FACTOID # 30: If Alaska were its own country, it would be the 26th largest in total area, slightly larger than Iran.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Spitball" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Spitball

A spitball is a baseball pitch in which the ball has been altered by the application of spit, petroleum jelly, or some other foreign substance. A view of the playing field at Busch Memorial Stadium, St. ... The typical motion of a pitcher In baseball, a pitch is the act of throwing a baseball toward home plate to start a play. ... Saliva is the watery and usually somewhat frothy substance produced in the mouths of humans and some animals. ... Petroleum jelly, vaseline, petrolatum or soft paraffin [3] is a semi-solid mixture of hydrocarbons, originally promoted as a topical ointment for its healing properties. ...


Such a pitch presents an additional challenge to the hitter because it causes the ball to move atypically during its approach due to the altered wind-resistance and weight on one side of the ball.


Alternative names for the spitball are mud ball, shine ball and emery ball, although technically, an emery ball is one where the ball has been abraded in much the same way that the original cut ball had been physically cut.


Preparing a spitball is roughly analogous to ball tampering in cricket, an action in which a fielder illegally alters the condition of the ball. A sample cricket ball. ... Bowler Shaun Pollock bowls to batsman Michael Hussey. ...

Contents

History

The invention of the spitball has been popularly credited to a number of individuals, among them Elmer Stricklett and Frank Corridon. Numerous accounts, however, refer to different players experimenting with versions of the spitball throughout the latter half of the 19th century, and it remains unlikely that any one individual "invented" the spitball [1].


Ed Walsh, however, is certainly responsible for popularizing it. Walsh dominated the American League from 1906-1912 primarily on the strength of his spitball, and pitchers around the league soon copied his spitball or invented their own trick pitch. The dramatic increase in the popularity of "freak deliveries" led to a great deal of controversy throughout the 1910s regarding the abolition of the spitball and related pitches. (In his autobiography, Ty Cobb wrote that such "freak pitches" "were outlawed when the owners greedily sold out to home runs.") Ed Walsh of the Chicago White Sox at Comiskey Park in 1913. ... Cover of the first English edition of 1793 of Benjamin Franklins autobiography. ... Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach, was a Hall of Fame baseball player. ... This article is about the baseball concept. ...


As a result, the spitball was banned in two stages. In the winter of 1919-1920, managers voted to partially ban the spitball, allowing each team to designate at most two pitchers who would be permitted to legally throw spitballs. Then, following the 1920 season, the spitball was banned leaguewide, except for existing spitballers who were grandfathered in and allowed to keep throwing the pitch legally until they retired [2]. A grandfather clause is an exception that allows an old rule to continue to apply to some existing situations, when a new rule will apply to all future situations. ...


Seventeen existing spitballers were granted this exemption. Burleigh Grimes lasted the longest, retiring in 1934. The complete list: Doc Ayers (played through 1921); Ray Caldwell (1921); Stan Coveleski (1928); Bill Doak (1929); Phil Douglas (1922); Red Faber (1933); Dana Fillingim (1925); Ray Fisher (1920); Marv Goodwin (1934); Dutch Leonard (1925); Clarence Mitchell (1932); Jack Quinn (1933); Allen Russell (1925); Dick Rudolph (1927); Urban Shocker (1928); and Allen Sothoron (1926). Burleigh Arland Grimes (August 18, 1893 - December 6, 1985) was an American professional baseball player, and the last pitcher officially permitted to throw the spitball. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Yancey Wyatt Doc Ayers (May 21, 1891 – May 26, 1968) was an American pitcher in Major League Baseball who specialized in throwing the spitball pitch. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Raymond Benjamin Caldwell, (April 26, 1888 – August 17, 1967), was an American major league pitcher from 1910 to 1921. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Stanley Anthony Coveleski (Kowalewski) (July 13, 1889 - March 20, 1984) was a Major League Baseball player during the 1910s and 1920s. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bill Doak, 1914 Bill Doak was born January 28, 1891, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Phillip Brooks Douglas was an American baseball player born on June 17, 1890 in Cedartown, Georgia. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... Urban Clarence Red Faber (September 6, 1888 - September 25, 1976) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball from 1914 until 1933, playing his entire career for the Chicago White Sox. ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ray Lyle Fisher (October 4, 1887 in Middlebury, Vermont -November 3, 1982) was an American pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hubert Benjamin Leonard (born April 16, 1892 Birmingham, Ohio - died July 11, 1952 Fresno, California) was a pitcher with an 11 year career from 1913-1921, 1924-1925. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Clarence Elmer Mitchell (February 22, 1891 in Franklin, Nebraska - November 6, 1963 in Grand Island, Nebraska), is a former professional baseball player who played pitcher in the Major Leagues from 1911-1932. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Quinn Picus, known better as Jack Quinn, (July 5, 1883 - April 17, 1946) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Allen Russell can refer to a baseball pitcher or to a Ohio politician ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Richard Rudolph (August 25, 1887 in New York, New York - October 20, 1949 in Bronx, New York), is a former professional baseball player who played pitcher in the Major Leagues from 1910-1927. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Urban James Shocker (August 22, 1890 – September 9, 1928), born Urbain Jacques Shockor, was a Major League Baseball pitcher for the New York Yankees and St. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Allen Sutton Sothoron (April 27, 1893 - June 17, 1939) was a spitball pitcher who spent eleven years in the major leagues, playing for the St. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Methodology

Although the spitball is now banned at all levels of professional and organized amateur baseball, it is still sometimes thrown in violation of the rules. (In 1942, Leo Durocher, then-manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers, fined Bobo Newsom for throwing a spitball and "lying to me about it.") Typically, a lubricant is hidden behind the pitcher's knee or under the peak of his cap. Others will place the ball in their mitt and then cough on or lick it. Another tactic pitchers use is to soak their hair in water before going out to the mound, and then rubbing their hand in their hair before a pitch. Some pitchers have even glued a piece of sandpaper to one of their fingers, and scuffed a part of the ball to achieve a similar effect to the spitball. Ted "Double Duty" Radcliffe has stated that he would hide a piece of emery board in his belt buckle so that he could roughen the ball or even cut it. During the Minnesota Twins' 1987 pennant chase, one of their starting pitchers, Joe Niekro, was suspended when he was caught on the field with a nail file in his back pocket. Niekro said in defense that he had been filing his nails, a common practice amongst knuckleball pitchers. The following are the baseball events of the year 1942 throughout the world. ... Leo Ernest Durocher (July 27, 1905 — October 7, 1991), nicknamed Leo the Lip, was an American infielder and manager in Major League Baseball. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899-1910), (1913) Brooklyn Grooms... Louis Bobo Newsom, (1907-1962), also known as Buck, was a Major League Baseball pitcher for a number of teams from the late 1920s to the early 1950s. ... sheets of sandpaper Sandpaper is a form of paper where an abrasive material has been fixed to its surface; it is part of the coated abrasives family of abrasive products. ... Ted Radcliffe c. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 6, 14, 29, 34, 42 Name Minnesota Twins (1961–present) Washington Nationals/Senators (1901-1960) Other nicknames The Twinkies Ballpark Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome 1982-present Metropolitan Stadium (1961-1981) Griffith Stadium (1903-1960... Joe Niekro autograph on a 1981 Fleer baseball card - 1981 Series, #54 Joseph Franklin Niekro (November 7, 1944- October 27, 2006) was a Major League Baseball player, brother of Hall of Famer Phil Niekro, and father of current player Lance Niekro. ...


One of the most famous spitballers was Preacher Roe, who played for the Brooklyn Dodgers in the 1950s. Roe was renowned both for his ability to control the spitball, as well as to throw it without getting caught. Another famous user of the pitch was Gaylord Perry, who went so far as to title his autobiography Me and the Spitter. (For example, Gaylord would sniff red peppers to make his nose run or he would put vaseline on his zipper because umpires would never check there.) One sportswriter quipped that "Gaylord Perry's 3.67 ERA was more than he expectorated." Elwin Charles Roe (born February 26, 1915 in Ash Flat, Arkansas) was a Major League Baseball pitcher for the St. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899-1910), (1913) Brooklyn Grooms... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Gaylord Jackson Perry (born September 15, 1938 in Williamston, North Carolina) is a former right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball and a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame. ... Cover of the first English edition of 1793 of Benjamin Franklins autobiography. ... Gaylord Jackson Perry (born September 15, 1938 in Williamston, North Carolina) is a All-Star Major League Baseball pitcher and member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame. ... An era is a long period of time with different technical and colloquial meanings, and usages in language. ...


Legal spits

The name dry spitter is sometimes used to describe a pitch that moves like a spitball without saliva, such as the forkball or split-finger fastball, the latter also being called a "splitter" as a joking backreference to "spitter". It is sometimes used simply as slang for the knuckleball. The forkball is a type of pitch in baseball. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Tim Wakefield in his throwing motion, showing his grip of the knuckleball. ...


See also

A sample cricket ball. ...

References

  1. ^ The Neyer/James Guide to Pitchers: An Historical Compendium of Pitching, Pitchers, and Pitches. Bill James and Rob Neyer. 2004.
  2. ^ Baseball Anecdotes. Daniel Okrent. 1989.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Spitballing (1841 words)
For those of you who are concerned that I'm talking about a sport that invloves a lot of bodily fluids, it's a term that screenwriters use for when they get stuck.
Well I love that name - spitballing - and I think it is an absolutely fantastic idea.
I have to say, this is the bit I love about my job; I'm meeting up with a client next week to talk over his book and spitball a little.
Spitball!: What's a Spitball? (249 words)
Hey folks, welcome to Spitball!, the world's first screenplay written by blog.You may want to read the posts in our about section, particularly our Statement of Purpose
Just realized there might be people out there unfamiliar with the term "spitball", which makes a lot of our in-jokes (well, maybe only the funny names) incomprehensible.
"Spitballing" is a term invented by William Goldman (author and screenwriter of such classics as Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and All The President's Men) as kind of synonym for brainstorming.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m