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Encyclopedia > Spoon
A spoon.
A spoon.

A spoon is a utensil consisting of a small, shallow bowl at the end of a handle, used primarily for serving and eating liquid, or semi-liquid foods, and solid foods such as rice and cereal which cannot easily be lifted with a fork. Spoons are also used in cooking to measure and mix ingredients. They can be made from metal, wood or plastic. The word spoon or spoons has several possible meanings: a utensil, and sometimes musical instrument a game a sex position (also known as spooning) an indie rock band from Texas another band from Canada (a New Wave-New Romantic synth pop music group popular in the early 1980s) a Javascript... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 781 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1848 × 1419 pixel, file size: 586 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Assassin (game) Metadata... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 781 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1848 × 1419 pixel, file size: 586 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Assassin (game) Metadata... ... For other uses, see Liquid (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rice (disambiguation). ... Grain redirects here. ... For other uses, see Fork (disambiguation). ...

Honey spoon of the type used in the Middle Ages
Honey spoon of the type used in the Middle Ages

From the derivation of the word the earliest northern European spoon would seem to have been a chip or splinter of wood; Greek references point to the early and natural use of shells, such as those that are still used by primitive peoples.[1] Ancient Indian texts also refer to the use of spoons. For example, the Rigveda refers to spoons during a passage describing the reflection of light as it "touches the spoon's mouth" (RV 8.43.10).[2] Preserved examples of various forms of spoons used by the ancient Egyptians include those composed of ivory, flint, slate and wood; many of them carved with religious symbols.[1] The spoons of the Greeks and Romans were chiefly made of bronze and silver and the handle usually takes the form of a spike or pointed stem.[1] There are many examples in the British Museum from which the forms of the various types can be ascertained, the chief points of difference being found in the junction of the bowl with the handle.[1] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 181 pixelsFull resolution (2584 × 584 pixel, file size: 113 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 181 pixelsFull resolution (2584 × 584 pixel, file size: 113 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Northern Europe is a name for the northern part of the European continent. ... Splinter can mean: A sharp, piece of material, usually wood, metal, (fibre) glass that is broken off of a main body. ... A display of seashells, mostly of marine Mollusca, including an abalone, nautilus, ark shell, scallop, pearl oyster, auger shell, cone shell, two cowries, a hammer oyster, and a fossil clam, but also including the shell or test of a sand dollar (an echinoderm). ... Rig veda is the oldest text in the world. ... Rig veda is the oldest text in the world. ... The pyramids are the most recognizable symbols of the civilization of ancient Egypt. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the sedimentary rock. ... For other uses, see Slate (disambiguation). ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... London museum | name = British Museum | image = British Museum from NE 2. ...


Medieval spoons for domestic use were commonly made of cow horn or wood, but brass, pewter, and latten spoons appear to have been common in about the 15th century.[1] The full descriptions and entries relating to silver spoons in the inventories of the royal and other households point to their special value and rarity.[1] The earliest English reference appears to be in a will of 1259.[1] In the wardrobe accounts of Edward I for the year 1300 some gold and silver spoons marked with the fleur-de-lis, the Paris mark, are mentioned.[1] One of the most interesting medieval spoons is the coronation spoon used in the anointing of the English sovereign.[1] The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... Brazen redirects here. ... Pewter plate Pewter is a metal alloy, traditionally between 85 and 99 percent tin, with the remainder consisting of 1-15 percent copper, acting as a hardener, with the addition of lead for the lower grades of pewter, which have a bluish tint. ... Latten – refers loosely to copper alloys much like brass used in the Middle Ages up through to the late 18th and early 19th Centuries, for things like decorative effect on borders, rivets or other details of metalwork (particuarly armour) and for funerary effigies. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... This article is about the chemical element. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For broader historical context, see 1250s and 13th century. ... Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks[1], also as Edward the Lawgiver or the English Justinian because of his legal reforms, and as Hammer of the Scots,[2] achieved fame as the monarch who conquered Wales and tried to do the same to Scotland. ... Events February 22 - Jubilee of Pope Boniface VIII. March 10 - Wardrobe accounts of King Edward I of Englanddo (aka Edward Longshanks) include a reference to a game called creag being played at the town of Newenden in Kent. ... Fleurs-de-lys on the flag of Quebec The fleur-de-lis (also spelled fleur-de-lys; plural fleurs-de-lis or -lys) is used in heraldry, where it is particularly associated with the France monarchy (see King of France). ... This article is about the capital of France. ...


The sets of Apostle Spoons, popular as christening presents in Tudor times, the handles of which terminate in heads or busts of the apostles, are a special form to which antiquarian interest attaches.[1] The earlier English spoon-handles terminate in an acorn, plain knob or a diamond; at the end of the 16th century, the baluster and seal ending becomes common, the bowl being fig-shaped.[1] During The Restoration[citation needed], the handle becomes broad and flat, the bowl is broad and oval and the termination is cut into the shape known as the hinds foot.[1] Sets of 12 spoons, with figures of the Apostles on the finial: a thirteenth spoon would have a figure of Jesus on the top. ... Allegory of the Tudor dynasty (detail), attributed to Lucas de Heere, c. ... An antiquarian or antiquary is one concerned with antiquities or things of the past. ... For other uses, see Acorn (disambiguation). ... This article is about the mineral. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... A page of fanciful balusters from A Handbook of Ornament, Franz S. Meyer, 1898 A baluster (through the French balustre, from Italian balaustro, from balaustra, pomegranate flower [from a resemblance to the post], from Lat. ... This article is about the authentication means. ... Species About 800, including: Ficus altissima Ficus americana Ficus aurea Ficus benghalensis- Indian Banyan Ficus benjamina- Weeping Fig Ficus broadwayi Ficus carica- Common Fig Ficus citrifolia Ficus coronata Ficus drupacea Ficus elastica Ficus godeffroyi Ficus grenadensis Ficus hartii Ficus lyrata Ficus macbrideii Ficus macrophylla- Moreton Bay Fig Ficus microcarpa- Chinese... For other uses, see Restoration. ... This article is about the species of deer. ...


In the first quarter of the 18th century, the bowl becomes narrow and elliptical, with a tongue or rat's tail down the back, and the handle is turned up at the end.[1] (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Elliptical may refer to: Ellipse: a shape and mathematical construct Elliptical trainer: an exercise machine This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


The modern form, with the tip of the bowl narrower than the base and the rounded end of the handle turned down, came into use about 1760.[1] Year 1760 (MDCCLX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Contents

Types and uses

Spoonful of cereal
Spoonful of cereal
See also: List of types of spoons

Spoons are used primarily for eating liquid or semi-liquid foods, such as soup, stew, or ice cream, and very small or powdery solid items which cannot be easily lifted with a fork, such as rice, sugar, cereals and green peas. In Southeast Asia, spoons are the primary utensil used for eating; forks are used only to push food onto the spoon.[3][4] Spoons are also widely used in cooking and serving. Download high resolution version (1024x670, 80 KB) [1] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (1024x670, 80 KB) [1] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Spoonful of cereal Absinthe spoon Soup spoon Tablespoon Teaspoon Iced tea spoon Dessert spoon Demitasse spoon Bouillon spoon Grapefruit spoon Egg spoon Caviar spoon — usually made of mother of pearl, gold, animal horn or wood. ... For other uses, see Liquid (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Soup (disambiguation). ... Beef Stew A stew is a combination of solid food ingredients that have been cooked in water or other water-based liquid, typically by simmering, and that are then served without being drained. ... Missing image Ice cream is often served on a stick Boxes of ice cream are often found in stores in a display freezer. ... For other uses, see Rice (disambiguation). ... This article is about sugar as food and as an important and widely-traded commodity. ... Cereal crops are mostly grasses cultivated for their edible seeds (actually a fruit called a grain, technically a caryopsis). ... Binomial name Pisum sativum L. A pea is the small, edible round green bean which grows in a pod on the leguminous vine Pisum sativum. ...


The teaspoon and tablespoon are used as standard units of measure for volume in cooking. The teaspoon is often used in a similar way to describe the dosage for over the counter medicines. A teaspoon is about 5ml and a table spoon about 15ml. Image:Teaspoon sugar. ... This tablespoon has a capacity of about 1 tbsp. ... This topic differs from units of measurement, which see. ... In recipes, quantities of ingredients may be specified by mass (weight), by volume, or by count. ... Image:Teaspoon sugar. ... Over-the-counter (OTC) drugs are medicines that may be sold without a prescription, in contrast to prescription drugs. ...


The souvenir spoon generally exists solely as a decorative object commemorating an event, place, or special date. Also known as Location Spoon A souvenir spoon is a decorative spoon used to signify or hold a memory of a place or event, or to display as a trophy of having been there, thus also a classical memento from pilgrimage sites; they are often in more fancy materials and...


Spoons can also be used as a musical instrument. Spoons can be played as a makeshift percussion instrument, or more specifically, an idiophone related to the castanets. ...


Spoons can also be when two people lie in bed together both facing the same direction with close skin to skin contact.


Manufacture

For machine-made spoons, the basic shape is cut out from a sheet of sterling silver, nickel silver alloy or stainless steel. The bowl is cross rolled between two pressurized rollers to produce a thinner section. The handle section is also rolled to produce the width needed for the top end. The blank is then cropped to the required shape, and two dies are used to apply the pattern to the blank. The fash is then removed using a lynisher, and the bowl is formed between two dies and bent. Sterling silver is an alloy of silver containing 92. ... Steel is a metal alloy whose major component is iron, with carbon content between 0. ... The 630 foot (192 m) high, stainless-clad (type 304) Gateway Arch defines St. ...


Handforging spoons, on the other hand, is the traditional way to manufacture spoons. Spoons are also used for sports such as 'spooning', this consists of 2 or more participents balancing a spoon on the end of their nose, the longest holder wins. The stages of the handforging process. ...


Popular Culture

Comedian Eddie Izzard references spoons and, particularly, this webpage in his stand-up routines during a stint at Union Square Theater in New York City during February of 2008. Edward John Eddie Izzard (born February 7, 1962) is a double Emmy-winning English[1] stand-up comedian and actor. ...


There is also a popular band, Spoon (band), that shares a name with this utensil (although their name was chosen for other reasons). Lead singer Britt Daniel Spoon is an American indie rock band from Austin, Texas. ...


Spoons were also mentioned in an episode of Fawlty Towers entitled The Hotel Inspectors, where actor Bernard Cribbins played an annoying spoon salesman who stayed in the hotel.-1... Fawlty Towers is a British sitcom made by the BBC and first broadcast on BBC2 in 1975. ... The Hotel Inspectors is the fourth episode of the BBC sitcom Fawlty Towers. ... Bernard Cribbins as Captain Michael in Space: 1999, episode: Brian the Brain (1976). ...


A UK Children's TV program, broadcast on ITV, called Button Moon featured a family of spoons who regularly flew to Button Moon. See TV (disambiguation) for other uses and Television (band) for the rock band European networks National In much of Europe television broadcasting has historically been state dominated, rather than commercially organised, although commercial stations have grown in number recently. ... For other uses, see ITV (disambiguation). ... Button Moon was a popular childrens television programme broadcast in the United Kingdom in the 1980s on the ITV Network. ... For other uses, see Family (disambiguation). ... -1... Button Moon was a popular childrens television programme broadcast in the United Kingdom in the 1980s on the ITV Network. ...


In an episode of Malcolm in the Middle, Malcolm wondered who invented the spoon. Stevie attempted to answer, but Reese butted in and said "Spoony Spoonicus." Malcolm in the Middle is a seven-time Emmy-winning,[1] one-time Grammy-winning[1] and seven-time Golden Globe-nominated[1] American sitcom created by Linwood Boomer for the Fox Network. ...


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Spoons
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Spoon

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Cutlery refers to any hand implement used in preparing, serving, and especially eating food in the Western world. ... A spoon bent at a PK party Spoon bending is the apparent deformation of objects, especially metal cutlery, apparently either without physical force, or with less force than normally necessary. ...

Sources

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "Spoon." Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, 1911. Viewing the linked scan requires the AlternaTiff plugin in most browsers. This article incorporates text from this source, which is now in the public domain.
  2. ^ Hopkins, E. Washburn (1907). "The Sniff-Kiss in Ancient India". Journal of the American Oriental Society 28: 120–134. American Oriental Society. doi:10.2307/592764. 
  3. ^ South China Seas Culture & Cuisine
  4. ^ UKTV Food: Recipes: Southeast Asian cuisine

Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ...

Bibliography

  • Bednersh, Wayne. Collectible Souvenir Spoons: The Grand Tour. Collector Books, 2000. ISBN 978-1574321890.

Features broad array of collectible spoons from around the world, with values.

  • Rainwater, Dorothy. Spoons From Around the World. New York: Shiffer Publishing, 1992. ISBN 978-0887404252.

Contains historical information and photos of antique collectible spoons.

  • Spark, Nick. Spoons West! Fred Harvey, the Navajo, and the Souvenir Spoons of the West 1890-1941. Los Angeles, California: Periscope Film, 2007. ISBN 978-0978638894.

Historical overview of American souvenir spoons with detailed photographs.


  Results from FactBites:
 
Spoon (519 words)
For many, Spoon's story has come to exemplify the dirty dealing and two-facedness that has come to define the major label side of the record industry, so much so, unfortunately, that it has come to define the band almost as much as their music.
This is not to suggest that Spoon is a knock-off; more like a worthy descendent of these bands; with each subsequent release, though, they seem to sound less like older groups and more like themselves, which is, perhaps, the way with all great bands.
For their fourth album, Spoon cut its songs down to their raw, sinewy cores to create Kill the Moonlight, one of the most electrifying albums of 2002, and one of the best rock albums to dance to in memory.
Spoon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1590 words)
Spoons are nowadays used primarily for eating liquid or semi-liquid foods, such as soup, stew, or ice cream, and very small or powdery solid items which cannot be easily lifted with a fork, such as rice, sugar, and green peas.
Wooden spoon is a phrase used to describe the "achievement" of a team or individual in finishing last in a contest, a wooden spoon being a common and almost valueless object, in stark contrast to the contest winners who will often receive a trophy made of silver or similar precious metal.
Spoons as an instrument are associated in the United States with American folk music, minstrelsy, and jug and spasm bands.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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