albans, Hertfordshire, UK. it was in the past named St Albans Boys Grammar School. ... Maddy Prior is a British folk singer. ... Listen to this article ( info/dl) This audio file was created from a revision dated 2007-03-02, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Arsenal F.C. (also known as Arsenal, The Arsenal or The Gunners) is a north London football team founded in 1886. ... Jonathan Stroud Jonathan Anthony Stroud (27 October 1970, Bedford, England) is an author of fantasy books, mainly for children and youths. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Bartimaeus Trilogy is a fantasy series by Jonathan Stroud and was published as a series of three novels between 2003 and 2006. ... Year 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... A dean, in a church context, is a cleric holding certain positions of authority within a religious hierarchy. ... St Albans Cathedral from the west. ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... 15 August 1945 marked Victory over Japan or VJ Day, taking a name similar to Victory in Europe Day, which was generally known as VE Day. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... St Albans Cathedral from the west. ... Events Otto I the Great founds missionary dioceses of Brandenburg, Havelburg, Ribe, Aarhus, and Schleswig Births Deaths Categories: 948 ... The Abbey Gateway, now home to the schools History, Economics and Classics departments. ... Richard of Wallingford (1292–1336) was an English mathematician active in the 14th century, who made major contributions to astronomy and horology whilst serving as the abbot of St Albans Abbey. ... For broader historical context, see 1290s and 13th century. ... Events End of the Kemmu restoration and beginning of the Muromachi period in Japan. ... St Albans Cathedral from the west. ... Leonhard Euler, considered one of the greatest mathematicians of all time A mathematician is a person whose primary area of study and research is the field of mathematics. ... Horology is the study of the science and art of timekeeping devices. ... Galileo is often referred to as the Father of Modern Astronomy. ... Charles Walter Stansby Williams (September 20, 1886 – May 15, 1945) was a British poet, novelist, theologian, and literary critic. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... The Abbey Gateway, now home to the schools History, Economics and Classics departments. ... Graham Frederick Young (September 7, 1947 – August 1, 1990) was a British serial killer who poisoned a total of three people to death (his stepmother, and then years later two work colleagues, Bob Egle and Fred Biggs) as well as administering smaller doses to scores of others. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Yevgeny Zamyatin by Boris Kustodiev (1923) Yevgeny Ivanovich Zamyatin (Евге́ний Ива́нович Замя́тин sometimes translated into English as Eugene Zamyatin) (February 1, 1884 – March 10, 1937) was a Russian author, most famous for his novel We, a story of dystopian future which influenced George Orwells Nineteen Eighty-Four and Aldous Huxleys Brave... Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... We (Russian: )[1] is a dystopian novel by Yevgeny Zamyatin completed in 1921. ... George Orwell is the pen name of Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903[1][2] – 21 January 1950) who was an English writer and journalist well-noted as a novelist, critic, and commentator on politics and culture. ... This article is about the Orwell novel. ... Ayn Rand (IPA: , February 2 [O.S. January 20] 1905 – March 6, 1982), born Alisa Zinovyevna Rosenbaum (Russian: ), was a Russian-born American novelist and philosopher. ... Anthem is a dystopian, science-fiction novella by philosopher Ayn Rand, first published in 1938. ... Aldous Leonard Huxley (26 July 1894 – 22 November 1963) was an English writer and one of the most prominent members of the famous Huxley family. ... For other uses, see Brave New World (disambiguation). ...

See also

St Albans is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Sopwell priory (also known as Sopwell nunnery) was built c. ... Sopwell House is an historic country house, now a 128 room luxury hotel, situated just south of St Albans, Hertfordshire , England. ...

Nearby towns & villages

Abbots Langley is a large village in the English county of Hertfordshire. ... , Borehamwood (sometimes referred to as Boreham Wood) is a town in southern Hertfordshire, just north of London. ... Bricket Wood is a village in the county of Hertfordshire, England, approximately three miles from St Albans. ... Chiswell Green is a village near St Albans, Hertfordshire with a population of approximately 2,800, in the City and District of St Albans It is situated 2 miles south of St Albans on the A405 road. ... Colney Street is a village in the English county of Hertfordshire. ... Elstree is a small village in Hertsmere borough of Hertfordshire on the A5, north of London. ... , Harpenden is a town in the City and District of St Albans of Hertfordshire in the South East of England. ... Arms of the former Hatfield Rural District Council Hatfield, originally Bishops Hatfield, is in the Welwyn Hatfield district of Hertfordshire, in the south of England. ... Hemel Hempstead is a town in Hertfordshire, England with a population of 81,143 at the 2001 Census. ... London Colney is a village in Hertfordshire, England. ... , Park Street is a village near St Albans, Hertfordshire. ... , Radlett is a small town located north of London in the county of Hertfordshire between St Albans and Elstree on Watling Street with a population of approximately 8,000. ... Redbourn is a village in Hertfordshire, United Kingdom, roughly 5 miles from St Albans, Hemel Hempstead and Markyate, and 3 miles from Harpenden. ... St Stephens is a former village which lies at the bottom of Holywell Hill in St Albans, Hertfordshire, England. ... Country Constituent area Region East of England County Hertfordshire Borough Watford Government leadership=Mayor & Cabinet  - Type Borough  - Mayor Dorothy Thornhill (Liberal Democrat  - mp Claire Ward Area  - Borough 55. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ Office for National Statistics, 2001 Census, Key Statistics for HCC Settlements #. Crown copyright. Table KS01 Usual resident population (numbers)
  2. ^ a b BBC News—UK House Prices3 December 2007
  3. ^ Nationwide—2006 City Movers and Shakers1 January 2007
  4. ^ a b The imperial figure was calculated from an original value given in metric.
  5. ^ Sport England—Active People Survey
  6. ^ Football Conference—Blue Square Premier Table
  7. ^ St Albans Hockey Club
  8. ^ St Albans Cricket Club

is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
St Albans - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2241 words)
St Albans (thus spelt, no apostrophe or dot) is the main urban area of the City and District of St Albans in southern Hertfordshire, England, around 22 miles (35.5km) north of central London.
St Albans School, which occupies a site to the West of the Abbey and includes the former Norman Abbey Gateway, was founded in AD 948 and is the only school in the English-speaking world to have educated a Pope.
St Albans is home to one of the country's oldest and finest indoor skateparks at the Pioneer Youth Club, in Heathlands Drive, next to the fire station.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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