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Encyclopedia > Sport in Ireland

Life in the Republic of Ireland Image File history File links Question_book-3. ...

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Sport on the island of Ireland is popular and widespread. Levels of participation and spectating are high, but as in other western regions participation has been dropping due to the increasing popularity of other activities such as watching television and playing computer games. Throughout the country a wide variety of sports are played, the most popular being Gaelic games such as Gaelic football, hurling and camogie; as well as association football, rugby union and boxing. By attendance figures Gaelic football is the most popular sport in Ireland[1][2] A pint of stout and some wheaten bread Irish cuisine can be divided into two main categories – traditional, mainly simple dishes, and more modern dishes, as served by hotels etc. ... A page from the Book of Kells. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Public holidays are observed in the Republic of Ireland on: New Years Day, 1 January[1] St Patricks Day, 17 March[1] Easter Monday, moveable Labour Day/May Day, the first Monday in May June Bank Holiday, the first Monday in June August Bank Holiday, the first Monday... Irish music is a folk music which has remained vibrant throughout the 20th century, when many other traditional forms worldwide lost popularity to pop music. ... Communications in the Republic of Ireland, including postal services run by An Post, are regulated to a large extent by the Commission for Communications Regulation (ComReg), the Minister for Communications, Marine & Natural Resources has overall responsibility for national policy and regulation. ... Christ Church Cathedral founded c. ... The History of Ireland began with the first known human settlement in Ireland around 8000 BC, when hunter-gatherers arrived from Great Britain and continental Europe, probably via a land bridge. ... Rates of household recycling in Ireland have increased dramatically since the late 1990s, but are still lagging behind European averages. ... Population (in millions) from 1841 - 2006 The initial, ancient settlers of Ireland were migrants from tribes in modern-day Iberia and southern France [1]. Modern-day Irish people are mainly of Gaelic ancestry, and although some of the population is also of English, Scottish (also often Gaelic), Anglo-Norman, Viking... Health care in Ireland redirects here. ... The Republic of Ireland has a common law legal system with four main sources of law: Constitution of Ireland (Bunreacht na hÉireann) Legislation Primary Legislation - Acts of the Oireachtas Secondary Legislation - Statutory Instrument Case law European Community Law Historical The state became independent in 1922 as the Irish Free... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Politics of Ireland (the Republic of Ireland) takes place in a framework of a parliamentary representative democratic republic, whereby the Taoiseach (Prime Minister) is the head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system. ... See Prostitution in the United Kingdom for information about prostitution in Northern Ireland. ... Computer and video games redirects here. ... Gaelic games are the native sports of Ireland: principally Hurling, Gaelic Football and Camogie. ... Gaelic Football (Irish: Peil, Peil Gaelach or Caid ), commonly referred to as football, or Gaelic , is a form of football played mainly in Ireland. ... For the Cornish sport, see Cornish Hurling. ... Camogie (in Irish, camógaíocht) is a Celtic team sport, the womens variant of hurling. ... “Soccer” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer (disambiguation). ...


In Ireland many sports, such as boxing, rugby union, Gaelic football and hurling, are organised in an all-island basis, with a single team representing Ireland in international competitions. Other sports, such as Association Football, have separate organising bodies in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. At the Olympics, a person from Northern Ireland can choose to represent either the Ireland or Great Britain team. Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ...

Contents

Gaelic football

Further information: Gaelic football

Occasionally known as Gaelic, Gah, GAA or just football, sometimes to avoid confusion with association football, this game (along with hurling) is considered the national sport of Ireland. [3] [4] [5] [6] Though it has existed for centuries in Ireland as Caid, Gaelic football was formally arranged into an organised playing code by the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) in the late nineteenth century. It is the most popular sport in Ireland in terms of match attendance - in the senior football championship in the summer, attendance is upwards of 80,000 for some of the more prestigious fixtures. In 2003 for example, 34% of all attendances to sports events in Ireland were to Gaelic football matches. Hurling is the closest rival with 23%. [7] Gaelic Football (Irish: Peil, Peil Gaelach or Caid ), commonly referred to as football, or Gaelic , is a form of football played mainly in Ireland. ... Caid was the name used for a collection of various ancient and traditional Irish football games. ... Gaelic Football (Irish: Peil, Peil Gaelach or Caid ), commonly referred to as football, or Gaelic , is a form of football played mainly in Ireland. ... For other uses, see GAA (disambiguation). ...


The game is played at underage, minor (under 18), under 21 and adult levels. All players are amateur, although players at a high level may receive income from sources such as sponsorship and grants. Every Gaelic footballer plays for a local club or parish team, and the best are chosen for the inter-county sides. There is great pride associated with playing for a county team in Ireland. County players may be chosen to play in inter-provincial (Railway Cup games or for the 'International Rules' team to face Australia. However, the main national competitions are the inter-county Senior All-Ireland Football Championships and the National Football League. The Railway Cup, the Interprovincial Championship or the Martin Donnelly Cup is the name of two annual Gaelic football and hurling competetitions held between the provinces of Ireland. ... International Rules Football match at the Telstra Dome - Australia vs Ireland. ...


A football year starts with pre-season competitions and the NFL. In early summer, the Championship begins. Each of the four provinces has its own tournament, and teams which are knocked out must do well in the 'qualifiers' if they are to gain a spot along with the four Provincial Champions in the All-Ireland quarter-finals. The All-Ireland Senior Football final is traditionally held on the third Sunday in September. Kerry are football's most successful team and are the current All-Ireland Champions. There are many rivalries within the game in Ireland - an example is that between Dublin and Meath. Other notable teams include Tyrone and Armagh. The Gaelic Athletic Association The All-Ireland Senior Football Championship (known for sponsorship reasons as the Bank of Ireland Football Championship) is the premier knockout competition in the game of Gaelic football played in Ireland. ... The Kerry County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (or Kerry GAA) is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Kerry. ... The Dublin County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (Irish: Cummann Luthchleas Gael Coiste Contae Ath Cliath) or Dublin GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Dublin. ... The Meath County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (Irish: Cummann Luthchleas Gael Coiste An Mhí) or Meath GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Meath. ... :For more details of Tyrone football see Tyrone Senior Club Football Championship or Tyrone Senior Club Hurling Championship. ... The Armagh County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (Irish: Cumann Lúthchleas Gael Coiste Chontae Ard Mhacha) or Armagh GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Armagh. ...


Hurling

Further information: Hurling

Hurling is a sport native to Ireland, organised by the Gaelic Athletic Association. In terms of attendance figures, hurling is second only to Gaelic football. [8] For the Cornish sport, see Cornish Hurling. ... For the Cornish sport, see Cornish Hurling. ... For other uses, see GAA (disambiguation). ...


The game has similarities to shinty and hockey. However the ball (or sliotar) is rarely played along the ground. Hurling is also played on a large pitch and is considerably faster than hockey. // A shinty game in progress Shinty (Scottish Gaelic camanachd or iomain) is a team sport played with sticks and a ball. ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men, women and children in many countries around the world. ... Sliotar(Ball) and Hurley A sliotar (or sliothar) is a hard ball about the size of a tennis ball, consisting of a cork core covered by two pieces of leather stitched together. ...


Many aspects of the organisation of hurling are similar to football, as both sports are organised by the GAA. Amateurism and the club/county/province structure are similar. Hurling is well-attended and the most prestigious games fill Croke Park to its capacity of well over 80,000. The main competitions are the All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship and the National Hurling League (NHL). As with football, pre-season competitions and the League are over by early summer. The Provincial Championships and Qualifiers are then played, followed by the All-Ireland series. The All-Ireland Hurling Final is traditionally held on the first Sunday in September of each year. The most successful teams have been Cork and Kilkenny. Kilkenny have won the last two championships and are currently regarded as the top team. Other notable teams include Tipperary and Waterford. GAA redirects here. ... Croke Park (Irish: Páirc an Chrócaigh) in Dublin, Ireland is the largest sports stadium in Ireland and the principal stadium and headquarters of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA), Irelands biggest sporting organisation. ... The All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship (known for sponsorship reasons as the Guinness Hurling Championship) is the premier knockout competition in the game of hurling played in Ireland. ... The National Hurling League (known for sponsorship reasons as the Allianz National Hurling League) is a hurling tournament held annually between the county teams of Ireland, under the auspices of the Gaelic Athletic Association. ... The Guinness All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship is the premier knockout competition in the game of hurling played in Ireland. ... The Cork County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (or Cork GAA) is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Cork. ... The Kilkenny County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (Irish: Cummann Luthchleas Gael Coiste Contae Cill Chainnigh) or Kilkenny GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Kilkenny. ... The Tipperary County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (Irish: Cumann Luthchleas Gael Coiste Contae Tiobraid Árainn) or Tipperary GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Tipperary. ... The Waterford County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (Irish: Cummann Luthchleas Gael Coiste Pórt Láirge) or Waterford GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Waterford. ...


Association Football

Further information: Association football in Northern Ireland and Association football in the Republic of Ireland

Often known as soccer to avoid confusion with [9] [10] [11] [12] or just football [13] [14], sometimes to avoid confusion with Gaelic football, association football is the most keenly supported international sport.[citation needed] Despite low match attendance at domestic league games, many people have an interest in the English Premier League or the Scottish Premier League.[citation needed] Football is played at all levels, with kids playing it on the street, teenagers playing in local clubs, and even-middle aged men playing it with co-workers on a regular basis.[citation needed] Association football is the largest participation team sport in Ireland.[15] The national body in the Republic is the Football Association of Ireland (FAI) while the national body in Northern Ireland is the older Irish Football Association (IFA). For other sports leagues which may be referred to by this name, see List of professional sports leagues. ... The Clydesdale Bank Scottish Premier League commonly known as the Scottish Premier League, Premier League or SPL is a professional league competition for football clubs located at the top level of the Scottish football league system - above the Scottish Football League. ... The Football Association of Ireland (FAI; Irish: Cumann Peile na h-Éireann) is the organising body for the sport of association football (soccer) in the Republic of Ireland. ... The Irish Football Association (IFA) is the organising body for football in Northern Ireland. ...


The domestic leagues are the FAI League of Ireland (in the Republic) and the Irish Football League (Northern Ireland). Some of the major teams in Ireland include Shamrock Rovers F.C., Cork City F.C., Drogheda United and Bohemians F.C. in the Republic and Glentoran FC and Linfield FC in Northern Ireland. Due to the financial incentives abroad, most of Ireland's top players, such as Damien Duff and Robbie Keane, play in the leagues of larger European countries, particularly in England and Scotland. This, along with the Irish media's huge coverage of the English league, is one of the reasons why Irish people tend to support foreign clubs such as Manchester United, Liverpool, Celtic. Rarely does a player from the Republic's domestic league make the national team, the most recent of these being Jason Byrne in 2006, although occasional appearances of Irish League players for Northern Ireland have been known. The FAI eircom League of Ireland (Irish: Curadh na hÉireann Cumann Peile na hÉireann) is the Republic of Irelands new national football league system created following the merging of the FAI and the League of Ireland. ... Official logo of the Carnegie Premier League. ... Shamrock Rovers Football Club (Irish: ) are a football club from Dublin, Ireland. ... Cork City F.C. is an Irish football (soccer) club playing in the Football League of Ireland. ... Drogheda United is an Irish football club playing in the Football League of Ireland. ... Bohemian F.C. (Irish: An Cumann Peile Bóithéimeach), more commonly referred to as Bohemians, are an Irish soccer club playing in the Football League of Ireland. ... Glentoran FC is a Northern Irish football club, playing in Belfast. ... Linfield F.C. (the Blues) are a Northern Irish football team, founded in March 1886 in south Belfast, who play at Windsor Park, the home of the Northern Ireland international team. ... Damien Anthony Duff (born March 2, 1979 in Ballyboden, Dublin) is an Irish footballer. ... Robert David Robbie Keane (born 8 July 1980 in Tallaght, Dublin) is an Irish footballer, who currently plays as a striker for Tottenham Hotspur . ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... Manchester United Football Club are a world-famous English football club, based at the Old Trafford stadium in Trafford, Greater Manchester, and are one of the most popular sports clubs in the world, with over 50 million supporters worldwide. ... Liverpool Football Club are an English professional football club based in Liverpool, Merseyside, who play in the Premier League; they are historically the most successful club in the history of English football, having won more trophies than any other English club. ... Current season Celtic Football Club are a football club from Glasgow, Scotland, who currently play in the Scottish Premier League, the highest form of competition in Scotland. ... Jason Byrne (born February 23, 1978 in Dublin) is an Irish football player, currently playing for Shelbourne F.C. in the Eircom League. ...


On the international stage, the Republic of Ireland — despite never winning a major tournament — have had many successful games in recent years, notably drawing with Brazil and Portugal. Northern Ireland's international team, despite a poor run of form in the late 1990s and first few years of the 21st century, and a corresponding slump in the FIFA World Rankings, enjoyed great success in the early and mid-1980s and recently have had a revival in their fortunes under former manager Lawrie Sanchez, with home wins over Spain and England For the Irish FAs all-Ireland international team, see Ireland national football team (IFA). ... First international Scotland 0 - 0 England (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Biggest win Ireland 0 - 13 England (Belfast, Ireland; 18 February 1882) Biggest defeat Hungary 7 - 1 England (Budapest, Hungary; 23 May 1954) World Cup Appearances 12 (First in 1950) Best result Winners, 1966 European Championship Appearances 7 (First in...


The Milk Cup is a successful international youth tournament held annually in Northern Ireland, in which clubs and national teams from anywhere in the world may compete. Northern Ireland also played host to the 2005 UEFA Under-19 European Championships. The Milk Cup is an international youth football tournament held annually in Northern Ireland. ... The Union Européenne de Football Association or Union of European Football Associations in English, almost always referred to by the acronym UEFA (pronounced (you-AY-fuh) or (oo-Ay-fuh) or ), is the administrative and controlling body for European football. ...


The Setanta Sports Cup was set up by its sponsors, television channel Setanta Ireland. It is an all-island mini-World Cup style tournament (two groups of four, then semis and final) featuring eight teams, four being from the League of Ireland and four from the Irish League. Despite fairly low turnouts for each jurisdictions leagues, the Setanta Cup has has so far drawn relatively successful gate receipts. The Setanta Sports Cup, commonly known as the Setanta Cup, is a club football competition featuring teams from both football associations on the island of Ireland. ... Setanta Sports (pronounced ) is an international sports broadcaster, operating 12 channels in 24 countries. ...


Rugby union

Further information: Rugby union in Ireland

Rugby union is common throughout Ireland, but is especially popular in Munster (County Limerick and Cork city mainly), Ulster and Dublin. Rugby union is played at club, province and national levels. The Ireland national team is composed of players from both Northern Ireland and the Republic, and the Irish Rugby Football Union governs the sport throughout the island. School rugby union is generally only played at secondary level. Notable rugby union schools include Belvedere College, Blackrock College, Rockwell College, Castleknock College, Clongowes Wood College, Terenure College, PBC Cork and CBC Cork in the south and the Royal Belfast Academical Institution and Methodist College Belfast in the north. Recent success at international level and the establishment of four professional teams has increased interest in rugby union as a spectator sport in Ireland[citation needed]. Rugby union is a popular team sport played in Ireland. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Statistics Area: 24,607. ... Statistics Province: Munster County Town: Limerick Code: LK Area: 2,686 km² Population (2006) 183,863 (including Limerick City); 131,303 (without Limerick City) Website: www. ... Look up cork in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the nine-county Irish province. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... First international  England 7 - 0 Ireland  (15 February 1875) Largest win  United States 3 - 83 Ireland  (10 June , 2000) Worst defeat  New Zealand 59 - 6 Ireland  (6 June 1992) World Cup Appearances 6 (First in 1987) Best result Quarter Finals, 1987, 1991, 1995, 2003, The Ireland rugby union team, represents... The Irish Rugby Football Union (IRFU) is the body managing rugby union in Ireland. ... Belvedere College SJ is a private secondary school for boys located on Great Denmark Street, Dublin, Ireland. ... For the rugby union club, see Blackrock College RFC. Blackrock College (Irish: Coláiste na Carraige Duibhe) is a Catholic, voluntary, fee-paying secondary school for boys, located in Blackrock, County Dublin, Ireland. ... Rockwell College, founded in 1864, is a well known private catholic secondary school near Cashel in South Tipperary, Republic of Ireland. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Clongowes Wood College is a private secondary boarding school for boys in County Kildare, Ireland run by the Society of Jesus (The Jesuits) since 1814, making it one of Irelands oldest Catholic schools. ... Terenure College is a Carmelites-run secondary school located in the Terenure area of Dublin, Ireland. ... Presentation Brothers College is a Catholic, boys-only, fee-paying college based in Cork, Ireland. ... // Christian Brothers College, Cork (CBC Cork) is a fee-paying Catholic school under the trusteeship of the Christian Brothers in Cork, Ireland. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Methodist College Belfast, styled locally as Methody, is a voluntary grammar school in Belfast, Northern Ireland. ...


Cricket

Ireland Compete against Essex at Castle Avenue
Ireland Compete against Essex at Castle Avenue
Further information: Ireland cricket team

Cricket in Ireland is something of a minority sport, and all players are amateurs, but the game is showing signs of development. Cricket is now getting more and more popular thanks to Irelands incredible Cricket World Cup campaign in 2007. It has been played in Ireland since the early 19th century, and the game against Scotland (a match which has first-class status) has been played annually since 1909. The Irish team was fairly strong in the mid and late 19th century, and sent several touring parties abroad, but development of the sport was adversely affected first by the Gaelic Athletic Association's ban on its members taking part in "foreign" sports and then by the creation of the Irish Free State; many of the best cricketers in Ireland had been British soldiers and civil servants and their withdrawal led to a decline in the overall standard of the game. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 484 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1260 × 1560 pixel, file size: 296 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 484 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1260 × 1560 pixel, file size: 296 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... The Ireland cricket team is the cricket team representing all Ireland (i. ... This article is about the sport. ... The Cricket World Cup is the premier international championship of mens One-Day International (ODI) cricket. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cricket Scotland The Scottish cricket team represents Scotland at the game of cricket. ... First-class cricket matches are those between international teams or the highest standard of domestic teams in which teams have two innings each. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see GAA (disambiguation). ... This article is about the prior state. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ...


There have been brighter spots in recent years, however. Dublin-born batsman Ed Joyce has played with some success as part of Ireland's ICC Trophy team and is now a key member of the Middlesex side in England's County Championship; he captained the county in 2004. Interest in Irish cricket was also generated by the national team's startling victory over West Indies in 1969; they did it again on 17 June 2004. The sport is organised on an all-island basis and is overseen by the Irish Cricket Union, founded in its present incarnation in 1923. Ireland has entered some domestic English tournaments since the early 1980s, but becoming an Associate Member of the International Cricket Council in 1993 paved the way for participation in international competition, and indeed the 2005 ICC Trophy was hosted by Ireland. The Irish finished second in the tournament, beaten by Scotland. Ireland has co-hosted the Cricket World Cup in 1999. Dublin also hosted one game of the 1999 World Cup. The 2007 World Cup which was held in the West Indies was a very successful tournament for the Irish Cricket team. Having qualified for the first time for the tournament, Ireland entered the arena with much to gain. Ireland tied the match with Test Cricket playing team, Zimbabwe and shocked Pakistan by defeating them on St. Patrick's day. Suddenly there was much talk about Cricket in Ireland. Ireland qualified for the super 8 and recorded some good results, including a win against Bangladesh. Ireland have been granted ODI status and now they appear in the ODI ranking table. In June 2007 Ireland is going to hold ODI matches with India and South Africa. Cricket batsman A batsman in the sport of cricket is a player whose speciality in the game is batting. ... Edmund Christopher Ed Joyce, born 22 September 1978 is an Irish[1] cricketer who has played in the England cricket team, and is a member of the England squad in the 2006-07 Ashes series. ... The ICC Trophy is an international one-day cricket tournament run under the auspices of the International Cricket Council. ... Middlesex County Cricket Club is a first-class cricket club in England, named after the historic county of Middlesex in which their home ground, Lords Cricket Ground in London, is located. ... The County Championship is the domestic first class cricket competition in the United Kingdom, mainly in England. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Learie Constantine, was one of the first great West Indian players. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... ICC logo The International Cricket Council (ICC) is the governing body for international Test match and One-day International cricket. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The ICC Trophy is an international one-day cricket tournament run under the auspices of the International Cricket Council. ... Cricket Scotland The Scottish cricket team represents Scotland at the game of cricket. ... The Cricket World Cup is the premier international championship of mens One-Day International (ODI) cricket. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... The 1999 Cricket World Cup was hosted primarily by England, but Ireland, Scotland and the Netherlands also hosted some games. ... The 2007 ICC Cricket World Cup was a mens cricket tournament that took place in the West Indies from 13 March to 28 April 2007, using the sports one-day international format. ...


Gaelic handball

Handball, once very popular in Ireland, has lost much of its popularity over the years to other sports such as Gaelic football and Association Football, and many handball alleys throughout Ireland are in a state of neglect. Ireland still produces top class handballers, but, lacking any international competitive level (except against the United States), the sport has not gained much media coverage in recent years. The sport is governed by the GAA. Gaelic handball (Irish: Liathróid Láimhe) (also known as handball, Irish handball, court handball or wall handball) is a sport similar to racquetball and squash in that it is one of the four Gaelic Games organised by the Gaelic Athletic Association. ...


Golf

Strandhill Golf Course in County Sligo, just one of the many coastal golf courses throughout Ireland
Strandhill Golf Course in County Sligo, just one of the many coastal golf courses throughout Ireland

Golf is very popular in Ireland, with several hundred clubs throughout the country. Golf tourism is growing rapidly. Golf is regularly televised in Ireland, with both domestic and international events broadcast. Among Ireland's most famous golf courses are Portmarnock, Ballybunion, and Royal Portrush. Download high resolution version (1024x768, 122 KB)The Strandhill Golf Course in Strandhill, a town in County Sligo, Ireland. ... Download high resolution version (1024x768, 122 KB)The Strandhill Golf Course in Strandhill, a town in County Sligo, Ireland. ... Statistics Province: Connacht County Town: Sligo Code: SO Area: 1,837 km² Population (2006) 60,894[1] Website: www. ... This article is about the sport. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference O238432 Statistics Province: Leinster County: Elevation: sea level Population (2002) 8,376  Portmarnock (Port Mearnóg in Irish) is a suburban village north of the city of Dublin, in the part of traditional County Dublin now governed as County Fingal, Ireland. ... The Ballybunion Golf Club in County Kerry, Ireland (founded in 1893) had barely opened its doors before experiencing financial problems. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ...


The K Club in County Kildare was the venue for the 2006 Ryder Cup. Ireland has produced several top golfers in recent years, with Pádraig Harrington, Paul McGinley and Darren Clarke all achieving significant success internationally. All three were part of the European team that successfully defended the Ryder Cup on home soil, with Clarke arguably being the emotional leader as he was recovering from the death of his wife from breast cancer. The Kildare Hotel and Golf Club (usually referred to as the K Club) is a golf and leisure complex located at Straffan, County Kildare, Republic of Ireland. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Naas Code: KE Area: 1,693 km² Population (2006) 186,075 Website: www. ... // The 36th Ryder Cup Matches were held between September 22 and September 24, 2006 at The K Club, Straffan, Co. ... Pádraig Harrington (born 31 August 1971) is an Irish professional golfer who is currently ranked world No. ... Paul McGinley (born December 16, 1966 in Dublin) is an Irish golfer who plays on the PGA European Tour. ... Darren Clarke (born in Dungannon, County Tyrone on August 14, 1968) is a professional golfer from Northern Ireland who plays on both the PGA Tour and the European Tour. ... The Ryder Cup is a golf trophy contested biennially in an event called the Ryder Cup Matches by teams from Europe and the United States. ...


Greyhound racing

Greyhound racing
Greyhound racing

Greyhound racing began in Ireland in 1927; there were greyhound races in Celtic Park in Belfast on 18 April of that year and the Shelbourne Park greyhound stadium opened in Dublin four weeks later. Hare coursing was already a well established sport in the country and greyhounds were bred for racing in Ireland from the very start. The great Mick the Miller, winner of the English Derby in 1929 and 1930, was an Irish greyhound and Ireland continues to export greyhounds. Foto of a typical Greyhound I took the foto :-) Fantasy 11:26, 13 Aug 2004 (UTC) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Foto of a typical Greyhound I took the foto :-) Fantasy 11:26, 13 Aug 2004 (UTC) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Several greyhounds before a race. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Shelbourne Park is a greyhound racing stadium in the south Dublin inner city suburb of Ringsend. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Coursing. ... Mick the Miller (June 1926-1939, black dog) is celebrated as the first great greyhound to race in England. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


There are now twenty licensed greyhound stadiums in Ireland. There are seventeen in the Republic where the licensing authority is Bord na gCon, the Irish Greyhound Board. This is a semi-state body and was established by the Irish government in 1958. The three stadiums in Northern Ireland are licensed by the Irish Coursing Club, which also organises hare coursing throughout the Island. The Government (Irish: ) [ral̪ˠt̪ˠəs̪ˠ n̪ˠə heːɼən̪ˠ] is the cabinet that exercises executive authority in the Republic of Ireland. ... Jan. ...


Once seen as a sport in decline, the popularity of greyhound racing has surged since 1995 and several million euro are now bet "at the dogs" annually. Bord na gCon has invested substantial amounts of money in developing and marketing the sport, prize money has increased and greyhound stadiums have been refurbished, helping the sport sell itself as a social event. It is now common for families and groups of friends or colleagues to go for "a night at the dogs" instead of to the cinema, the pub or a nightclub. Dogs are generally owned by syndicates. Prize money ranges from a few hundred euro to several thousand for top dogs. The annual Paddy Power Irish Greyhound Derby run each year in August at Shelbourne Park is one of the richest greyhound races in the world. Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... For other uses, see Euro (disambiguation). ...


Road bowling

Irish Road Bowling is an ancient sport. It is centred in Ireland but is also played in the United States and the United Kingdom. Similar sports are played in Holland, Germany and Italy and since the 1960s the sport has enjoyed a genuine international dimension with an international championship being played on a regular basis by athletes from all these countries. Irish road bowling is an ancient sport. ...


Tug of war

Tug of war has been in Ireland for a long time and the creation of the Irish Tug of War Association in 1967 boosted the competition among clubs in Ireland and also enabled Ireland to compete in international events, such as the Tug of War International Federation (TWIF) World Championships.


Other sports

Athletics

Athletics in the Republic of Ireland is governed by Athletics Ireland, and in Northern Ireland by Athletics Northern Ireland. The various track and field events tend to be supported by local athletics clubs rather than schools. Athletics has seem some of the Ireland's highest performers at the Olympics, with several Irish athletes performing well for both the Republic of Ireland and Great Britain & Northern Ireland at the games over the years. Denis Horgan won the Shot Putt 13 times at the AAAs, (still holding a title for greatest number of individual titles won), before emigrating to New York to (inevitably) become a policeman, where he also won many American titles. Horgan broke the world record on several occasions, and - at the tail end of his career (despite having a fractured skull) - he won the silver medal at the Olympics 1908. Dr. Pat O'Callaghan (also from North Cork) won the hammer throw in 1928 and again in 1932 at the Olympic Games. Bob Tindall also won gold for Ireland in 1932, competing in the 400m hurdles. In more recent years, notable athletes have included Ron Delany, Mary Peters, Eamonn Coghlan and Sonia O'Sullivan. Despite these past successes, the sport suffers from low media attention and dropping interest due to the popularity of other sports and past underinvestment. A womens 400 m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track in the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in Finland. ... Denis Horgan (born 18 May 1871) was a British athlete who competed mainly in the shot put. ... The Amateur Athletic Association of England (formerly simply the Amateur Athletic Association) or AAA (pronounced three As) is the oldest athletics organization in the UK, having been established in 1880. ... Dr. Patrick Pat OCallaghan (September 15, 1905 - December 1, 1991), was an Irish athlete and Olympic gold medallist. ... Ronald Michael Delany (March 6, 1935), better known as Ron or Ronnie is a former Irish athlete, who specialised in the middle distances. ... Dame Mary Peters (born July 6, 1939) is a former British pentathlete. ... Eamon Coghlan (born November 21, 1952) is an Irish 4-time Olympian and retired runner. ... Sonia OSullivan (born November 28, 1969) is an Irish runner from Cobh, County Cork. ...


The Dublin Marathon and Belfast Marathon are run annually and are two of the most popular athletics events in the country. The Women's Mini Marathon in Dublin regularly gets upwards of 40000 competitors. The Dublin Marathon is a marathon run every year in Dublin, Ireland. ... Planned 2006 route, later changed. ...


Australian rules football

Further information: Australian rules football in Ireland

Australian rules football in Ireland has a very small following, however due to the International rules series that takes place annually between Australia and Ireland, interest in the sport has increased. In October 2000, the Australian Rules Football League of Ireland was established, and a representative Irish team took part in the 2005 Australian Football International Cup. The Irish Green Machine became inaugural International champions in 2002. Australian Rules football is a team sport played in Ireland. ... High marking is a key skill and spectacular attribute of Australian rules football Precise field and goal kicking using the oval shaped ball is the key skill in Australian rules football Australian rules football, also known as Australian football, Aussie rules, or simply football or footy is a code of... International rules is a rhetoric sentence used by the governments of United States and Great Britain when pointing at countries that they regard as rogue states because of their political inclinations or because they do not voluntarily align to Washington or Londons international policies. ... The Australian Rules Football League of Ireland (ARFLI) is an Australian Rules Football competition in Ireland. ... 2005 International Cup logo The Australian Football International Cup is an international Australian rules football competition hosted by the Australian Football League. ... The Green Machine are Irelands national Australian Rules football team. ...


The sport first gained exposure in when former Gaelic football player Jim Stynes moved to Australia to play AFL and in 1991 became the first Gaelic footballer to win the Brownlow Medal. Jim Stynes (born April 23, 1966) is an Irish Australian rules football player. ... The Charles Brownlow Trophy, better known as the Brownlow Medal, is the medal awarded to the best and fairest player in the Australian Football League during the regular season (ie not including finals matches) as decided upon by umpires. ...


In the 2005 AFL Grand Final, Tadhg Kennelly (son of Tim Kennelly) became the first Irishman to be part of a premiership-winning side, with the Sydney Swans. Australian journalist Andrew Maher flew out to Ireland with Kennelly's family to watch the game on television with them. This article is about the national league in Australian rules football. ... A Grand Final is the culmination of a series of final matches played between a number of sporting teams to decide the premier team. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Tim Kennelly (1954 - 2005) was a famous Irish sportsperson who played Gaelic football for Kerry in the 1970s. ... Sydney Swans is an Australian Football League (AFL) club based in Sydney, New South Wales. ... Andrew Andy Radar Maher (born 1965 in Victoria, Australia) is an Australian media personality, having had multiple roles in Australian newspapers, television and radio. ...


Recent exposure however has been negative, due to a spiteful 2005 and calls from the GAA to ban it. As a result, the AFL and GAA agreed on harsh penalties for offenders. Despite this, interest in the 2006 International Rules Series reached an all time high, with the series selling both games out in Ireland including a record crowd at Croke Park for any international sporting event in the country. Other concerns are the active poaching of talented junior Gaelic players by AFL clubs like the Brisbane Lions and Collingwood Magpies. The AFL has since agreed to change the rules for the series and to limit the number of Gaelic players drafted, which may also slow growth of Australian rules in Ireland. The 2005 International Rules series will be the 14th time that a test series of International rules football will be played between Ireland and Australia. ... The 2006 international rules series is the 15th time that a test series of international rules football has been played between Ireland and Australia. ... Brisbane Lions Australian Football Club (the trading name for the Brisbane Bears-Fitzroy Football Club) is an Australian Football League club based in Brisbane, Queensland. ... Collingwood Football Club logo The Collingwood Football Club (nicknamed The Magpies because of the black and white striped jerseys worn by the players) is an Australian rules football club, playing in the elite Australian Football League. ...


Baseball

Baseball is an emerging sport in Ireland. The sport is played on an organized level in Dublin, Greystones, Belfast, Cork and Kerry. The Irish National Baseball Team won the bronze medal at the 2004 European Championships in Germany and followed up that performance with a silver medal in the 2006 European Championships in Belgium. On a club level, baseball is organized through Baseball Ireland, which operates an adult league established in 1997 with teams in Dublin, Greystones and Belfast. Irish baseball was the subject of an award-winning documentary The Emerald Diamond in 2006. Baseball Ireland is the governing body of baseball in Ireland. ... The Irish National Baseball Team has been in existence since 1996 and has taken part in several major baseball tournaments and tours. ... This article is about the sport. ... The Emerald Diamond is a documentary following the history of Baseball Ireland and the Irish National Baseball team. ...


Basketball

See also Ireland national basketball team

Basketball is an emerging sport in Ireland. Basketball Ireland is the governing body and organises the main competitions such as the SuperLeague. The main basketball arena in Ireland is the ESB Basketball Arena in Dublin. The sport receives small amounts of media attention, with a few games broadcast on television annually - usually when there is no Gaelic football on. Basketball is mainly driven by school, college and club support. Pat Burke is the only Irishman currently playing in the NBA The Ireland national basketball team is the team that represents Ireland in international competetions. ... This article is about the sport. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Patrick Burke, see Patrick Burke (disambiguation). ... NBA redirects here. ...


Boxing

Combat sports have had mixed fortunes in recent years. Boxing, once one of the most popular sports in the country now gets little media coverage and struggles to attract new participants. Boxing had a brief resurgence in interest in 2004, when Limerick boxer Andy Lee looked like winning a medal at the 2004 Summer Olympics; however he eventually lost and interest in the sport receded. For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Limerick (disambiguation). ... Andy Lee (born June 11, 1984 in London, England) is an Irish boxer from Limerick, who won the bronze medal at the 2004 European Amateur Boxing Championships in Pula, Croatia. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ...


Equestrianism

The various equestrian sports have a sizeable following in Ireland. Thanks to generous tax treatment, many of the world's best race horses retire to Ireland to stud. The local industry (including the world's largest thoroughbred breeding operation; Coolmore Stud) produces many top race horses every year. Ireland's top tracks are the Curragh and Fairyhouse. Show jumping also has quite a good following in Ireland, however the disqualification of Cian O'Connor at the 2004 Summer Olympics has deeply damaged the sport. A young rider at a horse show in Australia. ... For the processor with the same codename , see Athlon. ... Worlds largest breeding operation of thoroughbred racehorses, based in County Tipperary in Ireland. ... The Curragh Racecourse, usually abbreviated to The Curragh, is Irelands most important Thoroughbred race track. ... Fairyhouse racecourse is one of Irelands premier horse racing venues. ... Show jumping is a form of competition in which horses are jumped over a course of fences, low walls, and other obstacles (e. ... Cian OConnor (b. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ...


Cycling

Cycling retains a strong following in Ireland. There are several regional clubs throughout the country and several competitions are organised regularly such as the Rás (Irish for race). The main governing body is Cycling Ireland which is responsible for cycling throughout the island. Ireland's most famous cyclists are Stephen Roche, who won both the Tour de France and Giro d'Italia in 1987; and Seán Kelly, who won the Vuelta a España in 1988, the sprinter's green jersey in the Tour de France four times, and numerous single-day classics. Police officer on a bicycle Cycling is a means of transport, a form of recreation and a sport. ... The Irish Tour (Irish: An Rás Tailteann, The FBD Insurance Rás) is an annual 8 day international cycling stage race, held in Ireland in May. ... Cycling Ireland logo Cycling Ireland or CI is the national governing body of cycle racing in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. ... Stephen Roche (Irish: Stiofán de Róiste) was born November 28, 1959 in Dundrum near Dublin, Ireland and is a retired professional cyclist. ... For other uses, see Tour de France (disambiguation). ... The Giro dItalia, also simply known as the Giro, is a long distance road bicycle racing stage race for professional cyclists held over three weeks in May or early June in and around Italy. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Seán Kelly (Irish: Seán Ó Ceallaigh) (born May 21, 1956) is a former professional road bicycle racer. ... The Vuelta a España bicycle race is one of the three Grand Tours of Europe. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... The maillot vert (French for green jersey) is the jersey worn by the leader of the Tour de Frances points classification. ...


Extreme sports

There is a large underground following of extreme sports in Ireland, with many sports such as skateboarding, rollerblading, surfing, BMX, mountainbiking and mountainboarding growing. Although many people participate in these sports, few of them do so competitively. Most of these sports have national governing bodies, such as the Irish Surfing Association, and national competitions, such as mountainbiking's national series. Extreme sports (now also known as action sports) is a general, somewhat hazily-defined term for a collection of newer sports involving adrenaline-inducing action. ... Skateboarders Skateboarding is the act of riding on and performing tricks with a skateboard. ... Roller skating girl in Rome, Italy (soul grind) Roller skating is travelling on smooth terrain with roller skates. ... For other uses, see Surfing (disambiguation). ... A BMX race. ... A rider during a Cross Country race Mountain biking (Mountain bicycling) is a form of cycling which uses very sturdy bicycles with (usually) straight handlebars and wide tires. ... Mountain boarding is a new summer sport, derived from snowboarding. ...


Since 2005, skateparks (for skateboarding, rollerblading, etc) have been developed up in several places. Concrete skateparks, are in Gorey, Greystones, Bushy park (Dublin) and Lucan (Dublin). Modular parks can be found in other parts of Ireland[1].


Hockey

Hockey is quite popular as a participative sport in Ireland. It is played throughout the country, particularly in secondary schools. There are many hockey clubs throughout the country. The main body in Ireland is the Irish Hockey Association. A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men, women and children in many countries around the world. ...


Ice Hockey

Ice Hockey has a measure of popularity in Northern Ireland, with one professional team, the Belfast Giants, playing in the Elite Ice Hockey League. The Irish Ice Hockey League comprises a number of amateur teams from both sides of the border. The NHL in North America has one Irish born player, Owen Nolan. Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The Belfast Giants are an ice hockey team from Belfast, Northern Ireland that compete in the Elite Ice Hockey League. ... The Elite Ice Hockey League (also known for sponsorship reasons as the bmibaby Elite League) is a professional ice hockey league in the United Kingdom. ... The Irish Ice Hockey League is an amateur ice hockey league in Ireland. ... NHL can also be an abbreviation for National Historic Landmark or Non-Hodgkins lymphoma. ... Owen Liam Nolan (born February 12, 1972 in Belfast, Northern Ireland) is an Irish Canadian professional hockey player who is currently playing for the Phoenix Coyotes of the National Hockey League. ...


Martial arts

Taekwondo and Karate have had some success over the past 10 years, with several new clubs being founded throughout the country. The All-Ireland Taekwondo Association has worked in recent years to promote the sport in the country and to organise more competitions. However, the rise in popularity of mixed martial arts (MMA) tournaments in Ireland and beyond has led to many of the traditionally popular disciplines such as karate and taekwondo begin to loose some of their following. Clubs which train in more practical martial arts such as Brazilian Ju Jitsu and Muay Thai are very much in the acendancy in Ireland and are leading the charge in the country's resurgant martial arts scene. Taekwondo (태권도; IPA: ) is a Korean martial art and combat sport. ... For other uses, see Karate (disambiguation). ... For the fighting styles that combine different arts, see hybrid martial arts. ... For the drink with a similar-sounding name, see Mai Tai. ...


Olympic handball

Olympic Handball is a minority sport in Ireland despite it being the second most popular team sport in Europe. Olympic handball has a growing following and participation with a continued growth paticularily in primary and secondary schools. The Irish Olympic Handball Association is the governing body in Ireland and there are currently 8 clubs in the Senior National League. In October 2007 the Irish Men's team recorded their best result in the European Challenge Trophy (a competition for developing nations) coming 4th ahead of Scotland and Malta. Handball is the name of several different sports: Team handball, or Olympic/European Handball is a game somewhat similar to association football, but the ball is played with the hand, not the foot. ...


Racquet sports

Tennis, badminton and squash are quite popular in Ireland. Tennis has a growing following, with Tennis Ireland, the governing body running several competitions between the some 200 clubs throughout Ireland. Ireland competes in tennis internationally in the Davis Cup (mens) and the Fed Cup (ladies). Badminton in Ireland is run by the BUI. Squash, which exploded in the 1970s and 1980s has been in decline for several years, but despite this there remain several clubs throughout the country. For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... This article is about the sport. ... Squash racquet and ball Players in a glass-backed squash court International Squash Singles Court, as specified by the World Squash Federation Squash is an indoor racquet sport that was formerly called Squash racquets, a reference to the squashable soft ball used in the game (compared with the harder ball... Tennis Ireland [1] is the governing body for Tennis in Ireland with responsiblities for clubs and competitions. ... The Ireland Davis Cup team represents Ireland in Davis Cup tennis competition and are governed by Tennis Ireland. ... The Ireland Fed Cup team represents Ireland in Fed Cup tennis competition and are governed by Tennis Ireland. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ...


Rounders

Rounders (Irish: cluiche corr) is regulated by the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) in Ireland, and is not dissimilar to baseball. Game-play centers around innings where teams alternate at turns being batters and fielders. Points ("rounders") are scored by the batting team by completing a circuit around the field through four bases without being put 'out'. The earliest nationally formalised rules of play were devised by the GAA in Ireland in 1884. For the movie, see Rounders (film). ... For other uses, see GAA (disambiguation). ... This article is about the sport. ... An innings, or inning, is a fixed-length segment of a game in any of a variety of sports – most notably baseball and cricket – during which one team attempts to score while the other team attempts to prevent the first from scoring. ...


Scuba diving

Diving the Skellig Islands, West of Ireland
Diving the Skellig Islands, West of Ireland

Ireland, being an island on the western edge of Europe and on the continental shelf, is perfectly suited for the sport of SCUBA diving. Ireland's waters provide dive sites of various qualities and standards to encompass all individual requirements. Because of its small size it is relatively easy to travel from one part of the country to another; giving divers the opportunity to travel for one or more days diving. The dive season in Ireland generally starts around March and ends around October. It is possible of course, to dive outside these times, but due to adverse weather and sea conditions it is not appealing. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 3072 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 3072 pixel, file size: 3. ... SE landing on Great Skellig Skellig Michael Little Skellig Little Skellig seen from Skellig Michael The Skellig Islands are two small, steep and rocky islands lying about 16 km west of Bolus Head on the Iveragh Peninsula in County Kerry, Ireland. ...  Sediment  Rock  Mantle  The global continental shelf, highlighted in cyan The continental shelf is the extended perimeter of each continent and associated coastal plain, which is covered during interglacial periods such as the current epoch by relatively shallow seas (known as shelf seas) and gulfs. ... Scuba diving is swimming underwater while using self-contained breathing equipment. ... This article identifies popular recreational diving sites around the world and describes the features of a dive site. ...


Diving started in Ireland in the early 1950s with the founding of the Belfast Branch of the British Sub Aqua Club. In the early 1960s the independent Irish diving clubs formed the Irish Underwater Council (or Comhairle Fó-Thuinn in Irish). This voluntary body regulates all aspects of diving for its members and represents Ireland at the Confédération Mondiale des Activités Subaquatiques. The British Sub-Aqua Club or BSAC is the governing body of recreational diving in Britain. ... The Confédération Mondiale des Activités Subaquatiques (CMAS) is the World Underwater Federation. ...


There are also about 40 dive centres affiliated to the Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI), mostly along the West coast. The Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI) is the worlds largest recreational diving membership and diver training organization founded by John Cronin and Ralph Erikson. ...


Softball

See also Softball in Ireland

Softball in Ireland can be traced back as far as 1982, with the first organised competition, the Dublin Softball League, taking place in 1984. The Irish Softball Association is the governing body of softball in Ireland and is responsible for the running of tournaments, Leagues, development and international competition in both co-ed slowpitch and ladies fastpitch softball. The National Team (Co-Ed) has competed at European level since 1998, with the best results being Silver in 2002 and 2004. Logo of Softball Ireland Softball is governed in Ireland by the Irish Softball Association, itself a member of the International Softball Federation. ... Soft ball is also a sugar stage Softball is a team sport popular around the world but especially in the United States. ...


Snooker and pool

Snooker and pool hold some interest in Ireland, with significant media coverage of most major international tournaments. Despite being home to one of the world's most successful snooker players (Ken Doherty), both snooker and pool are in decline in Ireland as major sports. They retain popularity in pubs, but many of the country's snooker/pool halls have closed in recent years including Jason's of Ranelagh. see Irish Snooker Homepage Snooker is a cue sport that is played on a large baize-covered table with pockets in each of the four corners and in the middle of each of the long side cushions. ... This article is about the American-style game. ... Ken Doherty (born September 17, 1969) is an Irish professional snooker player. ... Ranelagh (Irish Raghnallach) is a residential area and township on the southside of Dublin city, Ireland. ...


Target shooting

Target shooting in Ireland comprises a large number of disciplines such as the Olympic shooting disciplines (administered by the NTSA), Metallic Silhouette shooting (administered by the NSAI), Gallery Rifle disciplines (administered by the NASRC), the Tetrathlon (administered by the Pony Club) and Olympic Penthathlon (administered by the Modern Pentathlon Association of Ireland), Clay Pigeon Shooting (administered by the ICPSA) and various long-range rifle shooting disciplines (administered by the NRAI).


Triathlon

The triathlon, as well as the duathlon, pentathlon, and decathlon, are rapidly gaining interest in Ireland. The national body for the triathlon is Triathlon Ireland which organises competitions between various clubs throughout the country. Many participants are members of clubs that specialise in swimming and cycling as well as Triathlon clubs. Although the Triathlon remains the most popular multi-event sport in Ireland, the other sports such as the pentathlon are gaining popularity. The Modern Pentathlon Association of Ireland was set up in 2004. The three components of triathlon: Swimming, Cycling, Running A triathlon is an athletic event consisting of swimming, cycling and running over various distances. ... Duathlon is an athletic event (not to be confused with biathlon) that consists of a running leg, followed by a cycling leg and then another running leg in a format bearing some resemblance to triathlons. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Decathlon is an athletic event combining 10 track and field events. ... Swimmer redirects here. ... Police officer on a bicycle Cycling is a means of transport, a form of recreation and a sport. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Water sports

Water sports practised in Ireland include canoeing, swimming, surfing, diving, water polo, sailing, kayaking, and scuba diving. Whilst many people participate in these, few do so competitively. Ireland has had only one Olympic medalist in swimming, Michelle Smith, and her medals have since been tarnished by drug allegations. The National Aquatic Centre was opened in Ireland in 2003 and held the European SC Championships in December 2003 — the first time the country hosted such a competition. At the competition, Ireland won its first medal at the European SC Championships ever, a silver in the 200m breaststroke by Andrew Bree. Swim Ireland is the national governing body of swimming in Ireland. See also List of Olympic-size swimming pools in Ireland. Canoeing is the recreational or sporting activity of paddling a canoe or kayak. ... Swimmer redirects here. ... For other uses, see Surfing (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Dive. ... Water polo is a team water sport. ... For either of the songs named Sailing, see Sailing (song). ... Sea Kayaking at Wilsons Promontory in Victoria, Australia Kayaking is the use of a kayak for moving across water. ... Scuba diving is swimming underwater while using self-contained breathing equipment. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Michelle Smith (born on December 16, 1969 in Rathcoole County Dublin), now more commonly referred to by her married name, Michelle de Bruin, is an Irish former swimmer. ... In sports, doping refers to the use of performance-enhancing drugs, particularly those that are forbidden by the organizations that regulate competitions. ... The National Aquatic Centre (NAC) is located in Abbotstown, Blanchardstown, Ireland. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... European SC Championships are held every year in winter - usually in December. ... Breaststroke Breaststroke is a swimming style swum on the breast. ... Andrew Bree is a breaststroke Ireland. ... Swim Ireland is the national governing body of swimming in Ireland. ...


Competitions and events

National

The various GAA discipline finals are easily the largest sporting events regularly held in Ireland, in both terms of attendance and media coverage. The biggest national sporting event in Ireland is the final of the All-Ireland Senior Football Championship, held annually in Croke Park, usually in September. It usually attracts a sell out crowd of 82,500 to croke park. Many of the matches in the championship attract crowds of 50,000+, depending on who is playing. The Gaelic Athletic Association The All-Ireland Senior Football Championship (known for sponsorship reasons as the Bank of Ireland Football Championship) is the premier knockout competition in the game of Gaelic football played in Ireland. ... Croke Park (Irish: Páirc an Chrócaigh) in Dublin, Ireland is the largest sports stadium in Ireland and the principal stadium and headquarters of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA), Irelands biggest sporting organisation. ...


Aside from the GAA, the biggest multi-sport event held in Ireland regularly is the Community Games. The games are organised every year from a local level, where hundreds of thousands of young people compete in different disciplines such as athletics, swimming, cycling etc., in the first half of the year. Winners progress to county level, and then to the Community Games finals. The finals are held over two weekends in the summer where over 3,000 children sleep over at a campus facility such as Mosney (which was used until 2004.) A multi-sport event is a competition in which athletes compete in a number of different sports. ... The Community Games is an annual sporting competition held in Ireland for children up to 16 that finishs in a national finals every August were over 6,000 children compete for their area, town, county and provience. ... Mosney, in County Meath, Ireland, is situated approximately 30 miles / 48 kilometres from Dublin; it has an unstaffed station on the Dublin-Dundalk railway line. ...


International

On an international level, Ireland has had mixed fortunes. Ireland has been particularly successful in recent years in rugby union, horse racing, showjumping, snooker, and golf. However, several scandals have arisen in recent years which have tarnished Ireland's international participation. In 2002, Roy Keane, one of Ireland's top international footballers, quit the national squad during the run-up to the World Cup after a bitter and public falling-out with coach Mick McCarthy. Ireland's main swimming body, Swim Ireland, has been involved in damaging child sex abuse scandals and a legal battle with the new CEO, Sarah Keane. There was widespread criticism of the lack of infrastructure and poor resources available to top athletes at the time of the Olympics. For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Horse-racing is an equestrian sporting activity which has been practiced over the centuries; the chariot races of Roman times were an early example, as was the contest of the steeds of the god Odin and the giant Hrungnir in Norse mythology. ... Show jumping is a form of competition in which horses are jumped over a course of fences, low walls, and other obstacles (e. ... Snooker is a cue sport that is played on a large baize-covered table with pockets in each of the four corners and in the middle of each of the long side cushions. ... This article is about the sport. ... Roy Maurice Keane (born 10 August 1971 in Mayfield, Cork City, Ireland) is an Irish former professional footballer and the current manager of English Premier League club Sunderland. ... 2002 World Cup redirects here. ... The Saipan Incident was a serious falling-out in 2002 between Republic of Ireland star player and captain Roy Keane and the teams manager, Mick McCarthy, during a training session on the Pacific island of Saipan while the team was preparing for the 2002 FIFA World Cup. ... Michael Joseph McCarthy (born 7 February 1959) is a former professional football player who moved into club management with Millwall, the Republic of Ireland, Sunderland, and currently Wolverhampton Wanderers. ... Swim Ireland is the national governing body of swimming in Ireland. ...

Showjumping
Showjumping

Ten Irish people have won Olympic medals, most recently Cian O'Connor who won a gold for showjumping. However, soon after, O'Connor has lost his medal after his horse tested positive for banned substances. At the 2004 Summer Olympics, Ireland had one of its smallest contingents in its history at the games, with only 106 individuals participating. This was due to the strict policy followed by the Olympic Council of Ireland of only allowing A time athletes and swimmers to attend the games. This prevented several sportspeople from competing. Show jumping competitor. ... Show jumping competitor. ... Cian OConnor (b. ... Show jumping is a form of competition in which horses are jumped over a course of fences, low walls, and other obstacles (e. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ... The Olympic Council of Ireland or OCI is the national Olympic Committee for Ireland. ...


One of the biggest international events in Ireland is international Association Football. The Republic's national team has punched above its weight in recent years, qualifying for the 2002 World Cup, and performing well against such teams as Brazil and Portugal. In rugby union, Ireland's national team has been ranked in the top five teams regularly over the last few years, and has produced major stars such as Keith Wood and Brian O'Driscoll. In golf, Ireland is home to several top golfers such as Pádraig Harrington. 2002 World Cup redirects here. ... First international  England 7 - 0 Ireland  (15 February 1875) Largest win  United States 3 - 83 Ireland  (10 June , 2000) Worst defeat  New Zealand 59 - 6 Ireland  (6 June 1992) World Cup Appearances 6 (First in 1987) Best result Quarter Finals, 1987, 1991, 1995, 2003, The Ireland rugby union team, represents... Keith Wood (born 27 January 1972 in Killaloe) is a former international rugby union footballer who played hooker for Ireland, the Lions, Harlequins and Munster. ... Brian Gerald ODriscoll (born 21 January 1979) is an Irish professional rugby union player. ... Pádraig Harrington (born 31 August 1971) is an Irish professional golfer who is currently ranked world No. ...


The traditional Gaelic games of Gaelic football and Hurling are played by Irish expats, with increasingly local involvement in communities around the world, however no nation has enough players to compete with Ireland. To compensate for this the GAA has entered into a partnership with the Australian Football League (Australian rules football) and plays a hybrid annual series called International rules football — this series has been going in various forms since 1967. Also the GAA plays an international Hurling hybrid match with Scotland's national shinty team (although Ireland do not select players from the best hurling teams in Tier One of the All-Ireland championship for this game). Gaelic games are the native sports of Ireland: principally Hurling, Gaelic Football and Camogie. ... Gaelic Football (Irish: Peil, Peil Gaelach or Caid ), commonly referred to as football, or Gaelic , is a form of football played mainly in Ireland. ... For the Cornish sport, see Cornish Hurling. ... This article is about the national league in Australian rules football. ... International Rules Football match at the Telstra Dome - Australia vs Ireland. ... // A shinty game in progress Shinty (Scottish Gaelic camanachd or iomain) is a team sport played with sticks and a ball. ...


In 2003, Ireland hosted the Special Olympics World Summer Games, which was the biggest sporting event ever held in the country. In December 2003, Ireland hosted the European SC Championships 2003. In 2006, Ireland hosted the Ryder Cup Matches. Iraqi athletes departing Dublin after the 2003 Special Olympics World Games The 2003 Special Olympics World Summer Games were hosted in Ireland, with participants staying in various host towns around the island in the lead up to the games before moving to dublin for the events. ... The European SC Championships 2003 were held in Dublin between 11th and 14th December. ... // The 36th Ryder Cup Matches were held between September 22 and September 24, 2006 at The K Club, Straffan, Co. ...


Stadia

Ireland boasts the fourth largest stadium in Europe. Croke Park in Dublin can hold 82,500 people. Until recently it was only used for Gaelic games and concerts. Association Football and rugby were played at Lansdowne Road prior to its ongoing reconstruction; when the stadium closed late in 2006, it could accommodate approximately 35,000 people for Association Football and 50,000 for rugby union (the difference is because standing-room terraces cannot be used for international Association Football but can be used for rugby union). Further to the stadia already mentioned there are several facilities throughout the country capable of accommodating between 10,000 and 50,000 people such as Semple Stadium Thurles, Gaelic Grounds Limerick and Páirc Uí Chaoimh Cork (these three are all Gaelic games venues). Ireland currently has three Olympic-sized swimming pools — two of which are open to the public, the largest; located at Sports Campus Ireland, is the National Aquatic Centre. Ireland has several large horse and greyhound tracks such as Fairyhouse. Croke Park (Irish: Páirc an Chrócaigh) in Dublin, Ireland is the largest sports stadium in Ireland and the principal stadium and headquarters of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA), Irelands biggest sporting organisation. ... A DART train passes under the Lansdowne Road Rugby Football Stadium and over the level crossing as it enters the station of the same name. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The grounds of where Semple Stadium is built were put up for sale in 1910 at the wish of Canon M. K. Ryan. ... The Gaelic Grounds or Páirc na nGael is the principal Gaelic Athletic Association stadium in Limerick City, Ireland, home to the Limerick hurling and football teams. ... Páirc Uí Chaoimh is a GAA stadium in Cork City in Ireland, where major hurling and Gaelic football matches are played. ... The National Aquatic Centre (NAC) is located in Abbotstown, Blanchardstown, Ireland. ... Fairyhouse racecourse is one of Irelands premier horse racing venues. ...


A project to rebuild Lansdowne Road to create a modern stadium with an all-seated capacity of 50,000 began early in 2007 and will be complete either in 2009 or early 2010. Thomond Park, a rugby ground in Limerick, is currently being rebuilt into a modern 26,000-capacity stadium, though not all-seated. Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2010 (MMX) will be a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Thomond Park is a stadium in Limerick, Ireland. ...


The UK government is currently developing controversial plans to develop a national stadium for Northern Ireland at the site of the former Maze prison in County Antrim. The stadium was proposed to host rugby, association football and Gaelic games, however the move is opposed by a majority of association football supporters according to a survey run by the Amalgamation of Northern Ireland supporters clubs. Alternative plans from private consortia have emerged to build a stadium in Belfast, Northern Ireland's biggest city. Her Majestys Prison (HMP) Maze (known colloqually as The Maze) is a disused prison sited at the former RAF station at Long Kesh (it is still called Long Kesh by many Irish Republicans) near Lisburn, nine miles outside Belfast, in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. ... Statistics Province: Ulster County Town: Antrim Area: 2,844 km² Population (est. ... This article is about the city in Northern Ireland. ...


Media coverage

  • Newspapers: All major newspapers dedicate significant amounts of space to sports coverage. These pages are usually dominated by Association Football, Gaelic games and equestrian events. The most popular newspapers in Ireland for sports coverage are the The Irish Examiner, Star, Irish Independent, The Sunday Tribune and The Sunday World.
  • Television: Gaelic games and Association Football receive most of the sports coverage on domestic channels. RTÉ Two and TG4 currently hold the right to broadcast Gaelic games in Ireland. TV3 and RTÉ Two have joint rights to the various European Association Football tournaments and foreign leagues such as the FA Cup. Setanta Ireland launched in early 2004 with the aim of offering a dedicated service to Irish sport. Satellite and Cable subscribers have access to many other foreign channels such as Sky Sports, Eurosport and Attheraces.
  • Magazines: There are relatively few Irish based magazines apart from GAA ones such as the Hogan Stand. However many foreign sports magazines are widely available.

This article is about the astronomical object. ... The Irish Independent is Irelands best-selling daily newspaper. ... Sunday Tribune is an Irish Sunday newspaper published by Tribune Newspapers plc. ... RTÉ Two (Irish: RTÉ a Dó) (known from 1988 to 2004 as Network 2, RTÉ Network Two, RTÉ2 or N2) is Irelands second-oldest television channel, operated by Irish state broadcaster Radio Telefís Éireann. ... TG4 (Irish: TG Ceathair or TG a Ceathair; IPA: /tiː dʒiː kʲahəɾʲ/) is a television channel in Ireland, aimed at Irish-language speakers and established as a wholly owned subsidiary by Radio Telefís Éireann on 31 October 1996. ... TV3 Ireland is the sole commercial terrestrial television channel in the Republic of Ireland. ... This article is about the English FA Cup. ... Setanta Sports is Irelands second sports channel (after Chorus Sports). ... Sky Sports is the brand name for a group of 9 channels. ... Eurosport is the largest European sports satellite and cable network available in 54 countries and broadcasting in 18 different languages. ...

References

  1. ^ GAA attendance figures. Retrieved on 2008-02-22.
  2. ^ Culture and.. Sport. Retrieved on 2008-02-22.
  3. ^ http://www.myguideireland.com/gaelic-football
  4. ^ http://www.pride.ie/
  5. ^ http://www.webtrade.ie/GAA_DVDs__sale_online/Default.127.html
  6. ^ http://homepage.eircom.net/~domainnames/t_links.html
  7. ^ The Social Significance of Sport. Retrieved on 2006-11-27.
  8. ^ The Social Significance of Sport. Retrieved on 2006-11-27.
  9. ^ http://www.irishabroad.com/news/irishpost/featurearticles/EveryoneWinnerGAACrokePark.asp
  10. ^ http://www.fai.ie/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1485
  11. ^ http://www.ireland.com/sports/
  12. ^ http://www.examiner.ie/irishexaminer
  13. ^ http://www.a2zsoccer.com/index.cfm/loc/8.htm
  14. ^ http://www.eleven-a-side.com/default.asp
  15. ^ FAI Official Site http://www.fai.ie/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1365&Itemid=9
  • Croke Park: Cathedral of Sport by Mícheál Ó Muircheartaigh, first printed September 2004 - ISBN 1-903464-54-4
  • The Ras: Ireland's Unique Bike Race 1953-2003 by Tom Daly, first printed October 2003 - ISBN 1-903464-37-4
  • Golfing in Ireland: The Most Complete Guide for Adventurous Golfers by Rob Armstrong, first printed May 2000 - ISBN 1-56554-726-8
  • The Fighting Irish by Roger Anderson, first printed October 2004 - ISBN 1-84018-755-7
  • Michael Fortune (2002), Greyhound racing in Brian Lalor (Ed.), The Encyclopedia of Ireland. Dublin: Gill and Macmillian. ISBN 0-7171-3000-2

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

A page from the Book of Kells. ... Ireland competed at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece. ...

External links

The list of unrecognized countries enumerates those geo-political entities which lack general diplomatic recognition, but wish to be recognized as sovereign states. ...  Southwest Asia in most contexts. ... The borders of the continents are the limits of the several continents of the Earth, as defined by various geographical, cultural, and political criteria. ...  The North American plate, shown in brown The North American Plate is a tectonic plate covering most of North America, extending eastward to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and westward to the Cherskiy Range in East Siberia. ...  The African plate, shown in pinkish-orange The African Plate is a tectonic plate covering the continent of Africa and extending westward to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Sport in Ireland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3896 words)
The sport is organised on an all-island basis and is overseen by the Irish Cricket Union, founded in its present incarnation in 1923.
Ireland's most famous cyclists are Stephen Roche, who won both the Tour de France and Giro d'Italia in 1987; and Sean Kelly, who won the Vuelta a España in 1988, the sprinter's green jersey in the Tour de France four times, and numerous single-day classics.
Ireland, being an island on the western edge of Europe and on the continental shelf, is perfectly suited for the sport of SCUBA diving.
Ireland national rugby union team - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1867 words)
Ireland compete annually in the Six Nations Championship (which they have won 10 times outright and of which they have shared the championship eight times) and in the Rugby World Cup every four years where they have been eliminated at the quarter-final stage in all but one competition.
Historically, Ireland have been the weakest of the rugby union home nations, with just a single Grand Slam to their name in 1948 and a regular recipient of the wooden spoon in the predecessor tournaments to the Six Nations.
Ireland lost their first test match against England 7-0 at the Oval on the 15th February 1875, but it was not until 1881 that they first won a test, against Scotland at Ormeau in Belfast.
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