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Encyclopedia > Spirou
Young Spirou on the cover of Spanish magazine Yo y Yo
Young Spirou on the cover of Spanish magazine Yo y Yo

Spirou is: ImageMetadata File history File links I own the comic book and scanned the cover. ...

The series fits in with the European comedic adventure comics like Tintin and Asterix. It is one of the most widely known of the classic Belgian comic strips and, unlike Tintin, new Spirou books continue to be published to this day. Only two books, number 15 and 16, have been translated into English by Fantasy Flight Publishing in the mid-90's, although they're currently out of print. Spirou is: a Belgian childrens comic magazine; one of its serial comic strips, which is also published in hardcover format the eponymous character of the comic strip. ... A collection of magazines A magazine is a periodical publication containing a variety of articles, generally financed by advertising and/or purchase by readers. ... This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... An eponym is a person, whether real or fictitious, whose name has (or is thought to have) given rise to the name of a particular place, tribe, discovery, or other item. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... European comics is a generalized terms for comics produced in Continental Europe. ... Tintin and Snowy (Tintin et Milou) are world travellers and inseparable friends in The Adventures of Tintin. ... A shrewd, cunning little warrior; all perilous missions are immediately entrusted to him. ... Tintin, one of the most famous Belgian comics Franco-Belgian comics are comics written in Belgium and France. ...

Contents


History

Spirou's Origins

The comic strip was originally created by Robert Velter (Rob-Vel) for the launch of his Journal de Spirou in 1938. François Robert Velter (February 9, 1909 – April 27, 1991), better known by his pen-name Rob-Vel, was a French cartoonist, noted for creating the character Spirou in 1938 for the launch of the Belgian magazine of the same name. ... Spirou is: a Belgian childrens comic magazine; one of its serial comic strips, which is also published in hardcover format the eponymous character of the comic strip. ... 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Spirou was originally an elevator (lift) operator (in French: un groom) for the Moustique Hotel, and remains dressed with his red uniform to this day, although there has been no mention of his occupation for many years. Spirou has a pet squirrel called Spip, and spirou means "squirrel" (lit.) and "mischievous" (fig.) in Walloon. The term Walloon may refer to either the Walloon language, or to the ethnic people of the same name. ...


Unlike most characters from European comics, Spirou belongs to the publisher (Dupuis editions, who bought the magazine and character from Rob-Vel in 1943) and not to any specific author. It was therefore subsequently passed to several different artists, starting with Joseph Gillain (Jijé) in 1943. In 1944 Jijé introduced a new character known as Fantasio, Spirou's best friend and co-adventurer. Dupuis is a Belgian editor of comic books and magazines. ... 1943 (MCMXLIII) is a common year starting on Friday. ... Jijé (January 13, 1914 - June 19, 1980) was a Belgian comics artist. ... 1943 (MCMXLIII) is a common year starting on Friday. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Young Spirou on the cover of Spanish magazine Yo y Yo Spirou is: Spirou magazine, a Belgian childrens comic magazine; one of its serial comic strips, Spirou et Fantasio (Spirou and Fantasio), which is also published in hardcover format Spirou, the eponymous character of the comic strip. ...


Franquin's Spirou

Jijé handed the series to the (then) young André Franquin in 1946, in the middle of Spirou et la maison préfabriquée. Franquin developed the strip, from single gags and short serials, into long adventures with complex plots, and is usually considered as the definitive author of the strip. He introduced a plethora of recurring characters, notably the count scientist and inventor, Champignac, the buffoonish mad scientist Zorglub, the cousin of Fantasio and wannabe dictator Zantafio, and the journalist Seccotine, one of the rare instances of a female character in Belgian comics of this period. André Franquin (January 3, 1924 – January 5, 1997) was a Belgian cartoonist, perhaps best known for his humorous comic strip creation Gaston and the Marsupilami. ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... The Count of Champignac is a fictional character in the Spirou comic books. ... They LAUGHED at my theories at the institute! Fools! Ill destroy them all! Caucasian, male, aging, crooked teeth, messy hair, lab coat, spectacles/goggles, dramatic posing — one popular stereotype of mad scientist. ... Zorglub is a fictional character in the Belgian comic strip Spirou et Fantasio. ... Zantafio is a recurring antagonist in the Spirou comic strip. ... Seccotine is a recurring character from the Spirou et Fantasio comics, and the first major female character in the series. ...


One Franquin creation that went on to develop a life of its own was the Marsupilami, a fictional monkey-like creature with a tremendously long prehensile tail. The Marsupilami appears in the majority of the Franquin stories, starting in 1952 with Spirou et les héritiers. In the series, it is adopted by the heroes and follows them everywhere they go. Franquin broke with this rule briefly in 1957 with Le nid des marsupilamis which is a fake nature documentary featuring the Marsupilami in his natural habitat, the fictitious South American state of Palombie. Marsupilami is a fictional comic book animal created by André Franquin in 1952. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ...


Starting with Le prisonnier du Bouddha (1959), Franquin begins to work with Greg (writing) and Jidéhem (backgrounds). As he would do in some of his later series (such as Bruno Brazil or Bernard Prince), Greg sets his stories into a realistic geopolitical context. The aforementioned Le prisonnier du Bouddha is set in mainland China, with veiled references made to the Cold War. As for QRN sur Bretzelburg, it takes place in two imaginary European countries which bring to mind pre-reunification Germany. Lastly, it is with Greg that Franquin created famed villain Zorglub in the diptych of Z comme Zorglub and L'ombre du Z. 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Greg (also Gregg) is a shortened form of the male given name Gregory. ... Bernard Prince and his companions are sailor-adventurers created by Belgian cartoonists Greg and Hermann for the comics magazine Tintin in 1966. ... The Cold War was the protracted geostrategic, economic, and ideological struggle that emerged after World War II between the global superpowers of the Soviet Union and the United States, supported by their respective and emerging alliance partners. ... The Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) and the German Democratic Republic (East Germany) German reunification (Deutsche Wiedervereinigung) took place on October 3, 1990, when the areas of the former German Democratic Republic (GDR, in English commonly called East Germany) were incorporated into the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG, in... A diptych is any object with two flat plates attached at a hinge. ...


However, as Franquin grew tired of Spirou, his other major character Gaston began to take precedence in his work, and following the controversial Panade à Champignac, the series passed on to a then unknown young cartoonist and Spirou fan, Jean-Claude Fournier, in 1969. One side effect of this is that the Marsupilami would only appear in one last story, Le faiseur d'or. This is because Franquin decided to retain the rights to that character; all the other characters remained the property of the publisher. Starting with Du glucose pour Noémie, there would be no more appearances or even mentions of the Marsupilami in Spirou. Only in the 1990 does the Marsupilami reappear in its own series and television cartoons. Gaston Lagaffe is the main character of the comic strip Gaston, originally created in 1957 by the Belgian cartoonist André Franquin in the Belgian comic strip magazine, Spirou. ... 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... This article is about the year. ...


A long transition

Fournier authored nine books in the series, which saw Spirou evolve into a more modern character. Where Franquin's stories tended to be politically neutral (his later works, notably Idées noires, would show his more militant side), Fournier's stint on Spirou addressed such hot topics (for the 1970s) as nuclear energy (L'Ankou), drug-funded dictatorships (Kodo le tyran) or Duvalier-style repression (Tora Torapa, which saw the first post-Franquin appearance of both Zorglub and Zantafio). Although Fournier introduced some new characters (such as Ororéa, Itoh Kata, as well as an occult criminal organisation known as The Triangle), none have been reused by later artists. The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ... Nuclear energy is energy released from the nucleus of an atom. ... Duvalier can refer to one of the following: Haitian Presidents: Francois Duvalier aka Papa Doc Jean-Claude Duvalier aka Baby Doc This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


However, at the end of the 1970s Fournier's pace began to slow down and the publisher, Dupuis, sought new authors to replace him. For a time, three separate teams worked on concurrent stories. Nic Broca (art) and Raoul Cauvin (writing) took on Fournier's lead without adding much to the characters. Their primary addition to the Spirou universe, namely the "Black box", a device which annihilates sound, is in fact an acknowledged rehash from an early Sophie story by Jidéhem (La bulle du silence). Strangely, the authors were not allowed by the publisher to use any of the side characters and because of this, the duo's three stories read somewhat like a parenthesis in the series. The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ... Sophie may be (But are not limited to): People: Sophie, Monacos Eurovision Song Contest 1975 entrant. ...


Yves Chaland, however, proposed a far more radical make-over, and his (very short) stint on Spirou (Coeurs d'acier, 1982) is an ironic re-staging of the strip as it was in the 1940s. This homage to Jijé and early Franquin was seen at the time as too sophisticated for the mainstream readership. Yves Chaland (born April 3, 1957 in Lyon, France; died July 18, 1990 (car accident)) was a French cartoonist. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the form of speech, see Irony. ... // Events and trends World War II was a truly global conflict with many facets: immense human suffering, fierce indoctrination, and the use of new, extremely devastating weapons such as the atomic bomb. ...


Spirou in contemporary times

But it was the team of Philippe Tome (writing) and Janry (art) which was to find lasting success with Spirou, both in terms of sales and critical appeal. Graphically, the authors' work was seen as a modern homage to Franquin's classic work, while their plots involved such modern topics as biotech (Virus), robotics (Qui arrêtera Cyanure?) and even time travel (The diptych of L'horloger de la comète and Le réveil du Z, the latter featuring a future reincarnation of Zorglub). Their position as the official Spirou authors made them the flagship team to a whole new school of young, likeminded artists, such as Didier Conrad, Bernard Hislaire or Frank Le Gall, who had illustrious careers of their own. For a time, Spirou also acted as a side character in Frank Pé's short-lived absurd humor strip L'Élan. Philippe Vandevelde, working under the pseudonym Tome or Philippe Tome (born February 24, 1957 in Brussels), is a comic strip script writer. ... Jean-Richard Geurts, perhaps better known under his pseudonym Janry (born October 2, 1957 in Jadotville, currently Likasi, Zaire), is a comic strip artist. ... Time travel is a concept that has long fascinated humanity—whether it is Merlin experiencing time backwards, or religious traditions like Mohammeds trip to Jerusalem and ascent to heaven, returning before a glass knocked over had spilt its contents. ... Bernard Hislaire (born in 1957 in Belgium) is a Belgian comic book writer. ...


With La jeunesse de Spirou (1987), Tome and Janry set to imagine Spirou's youth. This was later developed into a spin-off series, Le Petit Spirou ("Young Spirou"), which details the antics of the character as an elementary school boy. A lot of the gags center around the character's interest in the opposite sex. It is generally acknowledged, however, that the Le Petit Spirou doesn't have very much in common, psychologically speaking, with the old one. 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


A new villain, the unlucky Mafia boss Vito Cortisone, was introduced in Spirou à New-York, while Spirou à Moscou (1990) sees Spirou and Fantasio pay their first visit to the USSR just as it was about to collapse in the real world (the country was dissolved in 1991). This article is about the year. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In Machine qui rêve (1998), Tome and Janry tried to once again renew the series with a more mature storyline (wounded hero, love relationships, etc.), coupled with a more realistic graphic style. This sudden shift into a darker tone, although its seeds were apparent in previous Spirou albums and in other series by the same authors (Soda, Berceuse assassine), shocked many readers. While many considered the change in tone to be courageous and laudable, there was some concern that Spirou lost much of its point when presented as a "realistic" character. At any rate, the controversy caused Tome & Janry to concentrate on Le Petit Spirou. 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ...


Then, after a 6 years break, which only saw the publication of L'accélérateur atomique, a Spirou spoof by Lewis Trondheim not included in the official series (but which received Dupuis' approval), the series went back to a more classical storytelling mode with seasoned cartoonists Jean-David Morvan (writing) and José-Luis Munuera (art). The latter kept close to the spirit of Franquin's graphical style, while bringing its own touch of manga-inspired modernism. Morvan and Munuera's Spirou is partly remarkable in that it uses background elements from the whole history of the character, and not just from Franquin's period. Lewis Trondheim (born December 11, 1964; real name: Laurent Chabosy) is a prolific French cartoonist and one of the founders of the publisher LAssociation. ... André Franquin (January 3, 1924 - January 5, 1997) was a Belgian cartoonist, perhaps best known for his humorous comic strip creation Gaston and the Marsupilami. ... Manga (漫画) is the Japanese word for comics and print cartoons; outside of Japan, it usually refers specifically to Japanese comics. ...


Une aventure de Spirou et Fantasio par...

It is often said that it is the secret dream of many Belgian and French cartoonists to draw their own Spirou. Perhaps Dupuis had this in mind when, in 2005, they launched a second series of one-off volumes by various authors, under the name Une aventure de Spirou et Fantasio par... ("A Spirou and Fantasio adventure by..."). The first volume, by Fabien Vehlmann and Yoann, had a modern storyline and art, not dissimilar in spirit to Movan and Munuera's work. The upcoming (2006) volume, by Yann and Fabrice Tarrin, is expected to be a slightly modernized homage to Franquin's classic period. 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Albums

This list includes French titles, their English translation, and the first year of publication


André Franquin

  • 1. Quatre aventures de Spirou et Fantasio (Four Adventures of Spirou and Fantasio), featuring Spirou et les plans du robot (Spirou and the Robot's Plans), 1948; Spirou sur le ring (Spirou on the Ring, 1948); Spirou fait du cheval (Spirou rides a horse, 1949); and Spirou chez les Pygmées (Spirou meets the Pygmees, 1949)
  • 2. Il y a un sorcier à Champignac (There is a Sorcerer in Champignac, 1951), written by Henri Gillain. First appearance of the Mayor and of the Count of Champignac.
  • 3. Les Chapeaux noirs (The Black Hats, 1952); followed by Comme une mouche au plafond (Like a Fly on the Ceiling, by Jijé); Spirou et les hommes-grenouilles (Spirou and the Frogmen by Jijé); and Mystère à la frontière (Mystery at the Frontier)
  • 4. Spirou et les héritiers (Spirou and the Heirs, 1952). First appearance of Zantafio and the Marsupilami.
  • 5. Les voleurs du Marsupilami (The Marsupilami Robberers, 1952, after an idea by Jo Almo). This story picks up exactly where Spirou et les héritiers ends.
  • 6. La corne de rhinocéros (The Rhinoceros Horn, 1953). First appearance of Seccotine.
  • 7. Le dictateur et le champignon (The Dictator and the Mushroom, 1953)
  • 8. La mauvaise tête (The Wrong Head, 1954)
  • 9. Le repaire de la murène (The Murena's Hideout, 1955). First appearance of John Helena.
  • 10. Les pirates du silence (Pirates of Silence, 1956, with Rosy (writing) and Will (backgrounds)); followed by La Quick Super (1956)
  • 11. Le gorille a bonne mine (Gorilla's in Good Shape, 1956); followed by Vacances sans histoires (Uneventful Holidays)
  • 12. Le nid des marsupilamis (The Marsupilamis' Nest, 1957); followed by La foire aux gangsters (Gangsters at the Fair)
  • 13. Le voyageur du mésozoïque (The Traveller from the Mesozoic, 1957); followed by La peur au bout du fil (Fear at the End of the Line, 1959, with Greg (writing))
  • 14. Le prisonnier du Bouddha (The prisoner of the Buddha, 1959, with Greg (writing) and Jidéhem (backgrounds))
  • 15. Z comme Zorglub (Z is for Zorglub, 1960, with Greg (writing) and Jidéhem (backgrounds)). First appearance of Zorglub.
  • 16. L'ombre du Z (The Shadow of Z, 1960, with Greg (writing) and Jidéhem (backgrounds)). Concludes a diptych.
  • 17. Spirou et les hommes-bulles (Spirou and the Bubble Men, 1959); followed by Les petits formats (The Small Formats, 1960); both with Roba (art). These stories, along with Tembo Tabou, first appeared in a newspaper, Le Parisien Libéré.
  • 18. QRN sur Bretzelburg (Q.R.N. over Bretzelburg, 1963, with Greg (writing) and Jidéhem (backgrounds)). A longer version was published in 1987 in a limited printing.
  • 19. Panade à Champignac (Babysitting in Champignac, 1968; with Peyo and Gos (writing)); followed by Bravo les Brothers (Hurray for the Brothers, 1967; with Jidéhem (backgrounds))
  • 24. Tembo Tabou, (1958, with Roba (art)); followed by short stories

1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) is a common year starting on Saturday. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) is a common year starting on Saturday. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1953 (MCMLIII) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1953 (MCMLIII) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1955 (MCMLV in Roman) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Jean-Claude Fournier

  • 20. Le faiseur d'or (The gold maker, 1970). Last appareance of the Marsupilami.
  • 21. Du glucose pour Noémie (Glucose for Noémie, 1971)
  • 22. L'abbaye truquée (The Fiddled Abbey, 1972)
  • 23. Tora Torapa (1973)
  • 25. Le gri-gri du Niokolo-Koba (The Greegree of Niokolo-Koba, 1974)
  • 26. Du cidre pour les étoiles (Cider for the Stars, 1977)
  • 27. L'Ankou (The Ankou, 1978)
  • 28. Kodo le tyran (Kodo the Tyrant, 1979)
  • 29. Des haricots partout (Beans Everywhere, 1980). Concludes a diptych.

1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1971 calendar). ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1972 calendar). ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1973 calendar). ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1974 calendar). ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ... This page refers to the year 1979. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ...

Nic & Cauvin

  • 30. La ceinture du grand froid (The great cold ring, 1983)
  • 31. La boîte noire (The Black Box, 1983)
  • 32. Les faiseurs du silence (The silence makers, 1984)

1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Tome & Janry

  • 33. Virus (1984)
  • 34. Aventure en Australie (Adventure in Australia, 1985)
  • 35. Qui arrêtera Cyanure? (Who Shall Stop Cyanide?, 1985)
  • 36. L'horloger de la comète (The Comet's Watchmaker, 1986)
  • 37. Le réveil du Z (Awakening of the Z, 1986). Concludes a diptych.
  • 38. La jeunesse de Spirou (Spirou's Youth, 1987)
  • 39. Spirou à New-York (Spirou in New York, 1987)
  • 40. La frousse aux trousses (Fear on the tail, 1988)
  • 41. La vallée des bannis (Valley of the Banished, 1989). Concludes a diptych.
  • 42. Spirou à Moscou (Spirou in Moscow, 1990)
  • 43. Vito la Déveine (Bad Luck Vito, 1991)
  • 44. Le rayon noir (The Black Ray, 1993)
  • 45. Luna fatale (1995)
  • 46. Machine qui rêve (Dreaming machine, 1998)

1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... This article is about the year. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ...

Jean-David Morvan & José-Luis Munuera

  • 47. Paris-sous-Seine (Paris-under-Seine, 2004)
  • 48. L'homme qui ne voulait pas mourir (The Man Who Didn't Want To Die, 2005)

2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Special issues ("hors-séries")

  • 1. L'héritage (Featuring: Fantasio et son Tank (1946, Franquin), L'Héritage (1946, Franquin)
  • 2. Radar le robot (Featuring La maison préfabriquée (1946, Jijé & Franquin), Radar le robot (1947, Franquin) and le Homard (1957, Franquin)
  • 3. La voix sans maître et 5 autres aventures (Featuring stories by Rob-Vel (La naissance de Spirou, 1938; Spirou et la puce, 1943), Franquin (Fantasio et le siphon, 1957), Nic (Le fantacoptère solaire, 1980) and Tome & Janry (La voix sans maître, 1981; La menace, 1982; La Tirelire est là, 1984; Une semaine de Spirou et Fantasio, 2001)
  • 4. Fantasio et le fantôme et 4 autres aventures (Featuring stories by Jijé (Fantasio et le fantôme, 1946), Franquin (La Zorglumobile, 1976; Noël dans la brousse, 1949; Fantasio et les pantins téléguidés, 1957), Yves Chaland (Cœurs d'acier, 1982) and Fournier (Vacances à Brocéliande, 1973; Joyeuses Pâques, Papa!, 1971)

1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1943 (MCMXLIII) is a common year starting on Friday. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1976 calendar). ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) is a common year starting on Saturday. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1973 calendar). ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1971 calendar). ...

Une aventure de Spirou et Fantasio par...

Une aventure de Spirou et Fantasio par... (A Spirou and Fantasio Adventure by...) is a new series started on January 2006. It's a collection of special albums that will appear in parallel with the regular series, without interfering with it. Each album will be a one-shot with different authors and will offer a new viewpoint on the series.

  • 1. Les géants pétrifiés (The Petrified Giants, 2006, by Fabien Vehlmann (story) and Yoann (art))
  • 2. Upcoming: Le tombeau des Champignac (The Tomb of the Champignacs, 2006, by Yann (story) and Fabrice Tarrin (art))
  • 3. Upcoming: Les marais du temps (The Marshlands of Time, 2007, by Frank Le Gall)

Yves Chaland's case

In 1982, Yves Chaland designed and drawn an interrupted story, which was prepublished in "Le Journal de Spirou", n°2297 to n°2318, in two-colour. This unfinished story was first collected in an unofficial album in 1984, "À la recherche de Bocongo", and then, legally, under the name of "Cœurs d'acier" (Champaka editor, 1990). This last edition proposes the original BDs, and a text from Yann Le Pennetier, illustrated by Chaland, for finishing the interrupted story. Yves Chaland (born April 3, 1957 in Lyon, France; died July 18, 1990 (car accident)) was a French cartoonist. ...


This episode was included in "L'intégrale Chaland" (Humanoïdes Associés, 1997 - ISBN 2-7316-1243-6), and at last joined to the rest of Spirou's adventures in the Special Edition n°4 (Dupuis ed.). Yves Chaland (born April 3, 1957 in Lyon, France; died July 18, 1990 (car accident)) was a French cartoonist. ... Spirou is: a Belgian childrens comic magazine; one of its serial comic strips, Spirou et Fantasio (Spirou and Fantasio), which is also published in hardcover format the eponymous character of the comic strip. ...


See also

Belgium has a strong tradition of comic art, that has grown seperately in each linguistic part of Belgium. ... Tintin, one of the most famous Belgian comics Franco-Belgian comics are comics written in Belgium and France. ...

External link

  • History with pictures

  Results from FactBites:
 
Spirou comic magazine (1488 words)
Spirou magazine is without a doubt one of the most important Belgian comics magazines, along with Tintin.
Fournier quit 'Spirou et Fantasio' in 1979 and after some stories by Yves Chaland and Nic Broca, Tome and Janry became the new authors of the title series.
Spirou changed its focus to just children in the early 1990s and the grown-up comics were dropped.
Spirou - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1799 words)
Spirou was originally an elevator (lift) operator (in French: un groom) for the Moustique Hotel, and remains dressed with his red uniform to this day, although there has been no mention of his occupation for many years.
Spirou has a pet squirrel called Spip, and spirou means "squirrel" (lit.) and "mischievous" (fig.) in Walloon.
Spirou et les héritiers (Spirou and the Heirs, 1952).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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