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Encyclopedia > Sremska Mitrovica
Сремска Митровица
Sremska Mitrovica
Image:Mitrovica coat.png
Location in Serbia
General Information
District Srem
Land area 762 km²
Population
(2002 census)
39,041 (town)
85,605 (municipality)
Settlements 26
Coordinates 44°59′N, 19°37′E
Area code +381 22
Car plates SM
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
CEST (UTC+2)
Website http://www.sremskamitrovica.org.yu
Politics
Mayor Zoran Miščević

Sremska Mitrovica (Сремска Митровица) is a city located in the Vojvodina province of Serbia at 44.98° North, 19.61° East. As of 2002 the city had a total population of 39,041, while Sremska Mitrovica municipality had a population of 85,605. It is the administrative centre of the Srem District of Serbia. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Subdivisions of Serbia. ... Srem District within Vojvodina Srem District (Serbian: Sremski okrug, Croatian: Srijemski okrug, Hungarian: Szerémségi Körzet, Slovak: Sriemski okres, Romanian: Districtul Srem) is a northwestern district of Serbia. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... This is an alphabetical list by town of dialing codes in Serbia. ... These are the current Serbian car license plate codes by region and in alphabetical order: Obsolete licence plate codes: Categories: | ... A time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries not observing summer time Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) is a high-precison atomic time standard. ... Time zones of Europe: Pale colours indicate countries without daylight saving Central European Summer Time (CEST) is one of the names of UTC+2 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) is a high-precison atomic time standard. ... A website (or Web site) is a collection of web pages, images, videos and other digital assets and hosted on a particular domain or subdomain on the World Wide Web. ... This article or section may be confusing or unclear for some readers, and should be edited to rectify this. ... Republic of Serbia   â€“Vojvodina   â€“Kosovo (UN admin. ... Anthem: Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian written with the Cyrillic alphabet1 Government Parliamentary republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 8th century   -  Independence c. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Srem District within Vojvodina Srem District (Serbian: Sremski okrug, Croatian: Srijemski okrug, Hungarian: Szerémségi Körzet, Slovak: Sriemski okres, Romanian: Districtul Srem) is a northwestern district of Serbia. ...

Contents

Name

In Serbian, the town is known as Сремска Митровица or Sremska Mitrovica, in Rusin as Сримска Митровица, in Croatian as Srijemska Mitrovica, in Hungarian as Szávaszentdemeter, in German as Syrmisch Mitrowitz, and in Latin as Sirmium. Serbian (српски језик; srpski jezik) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs everywhere. ... Rusin (meaning literally Rusyn, Ruthenian) is a Slavic language/dialect spoken in north-western Serbia and eastern Croatia (therefore also called Yugoslavo-Ruthenian, Vojvodina-Ruthenian or Bačka-Ruthenian). ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Ruins of Sirmium Julian solidus, ca. ...


"Sremska Mitrovica" means "Mitrovica of Srem" (Mitrovica of Kosovo and Mitrovica of Mačva also exists), while "Mitrovica" itself stems from the name "Saint Demetrius" or "Свети Димитрије" ("Sveti Dimitrije") in the Serbian language. Srem District in Vojvodina Vukovar-Srijem county within Croatia Syrmia (Serbian: Срем or Srem, Croatian: Srijem, Hungarian: Szerémség or Szerém, Slovak: Sriem, German: Syrmien, from Latin: Syrmia or Sirmium) is a fertile region of the Pannonian plain in Europe, between the Danube and Sava rivers. ... Mitrovica or Mitrovicë (Albanian) or Kosovska Mitrovica/Косовска Митровица (Serbian) is a city located in the north of Kosovo at 42. ... Mačvanska Mitrovica and neighbouring villages Mačvanska Mitrovica (Мачванска Митровица) is a town located in the Sremska Mitrovica municipality, in the Srem District of Serbia. ... Serbian (српски језик; srpski jezik) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs everywhere. ...


The name of the city during the reign of the Roman Empire was Sirmium. Beginning in 1180 A.D. the name changed from "Civitas Sancti Demetrii" to "Dmitrovica", "Mitrovica", and finally to the present form - "Sremska Mitrovica". Motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire at its greatest extent, c. ... Ruins of Sirmium Julian solidus, ca. ...


History

Ancient Sirmium

Main article: Sirmium

Sirmium was one of the oldest cities in Europe. Archaeologists have found a trace of organized human life dating from the 5000 BC. When the Romans conquered the city in the 1st century BC, Sirmium already was a settlement with a long tradition. Ruins of Sirmium Julian solidus, ca. ... This article is 150 kilobytes or more in size. ... Trinomial name Homo sapiens sapiens Linnaeus, 1758 Humans, or human beings, are bipedal primates belonging to the mammalian species Homo sapiens (Latin: wise man or knowing man) under the family Hominidae (the great apes). ... Area under Roman control  Roman Republic  Roman Empire  Western Empire  Eastern Empire Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a city-state founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 1st century BC started on January 1, 100 BC and ended on December 31, 1 BC. An alternative name for this century is the last century BC. The AD/BC notation does not use a year zero. ...


In the 1st century, Sirmium gained a status of a colony of the citizens of Rome, and became a very important military and strategic location in Pannonia province. The war expeditions of Roman emperors Traian, Marcus Aurelius, and Claudius II, were prepared in Sirmium. The 1st century was that century which lasted from 1 to 100 according the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: The Eternal City Motto: SPQR: Senatus PopulusQue Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban... Position of the Roman province of Pannonia Pannonia is an ancient country bounded north and east by the Danube, conterminous westward with Noricum and upper Italy, and southward with Dalmatia and upper Moesia. ... Emperor Trajan Marcus Ulpius Nerva Traianus (September 18, 53-August 9, 117), Roman Emperor (98-117), commonly called Trajan, was the second of the so-called Five Good Emperors of the Roman Empire. ... Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus (April 26, 121[1] – March 17, 180) was Roman Emperor from 161 to his death. ... Claudius Gothicus on a coin celebrating his equity (AEQUITAS AUGUSTI). ...


In 103, Pannonia was split into two provinces: Upper Pannonia and Lower Pannonia, and Sirmium became the capital city of Lower Pannonia. In 296, Diocletian operated a new territorial division of Pannonia. Instead of previous two provinces, there were four new provinces established in former territory of original Pannonia: Pannonia Prima, Pannonia Valeria, Pannonia Savia and Pannonia Secunda. Capital city of Pannonia Secunda was Sirmium. For other uses, see number 103. ... Upper Pannonia (Pannonia Superior) map The Upper Pannonia or Pannonia Superior was ancient Roman province. ... Position of the Roman province of Pannonia Pannonia is an ancient country bounded north and east by the Danube, conterminous westward with Noricum and upper Italy, and southward with Dalmatia and upper Moesia. ... Events Galerius conquers Ctesiphon on the Persians; in the following peace settlement he returns it in exchange of Armenia Pope Marcellinus I succeeds Pope Caius Allectus, sucessor by assassination to Britain, is defeated by Constantius Chlorus and Britain is returned to the Roman Empire Births Deaths Pope Caius Categories: 296... Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus ( 245– 312), born Diocles (Greek Διοκλής) and known in English as Diocletian,[1] was Roman Emperor from November 20, 284 to May 1, 305. ... The Pannonia Prima was ancient Roman province. ... The Pannonia Valeria was ancient Roman province. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Pannonia Secunda map The Pannonia Secunda was ancient Roman province. ...


In 293, with the establishment of tetrarchy, the Roman Empire was split into four parts; Sirmium became one of the four capital cities of Roman Empire, the other three being Trier, Mediolanum, and Nicomedia. During the tetrarchy, Sirmium was the capital of emperor Galerius. With the establishment of praetorian prefectures in 318, the capital of the prefecture of Illyricum was Sirmium. Events March 1 - Diocletian and Maximian appoint Constantius Chlorus and Galerius as Caesars. ... The Tetrarchs, a porphyry sculpture sacked from a Byzantine palace in 1204, Treasury of St. ... Trier (French: ; Luxembourgish Tréier) is a city in Germany on the banks of the Moselle River. ... Arcadius solidus, from Mediolanum mint, 400s. ... Nicomedia (modern İzmit, also known as Iznik) was founded by Nicomedes I of Bithynia at the head of the Gulf of Astacus (which opens on the Propontis) in 264 BC. The city has ever since been one of the chief towns in this part of Asia Minor. ... Galerius Maximianus ( 250–5 May 311), formally Gaius Galerius Valerius Maximianus was Roman Emperor from 305 to 311. ... The division of the Roman Empire into four Praetorian prefectures originated in the age of the Tetrarchy yet outlived that period. ... Events Gregory the Illuminator appoints his son Aristax as successor in the Patriarchate of Armenia. ... map of the praetorian prefecture of Illyricum, 318-379 AD The Praetorian prefecture of Illyricum (also termed simply the Prefecture of Illyricum) was one of four large prefectures (see Praetorian prefecture) into which the Late Roman Empire was divided. ...


Since the 4th century, the city was an important Christian centre, and was a seat of the Episcopate of Sirmium. Four Christian councils were held in Sirmium. Christians believe that Jesus is the mediator of the New Covenant (see Hebrews 8:6). ... The Council of Sirmium is the name primarily given to the third Council of Sirmium which marked a temporary compromise between Arianism and the Western bishops of the Christian church. ...


At the end of the 4th century, Sirmium was brought under the sway of the Goths, and later, was again annexed to the Eastern Roman Empire. In 441, Sirmium was conquered by the Huns, and after this conquest, it remained for more than a century in the hands of various Barbarian tribes, such were Eastern Goths and Gepids. For a short time, Sirmium was the center of the Gepide State and the king Cunimund minted golden coins in it. After 567, Sirmium was again included into Eastern Roman Empire. The city was finally conquered and destroyed by Avars in 582. This event marked the end of the period of late Antiquity in the history of Sirmium. Invasion of the Goths: a late 19th century painting by O. Fritsche, is a highly romanticized portrait of the Goths as cavalrymen. ... The Huns were a confederation of Central Asian equestrian nomads or semi-nomads. ... Look up Barbarian in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Invasion of the Goths: a late 19th century painting by O. Fritsche, is a highly romanticized portrait of the Goths as cavalrymen. ... The Gepids (Latin Gepidae) were a Germanic tribe most famous in history for defeating the Huns after the death of Attila. ... The Gepids (Latin Gepidae) were a Germanic tribe most famous in history for defeating the Huns after the death of Attila. ... Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered around its capital in Constantinople. ... Map showing the location of Avar Khaganate, c. ...


After the Avar conquest

For more than two centuries the fate of Sirmium was unknown. At the end of the 8th century, Sirmium belonged to the Frankish State. The historical role of Sirmium increased again in the 9th century, when it was part of Bulgaria. After having adopted Christianity, the Bulgarians restored in Sirmium the Christian Episcopate, having in mind old Christian traditions and the reputation this city had in the ancient world.


In the 11th century, Sirmium was a residence of Sermon, a duke of Srem, who was a vassal of the Bulgarian emperor Samuil. After 1018, the city was again included into the Byzantine Empire, and since the end of the 11th century, Sirmium was a subject of a dispute between the Byzantine Empire and the Kingdom of Hungary, until 1180 when the Byzantine Empire gave up Sirmium, surrendering it to the Hungarian Kingdom. Territory ruled by Sermon Also see: Sermon (disambiguation) Sermon was an 11th century ruler of Srem, vassal of Bulgarian emperor Samuil. ... Map of the Syrmia region Syrmia (Serbian: Srem (Cyrillic: Срем), Croatian: Srijem) is a fertile region of the Pannonian plain in Europe, between the Danube and Sava rivers. ... Tsar Samuil of Bulgaria (c. ... Byzantine Empire at its greatest extent c. ... The Kingdom of Hungary (Hungarian: Magyar Királyság) is the name of a multiethnic kingdom that existed in Central Europe from 1000 to 1918. ...


For a while, about 1451, the city was in possession of the Serbian despot Đurađ Branković. In 1521 the city came into Ottoman hands and it remained under the Ottoman rule for almost two centuries. Despot ĐuraÄ‘ Branković, Cyrillic: Ђурађ Бранковић, Hungarian: György Brankovics, ruled 1427 - 1456) was a Serbian monarch who built Smederevo. ... Motto: دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem: Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299-1326) Bursa (1326-1365) Edirne (1365-1453) Constantinople (Istanbul) (1453-1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 Osman I  - 1918–1922 Mehmed VI...


According to the 1545/1548 data, the city was mainly populated by ethnic Serbs, while the name of the mayor of the city was Dimitar. Since the middle of the 16th century, the city was mostly populated with Muslims. According to the 1566/69 data, the population of the city was composed of 592 Muslim and 30 Christian houses, while according to the 1572 data, it was composed of 598 Muslim and 18 Christian houses. According to the 1573 data, the city had 17 mosques and no Christian church. The Christians who lived in the city were mostly ethnic Serbs. During the Ottoman rule, Sremska Mitrovica was the largest settlement in Srem, and was the administrative center of the Ottoman sanjak of Srem. Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) or christian turks are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... Christians believe that Jesus is the mediator of the New Covenant (see Hebrews 8:6). ... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) or christian turks are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Map of the Syrmia region Syrmia (Serbian: Srem (Cyrillic: Срем), Croatian: Srijem) is a fertile region of the Pannonian plain in Europe, between the Danube and Sava rivers. ...


With the establishment of the Habsburg rule in 1718, the Muslim population fled from the city and was replaced with Serb, Croat, and German settlers. According to the 1765 data, the population of the city numbered 809 people, of whom 514 were Serbs and 290 Catholics. The Habsburg Monarchy, often called Austrian Monarchy or simply Austria, are the territories ruled by the Austrian branch of the House of Habsburg, and then by the successor House of Habsburg-Lorraine, between 1526 and 1867/1918. ... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) or christian turks are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ...


Sremska Mitrovica was part of the Habsburg Military Frontier (Slavonian Krajina). In 1848/1849, it was part of the Serbian Voivodship, a Serb autonomous region within Austrian Empire, but in 1849, it was returned under administration of the Military Frontier. Military Frontier (Military Border, Military Krajina, Vojna Krajina, Војна Крајина, Militärgrenze, Confiniaria militaria) was a borderland of Habsburg Austria which acted as the cordon sanitaire against the Turks from the Middle Ages (Croatian Krajina) or from the late 17th and 18th centuries (Slavonian and Banat Krajina) until the 19th century. ... Slavonian Krajina in 1849 Slavonian Krajina was part of the Habsburg Military Frontier (Krajina). ... Proclaimed borders of Serbian Vojvodina in 1848 The Serbian Vojvodina (Serbian Dukedom, Srpska Vojvodina, Српска Војводина) was a Serbian autonomous region within the Austrian Empire. ...


With the abolition of the Slavonian Military Frontier in 1881, Sremska Mitrovica was included into Srem County, which was part of the Kingdom of Croatia-Slavonia and Kingdom of Hungary within Austria-Hungary. According to the 1910 census, the population of the city numbered 12,909 people, of which 4,878 spoke Serbian language, 3,915 Croatian, and 2,341 German. The municipal area of the city had 32,012 inhabitants, of which 27,022 spoke Serbian, 2,324 German, and 1,071 Croatian. Szerém (Hungarian; Serbian: Срем or Srem, Croatian: Srijem, Latin: Syrmia or Sirmium) is the name of administrative county (comitatus) of the autonomous region Croatia-Slavonia within the historic Kingdom of Hungary. ... Following the Battle of Mohács, in 1527 some of the Croatian (and Hungarian) nobles supported Ivan Zapolja, while some preferred suzerainty to the Austrian king Ferdinand of Habsburg. ... The Kingdom of Hungary (Hungarian: Magyar Királyság) is the name of a multiethnic kingdom that existed in Central Europe from 1000 to 1918. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ...


After the First World War

In 1918, the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy collapsed and the Srem region first became a part of the newly formed State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs, and then, on November 24, 1918, the assembly of Srem in Ruma decided that entire Srem (including Mitrovica) join to the Kingdom of Serbia. Subsequently, on December 1, 1918, Kingdom of Serbia united with the Kingdom of Montenegro and the State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs to form the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (renamed to Yugoslavia in 1929). Between 1918 and 1922, Sremska Mitrovica was part of the Srem County, between 1922 and 1929 part of the Srem Oblast, between 1929 and 1931 part of the Drina Banovina, and between 1931 and 1941 part of the Danube Banovina. Flag Capital Zagreb Language(s) Slovenian and Serbo-Croatian Government Republic President¹ Anton KoroÅ¡ec Vice presidents¹ Ante Pavelić Svetozar Pribićević Historical era World War I  - Independence 29 October, 1918  - Joined Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes 1 December, 1918 ¹ President and vice presidents of the National Council. ... - Ruma (Рума) is a city located in Serbia and Montenegro at 45. ... Anthem: Bože Pravde [[Image:|250px|center|Location of the Kingdom of Serbia]] Capital Belgrade Largest city Belgrade Serbian Government Monarchy  - King Milan (1882-1889)  - King Aleksandar (1889-1903)  - King Peter I (1903-1918) Proclamation March 6, 1882 Area  - Total  km² ([[List of countries and outlying territories by area|]])  sq... Flag Anthem: Ubavoj nam Crnoj Gori, Onamo, namo! The Kingdom of Montenegro in 1913 Capital Cetinje Language(s) Serbian Religion Eastern Orthodox Government Monarchy King Nicholas I Historical era World War I  - Established 28 August, 1910  - Disestablished 26 November, 1918 Currency Montenegrin perper The Kingdom of Montenegro (Serbian: Краљевина Црнe Горe... The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state which existed from December 1, 1918 to mid-April 1941. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in Latin, Југославија in Cyrillic, English: Land of the South Slavs) describes four political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ... Map showing banovinas in 1929 (Drinska banovina is coloured orange) The Drina Banovina (Serbian: Drinska banovina) was a province (banovina) of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia with its capital at Sarajevo. ... Dunavska banovina map The Danube Banovina (or Danube Banate; Serbian and Croatian: Дунавска бановина Dunavska banovina) was a province (banate) of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia between 1929 and 1941. ...


During World War II, the city was occupied by the Axis troops and was attached to the Independent State of Croatia. During that time its name was changed to Hrvatska Mitrovica (meaning Croatian Mitrovica). Beginning in 1945, it was part of the Autonomous Province of Vojvodina within the new Socialist Yugoslavia and the Socialist Republic of Serbia, and from 1992 to 2003 it was part of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, which was then transformed into the state union of Serbia and Montenegro. Since the 2006 independence of Montenegro, Sremska Mitrovica is part of an independent Serbia. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that Hanging in NDH be merged into this article or section. ... Republic of Serbia   â€“Vojvodina   â€“Kosovo (UN admin. ... The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state that existed from 1945 to 1992. ... Official language Serbian written in Cyrillic alphabet1 Capital Belgrade2 President3 Svetozar Marović Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 105th 102,350 km² 0. ... Anthem: Oj, svijetla majska zoro Oh, the bright dawn of May Montenegro() on the European continent()  —  [] Capital (and largest city)  Podgorica Official languages Serbian (Ijekavian dialect)1 Government Republic  - President Filip Vujanović  - Prime Minister Željko Å turanović Independence from Serbia and Montenegro   - Declared June 3, 2006   - Recognised June 8, 2006  Area... Anthem: Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian written with the Cyrillic alphabet1 Government Parliamentary republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 8th century   -  Independence c. ...


Inhabited places

Sremska Mitrovica municipality includes the city of Sremska Mitrovica, the town of Mačvanska Mitrovica, and several villages. Mačvanska Mitrovica and neighbouring villages Mačvanska Mitrovica (Мачванска Митровица) is a town located in the Sremska Mitrovica municipality, in the Srem District of Serbia. ...


Villages on the northern bank of the river Sava, in the region of Srem: Sava also Save (in Serbian: Сава; German: Save; Hungarian: Száva) is a river in Europe, a right side tributary of Danube at Belgrade. ... Map of the Syrmia region Syrmia (Serbian: Srem (Cyrillic: Срем), Croatian: Srijem) is a fertile region of the Pannonian plain in Europe, between the Danube and Sava rivers. ...

Villages on the southern bank of the river Sava, in the region of Mačva: BeÅ¡enovački Prnjavor (Бешеновачки Прњавор) is a village in Serbia. ... BeÅ¡enovo (Бешеново) is a village in Serbia. ... Bosut (Босут) is a village located in the Sremska Mitrovica municipality, in the Srem District of Serbia. ... Veliki Radinci (Велики Радинци) is a village in Serbia. ... Grgurevci (Гргуревци) is a village in Serbia. ... DivoÅ¡ (Дивош) is a village located in the Sremska Mitrovica municipality, in the Srem District of Serbia. ... The Orthodox church. ... Kuzmin (Кузмин) is a village in Serbia. ... Laćarak (Лаћарак) is a suburb of town of Sremska Mitrovica in Serbia. ... Ležimir (Лежимир) is a village located in the Sremska Mitrovica municipality, in the Srem District of Vojvodina, Serbia. ... ManÄ‘elos (Манђелос) is a village located in the Sremska Mitrovica municipality, in the Srem District of Vojvodina, Serbia. ... Martinci (Мартинци) is a village in Serbia. ... Sremska Rača (Сремска Рача)) is a village located in the Sremska Mitrovica municipality, in the Srem District of Vojvodina, Serbia. ... Stara Bingula (Стара Бингула) is a village located in the Sremska Mitrovica municipality, in the Srem District of Serbia. ... ÄŒalma (Чалма) is a village located in the Sremska Mitrovica municipality, in the Srem District of Serbia, Serbia and Montenegro. ... Å aÅ¡inci (Шашинци) is a village located in the Sremska Mitrovica municipality, in the Srem District of Vojvodina, Serbia. ... Å iÅ¡atovac (Шишатовац) a village in Serbia. ... Å uljam (Шуљам) is a village located in the Sremska Mitrovica municipality, in the Srem District of Serbia. ... Sava also Save (in Serbian: Сава; German: Save; Hungarian: Száva) is a river in Europe, a right side tributary of Danube at Belgrade. ... Macva District in Central Serbia Mačva (Serbian: Mačva or Мачва, Hungarian: Macsó) is a region in the northwest of Central Serbia. ...

Location map of Noćaj and northern part of the Mačva region Noćaj (Ноћај) is a village located in the Sremska Mitrovica municipality, in the Srem District of Vojvodina, an autonomous province in northern Serbia. ... Ravnje (Равње) is a village located in the Sremska Mitrovica municipality, in the Srem District of Vojvodina, Serbia. ... Radenković (Раденковић) is a village located in the Sremska Mitrovica municipality, in the Srem District of Vojvodina, Serbia. ... Salaš Noćajski (Салаш Ноћајски) is a village located in the Sremska Mitrovica municipality, in the Srem District of Vojvodina, Serbia. ... Zasavica I (Засавица 1) is a village located in the Sremska Mitrovica municipality, in the Srem District of Vojvodina, Serbia. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Demographics (2002 census)

Ethnic groups in the municipality

The population of the Sremska Mitrovica municipality is composed of:

Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) or christian turks are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Yugoslav (Bosnian, Macedonian, Serbian Cyrillic: Југословени; Latinic: Jugosloveni; Croatian: Jugoslaveni, Slovenian: Jugoslovani) was an ethnic designation used by some people in former Yugoslavia, which continues to be used in some of its successor countries. ... Pannonian Rusyns or simply Rusyns (Ruthenians) is the name of a Slavic minority in Serbia and Croatia. ... Tzigane redirects here; for the composition by Maurice Ravel, see Tzigane (Ravel). ...

Settlements by ethnic majority

Most of the settlements in the municipality have an ethnic Serb majority. Ethnically mixed settlement with relative Serb majority is Stara Bingula. The main concentration of ethnic minorities is in the town.


Ethnic groups in the town

The population of the Sremska Mitrovica town is composed of:

  • Serbs = 31,127 (79.64%)
  • Croats = 2,130 (5.45%)
  • Others.

Ethnically mixed families are also very common in this town. Up to 1991 many of them declared themselves as Yugoslavs. 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Yugoslav (Bosnian, Macedonian, Serbian Cyrillic: Југословени; Latinic: Jugosloveni; Croatian: Jugoslaveni, Slovenian: Jugoslovani) was an ethnic designation used by some people in former Yugoslavia, which continues to be used in some of its successor countries. ...


Archeological trivia

  • In early 1970s American archeologists sponsored by the US Government made an offer to the citizens of Sremska Mitrovica to completely rebuild the town on another location so that the town could be excavated. The town government refused the request immediately, under pressure from the then hard-socialist Yugoslav government.
  • During work on the new Sremska Mitrovica trade center in 1972, a worker accidentally broke into an old Roman pot, about 2m deep, over the site of an old Sirmium settlement. 33 gold Roman coins enclosed in a leather pouch were found inside a Roman house wall, probably the hidden savings of a wealthy Roman family stashed centuries ago. Of this extraordinary rare find of Sirmium minted coins were 4 Constantius II era coins, considered the most valuable examples from the late Roman empire of the fourth century AD. The young worker whose shovel brought this significant discovery to light was never rewarded.
  • The only known unexcavated Roman horse racing arena in the world is in Sirmium. A colossal building about 150m wide and 450m long lays directly under the Sremska Mitrovica town center and just beside the old Sirmium Emperor's Palace (one of just a few Sirmium publicly accessible archeological sights). The presence of the arena has clearly affected the layout of the present town (Sremska Mitrovica is today about 2-4m above ground line of former Sirmium settlement). Recently announced cultural and archeological projects for preserving and popularising Sirmium sights haven't included any activity dealing with the arena, probably due to the extent of the large arena - the entire present town center might have to be excavated.

Capital Belgrade Language(s) Serbo-Croatian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovenian, Macedonian Government Socialist republic President  - 1945 - 1953 Ivan Ribar  - 1991 Stjepan Mesić Prime Minister  - 1945 - 1963 Josip Broz Tito  - 1989 - 1991 Ante Marković Historical era Cold War  - Proclamation November 29, 1943  - UN membership October 24, 1945  - Constitution February 21, 1974  - Secessions... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Area under Roman control  Roman Republic  Roman Empire  Western Empire  Eastern Empire Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a city-state founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Ruins of Sirmium Julian solidus, ca. ... Flavius Iulius Constantius, known in English as Constantius II, (7 August 317 - 3 November 361) was a Roman Emperor (337 - 361) of the Constantinian dynasty. ... Area under Roman control  Roman Republic  Roman Empire  Western Empire  Eastern Empire Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a city-state founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Ruins of Sirmium Julian solidus, ca. ... Ruins of Sirmium Julian solidus, ca. ... Archaeology or sometimes in American English archeology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains, including architecture, artefacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... Ruins of Sirmium Julian solidus, ca. ...

Sport

  • FK Srem, a football club from Sremska Mitrovica.

FK Sram is a Serbian football club from the city of Sremska Mitrovica. ...

See also

Ruins of Sirmium Julian solidus, ca. ... The Council of Sirmium is the name primarily given to the third Council of Sirmium which marked a temporary compromise between Arianism and the Western bishops of the Christian church. ... This is a list of cities and towns in Serbia. ... This is a list of inhabited places of Vojvodina. ...

External links

  • Sremska Mitrovica municipality Official Web Site, in Serbian and English
  • City of Sremska Mitrovica Web Site, in Serbian, short preface in English
Municipalities and cities of Serbia

  Results from FactBites:
 
Serbia Info / Facts and Figures / Districts (174 words)
It encompasses the municipalities of: Sid, Indjija, Sremska Mitrovica, Irig, Ruma, Stara Pazova, and Pecinci.
Seat of the district is in the city of Sremska Mitrovica.
Leading actors in the economy of Sremska Mitrovica are the "Matroz" factory of cellulose and paper, the Wood Combine, the "1 novembar" furniture factory and the "Woods of Serbia".
BalkanKult: Projects (707 words)
Ivano Batiston, accordion soloist held a concert on 28th June in Zajecar at the locality of Felix Romuliana and on 29th June in Sremska Mitrovica in Lapidarium of the Museum of Srem.
Italian string quartet Bernini held a concert on 2nd July in Sremska Mitrovica in Lapidarium of the Museum of Srem and on 3rd July in Belgrade in Pavilion Cvijeta Zuzoric.
Sremska Mitrovica is ready to cooperate more closely with Gorizia region in both cultural and economic sense.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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