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Encyclopedia > Spy fiction

The genre of spy fiction — sometimes called political thriller or spy thriller or sometimes shortened simply to Spy-fi — arose before World War I at about the same time that the first modern intelligence agencies were formed. Seldom has this literary field met with critical acclaim, although insightful, literate, and politically important works have been published in it. Spy Fiction is a stealth-based video game by Sammy Studios and Sega for the PlayStation 2. ... Look up genre in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Spy-fi is a fan name for television series and movies - especially those from the 1960s - that blend the espionage genre with elements of science fiction. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... An intelligence agency is a governmental organization devoted to gathering of information by means of espionage (spying), communication interception, cryptoanalysis, cooperation with other institutions, and evaluation of public sources. ...


At the same time, it has enjoyed great popular success. Readership waned only in the lull following the end of the Cold War (the Berlin Wall fell in November 1989). The 9/11 terrorist attacks on the United States reignited interest and have reversed that trend. Some pundits are referring to the current era as the Decade of the Spy and pointing to the renaissance in spy fiction and film as two of the indicators of this[citation needed]. For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... -1... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ...

Contents

Before World War I

Early spy novels include James Fennimore Cooper's The Spy (1821) and The Bravo (1831); Rudyard Kipling's Kim (1901), which was based on The Great Game (espionage and politics) between Europe and Asia and centered in Afghanistan; and Baroness Orczy's The Scarlet Pimpernel (1905), recounting the undercover exploits of an English aristocrat's attempts to rescue French aristocrats during the French Revolution, while Robert Erskine Childers's novel The Riddle of the Sands (1903) defined the spy novel for the pre–First World War era. Cooper portrait by John Wesley Jarvis, 1822 James Fenimore Cooper (September 15, 1789 – September 14, 1851) was a prolific and popular American writer of the early 19th century. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Leopold I 1831 (MDCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the British author. ... This article is about the novel. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Central Asia, circa 1848. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... Baroness Emma (Emmuska) Orczy (September 23, 1865 – November 12, 1947) was a British novelist, playwright and artist of Hungarian origin. ... The Scarlet Pimpernel is a classic play and adventure novel by Baroness Emmuska Orczy, set during the French Revolution. ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Aristocracy is a form of government in which rulership is in the hands of an upper class known as aristocrats. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... Robert Erskine Childers Robert Erskine Childers DSO (25 June 1870 - 24 November 1922) was an author and Irish nationalist who was executed by the authorities of the newly independent Irish Free State during the Irish Civil War. ... The Riddle of the Sands is a 1903 novel by Erskine Childers. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


While Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes is mainly remembered as a protagonist of detective fiction, several of the stories are actually early examples of the spy genre. In "The Adventure of the Naval Treaty" and "The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans", Holmes protects vital British secrets from foreign spies, while in "His Last Bow" he is himself a double agent feeding false information to the Germans on the eve of World War I. ... A portrait of Sherlock Holmes by Sidney Paget from the Strand Magazine, 1891 Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who first appeared in publication in 1887. ... Basil Rathbone as Sherlock Holmes Detective fiction is a branch of crime fiction that centers upon the investigation of a crime, usually murder, by a detective, either professional or amateur. ... The Adventure of the Naval Treaty, one of the 56 Sherlock Holmes short stories written by British author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, is one of 12 stories in the cycle collected as The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. ... The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans, one of the 56 Sherlock Holmes short stories written by British author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, is one of eight stories in the cycle collected as His Last Bow. ... His Last Bow, one of the 56 Sherlock Holmes short stories written by British author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, is one of eight stories in the cycle collected as His Last Bow. ... A double agent pretends to spy on a target organization on behalf of a controlling organization, but in fact is loyal to the target organization. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


Joseph Conrad's The Secret Agent (1907) was a more serious look at espionage and its consequences, both for individuals and society. It includes a close study of a small group of revolutionaries and their terrorist plot to blow up the Greenwich Observatory. The result is failure and a series of personal tragedies. // Joseph Conrad (born Teodor Józef Konrad Nałęcz-Korzeniowski, 3 December 1857 – 3 August 1924) was a Polish-born novelist who spent most of his adult life in Britain. ... The Secret Agent is a 1907 novel by Joseph Conrad. ... This article is becoming very long. ... Royal Observatory, Greenwich The original site of the Royal Greenwich Observatory (RGO), which was built as a workplace for the Astronomer Royal, was on a hill in Greenwich Park in Greenwich, London, overlooking the River Thames. ...


The most widely read spy-fiction writer was William Le Queux, whose ordinary prose has since relegated his works to used-book stores, but who was Britain's highest-selling author during the pre–World War I years; the second greatest selling spy-fiction writer was E. Phillips Oppenheim. Together they wrote hundreds of spy novels, between 1900 and 1914, but the formulaic stories have been judged as of little literary merit. William Tufnell Le Queux (1864 - 1927) was a British journalist and writer. ... Edward Phillips Oppenheim (October 22, 1866 – February 3, 1946), was an English novelist, in his lifetime a major and successful writer of genre fiction including thrillers. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Literary Merit a written text has Liteary Merit if it is a work of quality, that is if it has some aesthetic value. ...


During the First World War, the pre-eminent author was John Buchan, a skilled propagandist; his novels were well-written portrayals of the war as the conflict between civilization and barbarism. His best-known works are the Richard Hannay novels The Thirty-Nine Steps (the title of which, but not the plot, was used for an Alfred Hitchcock film), Greenmantle and other sequels; Buchan's novels are still in print. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... John Buchan, 1st Baron Tweedsmuir (August 26, 1875 - February 11, 1940), was a Scottish novelist and politician who served as Governor General of Canada. ... Central New York City. ... Barbarism may refer to: Barbarism (derived from barbarian), the condition to which a society or civilization may be reduced after a societal collapse, relative to an earlier period of cultural or technological advancement; the term may also be used pejoratively to describe another society or civilization which is deemed inferior... Richard Hannay is the fictional secret agent created by Scottish novelist, John Buchan, 1st Baron Tweedsmuir. ... The Thirty-nine Steps is an adventure novel by the Scottish author John Buchan, first published in 1915 by William Blackwood and Sons, Edinburgh. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... “Moving picture” redirects here. ... Greenmantle is the second of five Richard Hannay novels by John Buchan, first published in 1916 by Hodder & Stoughton, London. ...


In France, in 1917, Gaston Leroux penned one of the earliest French spy thrillers with Rouletabille chez Krupp starring his fictional detective Joseph Rouletabille. 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Gaston Leroux. ... Gumshoe redirects here. ... Joseph Rouletabille is the creation of Gaston Leroux, a French writer and journalist. ...


The inter-war period's pulp spy fiction mostly concerned battling Bolsheviks. Bolshevik Party Meeting. ...


World War II

The strength and versatility of the literary form became evident in the period between the two world wars, and flowered during World War II. For the first time, there appeared novels written by retired intelligence officers such as W. Somerset Maugham, who accurately portrayed spying in the First World War in Ashenden. Compton Mackenzie, another former British intelligence agent, wrote the first successful spy satire. Eric Ambler wrote of ordinary people caught up in espionage in Epitaph for a Spy (1938), The Mask of Dimitrios (U.S. title: A Coffin for Dimitrios) (1939), and Journey into Fear (1940). Ambler was notable (and shocking to some) for introducing the left-wing perspective to a genre previously featuring right-wing, Establishment attitudes. W. Somerset Maugham as photographed in 1934 by Carl Van Vechten. ... This article should belong in one or more categories. ... Sir (Edward Montague) Compton Mackenzie, (1883–1972), was an Scottish novelist. ... Eric Ambler (28 June 1909 - 22 October 1998) was an influential English writer of spy novels who brought a level of realism to the field that had generally been absent in earlier works. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1939, Glasgow-born author Helen MacInnes's first espionage novel, Above Suspicion, was published in Britain (1941 in the U.S.A.), beginning a 45-year, highly successful career in which critics praised her for her literate, fast-paced, intricately plotted suspense novels set against contemporary history. Above Suspicion was made into a popular movie. Some of her other famous titles include Assignment in Britanny (1942), Decision at Delphi (1961), and Ride a Pale Horse (1984). Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Helen MacInnes (born October 7, 1907 in Glasgow, Scotland; died September 30, 1985 in New York, New York) was an Scottish author of espionage novels. ... A 1995 suspense thriller starring Christopher Reeve as a paralyzed policeman who plots to murder his unfaithful wife (Kim Cattrall) and her lover. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film). ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ...


In 1940, British writer Manning Coles brought out Drink to Yesterday, the first of his acclaimed Thomas Elphinstone Hambledon novels. It was a grim story set in World War I, while his next books, which occurred in Nazi Germany or in World War II England, had a lighter tone despite the graveness of the events depicted. After the war, Hambledon's books grew formulaic, and critical interest waned. Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Manning Coles is the pseudonym of two British writers, Adelaide Frances Oke Manning (1891-1959) and Cyril Henry Coles (1899-1965), who wrote many spy thrillers from the early 40s through the early 60s. ... Thomas Elphinstone Hambledon (Tommy Hambledon) is the fictional protagonist of many spy novels written by the British author Manning Coles from 1940 through 1963. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


The Cold War

The Cold War that followed hard upon World War II was a great impetus to the genre. In the early 1950s, authors such as Desmond Cory introduced fictional "licensed to kill" agents, while Graham Greene drew on his real-life experience with British Intelligence to create a number of left-wing, anti-imperialist spy novels, including The Quiet American (1955), set in southeast Asia, A Burnt-out Case (1961), about the Belgian Congo, The Comedians (1966), set in Haiti, The Honorary Consul (1973), in the Argentine town of Corrientes, near the Paraguay border, and The Human Factor (1978), about spies in London. His most popular novel was Our Man in Havana (1959), a seriocomedy about British intelligence bumbling in pre-Castro Cuba. For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Desmond Cory is a pseudonym used by British mystery and thriller writer Shaun Lloyd McCarthy between 1951 and 1991. ... This article is about the writer Graham Greene. ... The Secret Intelligence Service (SIS), more commonly known as MI6 (originally Military Intelligence [section] 6), or Her Majestys Secret Service or just the Secret Service, is the British external security agency. ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... Anti-imperialism is a current within the political left advocating the collapse of imperialism. ... The Quiet American (1955) is a novel (ISBN 0-09-947839-0) written by British author Graham Greene. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Motto: Travail et Progres (Work and Progress) The Belgian Congo Capital Léopoldville/Leopoldstad Political structure Colony Governor  - 1908-1910 Baron Wahis  - 1946-1951 Eugène Jacques Pierre Louis Jungers  - 1958-1960 Henri Arthur Adolf Marie Christopher Cornelis History  - Established 15 November, 1908  - Congolese independence 30 June, 1960 The Belgian... The Comedians is a novel by Graham Greene, first published in 1966. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... A novel by Graham Greene, published in 1973. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... The Human Factor (ISBN 0679409920) is an espionage novel by Graham Greene, first published in 1978 and adapted into a 1979 film by Otto Preminger. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Our Man In Havana is a 1958 novel by Graham Greene. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... // Castro is a Romance (Spanish, Galician, Portuguese and Italian) word coming from Latin castrum, a fortification (cf: Greek: kastron; Proto-Celtic: *Kassrik; Breton: kaer, *kastro). ...


An early, literary phenomenon of the Cold War was Ian Fleming's counter-intelligence agent, James Bond007, who became and remains the most famous fictional spy. Yet despite Fleming's enormous commercial success, other authors quickly developed heroes with anti-Bond traits. Notable examples are John le Carré and Len Deighton, who modeled their novels on those 1930s authors who were dubious about the morality of espionage. For example, in contrast to Bond, Le Carré's George Smiley, is a middle-aged intelligence officer whose wife has had several public love affairs. Frederick Forsyth (The Day of the Jackal) and Ken Follett (Eye of the Needle) approached the subject journalistically, and were praised for their dramatic use of historic events. "Adam Hall", one of the pseudonyms of Trevor Dudley-Smith, created a popular series about British spy Quiller, beginning with The Berlin Memorandum (U.S. title: The Quiller Memorandum), which has a different tack; it is both literary and focused upon tradecraft. Ian Lancaster Fleming (May 28, 1908 – August 12, 1964) was a British author, journalist and Second World War Navy Commander. ... Flemings image of James Bond; commissioned to aid the Daily Express comic strip artists. ... 007 refers to either James Bond or Korean Airlines Flight 007 which was shot down in 1983 over Soviet airspace. ... John le Carré is the pseudonym of David John Moore Cornwell (born October 19, 1931 in Poole, Dorset, England), an English writer of espionage novels. ... Len Deighton (left) teaches Michael Caine how to break an egg on the set of The IPCRESS File. ... Face The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known in Europe as the World Depression. ... Book cover showing Sir Alec Guiness as George Smiley. ... Frederick Forsyth. ... The Day of the Jackal is a thriller novel by Frederick Forsyth, first published in 1971, about a professional assassin who is contracted by the OAS, a French terrorist group of the early 1960s, to kill Charles de Gaulle. ... Ken Follett (born June 5, 1949) is a British author of thrillers and historical novels. ... Eye of the Needle is a spy thriller novel written by British author Ken Follett. ... Elleston Trevor was the pseudonym, and eventually legal name, of the British novelist Trevor Dudley-Smith (February 17, 1920 – 1995), who also wrote as Adam Hall and Simon Rattray, among other names. ... Quiller is the alias of a fictional spy created by English novellist Elleston Trevor and featured in a series of Cold War thrillers written under the pseudonym Adam Hall. ... The Quiller Memorandum is a 1966 film adaptation of an Adam Hall spy novel. ...


During this era, American authors for the first time rose to sufficient prominence to break British dominance of the genre. In 1960 Donald Hamilton published Death of a Citizen and The Wrecking Crew, the debut novels in his long-running series featuring the grim counterspy/assassin Matt Helm. The books inspired a series of comic, popular movies starring Dean Martin as Matt Helm. Robert Ludlum's first book, The Scarlatti Inheritance (1971), sold modestly in hardcover, but was a bestseller in paperback, launching Ludlum's career. Generally considered the inventor of the modern spy thriller, Ludlum has been criticized, praised, and widely imitated. The Hunt for Red October (1984), the first novel of Tom Clancy, was a major publishing sensation and also made into a film. The Welsh writer Craig Thomas is generally credited with creating the techno-thriller genre with the publication of Firefox in 1977; however, it was Clancy who took this to new heights. Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Donald Hamilton (born March 24, 1916) is a U.S. writer of novels, short stories, and non-fiction about the outdoors. ... Death of a Citizen is a 1960 spy novel by Donald Hamilton, and was the first in a long-running series of books featuring the adventures of assassin Matt Helm. ... The Wrecking Crew is a spy novel by Donald Hamilton first published in 1960. ... Counterspy is a Antispyware application of Sunbelt Software. ... Jack Ruby murdered the assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald, in a very public manner. ... Matt Helm as depicted on the back cover of The Wrecking Crew, 1960 Matt Helm, a fictional character created by author Donald Hamilton, is a U.S. government counteragent—a man whose primary job is to kill or nullify enemy agents—not a spy or secret agent in the ordinary... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as... Dean Martin (born Dino Paul Crocetti, June 7, 1917 – December 25, 1995) was an Italian American singer, film actor, and comedian. ... Robert Ludlum (May 25, 1927 New York City â€“ March 12, 2001 Naples, Florida) was an American author of 29 thriller novels, and was educated at Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut. ... HEy does anyone know what his first book is in his series? ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... A bestseller is a book that is identified as extremely popular by its inclusion on lists of currently top selling titles that are based on publishing industry and booktrade figures and published by newspapers, magazines, or bookstore chains. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... This article is about the year. ... Thomas Leo Clancy Jr. ... for other people of the same / or similar name Craig Thomas Craig David Thomas (born 24 November 1942) is a Welsh author of thrillers, notably the Mitchell Gant series. ... Firefox is a fiction novel written by Craig Thomas, published in 1978. ...


The 1960s saw an abundance of spy films, many based on works of literature. They covered a wide range, from the fantastical James Bond films to the grainy, monochrome realism of The Spy Who Came In from the Cold (based on the Le Carré novel of that title), to the cool commercialism of The Quiller Memorandum (screenplay for the film first released in the UK as The Berlin Memorandum is by Harold Pinter, adapted from "Adam Hall"'s eponymous novel). The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... The spy film genre deals with the subject of fictional espionage, either in a realistic way or as a basis for fantasy. ... Old book bindings at the Merton College library. ... The Spy Who Came in from the Cold is a 1965 film adaptation of the novel of the same name by John Le Carre. ... The Quiller Memorandum is a 1966 film adaptation of an Adam Hall spy novel. ... Harold Pinter, CH, CBE (born 10 October 1930) is an English playwright, screenwriter, poet, actor, director, author, and political activist. ... Elleston Trevor was the pseudonym, and eventually legal name, of the British novelist Trevor Dudley-Smith (February 17, 1920 – 1995), who also wrote as Adam Hall and Simon Rattray, among other names. ... An eponym is a person (real or fictitious) whose name has become identified with a particular object or activity. ...


Spies also were depicted on television, including James Bond in 1954 in an episode of Climax! based on Fleming's Casino Royale. Several television series — including The Man from U.N.C.L.E, Danger Man, and I Spy — aired during the 1960s; spies were parodied in Get Smart. Then, in the late 1970s and into the 1980s, The Sandbaggers presented a gritty, bureaucratic view of espionage operations to television. Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Climax! (a. ... Casino Royale by Ian Fleming was the first James Bond novel. ... Rare childrens storybook based upon Left to right: David McCallum, Robert Vaughn, and Leo G. Carroll. ... This article is about the 1960s TV series which was also known as Secret Agent and shouldnt be confused with the 1990s television series Secret Agent Man. ... The I-SPY books were spotters guides written for British children, and particularly successful in the 1950s and 60s. ... Get Smart was an American comedy television series that satirized the secret agent genre. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... Roy Marsden as Neil Burnside in The Sandbaggers The Sandbaggers is a British television drama series about men and women on the front lines of the Cold War. ...


In the 1970s and 1980s a former CIA employee, Charles McCarry, wrote a half-dozen, highly regarded novels such as The Tears of Autumn that were notable for mastery of espionage tradecraft and their literary quality. Charles McCarry is a novelist whose works often concern secret history, bankers, the CIA, post-war Germany, and Richard Nixon. ...


After the Cold War

As the Cold War closed, literary novelist Norman Mailer's abiding preoccupation with U.S. espionage inspired him to write Harlot's Ghost, a sprawling 1,300-page work published in 1991, the year that the Soviet Union dissolved. Norman Mailer, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1948 Norman Kingsley Mailer (born January 31, 1923) is an American novelist, journalist, playwright, screenwriter and film director. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ...


With the fall of the Iron Curtain, the once-Communist East reeled, desperately in need of financial aid from the West as it struggled to adopt democracy. The Soviet Union was gone, and Russia was not easily believable as the arch enemy in contemporary spy tales. Adding to the problem, the very existence of the CIA was in question—the U.S. Congress seriously discussed disbanding it. Interest in espionage fiction plummeted. Deciding the game was over, The New York Times abandoned its long-running column that reviewed spy thrillers. Warsaw Pact countries to the east of the Iron Curtain are shaded red; NATO members to the west of it — blue. ... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ...


Still, publishers continued to bring out the new work of those authors who had been highly popular during the Cold War, hoping that most of their readership would remain loyal. That proved to be true. Besides the Cold War writers mentioned earlier, those who published successfully during this low point included Nelson DeMille, W.E.B. Griffin, and David Morrell. Nelson Richard DeMille (born August 23, 1943) is an American author. ... W.E.B. Griffin (born William Edmund Butterworth III on November 10, 1929) is a writer of military and detective fiction with some thirty novels in five series published under that name. ... David Morrell (born 1943 in Kitchener, Ontario, Canada) is the award-winning author of First Blood, the novel in which Rambo was created. ...


At the same time, editors were naturally wary of gambling on brand-new authors. Only a handful of novelists ultimately were deemed to have written work strong or original enough to be published in hardcover. Among those in the United States were Joseph Finder, Moscow Club (1995), Gayle Lynds, Masquerade, (1996), and Daniel Silva, The Unlikely Spy (1996) and, in the United Kingdom, Charles Cumming, A Spy By Nature (2001), and Henry Porter, Remembrance Day (2000). They were rarities, whose best-selling espionage stories about the new post-Cold War world helped to keep the form alive. For other uses, see editor. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Joseph Finder[1] (b. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Gayle Lynds is the author of The Coil, Masquerade, Mosaic, and Mesmerized, and co-creator with Robert Ludlum of the Covert-One series. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Author Daniel Silva writes thriller/espionage novels and lives in Georgetown in Washington, D.C. with his wife and children. ... Charles Cumming (born April 5, 1971, Ayr, Scotland) is a British writer of spy fiction. ... The post-Cold War era is a time period following the end of the Cold War. ...


The decade of the spy

Finally, the political tide turned again. The tragic events of 9/11 and the aftermath of continued terrorist attacks reawakened readers' hunger for information about the world at large. Fiction has always been a favored lens through which readers not only entertained but educated themselves. Quickly a demand for spy thrillers arose, a demand that has only grown, reflecting the widespread attention paid by the public to real-life intelligence matters not only in their own countries but internationally. A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... Terrorist redirects here. ...


Le Carre and Forsyth returned to the field with new books. Editors actively sought out espionage novels and continue to do so. Today a host of new writers across Europe and the United States publish in the field. In the United States, the New York Times bestseller list is often dominated by thrillers. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


Finally, in 2004, the first international organization for professional thriller authors was formed—International Thriller Writers—"ITW." ITW held the first international conference to celebrate thrillers—ThrillerFest—in June 2006. The next is scheduled for July 2007. Also in 2007, the first spy theme park—Spyland—is scheduled to open near Lyons, France. Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... International Thriller Writers, Inc. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... This article is about the French city. ...


Spy thrillers and similar works that are aimed at a yonger demographic have emerged as well, introducing the world of espionage to audiences of an increasingly younger age. These range from farcial teenage spy comedies such as the film Agent Cody Banks to the fairly serious series of Alex Rider novels written by Anthony Horowitz and chick lit novels such as I'd Tell You I Love You, But Then I'd Have to Kill You. Ben Allsop, one of the youngest authors in England, also writes spy fiction, including titles such as "Sharp" and "The Perfect Kill." Agent Cody Banks is a movie released in the U.S. on March 14, 2003 that follows the adventures of 15-year-old Cody Banks (played by Frankie Muniz) who has to finish his chores, avoid getting grounded, and save the world by going undercover for the CIA. Hilary Duff... For the title character of the series, see Alex Rider (character). ... Anthony Horowitz (born 5 April 1955) is an English author and television scriptwriter. ... Chick lit is a term used to denote genre fiction written for and marketed to young women, especially single, working women in their twenties and thirties. ... This article is considered orphaned, since there are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


Recently, there have been several successful TV espionage series. Some, such as La Femme Nikita (1997-2001), Alias (2001-2006), 24 (2001- ), and Spooks (in the UK; re-titled MI-5 in the USA and Canada; 2002- ), have cult followings of millions of fans worldwide in both first-runs and re-runs and have become perhaps even cultural icons. Nikita is a television spy drama based upon the French film directed by Luc Besson (see Nikita). ... Alias is an American Spy-fi television series created by J. J. Abrams which was broadcast on ABC from September 30, 2001 to May 22, 2006, spanning five seasons. ... For other uses, see 24 (disambiguation). ... For the Three Stooges film, see Spooks!. Spooks is a British television drama series, produced by the independent production company Kudos for BBC One. ...


But most notably, there have been a recent surge of independent and Hollywood-produced spy movies shown in movie theaters and distributed on DVD which have generated steady streams of both popular interest and financial profits for those involved in their production.


The most popular, and profitable, of these have been the Jason Bourne films and Tom Cruise's Mission: Impossible films, as well as the recent James Bond revival in Casino Royale. But most interestingly, the once strictly-popcorn spy genre has begun to achieve a semblance of critical acclaim, with Steven Spielberg's Munich leading the pack, nominated for five Academy Awards and two Golden Globes in 2005. In addition, Syriana, featuring George Clooney and The Constant Gardener (based on Le Carre's 2001 novel of the same title), also garnered numerous awards including Best Supporting Actor for George Clooney, Best Supporting Actress for Rachel Weisz and a BAFTA for Ralph Fiennes. For the 1980 novel by Robert Ludlum, see The Bourne Identity (novel). ... Tom Cruise (born Thomas Cruise Mapother IV on July 3, 1962) is an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe Award-winning American actor and film producer. ... Flemings image of James Bond; commissioned to aid the Daily Express comic strip artists. ... Casino Royale (2006) is the 21st film in the James Bond series and the first to star Daniel Craig as MI6 agent James Bond. ... Steven Allan Spielberg (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ... Munich is a 2005 drama film starring Eric Bana. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Syriana is a 2005 Academy Award-winning geopolitical thriller film written and directed by Stephen Gaghan. ... George Timothy Clooney (born May 6, 1961) is an Academy Award and two-time Golden Globe-winning American actor, director, producer and screenwriter, known for his role in the first five seasons of the long-running television drama ER (1994–99), and his rise as an A-List movie star... The Constant Gardener is a 2005 Academy Award-winning film based on the John le Carré novel of the same name. ... For the 2005 film of the same name, see The Constant Gardener (film). ... George Timothy Clooney (born May 6, 1961) is an Academy Award and two-time Golden Globe-winning American actor, director, producer and screenwriter, known for his role in the first five seasons of the long-running television drama ER (1994–99), and his rise as an A-List movie star... Rachel Weisz (born March 7, 1971) is an Academy Award-winning English film and television actress. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organization that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... Ralph Nathaniel Fiennes, (IPA: ), born 22 December 1962) is a Tony Award-winning, Academy Award-nominated and Genie Award-nominated British actor. ...


Spy fiction has also taken off in a brand-new direction with the arrival of digital gaming. Players can become a spy and infiltrate enemy territory without being detected. The Metal Gear (most specifically the third installment Metal Gear Solid) series pioneered the concept of infiltration and secrecy in computer gaming (as opposed to the standard first-person shooter genre), followed by games like Syphon Filter and Splinter Cell. These games feature complex conspiracy/espionage storylines and cinematic presentation that rival most espionage-based motion pictures. Some games such as "No One Lives Forever" and it's sequel "No One Lives Forever 2: A Spy in H.A.R.M.'s way" combines the very serious story type mentioned above with much humor and over-the-top 1960s retro design. Evil Genius (game), set in the same age and design as the NOLF series gives the player an opportunity to become the evil villain and differs from other spy games as it is a real time strategy game. For the original video game titled Metal Gear, see Metal Gear. ... This article is about the original Metal Gear Solid released for the PlayStation. ... This article is about video games. ... Syphon Filter is a third-person shooter for the PlayStation released in 1999. ... An image from the original Splinter Cell Splinter Cell is a series of video games endorsed by American author Tom Clancy. ... No One Lives Forever (full title: The Operative: No One Lives Forever), commonly abbreviated NOLF, is the name of a computer game and video game developed by Monolith Productions and published by Fox Interactive. ... No One Lives Forever 2: A Spy in H.A.R.M.s Way (abbreviated NOLF2) is a computer game developed by Monolith Productions, and published by Sierra Entertainment. ... Evil Genius is a tongue-in-cheek take on the 1960s spy thriller genre offering the player the chance to play the villain himself and control a secret island fortress complete with powerful henchmen, loyal minions and a wide range of gizmos, gadgets and traps. ...


At fan gatherings, writers' conferences, publishers' meetings, and in the Intelligence Community itself—analysts, spymasters, and covert operators read the genre for entertainment and to pick up ideas—memories of the field's near death after the Cold War are painfully fresh. But since terrorism and world unrest are not expected to end soon, the need for intelligence gathering, counterespionage, and counter-terrorism are not expected to end soon either. The Intelligence Community of the United States is an organization of several executive branch agencies within the federal government that are responsible for foreign and domestic intelligence, military planning, and espionage. ... Terrorist redirects here. ... Counter Intelligence A uk label started and owned by John Machielsen. ... Counter-terrorism refers to the practices, tactics, and strategies that governments, militaries, and other groups adopt in order to fight terrorism. ...


Prominent writers of spy fiction

Eric Ambler (28 June 1909 - 22 October 1998) was an influential English writer of spy novels who brought a level of realism to the field that had generally been absent in earlier works. ... The cover of the Fontana 1982 paperback edition of Bagleys The Snow Tiger Desmond Bagley (October 29, 1923 Kendal - April 12, 1983 Southampton), was a UK journalist and novelist principally known for a series of best-selling thrillers. ... Raymond Benson (born September 6, 1955) is an American author best known for being the last official author of the adult James Bond novels. ... John Buchan, 1st Baron Tweedsmuir (August 26, 1875 - February 11, 1940), was a Scottish novelist and politician who served as Governor General of Canada. ... William Frank Buckley Jr. ... Robert Erskine Childers Robert Erskine Childers DSO (25 June 1870 - 24 November 1922) was an author and Irish nationalist who was executed by the authorities of the newly independent Irish Free State during the Irish Civil War. ... Thomas Leo Clancy Jr. ... Brian Cleeve Brian Talbot Cleeve, (November 22, 1921 – March 11, 2003) was a prolific writer and popular TV broadcaster, who lived in Ireland for most of his life . ... Manning Coles is the pseudonym of two British writers, Adelaide Frances Oke Manning (1891-1959) and Cyril Henry Coles (1899-1965), who wrote many spy thrillers from the early 40s through the early 60s. ... Desmond Cory is a pseudonym used by British mystery and thriller writer Shaun Lloyd McCarthy between 1951 and 1991. ... Charles Cumming (born April 5, 1971, Ayr, Scotland) is a British writer of spy fiction. ... Len Deighton (left) teaches Michael Caine how to break an egg on the set of The IPCRESS File. ... Joseph Finder[1] (b. ... Ian Lancaster Fleming (May 28, 1908 – August 12, 1964) was a British author, journalist and Second World War Navy Commander. ... Vince Flynn is a best-selling American author of political thriller novels. ... Ken Follett (born June 5, 1949) is a British author of thrillers and historical novels. ... Frederick Forsyth. ... Alan Furst (born February 20, 1941) is an American author of historical spy novels set just prior to and during the Second World War. ... John Gardner, circa 1984 John Edmund Gardner (November 20, 1926 - August 3, 2007) was an English spy novelist. ... Michael Francis Gilbert, born in 1912, is a British writer of both fictional mysteries and thrillers who writes as Michael Gilbert. ... John Griffiths (born 1956) is a Labour and Co-operative politician and Member of the Welsh Assembly for Newport East since 1999. ... This article is about the writer Graham Greene. ... Jan Guillou at the Swedish Book- and Library Convention in Gothenburg, Sweden Jan Oscar Sverre Lucien Henri Guillou (pron. ... Elleston Trevor was the pseudonym, and eventually legal name, of the British novelist Trevor Dudley-Smith (February 17, 1920 – 1995), who also wrote as Adam Hall and Simon Rattray, among other names. ... Donald Hamilton (born March 24, 1916) is a U.S. writer of novels, short stories, and non-fiction about the outdoors. ... Robert Harris is an English TV reporter and author, born in 1957 in the city of Nottingham. ... Jack Higgins is the principal pseudonym of UK novelist Harry Patterson (b. ... Charlie Higson (born, 1958 in Frome, Somerset) is an English actor and producer, an author, television writer and a comedian. ... Raelynn Hillhouse Raelynn Hillhouse is an American novelist, expert on international affairs and national security and former smuggler. ... Anthony Horowitz (born 5 April 1955) is an English author and television scriptwriter. ... John le Carré is the pseudonym of David John Moore Cornwell (born October 19, 1931 in Poole, Dorset, England), an English writer of espionage novels. ... William Tufnell Le Queux (1864 - 1927) was a British journalist and writer. ... Robert Littell (born January 8, 1935 in Brooklyn, New York, USA) is an American author residing in France. ... Robert Ludlum (May 25, 1927 New York City â€“ March 12, 2001 Naples, Florida) was an American author of 29 thriller novels, and was educated at Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut. ... Gayle Lynds is the author of The Coil, Masquerade, Mosaic, and Mesmerized, and co-creator with Robert Ludlum of the Covert-One series. ... Helen MacInnes (born October 7, 1907 in Glasgow, Scotland; died September 30, 1985 in New York, New York) was an Scottish author of espionage novels. ... Ian Mackintosh Ian Mackintosh, MBE, (born July 26, 1940; disappeared and presumed dead July 1979) was a Scottish naval officer, a writer of thriller novels, and a screenwriter for British television. ... Norman Mailer, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1948 Norman Kingsley Mailer (born January 31, 1923) is an American novelist, journalist, playwright, screenwriter and film director. ... W. Somerset Maugham as photographed in 1934 by Carl Van Vechten. ... Charles McCarry is a novelist whose works often concern secret history, bankers, the CIA, post-war Germany, and Richard Nixon. ... Andy McNab DCM MM (born December 28, 1959) is a British former soldier turned novelist. ... David Morrell (born 1943 in Kitchener, Ontario, Canada) is the award-winning author of First Blood, the novel in which Rambo was created. ... Robert Muchamore, The Author who has won many awards Books: The Recruit, Class A, maximum Security, Divine Madness, Man Vs Beast, The Fall And coming soon, Mad Dog he was born yesterday ... James Munro was the pseudonym of a British writer named James William Mitchell (born 1926) who, in the late 1960s, wrote four spy thrillers under this byline. ... Manning OBrine, born 1915 is an Irish thriller writer and television screenplay writer. ... Edward Phillips Oppenheim (October 22, 1866 – February 3, 1946), was an English novelist, in his lifetime a major and successful writer of genre fiction including thrillers. ... Baroness Emma (Emmuska) Orczy (September 23, 1865 – November 12, 1947) was a British novelist, playwright and artist of Hungarian origin. ... There are several prominent people named James Phelan, including three American politicians: James Phelan, Sr. ... For the British fashion designer, see Antony Price. ... Author Daniel Silva writes thriller/espionage novels and lives in Georgetown in Washington, D.C. with his wife and children. ... Desmond Skirrow was a British advertising executive and writer of thrillers. ... Ross Thomas (born February 19, 1926 in Oklahoma City, USA, died December 18, 1995 in Santa Monica, USA) was a mystery writer. ... Dennis Wheatley (8 January 1897-10 November 1977) was a British writer born in London. ...

References

  • Aronoff, Myron J. The Spy Novels of John Le Carré: Balancing Ethics and Politics (1999).
  • Britton, Wesley. Spy Television. The Prager Television Collection. Series Ed. David Bianculli. Westport, CT and London: Praeger, 2004. ISBN 0-275-98163-0.
  • Britton, Wesley. Beyond Bond: Spies in Fiction and Film. Westport, CT and London: Praeger, 2005. ISBN 0-275-98556-3.
  • Britton, Wesley. Onscreen & Undercover: The Ultimate Book of Movie Espionage. Westport, CT and London: Praeger, 2006. ISBN 0-275-99281-0.
  • Cawelti, John G. The Spy Story (1987)
  • Priestman, Martin, ed. The Cambridge Companion to Crime Fiction (2003).

See also

Spy and Secret agent redirect here. ... Spy-fi is a fan name for television series and movies - especially those from the 1960s - that blend the espionage genre with elements of science fiction. ... The spy film genre deals with the subject of fictional espionage, either in a realistic way or as a basis for fantasy. ... This is a list of fictional secret agents. ... Thriller fiction, sometimes called suspense fiction, is a genre of literature that typically entails fast-paced plots, numerous action scenes, and limited character development. ... Thriller films are movies that primarily use action and suspense to engage the audience. ... This is a list of thriller or suspense novelists. ...

External links

  • Spy-Wise The official website of Wesley A. Britton, author of three books on the fictional spy genre in print, on film and television. Contains extensive material on all aspects of spy fiction, interviews with actors, writers and producers and behind-the-scenes glimpses into the world of fictional spies.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Spy Fiction review for the PS2 (1249 words)
A fiction is a story, so the title can be read as "Spy Story." But a fiction is also a made-up event, so you could read it as "Spy Lies." Either way, I was anticipating a subtle, classy stealth game.
In Spy Fiction, where you're asked if you want to quit every time you save and a woman using an electric shaver is seen as commonplace by most of the NPCs, you quickly learn to stop looking for reasonable answers.
Throughout Spy Fiction, you'll be engaged in one of three activities: sneaking around in disguises, navigating past lasers, or beating up brainless enemies.
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