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Encyclopedia > Spring Hill College
Spring Hill College

Motto: ''In Colle Exaltatus Fons Sapientae "
"A spring of wisdom is he who was lifted up on the hill"
Established: 1830
Type: Private
Religious affiliation: Roman Catholic (Jesuit)
President: Rev. Gregory F. Lucey, S.J.
Faculty: 69 full-time
Undergraduates: ~1,100
Postgraduates: ~400
Location: Mobile, Alabama, USA
Campus: Urban, 400 acres, 18-hole golf course, 23 buildings
Colors: Purple and White
Mascot: Badger
Website: http://www.shc.edu/

Spring Hill College is a private, co-educational Roman Catholic Jesuit college in the United States. It was founded in 1830 on the Gulf Coast in Mobile, Alabama, by Most Rev. Michael Portier, Archbishop of Mobile, Alabama. It was the first Catholic college in the South, fifth oldest Catholic college in the United States, and third oldest of the 28 member Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities. It is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. In 2007, US News & World Report reported that Spring Hill College ranked 11th among colleges in the South offering both bachelor's and master's level degrees.[citation needed] For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Various Religious symbols, including (first row) Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Bahai, (second row) Islamic, tribal, Taoist, Shinto (third row) Buddhist, Sikh, Hindu, Jain, (fourth row) Ayyavazhi, Triple Goddess, Maltese cross, pre-Christian Slavonic Religion is the adherence to codified beliefs and rituals that generally involve a faith in a spiritual... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country State County Mobile Founded 1702 Incorporated 1814 Government  - Mayor Sam Jones Area  - City 412. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Purple is any of a group of colors intermediate between blue and red. ... Alternate meanings: White (disambiguation) White is a color (more accurately it contains all the colors of the spectrum and is sometimes described as an achromatic color—black is the absence of color) that has high brightness but zero hue. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... For other uses, see Badger (disambiguation). ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Seal of the Society of Jesus. ... For other uses, see College (disambiguation). ... The Gulf of Mexico is a major body of water bordered and nearly landlocked by North America. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country State County Mobile Founded 1702 Incorporated 1814 Government  - Mayor Sam Jones Area  - City 412. ... Michael Portier, born Sep 7, 1795, in Montbrison, France, was a Roman Catholic bishop and the first Bishop of Mobile. ... The Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities or AJCU is an American voluntary service organization based in Washington, D.C. whose mission is to serve its member institutions, the 28 colleges and universities in the United States administered by the Society of Jesus. ... The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) is a regional accreditor for over 13,000 public and private educational institutions ranging from preschool to college level in the Southern United States. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


The Spring Hill academic calendar is divided into two semesters, a fall semester of 15 weeks beginning at the end of August and ending before Christmas, and a spring semester of 15 weeks beginning in early January and ending in early May. There are May and June mini-sessions, and summer school is during June and July. An academic term is a division of an academic year, the time during which a school, college or university holds classes. ...

Contents

History

The Administration Building
The Administration Building

Spring Hill College was founded by the first bishop of Mobile, Michael Portier. After purchasing a site for the College on a hill near Mobile, Bishop Portier went to France to find teachers and funds for the new college. Upon his return he rented a hotel next to the college grounds and started the first semester on May 1, 1830, with an enrollment of thirty students, making Spring Hill the oldest institution of higher education in Alabama.[1] On July 4 of the same year the bishop laid the cornerstone of the first permanent building. It stood on the site of the present Administration Building and opened for classes in November 1831. Spring Hill thus takes its place among the oldest colleges in the South. It is the third oldest Jesuit college in the United States. The Archdiocese of Mobile (Archidioecesis Mobiliensis) is a Catholic Archdiocese covering 22,969 square miles (59,467 km^2) in southern Alabama and Mississippi and governing the Diocese of Biloxi, the Diocese of Birmingham, and the Diocese of Jackson. ... Michael Portier, born Sep 7, 1795, in Montbrison, France, was a Roman Catholic bishop and the first Bishop of Mobile. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1836 the governor of Alabama, Clement C. Clay, signed a legislative act which chartered the College and gave it "full power to grant or confer such degree or degrees in the arts and sciences, or in any art or science as are usually granted or conferred by other seminaries of learning in the United States." This power was used in the following year, 1837, when four graduates received their degrees. The first two presidents of the College were called away to be bishops, one to Dubuque, Iowa (Bishop Mathias Loras), the other to Vincennes, Indiana (Bishop John Stephen Bazin), and the third, Father Mauvernay, died after a brief term of office. Bishop Portier then found it necessary to transfer the College, first to the French Fathers of Mercy, and next to the Society of Jesus and Mary, both of whom lacked teaching and administrative experience. He then persuaded the Fathers of the Lyonnais Province of the Society of Jesus to take possession of the College. The new regime was inaugurated with Father Francis Gautrelet, S.J., as president in September 1847. Since that time the institution has continued under Jesuit direction. Clement Comer Clay (December 17, 1789–September 7, 1866) was the Democratic Governor of the U.S. state of Alabama from 1835 to 1837. ... Saint Raphaels Cathedral The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Dubuque is an ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Roman Catholic Church in the northeastern quarter of the state of Iowa in the United States. ... A stained glass image of Bishop Loras Bishop Mathias Loras (August 30, 1792 - February 20, 1858) was a French priest who later became the first Bishop of the Dubuque Diocese in what would become the state of Iowa. ... This article is about the United States city, Vincennes. ... The Fathers of Mercy are a Roman Catholic congregation of missionary priests. ... This article is about the French city. ... Seal of the Society of Jesus. ...


Instruction at the College was not interrupted by the American Civil War, but in 1869 a fire destroyed the main building and required the removal of students and faculty to St. Charles College, Grand Coteau, Louisiana. Bishop John Quinlan and other benefactors assisted in rebuilding the College, which reopened at Spring Hill before the year's end. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... St. ... Grand Coteau is a town located in St. ... John Quinlan, born October 19, 1826, in Cloyne, Ireland, was a Roman Catholic bishop and the second Bishop of Mobile. ...


As the enrollment increased, Quinlan Hall, the College Chapel, the Thomas Byrne Memorial Library, and Mobile Hall were erected. In 1935, the high school, which had been a unit distinct from the College since 1923, was discontinued. In the space vacated by the high school, the Jesuit House of Studies was opened in 1937, and the Scholasticate of the Sacred Heart opened on a site adjoining the College a few years later. After World War II, a great influx of veterans taxed the facilities of the College, requiring the erection of a number of temporary buildings on the campus. At the request of His Excellency, Archbishop Thomas Joseph Toolen of Mobile, the College became co-educational in 1952. At present the ratio of male to female students is approximately 1:2. Black students were accepted into all departments of the College for the first time in 1954, before desegregation was mandated by the United States government. Mrs. Fannie E. Motley was the first black graduate from the institution in 1956. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Archbishop Thomas Joseph Toolen, born February 28, 1886, in Baltimore, Maryland, was a Roman Catholic bishop and the sixth Bishop of Mobile. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Affirmative action in the United States Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


Statistics

Over 1400 students study at Spring Hill College each year of which over 70% are from outside the Alabama state limits. Student statistics is 38% are male and 62% are female. 90% of the freshman class and 75% of the total student body live on campus. The student-faculty ratio is 13:1, and the average class size is 17. Of faculty members, 86% hold doctorates or the highest degrees in their fields. More than one-third of graduating students continue their education at graduate or professional school. This article is about the U.S. State. ...


Facts about SHC

Marnie & John Burke Memorial Library.
Marnie & John Burke Memorial Library.

The campus rests on a 450 acre (1.8 km²) site, is naturally landscaped and features huge live oaks, palm trees, azalea-lined walkways, and an 18-hole golf course. There are 32 buildings, several of which are listed in the National Register of Historic Places. This article is about the sport of golf. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ...


On the night of January 21, 1957, a dozen or more darkened cars eased down the main avenue of the college. Several members of the KKK attempted to set up a kerosene-soaked cross outside Mobile Hall, a dormitory. The Klan made a tactical blunder, however, in visiting the campus during finals week. Most of the white, male residents were still awake, studying for exams, and several heard the hammering. Once alerted, students streamed from both ends of the building carrying whatever items were handy -- golf clubs, tennis rackets, bricks, a softball bat -- and put the panicked Klansmen to flight. To save face, the KKK returned the next night and succeeded in burning a cross at the gate of the College before students reacted. The following day, however, a group of students -- male and female -- hanged a Klansman in effigy at the College gate, with a sign reading, "KKKers ARE CHICKEN." is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Members of the second Ku Klux Klan at a rally during the 1920s. ...


In the summer of 1963, Lee Harvey Oswald gave a speech at Spring Hill, just months before assassinating President John F. Kennedy. Lee Harvey Oswald (October 18, 1939 – November 24, 1963) was, according to four United States government investigations, the assassin of U.S. President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963 in Dallas, Texas. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ...


In 1963, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. mentions Spring Hill in his "Letter from Birmingham Jail," citing the College as one of the first Southern schools to integrate. Martin Luther King redirects here. ... Martin Luther King Jr The Letter from Birmingham Jail or Letter from Birmingham City Jail, commonly but incorrectly rendered Letter from a Birmingham Jail, was an open letter on April 16, 1963 written by Martin Luther King, Jr. ...


In 1969, Musician Jimmy Buffett married his first wife, Margie Washichek, in St. Joseph's Chapel. Jimmy Buffett tours Pearl Harbor with United States Navy Admiral Jonathan Greenert, June 12, 2003 James William Jimmy Buffett (born December 25, 1946) is a singer, songwriter, author, businessman, and recently a film producer best known for his island escapism lifestyle and music including hits such as Margaritaville (No. ...


Athletics

Spring Hill College competes in the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics and the Gulf Coast Athletic Conference as the Spring Hill College Badgers. Men and women Spring Hill College Badgers field teams in baseball, basketball, cross-country, golf, soccer, softball, tennis and volleyball. The National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (better known as the NAIA) traces its roots to the National Association of Intercollegiate Basketball. ... The Gulf Coast Athletic Conference (GCAC) is a college athletic conference affiliated with the NAIA. Member institutions are located in Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi. ... This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... The Minnesota State Highschool Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... This article is about the game. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Softball is a team sport popular especially in the United States. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ...


Spring Hill College has maintained a baseball team for much of its storied history. Currently, the Spring Hill College baseball team plays its home games at Stan Galle Field ("The Pit"), the oldest continually used college baseball field in the country. Stan Galle Field has played host to a plethora of former major league players, including such legends as Babe Ruth and Hank Aaron. Notable alumni include Blake Stein (former pitcher for the Kansas City Royals) and Jim Hendry (general manager of the Chicago Cubs). This article is about the baseball player. ... Henry Louis Hank Aaron (born February 5, 1934 in Mobile, Alabama), nicknamed Hammer, Hammerin Hank”, or Bad Henry”, is a retired American baseball player whose Major League Baseball (MLB) career spanned the 1950s through the 1970s. ... Cubs GM Jim Hendry Jim Hendry (born July 27, 1955, Dunedin, Florida) is the Vice President/General Manager of the Chicago Cubs. ...


In 1900, the Spring Hill football team began play for the first time. In 1908, the team held its opponents scoreless in every game. The team was disbanded in 1941, so it is commonly said on campus that the Spring Hill College Football Team has been undefeated since 1941. United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ...


Intramural sports

Spring Hill College has a student-run intramural program. The following sports are offered:

Tennis, Golf, and Card Tournaments are tentative. Softball is a team sport popular especially in the United States. ... An Intramural game of co-ed flag football at the University of Texas at Austin Flag football is a version of American football that is popular across the United States. ... This article is about the sport. ... Racquetball racquet and ball Racquetball is a sport played with racquets and a hollow rubber ball on an indoor or outdoor court. ... Wallyball (known in some places as rebound volleyball) is a fast-paced sport that was invented by Joe Garcia in 1979. ... Soccer redirects here. ... This article is about the game. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Look up card in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Famous graduates and faculty

  • Edward Troye is a famous mid-19th century artist. He taught French and drawing at the college from 1849 to 1855.
  • Paul Morphy graduated in the Spring of 1855 at 18 years of age. He was generally considered to have been the strongest chess master of his time, as well as the first recorded chess prodigy in history.
    In 1957, a centennial monument dedicated to Morphy's 1857 victory in the First American Chess Conference was erected behind Mobile Hall. It was presented by the Log Cabin National Chess Affiliation (now defunct).
  • Arthur C. Watson was a Natchitoches, Louisiana, lawyer, civic leader, politician, and philanthropist who succeeded despite the loss of the use of both legs from polio. He graduated from Spring Hill College in 1930.
  • Joseph Canizaro, real estate mogul and philanthropist.
  • D.H. 'Buck' Long was president and general manager of WKRG-TV, Inc. in Mobile. He graduated from Spring Hill in 1950.
  • Joe Langan is a former Alabama state senator and mayor of Mobile, Alabama, and is credited with having maintained the peace during the racial turmoil of the 1960s, when many other major cities in the Southeast were attracting national attention because of their racism. He graduated from the college in 1951.
  • Jeremiah Denton was one of the most famous American POWs during the Vietnam War. A pilot during the war, he was shot down on July 18, 1965 while flying a combat mission. He was subsequently captured and tortured for seven years. He is perhaps most famous for a TV interview he gave during his time as a prisoner of war, in which he blinked the word "torture" in morse code during what was supposed to be a North-Vietnamese propaganda piece on the "humane" treatment of detainees. He is the author of the book, When Hell was in Session, which details his experiences as a prisoner of war.
  • Robert McCown, S.J. is a Jesuit artist and literatus. In 1979, he filmed the award-winning documentary República Jesuítica del Paraguay, which depicts the efforts of Jesuits in the 17th and 18th centuries in Paraguay. He taught at Spring Hill in 1968.
  • Patricia Krenwinkel was a student at the college. She eventually dropped out and joined "The Family", the followers of the murderer Charles Manson.
  • Joe Miller is a research biologist who helped discover that IRDS (infant respiratory distress syndrome) was due to a lack of surfactants. This research led to the discovery of a treatment for infants with this condition.
  • Michael R. Augustus, President/ Advancing Student Leadership, scholar, Department of Labor. He graduated in 2004.

The definition of an artist is wide-ranging and covers a broad spectrum of activities to do with creating art, practicing the arts and/or demonstrating an art. ... For scale drawings or plans, see Plans (drawings). ... Paul Charles Morphy (June 22, 1837 - July 10, 1884), The Pride and Sorrow of Chess, was an American chess player. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Young Sammy Reshevsky Chess prodigies are children who play chess so well that they are able to beat Masters and even Grandmasters, often at a very young age. ... Stephen Russell Mallory (c. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... Arthur Chopin Watson (December 15, 1909 – November 15, 1984) was an attorney, state legislator, civic leader, philanthropist, and chairman of the Louisiana Democratic Party from 1968 – 1976. ... The city of Natchitoches (pronounced , or NAK-uh-tush) is the parish seat of Natchitoches Parish, in the U.S. state of Louisiana. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country State County Mobile Founded 1702 Incorporated 1814 Government  - Mayor Sam Jones Area  - City 412. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial quota... Jeremiah Andrew Denton Jr. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... When Hell was in Session is a book written by American POW Jeremiah Denton. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... The official portrait of Alexis Herman hangs in the Department of Labor Alexis Margaret Herman (born July 16, 1947 in Mobile, Alabama) served as the 23rd U.S. Secretary of Labor under President Bill Clinton. ... The United States Secretary of Labor is the head of the United States Department of Labor. ... The definition of an artist is wide-ranging and covers a broad spectrum of activities to do with creating art, practicing the arts and/or demonstrating an art. ... An intellectual is a person who uses his or her intellect to study, reflect, or speculate on a variety of different ideas. ... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... John T. Schuessler is Chairman of the Board, Chief Executive Officer, and President of Wendys International, Inc. ... Wendys International, Inc. ... The Dallas Bar Association or DBA is a professional organization providing resources for attorneys and the public in the city of Dallas, Texas. ... Patricia Dianne Krenwinkel (born December 3, 1947) is an American convicted murderer and a former member of Charles Mansons murderous commune, known as The Family. During her time with Mansons group, she was known by various aliases such as Big Patty, Yellow, and Mary Ann Scott, but to... This article is about the concept. ... A biologist is a scientist devoted to and producing results in biology through the study of organisms. ... Infant respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), previously called hyaline membrane disease, is a syndrome caused by developmental lack of surfactant and structural immaturity in the lungs of premature infants. ... Surfactants, also known as tensides, are wetting agents that lower the surface tension of a liquid, allowing easier spreading, and lower the interfacial tension between two liquids. ... This article is about the sport. ... A baseball pitcher delivers the ball to home plate In baseball, pitching is the act of throwing the baseball from the pitchers mound toward the catcher with the goal of retiring a batter who attempts to make contact with it, or draw a walk. ... This article is about the baseball team. ... National league can refer to: National Basketball League, in the United States and Canada, which merged with the rival Basketball Association of America to form the National Basketball Association National Football League, the major American football league in the United States National Hockey League, the major ice hockey league in... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... The Denver Post is a daily newspaper and online website published in Denver, Colorado. ... Journalism is a discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Cubs GM Jim Hendry Jim Hendry (born July 27, 1955, Dunedin, Florida) is the Vice President/General Manager of the Chicago Cubs. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1871, 1874-1889) (a. ... United Parcel Service, Inc. ... Colman McCarthy is a journalist, teacher, lecturer, pacifist, and long-time peace activist. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ...

Presidents of the college

St. Joseph's Chapel
St. Joseph's Chapel
  • Bishop Michael Portier, D.D., first bishop of Mobile, founded Spring Hill College on May 1, 1830.
  • Bishop Mathias Loras, D.D. 1830-1832
  • Bishop John Stephen Bazin, D.D. 1832-1836
  • Peter Mauvernay 1836-1839
  • Bishop John Stephen Bazin, D.D. 1839-1840
  • Dominic F. Bach, S.P.M. 1840-1842
  • Bishop John Stephen Bazin, D.D. 1842-1844
  • J. P. Bellier, C.J.M. 1844-1845
  • A. Desgaultieres 1845
  • Claude Rampoon 1845-1846
  • Bishop John Stephen Bazin, D.D. 1846-1847
  • Thomas Rapier 1847
  • Francis de S. Gautrelet, S.J. 1847-1859
  • Anthony Jourdant, S.J. 1859-1862
  • Francis de S. Gautrelet, S.J. 1863-1865
  • Aloysius Curioz, S.J. 1865-1868
  • John Montillot, S.J. 1868-1875
  • Dominic Beaudequin, S.J. 1875-1880
  • John Downey, S.J. 1880-1883
  • David McKiniry, S.J. 1883-1887
  • James Lonegan, S.J. 1887-1896
  • Michael S. Moynihan, S.J. 1896-1899
  • William Tyrrell, S.J. 1899-1907
  • Francis X. Twellmeyer, S.J. 1907-1913
  • Edward Cummings, S.J. 1913-1919
  • Joseph C. Kearns, S.J. 1919-1922
  • Michael McNally, S.J. 1922-1925
  • Joseph M. Walsh, S.J. 1925-1931
  • John J. Druhan, S.J. 1931-1938
  • W. Doris O'Leary, S.J. 1938-1946
  • W. Patrick Donnelly, S.J. 1946-1952
  • Andrew C. Smith, S.J. 1952-1959
  • A. William Crandell, S.J. 1959-1966
  • William J. Rimes, S.J. 1966-1972
  • Paul Smallwood Tipton, S.J. 1972-1989
  • Donald I. MacLean, S.J. 1989
  • William J. Rewak, S.J. 1989-1997
  • Gregory F. Lucey, S.J. 1997-Present

Michael Portier, born Sep 7, 1795, in Montbrison, France, was a Roman Catholic bishop and the first Bishop of Mobile. ... The Archdiocese of Mobile (Archidioecesis Mobiliensis) is a Catholic Archdiocese covering 22,969 square miles (59,467 km^2) in southern Alabama and Mississippi and governing the Diocese of Biloxi, the Diocese of Birmingham, and the Diocese of Jackson. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... A stained glass image of Bishop Loras Bishop Mathias Loras (August 30, 1792 - February 20, 1858) was a French priest who later became the first Bishop of the Dubuque Diocese in what would become the state of Iowa. ...

References

  1. ^ "As the oldest college in Alabama, the first Catholic college in the Southeast, and the third oldest Jesuit college in the United States, Spring Hill's heritage remains vital, its mission constant: to educate students to become responsible leaders in service to others." - Mission Statement of SHC (http://www.shc.edu/about-shc/employment/hiring/the-mission-statement-of-spring-hill-college/)

External links

The Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities or AJCU is an American voluntary service organization based in Washington, D.C. whose mission is to serve its member institutions, the 28 colleges and universities in the United States administered by the Society of Jesus. ... For similarly-named academic institutions, see Education in Boston, MA. Boston College (BC) is a private university located in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, in the New England region of the United States. ... Canisius College (pronounced IPA: ) is a private Catholic college in the Hamlin Park district of north-central Buffalo, New York. ... Not to be confused with Holy Cross College (Indiana) or other similarly named Holy Cross Colleges. ... Creighton University is a Jesuit, Catholic university located in Omaha, Nebraska, United States of America. ... University of Detroit Mercy is the largest and most comprehensive Catholic University in Michigan. ... Main Entrance Fairfield University is a private, co-educational undergraduate and masters level university located in Fairfield, Connecticut, in the New England region of the United States. ... Fordham University is a private, coeducational research university[3] in the United States, with three campuses located in and around New York City. ... Georgetown University is a Jesuit private university located in Georgetown, Washington, D.C. Father John Carroll founded the school in 1789, though its roots extend back to 1634. ... Gonzaga University is a private Catholic university located in Spokane, Washington. ... John Carroll University is a private, co-educational Jesuit university in the greater Cleveland, Ohio area in the United States. ... Le Moyne College is a private, four-year Jesuit college of approximately 2,300 undergraduate students that balances a comprehensive liberal arts education with preparation for specific career paths or graduate study. ... A garden sign welcomes residents and visitors to Rogers Park as home of Loyola University Chicago. ... Loyola College in Maryland, formerly Loyola College, is a private, coeducational university in Baltimore, Maryland, United States, affiliated with the Society of Jesus and the Roman Catholic Church. ... Loyola Marymount University (LMU) is a comprehensive co-educational private Roman Catholic Jesuit university in Los Angeles, California, USA. The University is one of 28 member institutions of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities and one of five Marymount institutions of higher education. ... Logo of Loyola University New Orleans Loyola University New Orleans is a private, co-educational Jesuit university in the United States with 5,000 students (3,000 undergraduates). ... Marquette University is a private, coeducational, Jesuit, Roman Catholic university located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in the United States of America. ... Regis University is a private, co-educational Roman Catholic university in the United States. ... This article is about Rockhurst University. ... This article is about the university in the United States. ... Saint Louis University is a private, co-educational Catholic Jesuit university in the United States of America located in St. ... Saint Peters College is a private, coeducational Roman Catholic college in the United States. ... University of San Francisco (USF) is a private Catholic, Jesuit University in San Francisco, California, United States. ... Santa Clara University is a private, co-educational Jesuit-affiliated university located in Santa Clara, California. ... The University of Scranton is a private, co-educational Jesuit university, located in Scranton, Pennsylvania, in the northeast region of the state. ... Centennial Fountain, designed by George Tsutakawa. ... Wheeling Jesuit University is a private, co-educational Roman Catholic university in the United States. ... For the school in New Orleans, see Xavier University of Louisiana. ... The Gulf Coast Athletic Conference (GCAC) is a college athletic conference affiliated with the NAIA. Member institutions are located in Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi. ... Belhaven College is a college in Jackson, Mississippi that was founded by the Presbyterian Church (USA) but that is independently run by a Board of Trustees. ... Dillard University is a private, faith-based liberal arts college in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Logo of Loyola University New Orleans Loyola University New Orleans is a private, co-educational Jesuit university in the United States with 5,000 students (3,000 undergraduates). ... Louisiana State University of Shreveport (or LSUS) is a branch of the Louisiana State University System in Shreveport, Louisiana. ... The Southern University at New Orleans is a University in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... {{Infobox University |name = Tougaloo College |image = |caption = |motto =Where History Meets the Future |tagline = |established = 1869 |type =[[Private College |affiliation =United Church of Christ |endowment =$8 million |staff = |faculty =108 |president =Dr. Beverly Wade Hogan |students = |undergrad =913 (in 2006-2007) |city = Tougaloo |state = Mississippi |country = USA |campus = suburban, 500... The University of Mobile is an American four-year, private, Christian university in Prichard, Alabama, an industrial suburb of Mobile. ... William Carey University is a university in southern Mississippi, in the United States affiliated with the Southern Baptist Convention and the Mississippi Baptist Convention. ... Xavier University of Louisiana is a historically African-American Roman Catholic University located off Carrollton Avenue in Mid-City New Orleans, Louisiana. ...

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College Profiles - Spring Hill College (844 words)
Founded in 1830, Spring Hill is the first Catholic college in the Southeast, the third-oldest Jesuit college in the nation, and the fifth-oldest Catholic college in America.
Spring Hill's campus occupies 500 acres, including 250 acres of woods and an eighteen-hole golf course and provides recreational resources for students and faculty.
Spring Hill's academic tradition stresses the importance of the liberal arts and sciences and aims to develop student's intellectual capacities for critical thinking, coherent writing and articulate speaking.
Mission Statements (1759 words)
The history of Spring Hill College is deeply rooted in the early French and Catholic culture of the Gulf Coast.
The College also recognizes its responsibility to carry its educational vision to the broader community by developing programs, both graduate and undergraduate, which respond to the needs of the growing number of non-traditional students in its local area and by extending its theological resources to the service of the Catholic Southeast.
Students should, through the education Spring Hill offers, be made aware of their special obligations to the world of the disadvantaged and the impoverished.
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