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Encyclopedia > Sports Illustrated
The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium.
The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium.
October 7, 2002, cover showing the University of Texas as the best University in the nation for sports.

Sports Illustrated is the biggest weekly American sports magazine owned by media conglomerate Time Warner. It has over 3 million subscribers and is read by 23 million adults each week, including over 18 million men, 19% of the adult males in the country. It was the first magazine with circulation over one million to win the National Magazine Award for General Excellence twice. Image File history File links Sportsillustrated_firstissue. ... Image File history File links Sportsillustrated_firstissue. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) East Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 21, 35, 41, 42, 44 Name Atlanta Braves (1966–present) Milwaukee Braves (1953-1965) Boston Braves (1941-1952) Boston Bees (1936-1940) Boston Braves (1912-1935) Boston Rustlers (1911) Boston Doves (1907-1910) Boston... Edwin Lee Mathews (October 13, 1931 – February 18, 2001) was a Hall of Fame third baseman in Major League Baseball and is widely regarded as one of the greatest, if not the greatest, third baseman to play the game. ... Milwaukee County Stadium (locally known as just County Stadium) was a ballpark in Milwaukee, Wisconsin from 1953 to 2000. ... Sports Illustrated cover, October 7, 2002. ... Sports Illustrated cover, October 7, 2002. ... October 7 is the 280th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (281st in leap years). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... The University of Texas System comprises fifteen educational institutions in Texas, of which nine are general academic universities, and six are health institutions. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Time Warner Inc. ...


Its swimsuit issue, which has been published since 1964, is now an annual publishing event that generates its own television shows, videos and calendars. Veronica Varekova, Elle Macpherson, Rebecca Romijn, Rachel Hunter, Daniela Pestova, Elsa Benitez, Carolyn Murphy and Yamila Diaz, 2006; Heidi Klum and Maria Sharapova are in the insets. ... A page from the Hindu calendar 1871-72. ...

Contents

History

Two other magazines named Sports Illustrated were started in the 1930s and 1940s, but they both quickly failed. In fact, there was no large-base, general sports magazine with a national following when TIME patriarch Henry Luce began considering whether his company should attempt to fill the gap. At the time, many believed sports was beneath the attention of serious journalism and didn't think sports news could fill a weekly magazine, especially during the winter. A number of advisers to Luce, including Life Magazine's Ernest Havemann, tried to kill the idea, but Luce, who was not a sports fan, decided the time was right."[1] A pocket watch, a device used to tell time Look up time in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Henry Robinson Luce (April 3, 1898 - February 28, 1967) was an influential American publisher. ... Journalism is a discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and more broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... A cover of Life Magazine from 1911 Life has been the name of two notable magazines published in the United States. ...


After offering $200,000 in an unsuccessful bid to buy the name Sport for the new magazine, they acquired the rights to the name Sports Illustrated instead for just $10,000. The goal of the new magazine was to be "not a sports magazine, but the sports magazine." Many at Time-Life scoffed at Luce's idea; in his Pulitzer Prize-winning biography, Luce and His Empire, W.A. Swanberg wrote that the company's intellectuals dubbed the proposed magazine "Muscle," "Jockstrap," and "Sweat Socks." Launched on August 16, 1954, it was not profitable and not particularly well run at first, but Luce's timing was good. The popularity of spectator sports in the United States was about to explode, and that popularity came to be driven largely by three things: The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  • economic prosperity
  • television, and
  • Sports Illustrated.

The early issues of the magazine seemed caught between two opposing views of its audience. Much of the subject matter was directed at upper class activities such as yachting, polo and safaris, but upscale would-be advertisers were unconvinced that sports fans were a significant part of their market.[2] Yachting is a physical activity involving boats. ... A game of polo. ... Map of Africa 1890 Look up safari in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Commercialism redirects here. ...


Innovations

From its start, Sports Illustrated introduced a number of innovations that are generally taken for granted today:

  • Liberal use of color photos - though the six-week lead time initially meant they were unable to depict timely subject matter
  • Scouting reports - including a World Series Preview and New Year's Day bowl game roundup that enhanced the viewing of games on television
  • In-depth sports reporting from writers like Robert Creamer, Tex Maule and Dan Jenkins.
  • High school football Player of the Month awards. Filip Pirganoski, the star quarterback playing for the Yorktown Patriots won it in January, becoming the youngest player to ever win the award (14 years and 363 days)

In 1956, Luce asked Time, Inc. senior European Correspondent André Laguerre to come to New York and help define the magazine's character. Many of the staff had serious doubts that the English-born Frenchman could possibly know anything about American sports, but Laguerre won them over, and during his term as Managing Editor (1960 - 1974), SI became a model for other middle-class American magazines. One of the first changes was the beginning of a segment honouring unknown athletes called Faces in the Crowd. Its writers developed their own characteristic style by daring to tell people what was important. Many would say that the magazine legitimized sports — and being a sports fan — for a huge segment of the American population. The steady creation of landmark stories (e.g., "The Black Athlete — A Shameful Story" by Jack Olsen and "Paper Lion" by George Plimpton) showed that sports fans could be readers, and a generation of sportswriters patterned their own writing after what they read in SI.[3] For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... This article is about January 1 in the Gregorian calendar. ... A bowl game is a post-season college football game, typically at the Division I-A level. ... Robert W. Creamer (b. ... Hamilton Prieleaux Bee Maule, commonly known as Tex Maule (May 19, 1915 in Ojus, Florida — May 16, 1981) was the lead American football writer for Sports Illustrated in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. ... Dan Jenkins (born December 2, 1929 in Fort Worth, Texas) is an American author and sportswriter, most notably for Sports Illustrated. ... Faces in the Crowd is a long-running segment from Sports Illustrated magazine. ... George Ames Plimpton (March 18, 1927 – September 25, 2003) was an American journalist, writer, editor, and actor. ...


Color printing

The magazine's photographers also made their mark with innovations like putting cameras in the goal at a hockey game and behind a glass backboard at a basketball game. In 1965, offset printing began to allow the color pages of the magazine to be printed overnight, not only producing crisper and brighter images, but also finally enabling the editors to merge the best color with the latest news. By 1967, the magazine was printing 200 pages of "fast color" a year; in 1983, SI became the first American full-color newsweekly. An intense rivalry developed between photographers, particularly Walter Iooss and Neil Leifer, to get a decisive cover shot that would be on newsstands and in mailboxes only a few days later.[4] Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Basketball is a team sport in which two teams of five active players each try to score points against one another by throwing a ball through a 10-foot high hoop (the basket) under organized rules. ... Offset lithography printing process Offset printing is a widely used printing technique where the inked image is transferred (or offset) from a plate to a rubber blanket, then to the printing surface. ... Assault landing One of the first waves at Omaha Beach as photographed by Robert F. Sargent. ... Walter Iooss (born 1943) has been a professional photographer since the age of 19. ... Neil Leifer (b. ...


In the late 1970s and early 1980s, during Gil Rogin's term as Managing Editor, the feature stories of Frank Deford became the magazine's anchor. "Bonus pieces" on Pete Rozelle, Bear Bryant, Howard Cosell and others became some of the most quoted sources about these figures, and Deford established a reputation as one of the best writers of the time.[5] Frank Deford (born December 16, 1938, in Baltimore, Maryland) is a senior contributing writer for Sports Illustrated, author, and commentator. ... Alvin Ray Pete Rozelle (March 1, 1926–December 6, 1996) was the commissioner of the National Football League (NFL) from January 1960 to November 1989, when he retired from office. ... Paul William Bear Bryant (September 11, 1913–January 26, 1983) was an American college football coach. ... Howard William Cosell, born Howard William Cohen (March 25, 1918 – April 23, 1995) was an American sports journalist on American television. ...


Purported creative decline

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After the death of Henry Luce in 1967, the creative freedom that the staff had enjoyed seemed to diminish. By the 1980s and 1990s, the magazine had become more profitable than ever, but many also believed it had become more predictable. Mark Mulvoy was the first top editor whose background contained nothing but sports; he had grown up as one of the magazine's readers, but he had no interest in fiction, movies, hobbies or history. Mulvoy's top writer Rick Reilly had also been raised on SI and followed in the footsteps of many of the great writers that he grew up admiring, but many felt that the magazine as a whole came to reflect Mulvoy's complete lack of sophistication. Mulvoy also hired the current creative director Steven Hoffman. Critics said that it rarely broke (or even featured) stories on the major controversies in sports (drugs, violence, commercialism) any more, and that it focused on major sports and celebrities to the exclusion of other topics. Image File history File links Circle-question. ... Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... Richard Rick Paul Reilly (born February 3, 1958 in Boulder, Colorado) is the back-page sportswriter for Sports Illustrated. ...


The proliferation of "commemorative issues" and crass subscription incentives seemed to some like an exchange of journalistic integrity for commercial opportunism. More importantly, perhaps, many feel that 24-hour-a-day cable sports television networks and sports news web sites have forever diminished the role a weekly publication can play in today's world, and that it is unlikely any magazine will ever again achieve the level of prominence that SI once had.[6]


Another example of a big change in direction for the periodical is in its capitalizing on alternate covers. The concept took off in the 2000s. There was an alternate issue in fall 2000 for the 2000 World Series. One issue featured Derek Jeter with the heading Subway Series. In January 2004, the controversy over USC and LSU's share of the National Football Championship, resulted in SI creating one issue for the West Coast with USC as champions while the state of Louisiana had an alternate cover with LSU as National Champions. In 2006 alone, there have been three different weeks in which alternate covers have been featured. The August 21 issue featured the College Football Preview and had five alternate covers. The October 23 issue was the NBA Preview and featured three covers with LeBron James, Dwayne Wade, and Carmelo Anthony. The College Basketball Preview was dated November 20 and had five alternate covers. Dates October 21, 2000–October 26, 2000 MVP Derek Jeter (New York Yankees) Television network FOX Announcers Joe Buck, Tim McCarver, and Bob Brenly Umpires Ed Montague, Jerry Crawford, Tim McClelland, Tim Welke, Charlie Reliford, Jeff Kellogg MTA logo for the 2000 Subway Series. ... Derek Sanderson Jeter (born June 26, 1974 in Pequannock Township, New Jersey) is an American Major League Baseball player. ... The program for the 1936 Subway Series. The Subway Series is a series of Major League Baseball games played between teams based in New York City. ... LeBron Raymone James (born December 30, 1984)) is an American professional basketball player who currently plays for the Cleveland Cavaliers of the National Basketball Association. ... Dwyane Wade (born January 17, 1982 in Chicago, Illinois) currently plays professional basketball for the NBAs Miami Heat. ... Carmelo Kiyan Anthony (born May 29, 1984)) is an American professional basketball player at the small forward position for the Denver Nuggets of the NBA and the USA National Team. ...


Sportsman of the Year

Since its inception in 1954, Sports Illustrated magazine has annually presented the Sportsman of the Year award to "the athlete or team whose performance that year most embodies the spirit of sportsmanship and achievement." Roger Bannister won the first ever Sportsman of the year award thanks to his record breaking time of 3:59.4 for a mile (the first ever time a mile had been run under four minutes). Since its inception in 1954, Sports Illustrated magazine has annually presented the Sportsman of the Year award to the athlete or team whose performance that year most embodies the spirit of sportsmanship and achievement. ... Bannister was chosen as the first Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year for his accomplishments in 1954. ...


Dwyane Wade is Sports Illustrated's most recent Sportsman of the Year, for 2006. Wade averaged almost 35 points per game during the six game NBA Finals series against the Dallas Mavericks. Tiger Woods is the only athlete to win the award twice. Dwyane Tyrone Wade, Jr. ...


The cover jinx

When Major League Baseball player Eddie Mathews, pictured on the cover of Volume 1, Issue 1, suffered a hand injury a week later that forced him to miss seven games, the "Sports Illustrated Cover Jinx" — also known as "The Dreaded SI Cover Jinx" — was born, as some noted that bad things seemed to happen to people soon after they appeared on the magazine's cover. Other notable cover coincidences include: This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Edwin Lee Mathews (October 13, 1931 – February 18, 2001) was a Hall of Fame third baseman in Major League Baseball and is widely regarded as one of the greatest, if not the greatest, third baseman to play the game. ... Issue 1, as well as refering to the first edition of a publication such as magazine, comic, or e-zine, is also used to denote the initial direction or output of creativity. ...

Peter King wrote an article on the Kansas City Chiefs' perfect half-season in 2003. The Chiefs lost their tenth game the following week, and went on to lose in the AFC Divisional Playoffs.
  • September 4, 1989 — Major League Baseball Commissioner Bart Giamatti's words about Pete Rose appeared on the cover the week Giamatti died of a heart attack.
  • July 4, 1994 — On the same day the US national soccer team is eliminated from the 1994 FIFA World Cup by Brazil, an issue comes out that has the headline "Soccer Mania" and features US striker Earnie Stewart on the cover.
  • October 31, 1994 — Because of the players' strike in 1994, the Japan Series is featured in the space usually reserved for Major League Baseball's World Series. A picture of a Seibu Lions pitcher in demolishing the Yomiuri Giants, 11-0, in Game 1 is shown from October 22. The issue was released on October 25, and on October 29, the Giants win the Fall Classic in six.
  • June 5, 1995 — Three days after his appearance, San Francisco Giants third baseman Matt Williams, the National League leader in home runs, batting average and RBI, fouled a pitch off his right foot, breaking it, and forcing him to miss 2½ months.
  • March 5, 2001 - Within a week after Nomar Garciaparra's cover appearance, it was announced that he had torn a tendon in his hand, forcing the Red Sox shortstop to miss all but 21 games of the 2001 season.
  • October 13, 2003 — In two regional covers of the baseball playoffs one cover shows Kerry Wood of the Chicago Cubs with the headline "Do You Believe?" as the Cubs had not won a World Series since 1908. In the other regional cover the picture is Pedro Martínez (then) of the Boston Red Sox, who had not won a World Series since 1918. Both teams would lose crushingly in their League Championship Series; the Cubs blew a 3 games to 1 lead to the Florida Marlins while the Red Sox blew a 3-run lead in Game 7 to their arch-rivals the New York Yankees. In addition, Wood and Martínez both pitched Game 7.
  • November 17, 2003Peter King wrote an article praising the Kansas City Chiefs' 9-0 season (at that point). The following week, after wide receiver Chad Johnson declared the Cincinnati Bengals were going to beat the Chiefs, the Chiefs suffered their first loss of the season. The Chiefs went on to win the AFC West with a 13-3 record and gain home-field advantage in the playoffs, but lost in the Divisional Playoff game against the Indianapolis Colts. The Kansas City press and fans soon declared that King jinxed the Chiefs' hopes of glory that season.
  • June 6, 2005 — The cover featured Danica Patrick, who had finished 4th at the Indy 500, her career-highest IRL finish. Since then, she has still not won any races, nor has finished in any race higher than that 4th place finish until a third-place finish at Texas in 2007.
  • September 26, 2005 — The cover picture shows Philadelphia Eagles QB Donovan McNabb laughing with Terrell Owens who had feuded before. The text said "Brotherly love? The soap opera Eagles come together and win big." Later in the year Owens then criticized McNabb, saying that the Eagles would be undefeated if Brett Favre were the quarterback. Owens was suspended for the season and eventually released by the team. McNabb had it worse and suffered a sports hernia which ended his season. The Eagles finished 6-10. The second headline showed the Philadelphia Phillies and their shortstop Jimmy Rollins, who were in the thick of the NL wild card race. They lost the wild card race by 1 game to the Houston Astros.
  • December 2005 — The last SI cover of the year featured USC Trojans stars Reggie Bush and Matt Leinart, after which the Trojans went on to lose to Vince Young and the Texas Longhorns in the 2006 Rose Bowl.
  • June 5, 2006 — Four members of the US national soccer team appear on the cover with the headline "US Soccer Wants You". The issue comes out two days before the US highly unsuccessful showing in the 2006 FIFA World Cup, in which they didn't win a game (managing a 0-2-1 record, with the tie against eventual winners Italy), and fail to make it past group play. They were ranked #5 in the world going into the Cup.
  • October 23, 2006LeBron James, Dwyane Wade, and (in particular) Carmelo Anthony all appear on the cover in an NBA preview issue saying "The New Era, game time for Carmelo Anthony and his new friends". On December 16, 2006, Anthony was involved in the Knicks-Nuggets brawl at Madison Square Garden where he punched Mardy Collins of the Knicks. Anthony was suspended for 15 games after the incident. Dwayne Wade had a season ending injury that year, and LeBron James was blasted by the media by his unusually bad performance during that year's finals.
  • November 20, 2006 — In the yearly college basketball preview, the Kansas Jayhawks are featured on one of the five regional covers, and are picked to win the national championship. Almost immediately, before the issue even arrives in most mailboxes, the Jayhawks lose their home opener to heavy underdog Oral Roberts.
  • In May 2007, the Detroit Pistons and Red Wings were featured on the cover, following this, they both lost in Game 6s of the conference finals after losing Game 5s in overtime at home.
  • June 11, 2007 - LeBron James was featured on the cover with the headline: "LeBron Arrives: Cleveland's in the Finals and a New Era Begins." He and the Cleveland Cavaliers would later lose the Finals to the San Antonio Spurs 4-0 a week after its release.

While the list of "examples" of the jinx is extensive, an individual record 49 cover appearances by Michael Jordan, team record 61 covers by the New York Yankees, and school record of 105 covers by the UCLA Bruins [1] have not hindered their success. January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Alpine skier carving a turn on piste Members of the U.S. Air Force skiing (and snowboarding) at Keystone Resorts 14th Annual SnoFest Downhill Ski Racing This article is about snow skiing. ... Jill Kinmont (current name: Jill Kinmont Boothe) (born February 16, 1936 in Los Angeles, California) is a former top skiier and was a shoe-in for the Winter Olympics until her downhill accident during the tryouts in Alta, Utah resulted in paralysis. ... November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Head Coach Bob Stoops 8th Year, 86-18 Home Stadium Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium Capacity 82,112 - Grass Conference Big 12 - South First Year 1895 Athletic Director Joe Castiglione Website SoonerSports. ... The University of Notre Dame IPA: is a Roman Catholic institution located in Notre Dame, Indiana, immediately northeast of South Bend, Indiana, United States. ... May 26 is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... “Indy 500” redirects here. ... Pat OConnor was a Formula One driver (Indy 500 only) from the United States. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... Laurence Richon Owen, born May 9, 1944 – died February 15, 1961, was a North American ladies figure skating champion. ... Figure skating is an ice skating sporting event where individuals, mixed couples, or groups perform spins, jumps, and other moves on the ice, often to music. ... After the crash. ... The International Skating Union (ISU) is the international governing body for competitive ice skating disciplines, including figure skating, synchronized skating, speed skating, and short track speed skating. ... The World Figure Skating Championships is an annual event sanctioned by the International Skating Union in which elite figure skaters compete for the title of World Champion. ... December 14 is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Head Coach Mack Brown 9th Year, 92-22 Home Stadium Darrell K. Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium Capacity 85,123 - Grass Conference Big 12 - South First Year 1893 Athletic Director DeLoss Dodds Website MackBrown-TexasFootball. ... Head Coach Charlie Weis 2nd Year, 19-6 Home Stadium Notre Dame Stadium Capacity 80,795 - Grass Conference Independent First Year 1887 Athletic Director Dr. Kevin White Website UND.com Team Records All-time Record 821-269-42 (.744) Postseason Bowl Record 13-15 Awards Wire National Titles 8 (11... For the Cotton Bowl stadium, see Cotton Bowl (stadium). ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Indian_uprising. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 5, 14, 18, 19, 21, 42, 455 Name Cleveland Indians (1915–present) Cleveland Naps (1905-1914) Cleveland Bronchos (1902-1904) Cleveland Blues (1901) Ballpark Jacobs Field (1994–present) Cleveland Stadium (1932-1993)* a. ... Joseph Chris Carter (born March 7, 1960 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma) is a former right fielder in Major League Baseball who played from 1983 to 1998, most famous for hitting a home run to end the 1993 World Series, with the Toronto Blue Jays trailing 6-5 to the Philadelphia... James Cory Snyder (born November 11, 1962 in Inglewood, California) was a Major League Baseball player for the Cleveland Indians, Chicago White Sox, Toronto Blue Jays, San Francisco Giants, and Los Angeles Dodgers from 1986 to 1994. ... The Curse of Rocky Colavito (curse supposedly began in 1960) is a phenomenon that supposedly prevented the Cleveland Indians baseball team from winning a World Series, or an American League pennant, or reaching postseason play, or even getting into a pennant race, following the 1960 trade of right fielder Rocky... is the 278th day of the year (279th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lloyd Anthony Moseby (born November 5, 1959 in Portland, Arizona) was a Major League Baseball player. ... Major league affiliations American League (1977–present) East Division (1977–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Toronto Blue Jays (1977–present) Ballpark Rogers Centre (1989–present) a. ... November 30 is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Head Coach Bob Stoops 8th Year, 86-18 Home Stadium Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium Capacity 82,112 - Grass Conference Big 12 - South First Year 1895 Athletic Director Joe Castiglione Website SoonerSports. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Charles Thompson is a businessman, motivational speaker and former American football player best known for his tenure and spectacular downfall as the quarterback of the Oklahoma Sooners. ... February 27 is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Cocaine is a crystalline tropane alkaloid that is obtained from the leaves of the coca plant. ... The head coach in sports coaching is the coach who is in charge of the other coaches. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1217x1613, 381 KB) Summary Trent Green from the November 17, 2003 edition of Sports Illustrated Licensing This image is of a magazine cover, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the magazine or the... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1217x1613, 381 KB) Summary Trent Green from the November 17, 2003 edition of Sports Illustrated Licensing This image is of a magazine cover, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the magazine or the... Peter King Peter King (b. ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Angelo Bartlett Bart Giamatti (April 4, 1938 – September 1, 1989) was the President of Yale University, and later, the 7th commissioner of Major League Baseball in the United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... July 4 is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... First international Unofficial: USA 0 - 1 Canada (Newark, NJ, USA; November 28, 1885) Official: Sweden 2 - 3 USA (Stockholm, Sweden; August 20, 1916) Biggest win USA 8 - 1 Cayman Islands (Mission Viejo, CA, USA; November 14, 1993) USA 7 - 0 El Salvador (Los Angeles, CA, USA; December 5, 1993) USA... Qualifying countries The 1994 FIFA World Cup, the 15th staging of the FIFA World Cup, was held in the United States from June 17 to July 17, 1994. ... Earnie Stewart (born March 28, 1969 in Veghel, Netherlands) is an American soccer player who was a regular midfielder for the U.S. national team from 1990s until his retirement in 2005. ... October 31 is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... The 1994 baseball strike resulted in the cancellation of the World Series for the first time in 90 years. ... The Yomiuri Giants have won twenty Japan Series, more than any other team. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... The Seibu Lions ) are a professional baseball team in Japans Pacific League and are owned by Yoshiaki Tsutsumi, who was once listed as the worlds richest man. ... The Yomiuri Giants ) are one of the popular Central League baseball teams based at the Tokyo Dome in Bunkyo, Tokyo, Japan. ... June 5 is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers NY, NY, 3, 4, 11, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885-1957) New York Gothams (1883-1885) Ballpark AT&T Park (2000–present) a. ... The position of the third baseman Third base redirects here. ... Matthew Derrick Matt Williams (born November 28, 1965 in Bishop, California) is a former Major League Baseball third baseman and right-handed batter who played for the San Francisco Giants (1987-96), Cleveland Indians (1997) and Arizona Diamondbacks (1998-2003). ... Mark McGwire swinging for the fences. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... In baseball statistics, a run batted in (RBI) is given to a batter for each run scored as the result of a batters plate appearance. ... This article is about the day. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Anthony Nomar Garciaparra (born July 23, 1973, in Whittier, California) is an American baseball player of Mexican descent who currently plays first base for the Los Angeles Dodgers. ... The Boston Red Sox are a Major League Baseball team located in Boston, Massachusetts. ... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Kerry Lee Wood (born June 16, 1977 in Irving, Texas) is an American baseball player. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1889) (a. ... Pedro Jaime Martínez (born October 25, 1971 in Manoguayabo, Dominican Republic) is a baseball pitcher who plays for the New York Mets. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds (1901-1911) Major league titles World Series titles (6) 2004... Major league affiliations National League (1993–present) East Division (1993–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 5, 42 Name Florida Marlins (1993–present) Ballpark Dolphin Stadium (1993–present) a. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Peter King Peter King (b. ... City Kansas City, Missouri Team colors Red, White, and Gold Head Coach Herman Edwards Owner The Hunt Family (Clark Hunt, chairman)[1] General manager Carl Peterson Mascot K.C. Wolf (1989-present) Warpaint (1963-1988) League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Western Division (1960-1969) National Football League... Chad Johnson (born January 9, 1978 in Miami, Florida), is an American football wide receiver for the Cincinnati Bengals of the National Football League. ... City Cincinnati, Ohio Team colors Black, Orange and White Head Coach Marvin Lewis Owner Mike Brown Mascot Who Dey League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1968-1969) Western Division (1968-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC Central (1970-2001) AFC North (2002-present) Team... The AFC West is a division of the National Football Leagues American Football Conference. ... City Indianapolis, Indiana Team colors Royal Blue and White Head Coach Tony Dungy Owner Jim Irsay General manager Bill Polian Mascot Blue [1] League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1953–present) Western Conference (1953-1969) Coastal Division (1967-1969) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC East (1970-2001) AFC South... June 6 is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Danica Patrick on Pole Day prior to the 2007 Indianapolis 500 Danica Sue Patrick (born March 25, 1982 in Beloit, Wisconsin) is an American auto racing driver competing in the IndyCar Series. ... Results of the 2005 Indianapolis 500 held at Indianapolis on Sunday, May 29, 2005. ... The Indy Racing League, better known as IRL, is the sanctioning body of a predominantly American based open-wheel racing series. ... Texas Motor Speedway is a superspeedway located in the northernmost portion of the U.S. city of Fort Worth, Texas -- the portion located in Denton County, Texas. ... September 26 is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Donovan Jamal McNabb (born November 25, 1976 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American football quarterback for the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League. ... Terrell Eldorado Owens (born December 7, 1973, in Alexander City, Alabama), is an American football wide receiver for the Dallas Cowboys. ... Brett Lorenzo Favre (born October 10, 1969, in Gulfport, Mississippi)[1] is the current starting quarterback for the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League (NFL). ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 14, 20, 32, 36, 42 Name Philadelphia Phillies (1883–present) Philadelphia Quakers (1882) (Commonly referred to as Blue Jays 1943-1945 despite formal name remaining Phillies) Ballpark Citizens Bank Park (2004–present) Veterans Stadium... James Calvin Jimmy Rollins (born November 27, 1978 in Oakland, California), nicknamed J-Roll, was the Philadelphia Phillies second round draft pick in 1996. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 24, 25, 32, 33, 34, 40, 42, 49 Name Houston Astros (1965–present) Houston Colt . ... Head Coach Pete Carroll 6th Year, 65-12 Home Stadium Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum Capacity 92,500 - Grass Conference Pac-10 First Year 1888 Athletic Director Mike Garrett Website USCTrojans. ... Reginald Alfred “Reggie” Bush II (born March 2, 1985 in San Diego, California), nicknamed “The President,” alluding to President Bush, is an American football player who plays for the New Orleans Saints of the NFL and formerly for the University of Southern California (USC) Trojans. ... Matthew Stephen Leinart (born May 11, 1983 in Santa Ana, California) is an American football quarterback (QB) for the Arizona Cardinals of the National Football League. ... Vincent Paul Young, Jr. ... 2006 Rose Bowl Bowl game Texas Longhorns at USC Trojans USC Trojans (12-1) 38 January 4, 2006 Rose Bowl Stadium in Pasadena, California The 2006 Rose Bowl Game presented by Citi was the final game and national championship of the 2005-2006 Bowl Championship Series (BCS), the 92nd Rose... June 5 is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Qualifying countries The 2006 FIFA World Cup was the 18th staging of the FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial international association football world championship tournament. ... The FIFA World Rankings is a ranking system for mens national teams in football (soccer). ... October 23 is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... LeBron Raymone James (born December 30, 1984)) is an American professional basketball player who currently plays for the Cleveland Cavaliers of the National Basketball Association. ... Dwyane Tyrone Wade, Jr. ... Carmelo Kiyan Anthony (born May 29, 1984)) is an American professional basketball player at the small forward position for the Denver Nuggets of the NBA and the USA National Team. ... The Knicks-Nuggets Brawl was an on-court altercation at a National Basketball Association game between the New York Knicks and Denver Nuggets at Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, on Saturday, December 16, 2006. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Mardy Collins (born August 4, 1984 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an American basketball player, who recently completed his college basketball career at Temple University, and was drafted by the New York Knicks with the 29th pick of the first round of the 2006 NBA Draft. ... November 20 is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... This article cites very few or no references or sources. ... The Oral Roberts Golden Eagles Basketball team is the basketball team that represent Oral Roberts University in Tulsa, Oklahoma. ... June 11 is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... LeBron Raymone James (born December 30, 1984)) is an American professional basketball player who currently plays for the Cleveland Cavaliers of the National Basketball Association. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The San Antonio Spurs are an American professional basketball team based in San Antonio, Texas. ... For other persons named Michael Jordan, see Michael Jordan (disambiguation). ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... The UCLA Bruins are the sports teams for UCLA. The Bruin mens and womens teams participate in NCAA Division I-A as part of the Pacific Ten Conference. ...


SI addressed their own cover jinx in a 2002 issue featuring a black cat on the cover. Then-St. Louis Rams quarterback Kurt Warner was asked to pose with the cat, but Warner, being a pious man, refused to associate himself with such superstition. Warner and the Rams won their next two games to win their second NFC Championship in three years. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Kurtis Eugene the Boyo Warner (was never born June 22, 1971, Burlington, Iowa) is a professional American football quarterback on the Arizona Cardinals. ...


Cover History

Most Covers by Athlete, 1954-2003

Athlete Number of Covers
Michael Jordan 49
Muhammad Ali 37
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar 29
Magic Johnson 22
Jack Nicklaus 22

Most Covers by Team, 1954-2003 For other persons named Michael Jordan, see Michael Jordan (disambiguation). ... “Cassius Clay” redirects here. ... For the football player, see Abdul-Karim al-Jabbar. ... Earvin Johnson, Jr. ... This article refers to the golfer. ...

Team Number of Covers
New York Yankees 61
Los Angeles Lakers 60
Dallas Cowboys 45
Chicago Bulls 44
Los Angeles Dodgers 38
Boston Celtics 37
Boston Red Sox 36
Cincinnati Reds 36
San Francisco 49ers 33
Notre Dame Football 32

Most Covers by Sport, 1954-2003 Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Lakers logo 1966-1991 The Los Angeles Lakers are a National Basketball Association (NBA) team based in Los Angeles, California. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899-1910), (1913) Brooklyn Grooms... The Boston Celtics are a professional basketball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds (1901-1911) Major league titles World Series titles (6) 2004... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 5, 8, 10, 13, 18, 20, 24, 42 Name Cincinnati Reds (1958–present) Cincinnati Redlegs (1953-1958) Cincinnati Reds (1882-1953) Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876-1882) Ballpark Great American Ball Park (2003–present) Riverfront... City San Francisco, California Other nicknames Niners, The Red And Gold, Bay Bombers Team colors Cardinal red, metallic gold and black Head Coach Mike Nolan Owner Denise DeBartolo York and John York General manager Lal Heneghan Mascot Sourdough Sam League/Conference affiliations All-America Football Conference (1946-1949) Western Division... Head Coach Charlie Weis 2nd Year, 19-6 Home Stadium Notre Dame Stadium Capacity 80,795 - Grass Conference Independent First Year 1887 Athletic Director Dr. Kevin White Website UND.com Team Records All-time Record 821-269-42 (.744) Postseason Bowl Record 13-15 Awards Wire National Titles 8 (11...

Sport Number of Covers
Pro Football 519
Baseball 510
Pro Basketball 302
College Basketball 200
Golf 155
College Football 153
Boxing 134
Track and Field 99
Hockey 83
Tennis 78

Celebrities on the Cover, 1954-2003

Celebrity Year Special Notes
Ed Sullivan 1959 On cover as golfer
Bob Hope 1963 Owner of Cleveland Indians
Shirley MacLaine 1964 Wearing a football uniform
Steve McQueen 1971 Riding a motorcycle
Burt Reynolds and Kris Kristofferson 1977 Promoting the film Semi-Tough
Big Bird 1977 On the cover with Mark Fidrych
Hulk Hogan 1985 Caption on cover was Mat Mania
Arnold Schwarzenegger 1987 Caption on cover was Hot Stuff
Ice Cube 1999 On cover with Shaquille O'Neal
Chris Rock 2000 Wearing Los Angeles Dodgers hat

Fathers and Sons who have been featured on the cover This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Bob Hope, KBE (May 29, 1903 – July 27, 2003), born Leslie Townes Hope, was an English-Born American entertainer who appeared in vaudeville, on Broadway, on radio and television, in movies, and in performing tours for U.S. Military personnel, well known for his good natured humor and career longevity. ... Shirley MacLaine (born Shirley MacLean Beaty April 24, 1934) is an Academy Award-winning American film and theatre actress, well-known not only for her acting, but for her devotion to her belief in reincarnation. ... Steve McQueen (March 24, 1930 – November 7, 1980) was an Academy Award-nominated American movie actor, nicknamed The King of Cool.[1] He was one of the biggest box-office draws of the 1960s and 1970s due to a popular anti-hero persona. ... Burt Reynolds (born Burton Leon Reynolds Jr. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... DVD Cover of 1977 movie Semi-Tough. ... Big Bird finds Ernie in a game of Journey to Ernie. ... Mark Steven The Bird Fidrych (born August 14, 1954 in Worcester, Massachusetts) was a Major League Baseball player for the Detroit Tigers. ... Terrence Terry Gene Bollea (born on August 11, 1953) is an American actor and semi-retired professional wrestler better known by his ring name Hulk Hogan. ... Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger (German pronunciation (IPA): ) (born on July 30, 1947) is an Austrian-American bodybuilder, actor and an American politician, currently serving as the 38th Governor of California. ... OShea Jackson (born June 15, 1969) is an American rapper, actor and film director. ... Shaquille Rashaun ONeal (born March 6, 1972 in Newark, New Jersey), frequently referred to simply as Shaq (pronounced shack), is an American professional basketball player and is one of the most famous professional basketball players, generally regarded as one of the most dominant in the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Christopher Julius Rock III[1] (born February 7, 1965)[2] is an Emmy and Grammy Award-winning American comedian, actor, screenwriter, television producer, film producer and director. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899-1910), (1913) Brooklyn Grooms...

Father Son
Archie Manning Peyton Manning
Calvin Hill Grant Hill
Bobby Hull Brett Hull
Bill Walton Luke Walton
Jack Nicklaus Gary Nicklaus
Phil Simms Chris Simms
Dale Earnhardt Dale Earnhardt, Jr.
Cal Ripken, Sr. Cal Ripken, Jr. & Billy Ripken

Presidents who have been featured on the cover Elisha Archie Manning (born May 19, 1949) is a former quarterback in professional American football. ... Peyton Williams Manning (born March 24, 1976 in New Orleans, Louisiana)[1] is an American football quarterback for the Indianapolis Colts NFL franchise. ... Calvin Hill (born January 2, 1947in the Turners Station neighborhood of Dundalk, Maryland) was a running back with a 12 year National Football League career from 1969 to 1981. ... Grant Henry Hill (born October 5, 1972) is an American NBA basketball player who currently plays for the Orlando Magic. ... Robert Marvin The Golden Jet Hull (born January 3, 1939) is a retired Canadian ice hockey player. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... William Theodore Walton III, better known as Bill Walton (born November 5, 1952), is a former American basketball player and current television sportscaster. ... Luke Theodore Walton (born March 28, 1980 in San Diego, California) is an American professional basketball player for the Los Angeles Lakers of the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... This article refers to the golfer. ... Phillip Martin Simms (born November 3, 1955, in Lebanon, Kentucky) is a former quarterback for the New York Giants of the National Football League and currently a television sportscaster for the CBS network. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the elder Dale Earnhardt. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Calvin Cal Edwin Ripken, Sr. ... Calvin Edwin Ripken, Jr. ... Billy Ripken on the cover of Sports Illustrated in 1988. ...

President SI Cover Date Special Notes
John F. Kennedy December 26, 1960 First Lady Jackie Kennedy also on cover and Kennedy was President-Elect at the time of the cover.
Gerald Ford July 8, 1974 Cover came one month before President Richard Nixon announced he would resign from the Presidency.
Ronald Reagan November 26, 1984 On cover with Georgetown Hoyas coach John Thompson and Patrick Ewing
Ronald Reagan February 16, 1987 On cover with America's Cup champion Dennis Conner
Bill Clinton March 21, 1994 On cover about the Arkansas college basketball team

Tribute Covers (In Memoriam) John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), also referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK, John Kennedy or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... this guy is awsome i played him in a school play he also has some pretty funky history Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... The Georgetown Hoyas are the athletics teams that officially represent Georgetown University in college sports. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981 – 1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967 – 1975). ... The Americas Cup trophy The Americas Cup is the most famous and most prestigious regatta in the sport of sailing, and the oldest active trophy in international sport, predating the FA Cup by two decades and the Modern Olympics by 45 years. ... Dennis Walter Conner (born December 16, 1942) is an American yachtsman who has participated in the Americas Cup nine times. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ...

Athlete SI Cover Date Special Notes
Len Bias June 30, 1986 Died of a cocaine overdose just after being drafted by the Boston Celtics
Arthur Ashe February 15, 1993 Tennis great and former US Open champion who died from AIDS
Reggie Lewis August 9, 1993 Celtics player who died due to a heart defect
Mickey Mantle August 21, 1995 Died after years of battling alcoholism
Walter Payton November 8, 1999 Died from rare liver disorder.
Dale Earnhardt February 26, 2001 Died in a crash on the last lap of the 2001 Daytona 500
Ted Williams July 15, 2002 Boston Red Sox who died due to old age
Johnny Unitas October 23, 2002 Baltimore Colts great who died due to old age
Brittanie Cecil April 1, 2002 Fan killed as the result of being struck with a puck to the head while in the crowd at a Columbus Bluejackets game
Pat Tillman May 3, 2004 Arizona Cardinals player who was killed in a friendly fire incident in Afghanistan.

| Leonard Kevin Bias (November 18, 1963 – June 19, 1986) was an American college basketball player who suffered a fatal cardiac arrhythmia that resulted from a cocaine overdose less than 48 hours after being selected by the Boston Celtics in the 1986 NBA Draft. ... The Boston Celtics are a professional basketball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Arthur Ashe (1943-1993) Country: United States Height: 185 cm (6 ft 1 in) Weight: 73 kg (160 lb) Plays: Right Turned pro: 1966 Retired: 1980 Highest singles ranking: 1 (1968 and 1975) Singles titles: 34 Career prize money: $2,584,909 Grand Slam Record Titles: 3 Australian Open W... Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS or Aids) is a collection of symptoms and infections resulting from the specific damage to the immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). ... Reggie Lewis (November 21, 1965 - July 27, 1993) was a basketball player for the Boston Celtics from 1987-1993. ... Mickey Charles Mantle (October 20, 1931 – August 13, 1995) was an American baseball player who was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974. ... Alcoholism is the consumption of, or preoccupation with, alcoholic beverages to the extent that this behavior interferes with the drinkers normal personal, family, social, or work life, and may lead to physical or mental harm. ... Walter Jerry Payton (July 25, 1954 – November 1, 1999) was an American football running back for the Chicago Bears. ... This article is about the elder Dale Earnhardt. ... The Daytona 500 is a 200-lap, 500 mile (805 km) NASCAR NEXTEL Cup Series race held annually at the Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Florida. ... Theodore Samuel Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002), best known as Ted Williams, nicknamed The Kid, the Splendid Splinter, Teddy Ballgame and The Thumper, was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds (1901-1911) Major league titles World Series titles (6) 2004... John Constantine Johnny Unitas (May 7, 1933 – September 11, 2002) was a professional American football player in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. ... City Indianapolis, Indiana Team colors Royal Blue and White Head Coach Tony Dungy Owner Jim Irsay General manager Bill Polian Mascot Blue [1] League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1953–present) Western Conference (1953-1969) Coastal Division (1967-1969) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC East (1970-2001) AFC South... Brittanie Nicole Cecil (born March 20, 1988 in Columbus, Ohio, died March 18, 2002) was a hockey fan who died from injuries suffered when a puck was deflected into the stands and struck her in the head at Nationwide Arena on March 16, 2002. ... Patrick Daniel Tillman, Jr. ... City Glendale, Arizona Other nicknames The Cards, The Birds, Big Red Team colors Cardinal Red, Black, and White Head Coach Ken Whisenhunt Owner Bill Bidwill General manager Rod Graves Mascot Big Red League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1920–present) Western Division (1933-1949) American Conference (1950-1952) Eastern Conference...

Writers

Marty Burns, former child-star, general wise-ass and sometimes detective, is the fictional creation of Jay Russell (writer). ... Frank Deford (born December 16, 1938, in Baltimore, Maryland) is a senior contributing writer for Sports Illustrated, author, and commentator. ... Karl Taro Greenfeld (born 1964 in Kobe, Japan) is a journalist and author known primarily for his articles on life in modern Asia. ... Edward Talmage Hinton (born July 21, 1948 in Laurel, Mississippi) is one of the most well-known and respected motor racing sportswriters in the United States and around the world. ... Peter King Peter King (b. ... Arash Markazi is an American sports journalist currently writing for Sports Illustrated. ... Jack Olsen (1925-2002) was a journalist and author known for his thorough, scholarly approach to crime reporting. ... Richard Rick Paul Reilly (born February 3, 1958 in Boulder, Colorado) is the back-page sportswriter for Sports Illustrated. ... Steve Rushin (b. ... Gary Smith is one of Americas most acclaimed sportswriters. ... Philip Douglas Taylor (born August 13, 1960) is a multi world champion darts player. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Paul Lionel Zimmerman (born October 23, 1932, Philadelphia), known to many fans as Dr. Z, is an American football sportswriter who currently writes for the weekly magazine Sports Illustrated. ...

Spinoffs

Sports Illustrated has helped launched a number of related publishing ventures, including:

  • Sports Illustrated KIDS magazine (circulation 950,000)
    • Launched in January 1989
    • Won the "Distinguished Achievement for Excellence in Educational Publishing" award 11 times
    • Won the "Parents' Choice Magazine Award" 7 times
  • Sports Illustrated Almanac annuals
    • Introduced in 1991
    • Yearly compilation of sports news and statistics in book form
  • SI.com sports news web site
  • Sports Illustrated Women magazine (highest circulation 400,000)
    • Launched in March 2000
    • Ceased publication in December 2002 because of a weak advertising climate
  • Sports Illustrated on Campus magazine
    • Launched on September 4, 2003
    • Dedicated to college athletics and the sports interests of college students.
    • Distributed free on 72 college campuses through a network of college newspapers.
    • Circulation of one million readers between the ages of 18 and 24.
    • Ceased publication in December 2005 because of a weak advertising climate

Action Sports star Travis Pastrana on the March 2007 cover of Sports Illustrated KIDS. Sports Illustrated KIDS (SI KIDS) is a spin-off of the popular weekly American sports magazine Sports Illustrated, and was first launched in January of 1989. ... July 17 is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... CNN or Cable News Network is a cable television network that was founded in 1980 by Ted Turner & Reese Schonfeld [1]. It is a division of the Turner Broadcasting System, owned by Time Warner. ... July 1999 cover showing soccer star Brandi Chastain Sports Illustrated is a popular weekly American sports magazine owned by media giant Time Warner. ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ (MacCambridge 1997, pp. 17-25).
  2. ^ (MacCambridge 1997, pp. 6, 27, 42).
  3. ^ (MacCambridge 1997, pp. 5-8, 160).
  4. ^ (MacCambridge 1997, pp. 108-111, 139-141, 149-151, 236).
  5. ^ (MacCambridge 1997, pp. 236-238).
  6. ^ (MacCambridge 1997, pp. 8-9, 268-273, 354-358, 394-398, 402-405).

References

  • MacCambridge, Michael (1997), The Franchise: A History of Sports Illustrated Magazine, Hyperion Press, ISBN 0-7868-6216-5.
  • Fleder, Rob (2005), Sports Illustrated 50: The Anniversary Book, Time Inc., ISBN 1-932273-49-2.

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Sports Illustrated - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1753 words)
At the time, many believed sports was beneath the attention of serious journalism and didn't think sports news could fill a weekly magazine, especially during the winter.
Much of the subject matter was directed at upper class activities (yachting, polo, and even safaris), but upscale would-be advertisers were unconvinced that sports fans were a significant part of their market.
The EA Sports Madden NFL series is said to have a similar jinx, pointing to incidents with Michael Vick and Ray Lewis after appearing on the cover.
Sports Illustrated Price Guide Prices Paid Values 1954-2005 (306 words)
In its early years, Sports Illustrated focused on hunting, fishing, baseball and college athletics, but soon found that the market for reportage on professional spectator sports - baseball, football, basketball, golf, hockey and tennis especially - was exploding in America in the 1960s.
As the popularity of sports in America and the evolution of advanced printing methods coincided, the publishers of Sports Illustrated were able to take advantage of both trends by improving its reportage and photo quality while increasing its circulation through newsstand and subscription sales.
In 2000, Sports Illustrated again attempted to expand its brand with Sports Illustrated for Women but the magazine never gained traction, as circulation hovered between 300,000 and 400,000 and was eventually discontinued in December of 2002.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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