FACTOID # 28: Austin, Texas has more people than Alaska.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Spoleto" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Spoleto

Spoleto (Latin: Spoletium), 42°44′ N 12°44′ E, an ancient town in the Italian province of Perugia in east central Umbria, at 385 meters (1391 ft) above sea-level on a foothill of the Apennines. It is 20 km (12 mi) S. of [[Trevi], 29 km (18 mi) N. of Terni, 63km (39 miles) SE of Perugia; 212km (131 miles) SE of Florence; and 126km (78 miles) N of Rome. Its population according to the 2003 census was 38,000. Perugia (It. ... Umbria is a mountainous region of central Italy, in the valley of the river Tiber. ... Terni, (Latin: Interamna Nahars) an ancient town of Italy, capital of Terni province in southern Umbria, 42°33N, 12°39E, at 130 meters (427 ft) above sea-level in the plain of the Nera river. ... Perugia (population 150,000) is the capital city in the region of Umbria in central Italy, near the Tiber river, and the capital of the province of Perugia. ... Founded 59 BC as Florentia Region Tuscany Mayor Leonardo Domenici (Democratici di Sinistra) Area  - City Proper  102 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 356,000 almost 500,000 3,453/km² Time zone CET, UTC+1 Latitude Longitude 43°47 N 11°15 E www. ... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni (Democratici di Sinistra) Area  - City Proper  1290 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,546,807 almost 4,000,000 1... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


History

Spoleto was situated on the eastern branch of the Via Flaminia, which forked into two roads at Narnia and rejoined at Forum Flaminii, near Foligno. An ancient road also ran hence to Nursia. The Via Flaminia was a Roman road leading from Rome to Ariminum (Rimini), and was the most important route to the north. ... Narnia was the Roman name for the modern town of Narni in the Umbrian region of Italy. ... Foligno, (Latin: Fulginiae, Fulginium) an ancient town of Italy, in the province of Perugia in east central Umbria, at 233 meters (764 ft) above sea-level, on the Topino river where it leaves the Apennines and enters the wide plain of the Clitunno river system. ... Norcia, (Latin: Nursia) an ancient town of Italy, in the province of Perugia in southeastern Umbria, at 42°48N 13°06E, at 604 meters (1982 ft) above sea-level in a wide plain abutting the Monti Sibillini, a subrange of the Apennines with some of its highest peaks, near the...


Located at the head of a large, broad valley, surrounded by mountains, Spoleto has long occupied a strategic geographical position. It appears to have been an important town to the original Umbri tribes, who built walls around their settlement in the 5th century BC, some of which are visible today. The Umbri, also called Umbrians in English, were an ancient Italic tribe. ...


The first historical mention of Spoleto is the notice of the foundation of a colony there in 241 BC. (Liv. Epit. xx; Vell. Pat. i.14), and it was still, according to Cicero (Pro Balbo), colonia latina in primis firma et illustris: a Latin colony in 95 BC. After the battle of Trasimenus (217 BC) Spoletium was attacked by Hannibal, who was repulsed by the inhabitants (Livy xxii.9). During the Second Punic War the city was a useful ally to Rome. It suffered greatly during the civil wars of Marius and Sulla. The latter, after his victory over Crassus, confiscated the territory of Spoletium (82 BC). From this time forth it was a municipium. Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC - 240s BC - 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC 200s BC 190s BC 246 BC 245 BC 244 BC 243 BC 242 BC - 241 BC - 240 BC 239 BC 238... Marcus Tullius Cicero (January 3, 106 BC – December 7, 43 BC) was an orator and statesman of Ancient Rome, and is generally considered the greatest Latin prose stylist. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 140s BC 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC - 90s BC - 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC Years: 100 BC 99 BC 98 BC 97 BC 96 BC - 95 BC - 94 BC 93 BC 92... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC - 210s BC - 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC Years: 222 BC 221 BC 220 BC 219 BC 218 BC - 217 BC - 216 BC 215 BC... Hannibals feat in crossing the Alps with war elephants passed into European legend: a fresco detail, 1510, Capitoline Museum, Rome Hannibal (from Punic, literally Baal is merciful to me, 247 BC – 182 BC) was a politician, statesman and military commander of ancient Carthage, best known for his achievements in... Bust of Livy Titus Livius (around 59 BC - 17 AD), known as Livy in English, wrote a monumental history of Rome, Ab urbe condita, from its founding (traditionally dated to 753 BC). ... The Second Punic War was fought between Carthage and Rome from 218 to 202 BC. It was the second of three major wars fought between the Phoenician colony of Carthage, and the Roman Republic, then still confined to the Italian Peninsula. ... A bust of Gaius Marius Gaius Marius (Latin: C·MARIVS·C·F·C·N)¹ (157 BC - January 13, 86 BC) was a Roman general and politician elected to Consul an unprecedented seven times during his career. ... Lucius Cornelius Sulla Felix (Latin: L·CORNELIVS·L·F·P·N·SVLLA·FELIX) ¹ (ca. ... Marcus Licinius Crassus Dives (c. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC - 80s BC - 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC 40s BC 30s BC Years: 87 BC 86 BC 85 BC 84 BC 83 BC - 82 BC - 81 BC 80 BC 79... A municipium was the second highest class of a Roman city, and was inferior in status to the colonia. ...


Under the empire it seems to have flourished once again, but is not often mentioned in history. Martial speaks of its wine. Aemilianus, who had been proclaimed emperor by his soldiers in Moesia, was slain by them here on his way to Rome (253), after a reign of three or four months. Rescripts of Constantine (326) and Julian (362) are dated from Spoleto. The foundation of the episcopal see dates from the 4th century: early martyrs of Spoleto are legends, but a letter to the bishop Caecilianus,from Pope Liberius in 354 constitutes its first historical mention. Owing to its elevated position Spoleto was an important stronghold during the Vandal and Gothic wars; its walls were dismantled by Totila (Procopius, de Bello Gothico iii. 12). This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Marcus Aemilius Aemilianus (ca. ... In ancient geography, Moesia was a district inhabited chiefly by Thracian peoples. ... For the book see 253 (book). ... Constantine. ... Events September 14 - Discovery of the (alleged) True Cross by Vatican City, where St. ... Julian solidus, ca. ... Events February 21 - Athanasius returns to Alexandria. ... (3rd century - 4th century - 5th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. ... Liberius, pope from May 17, 352 to September 24, 366, was the earliest pope who did not become a saint. ... The Vandals were an East Germanic tribe that entered the late Roman Empire, and created a state in North Africa, centered on the city of Carthage. ... Invasion of the Goths: a late 19th century painting by O. Fritsche portrays the Goths as cavalrymen. ... Totila, born in Treviso, was king of the Ostrogoths, chosen after the death of his uncle Ildibad, having engineered the assassination of Ildibads short-lived successor his cousin Eraric in 541. ... The writings of Procopius of Caesarea (500 ? - 565 ?), in Palestine, are the primary source of information for the rule of the emperor Justinian. ...

See main entry Duchy of Spoleto.

Under the Lombards, Spoleto became the capital of an independent duchy, the Duchy of Spoleto (from 570), and its dukes ruled a considerable part of central Italy. Together with other fiefs, it was bequeathed to Pope Gregory VII by the empress Matilda, but for some time struggled to maintain its independence. In 1155 it was destroyed by Frederick Barbarossa. In 1213 it was definitively occupied by Pope Gregory IX. During the absence of the papal court in Avignon, it was prey to the struggles between Guelphs and Ghibellines, until in 1354 Cardinal Albornoz brought it once more under the authority of the Papal States. The independent Duchy of Spoleto in southern Italy was a Lombard territory founded about 570 by a Lombard dux Faroald. ... The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, from which the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Scandinavia that entered the late Roman Empire. ... The independent Duchy of Spoleto in southern Italy was a Lombard territory founded about 570 by a Lombard dux Faroald. ... Events First mention of the Spear of Destiny (approximate date). ... Gregory VII, né Hildebrand (ca. ... Matilda (sometimes spelled Mathilda) is a female name, of Teutonic derivation, meaning mighty warrior. ... Events Frederick I Barbarossa crowned Holy Roman Emperor. ... Frederick in a 13th century Chronicle Frederick I (German: Friedrich I. von Hohenstaufen)(1122 – June 10, 1190), also known as Friedrich Barbarossa (Frederick Redbeard) was elected king of Germany on March 4, 1152 and crowned Holy Roman Emperor on June 18, 1155. ... Events Alix of Thouars, heiress of the duchy of Brittany marries Peter of Dreux; beginning of the Dreux rule in Brittany, which would last until 1514 Births March 9 - Hugh IV, Duke of Burgundy Deaths September 12 - Peter II of Aragon at the Battle of Muret Heads of state France... Gregory IX, né Ugolino di Conti (Anagni, ca. ... The Papal palace in Avignon In the history of the Roman Catholic Church, the Avignon Papacy was the period from 1305 to 1378 during which the Bishop of Rome, the Pope, lived in Avignon (now a part of France) rather than in Rome. ... Guelph has several meanings: Guelph is a city in Ontario, Canada. ... The Guelphs and Ghibellines were factions supporting, respectively, the Papacy and the Holy Roman Empire in Italy during the 12th century and 13th century. ... Events End of reign of John VI Cantacuzenus, as Byzantine emperor. ... Gil Alvarez De Albornoz, Spanish cardinal, was born at Cuenca early in the 14th century. ... The Papal States (Gli Stati della Chiesa or Stati Pontificii, States of the Church) was one of the historical states of Italy before the peninsula was unified under the crown of Savoy. ...


After Napoleon's conquest of Italy, in 1809 Spoleto became capital of the short-lived French department of Trasimène, returning to the Papal States after Napoleon's defeat, within five years. In 1860, after a gallant defence, Spoleto was taken by the troops fighting for the unification of Italy. Giovanni Pontano, founder of the Accademia Pontaniana of Naples, was born here. Another child of Spoleto was Francis Possenti who was educated in the Jesuit school and whose father was the Papal assesor, Francis later entered the Passionists and became Saint Gabriel of Our Lady of Sorrows. For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... 1809 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Trasimène is the name of a département of the First French Empire in present Italy. ... The Papal States (Gli Stati della Chiesa or Stati Pontificii, States of the Church) was one of the historical states of Italy before the peninsula was unified under the crown of Savoy. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... Saint Gabriel of Our Lady of Sorrows (born Francesco Possenti, in Assisi, March 1st, 1838 - Gran Sasso, February 27, 1862) was a Passionist student who entered the religious life after turning from a life devoted to excess. ...


In 1958, because Spoleto was a small town, whose real estate and other goods and services were, at the time relatively inexpensive. Yet, Spoleto was fairly close to Rome with good rail connections, so it was chosen by Gian-Carlo Menotti as the venue for an arts festival. The Festival dei Due Mondi (Festival of the Two Worlds) has developed into the most important cultural manifestation in Umbria, with a three-week schedule of music, theater and dance performances; it is usually held in late June-early July. 1958 was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Gian Carlo Menotti, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1944 Gian Carlo Menotti (born July 7, 1911, Cadegliano, Italy) is an Italian-born American composer. ...


Monuments

  • Roman theater
  • Roman amphitheater
  • Ponte Sanguinaro, a Roman bridge
  • a striking 13th-century aqueduct
  • principal churches:
    • Duomo S. Maria Assunta
    • S. Pietro, with a remarkable Romanesque façade
    • S. Salvatore, incorporating the cella of a Roman temple
    • S. Ponziano
    • S. Eufemia

Categories: Ancient Roman architecture | Theatre | Historical stubs ... The name amphitheatre (alternatively amphitheater) is given to a public building of the Classical period (being particularly associated with ancient Rome) which was used for spectator sports, games and displays. ... Pont du Gard, France, a Roman era aqueduct circa 19 BC, it is one of Frances top tourist attractions at over 1. ... The Temple of Vesta, near the Teatro di Marcello (a Greek-style Roman temple) The numbers and architecture of Roman temples reflect the citys receptivity to all the religions of the world. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
G (15003 words)
In merito alla sua elezione, dev'essere ricordato che Spoleto nel 1247 aveva ottenuto il privilegio di eleggere il podestà e gli altri officiali del comune "sicut tunc temporis faciabant (sic) et sicut ipsi comuni placuerit"(202).
A livello statutario, Spoleto mise in atto una politica di strenua difesa delle proprie consuetudini giurisdizionali, anche al di là dei termini stabiliti dal privilegio pontificio.
In materia di fideiussione, l'indirizzo seguito a Spoleto, anche in questo caso in modo non dissimile da altri statuti coevi(510), è quello della protezione dei diritti dei fideiussori che abbiano adempiuto il debito principale.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m