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Encyclopedia > Spiro Agnew
Spiro Theodore Agnew
Spiro Agnew

In office
January 20, 1969 – October 10, 1973
President Richard Nixon
Preceded by Hubert Humphrey
Succeeded by Gerald Ford

In office
January 25, 1967 – January 7, 1969
Lieutenant(s) Marvin Mandel
Preceded by J. Millard Tawes
Succeeded by Marvin Mandel

In office
1962 – 1966
Preceded by Christian H. Kahl
Succeeded by Dale Anderson

Born November 9, 1918(1918-11-09)
Towson, Maryland
Died September 17, 1996 (aged 77)
Berlin, Maryland
Political party Republican
Spouse Judy Agnew
Religion Episcopalian

Spiro Theodore Agnew (November 9, 1918September 17, 1996) was the thirty-ninth Vice President of the United States serving under President Richard M. Nixon, and the fifty-fifth Governor of Maryland. He is most famous for his resignation in 1973 after he was charged with the crime of tax evasion. He is also noted for his quick rise in politics - in six years from County Executive to Vice President. from PBS.org File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Seal of the office of the Vice-President of the United States The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the President. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1973 Gregorian calendar. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... Hubert Horatio Humphrey, Jr. ... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... Thomas Johnson, the first Governor of Maryland after independence. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday and the summer of 1967 was known as The Summer of Peace and Love (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Marvin Mandel (b. ... John Millard Tawes (b. ... Marvin Mandel (b. ... The Baltimore County Executive is the highest elected official representing the government of Baltimore County, Maryland. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Towson is an unincorporated community and a census-designated place in Baltimore County, Maryland, United States. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 90 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N  - Longitude 75° 03′ W to 79° 29... September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Berlin is a town in Worcester County, Maryland, United States. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 90 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N  - Longitude 75° 03′ W to 79° 29... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Elinor Isabel Judy Agnew was the wife of the thirty-ninth Vice President of the United States, Spiro Agnew. ... The Episcopal Churchs Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul in Washington, D.C. is often referred to as the National Cathedral. The Episcopal Church in the United States of America is the Province of the Anglican Communion in the United States and several other nations, including dioceses... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Seal of the office of the Vice-President of the United States The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the President. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... Thomas Johnson, the first Governor of Maryland after independence. ... This article contrasts tax evasion, tax avoidance, tax resistance and tax mitigation. ...

Contents

Early life

Spiro Agnew was born Spiros Anagnostopoulos in the Towson section of Baltimore County, Maryland to Theodore Spiros Anagnostopoulos and Margaret Akers, a native of Virginia. His father emigrated from Gargalianoi, Greece to the United States in 1897 and owned a diner famous for its chicken souvlaki and spanakopita. He became a Baltimore Democratic ward leader and well known in the local Greek community. He was Theodore Agnew's only child; his mother had two children from an earlier marriage that left her a widow. Towson is an unincorporated community and a census-designated place in Baltimore County, Maryland, United States. ... For other uses of Baltimore, see Baltimore (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,774 sq mi (110,785 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ... Gargalianoi (Greek: Γαργαλιάνοι), also Gargaliani, is a community located in the western part of Messenia. ... Souvlaki (Greek: Σουβλάκι) is a popular Greek fast food consisting of small pieces of meat and sometimes vegetables grilled on a skewer. ... Wikibooks Cookbook has more about this subject: Spanakopita Spanakopita is a Greek spinach pie, made with pre-cooked spinach, phyllo pastry, butter, olive oil, feta cheese, green onions, egg, and seasoning. ... Nickname: Motto: The Greatest City in America,[4] Get in on it. ...


Agnew attended Forest Park Senior High School in Baltimore before enrolling in the Johns Hopkins University in 1937. He studied chemistry at Johns Hopkins University for three years before joining the U.S. Army and serving in Europe during World War II. He was awarded the Bronze Star for his service in France and Germany. Forest Park Senior High School is a four year , public high school in Baltimore, Maryland. ... The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ... Chemistry - the study of interactions of chemical substances with one another and energy based on the structure of atoms, molecules and other kinds of aggregrates Chemistry (from Egyptian kēme (chem), meaning earth[1]) is the science concerned with the reactions, transformations and aggregations of matter, as well as accompanying... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Bronze Star Medal is a United States Armed Forces individual military decoration and is the fourth highest award for bravery, heroism or meritorious service. ...


Before leaving for Europe, Agnew worked at an insurance company where he met Elinor Judefind, known as Judy. Agnew married her on on May 27, 1942. They eventually had four children: Pamela, James Rand, Susan, and Kimberly. Elinor Isabel Judy Agnew was the wife of the thirty-ninth Vice President of the United States, Spiro Agnew. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Upon his return from the war, Agnew transferred to the evening program at the University of Baltimore School of Law. He studied law at night while working as a grocer and as an insurance salesman. In 1947, Agnew received his LL.B. (later amended to Juris Doctor) and moved to the suburbs to begin practicing law. He passed the bar in 1949. University of Baltimore School of Law, or UB Law, is a law school located in Baltimore, Maryland on the University of Baltimore campus. ... The degree of Bachelor of Laws is the principal academic degree in law in most common law countries. ... Doctor of Law, Doctor of Jurisprudence, or Juris Doctor (abbreviated J.D. or JD, from the Latin, Teacher of Law) is a professional degree in law offered by universities in a number of countries. ...


Early political career

Agnew, raised as a Democrat, switched parties and became a Republican. During the 1950s, he aided U.S. Congressman James Devereux in four successive winning election bids, before entering politics himself in 1957 upon his appointment to the Baltimore County Board of Appeals by Democratic Baltimore County Executive Michael J. Birmingham. In 1960, he made his first elective run for office as a candidate for Judge of the Circuit Court, finishing last in a five-person contest. The following year, the new Democratic Baltimore County Executive, Christian H. Kahl, dropped him from the Zoning Board, with Agnew loudly protesting, thereby gaining name recognition. Brigadier General James Devereux James Patrick Sinnott Devereux (February 20, 1903 – August 5, 1988) was an United States Marine Corps general who was Commanding Officer of the 1st Defense Battalion during the defense of Wake Island in December of 1941. ... The Baltimore County Executive is the highest elected official representing the government of Baltimore County, Maryland. ... Circuit courts previously were United States federal courts established in each federal judicial district. ...


In 1962, Agnew ran for election as Baltimore County Executive, seeking office in a predominantly Democratic county that had seen no Republican elected to that position in the twentieth century, with only one (Roger B. Hayden) earning victory after he left. Running as a reformer and Republican outsider, he took advantage of a bitter split in the Democratic Party and was elected. Agnew backed and signed an ordinance outlawing discrimination in some public accommodations, among the first laws of this kind in the United States. The Baltimore County Executive is the highest elected official representing the government of Baltimore County, Maryland. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... This article is about discrimination in the social science context. ...


Governor of Maryland

After choosing not to seek a second term as County Executive, Agnew ran for the position of Governor of Maryland in 1966. In this overwhelmingly Democratic state, he was elected after the Democratic nominee, George P. Mahoney, a Baltimore paving contractor and perennial candidate running on an anti-integration platform, narrowly won the Democratic gubernatorial primary out of a crowded slate of eight candidates. Many Democrats opposed to segregation then crossed party lines to give Agnew the governorship by 82,000 votes. Thomas Johnson, the first Governor of Maryland after independence. ... Children at a parade in North College Hill, Ohio Racial integration, or simply integration includes desegregation (the process of ending systematic racial segregation). ... The Rex Theatre for Colored People Racial segregation is characterized by separation of different races in daily life, such as eating in a restaurant, drinking from a water fountain, using a rest room, attending school, going to the movies, or in the rental or purchase of a home[1]. Segregation...


As governor, Agnew worked with the Democratic legislature to pass tax and judicial reforms, as well as tough anti-pollution laws. Projecting an image of racial moderation, Agnew signed the state's first open-housing laws and succeeded in getting the repeal of an anti-miscegenation law. However, during the riots that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., Agnew angered many African-American leaders by lecturing them about their constituents in stating, "I call on you to publicly repudiate all black racists. This, so far, you have been unwilling to do." Frederick Douglass with his second wife Helen Pitts Douglass (sitting) who was white, a famous 19th century American example of miscegenation. The woman standing is her sister Eva Pitts. ... “MLK” redirects here. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ...


Vice Presidency

Spiro Agnew is sworn in as vice-president in 1969. From left to right: Lyndon Johnson, Richard Nixon, Everett Dirksen, Spiro Agnew (with hand raised), Hubert Humphrey.

Agnew's moderate image, immigrant background and success in a traditionally Democratic state made him an attractive running mate for Nixon in 1968. In line with what would later be called Nixon's "Southern Strategy," Agnew was selected as a candidate for being sufficiently from the South to attract Southern moderate voters, yet not as identified with the Deep South, which could have turned off Northern centrists come election time. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... Everett McKinley Dirksen Everett McKinley Dirksen (January 4, 1896 – September 7, 1969) was a Republican U.S. Congressman and Senator from Illinois. ... Hubert Horatio Humphrey, Jr. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


His vice presidency was the highest-ranking United States political office ever reached by a Greek-American citizen or, for that matter, a Marylander. Agnew's nomination was supported by many conservatives within the Republican Party and by Nixon. But a small band of delegates started shouting "Spiro Who?" and tried to place George W. Romney's name in nomination. Nixon's wishes prevailed and Agnew went from his first election as County Executive to Vice President in six years—one of the fastest rises in U.S. political history. A Greek American is a citizen of the United States of Greek heritage or descent. ... George Wilcken Romney (July 8, 1907 – July 26, 1995) was chairman of the American Motors Corporation from 1954 to 1962 and was elected three times as the Republican Governor of Michigan from 1963 to 1969. ...


Agnew was a protege of Nelson Rockefeller, then governor of New York State and a head of the moderate wing of the Republican Party. Rockefeller was Nixon's chief opponent during the 1968 primary season. Going into the 1968 GOP convention neither Nixon nor Rockefeller had enough votes to clinch the nomination, but Nixon had nearly enough. He invited Rockefeller to his hotel room and proposed that Rockefeller throw his support to Nixon in exchange for naming the Vice Presidential nominee. The only condition was that Rockefeller could not name himself. Rockefeller named Agnew. (The corruption that later got Agnew expelled from office was well known in Maryland, and almost certainly by Rockefeller.[citation needed] It has been suggested that Rockefeller named Agnew as VP nominee with the intention of having him exposed and ejected at some later point, allowing Nixon to name him VP.[citation needed] Nixon instead of course nominated Gerald Ford, who in turn named Rockefeller as his VP.) Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 – January 26, 1979) was an American Vice President, governor of New York State, philanthropist and businessman. ... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ...


Agnew was known for his tough criticisms of political opponents, especially journalists and anti-Vietnam War activists. He was known for attacking his opponents with unusual, often alliterative epithets, some of which were coined by White House speech-writers William Safire and Pat Buchanan, including "nattering nabobs of negativism" (written by Safire), "pusillanimous pussyfoots", and "hopeless, hysterical hypochondriacs of history". Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... William Safire receiving the 2006 Presidential Medal of Freedom. ... Patrick Joseph Buchanan (born November 2, 1938) is an American politician, author, syndicated columnist, and broadcaster. ...


In short, Agnew was Nixon's "hatchet man" when defending the administration on the Vietnam War. Agnew was chosen to make several powerful speeches in which he spoke out against anti-war protesters and media portrayal of the Vietnam War, labeling them "Franco Un-American". Agnew toned down his rhetoric and dropped most of the alliterations after the 1972 election with a view to running for president himself in 1976.

Spiro Agnew congratulates launch control after launch of Apollo 17 in 1972.
Spiro Agnew congratulates launch control after launch of Apollo 17 in 1972.

Image File history File links Spiro_Agnew_at_NASA.jpg Original image from NASA: http://grin. ... Image File history File links Spiro_Agnew_at_NASA.jpg Original image from NASA: http://grin. ...

Alternative to Connally

By mid-1971, Nixon concluded that Spiro Agnew was not "broad-gauged" enough for the vice-presidency. He constructed a scenario by which Agnew would resign, enabling Nixon to appoint Treasury Secretary John Connally as vice president under the provisions of the Twenty-fifth Amendment. [1] By appealing to southern Democrats, Connally would help Nixon create a political realignment, perhaps even replacing the Republican party with a new party that could unite all conservatives. Nixon rejoiced at news that the vice president, feeling sorry for himself, had talked about resigning to accept a lucrative offer in the private sector. Yet while Nixon excelled in daring, unexpected moves, he encountered some major obstacles to implementing this scheme. John Bowden Connally, Jr. ...


John Connally was a Democrat, and his selection might offend both parties in Congress, which under the Twenty-fifth Amendment had to ratify the appointment of a new vice president. Even more problematic, John Connally did not want to be vice president. He considered it a "useless" job and felt he could be more effective as a cabinet member. Nixon responded that the relationship between the president and vice president depended entirely on the personalities of whoever held those positions, and he promised Connally they would make it a more meaningful job than ever in its history, even to the point of being "an alternate President." But Connally declined, never dreaming that the post would have made him president when Nixon was later forced to resign during the Watergate scandal.


Nixon concluded that he would not only have to keep Agnew on the ticket but must publicly demonstrate his confidence in the vice president. He recalled that Eisenhower had tried to drop him in 1956 and believed the move had only made Ike look bad. Nixon viewed Agnew as a general liability, but backing him could mute criticism from "the extreme right." Attorney General John Mitchell, who was to head the reelection campaign, argued that Agnew had become "almost a folk hero" in the South and warned that party workers might see his removal as a breach of loyalty. As it turned out, Nixon won reelection in 1972 by a margin wide enough to make his vice-presidential candidate irrelevant. Dwight David Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969) was an American General and politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... Mitchell (far left) meeting with Nixon, J. Edgar Hoover, and John Ehrlichman on May 26, 1971. ...


Immediately after his reelection, however, Nixon made it clear that Agnew should not become his eventual successor. The president had no desire to slip into lame-duck status by allowing Agnew to seize attention as the frontrunner in the next election. "By any criteria he falls short," the president told John Ehrlichman: "Energy? He doesn't work hard; he likes to play golf. Leadership?" Nixon laughed. "Consistency? He's all over the place. He's not really a conservative, you know." John D. Ehrlichman as Assistant to the President for Domestic Affairs, May 13, 1969. ...


Nixon considered placing the vice president in charge of the American Revolution Bicentennial as a way of sidetracking him. But Agnew declined the post, arguing that the Bicentennial was "a loser." Because everyone would have a different idea about how to celebrate the Bicentennial, its director would have to disappoint too many people. "A potential presidential candidate," Agnew insisted, "doesn't want to make any enemies."


Resignation

On October 10, 1973, Spiro Agnew became the second Vice President to resign the office. Unlike John C. Calhoun, who resigned to take a seat in the Senate, Agnew resigned and then pleaded nolo contendere (no contest) to criminal charges of tax evasion and money laundering, part of a negotiated resolution to a scheme wherein he accepted $29,500 in bribes during his tenure as governor of Maryland. The bribes were paid to Agnew by some members of the construction industry to get their projects approved. When Agnew moved from Baltimore to Washington, DC, he continued to demand payments. Angered, the construction men turned government's witnesses. Agnew was fined $10,000 and put on three years' probation. The $10,000 fine only covered the taxes and interest due on what was "unreported income" from 1967. The plea bargain was later mocked as the "greatest deal since the Lord spared Isaac on the mountaintop" by former Maryland Attorney General Stephen Sachs. Students of Professor John Banzhaf from The George Washington University Law School, collectively known as Banzhaf's Bandits, found four residents of the state of Maryland willing to put their names on a case and sought to have Agnew repay the state $268,482 - the amount he was known to have taken in bribes. After two appeals by Agnew, he finally resigned himself to the matter and a check for $268,482 was turned over to Maryland state Treasurer William James in early 1983. As a result of his nolo contendere plea, Agnew was later disbarred by the State of Maryland. Like most jurisdictions, Maryland lawyers are automatically disbarred after being convicted of a felony, and a nolo contendere plea exposes the defendant to the same penalties as a guilty plea. is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1973 Gregorian calendar. ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century, best known as a spokesman for slavery, nullification and the rights of electoral minorities, such as slave-holders. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Nolo contendere, in criminal trials, in some common law jurisdictions, is a plea where the defendant neither admits nor disputes a charge, serving as an alternative to a pleading of guilty or not guilty. ... This article contrasts tax evasion, tax avoidance, tax resistance and tax mitigation. ... Money laundering is the practice of engaging in financial transactions in order to conceal the identity, source and destination of the money in question. ... Sacrifice of Isaac, a detail from the sarcophagus of the Roman consul Junius Bassus, ca. ... John Banzhaf is a Professor of Law at The George Washington University Law School. ... The George Washington University Law School, commonly referred to as GW Law, was founded in 1865 and is the oldest law school in the District of Columbia. ... Disbarment is a revocation of a lawyers ability to practice law or argue cases. ...


His resignation triggered the first use of the 25th Amendment, as the vacancy prompted the appointment and confirmation of Gerald Ford as his successor. It remains one of only two times that the amendment has been employed to fill a Vice Presidential vacancy. (The other time was when Ford, after becoming President, chose Nelson Rockefeller to succeed him as Vice President.) Page 1 of Amendment XXV in the National Archives Page 2 of the amendment Amendment XXV (the Twenty-fifth Amendment) of the United States Constitution clarifies an ambiguous provision of the Constitution regarding succession to the Presidency, and establishes procedures both for filling a vacancy in the office of the... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 – January 26, 1979) was an American Vice President, governor of New York State, philanthropist and businessman. ...


After the 1972 landslide Agnew was seen as Nixon's natural successor in the 1976 Presidential Election. With the strong support of the party's conservative wing, he had planned to decide on running only after the 1974 midterm elections. He had also hoped to build on his foreign policy credentials by visiting the Soviet Union. However the scandal broke and damaged him. Nixon was also not supportive of Agnew replacing him and in April 1973 his staff was cut back and duties trimmed. Privately, Agnew blamed Nixon for releasing the accusations of bribes and tax evasion in order to divert attention from the growing Watergate scandal that was engulfing Nixon's administration.[citation needed] Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The Watergate scandal was a 1972 break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters at a Watergate Office Building in Washington, D.C. by members of Richard Nixons administration and the resulting cover-up which led to the resignation of the President. ...


As fate would have it, Nixon was forced from office but Agnew's earlier resignation and criminal charges ruined any hopes of an Agnew presidency. The two men never spoke to each other again. As a gesture of reconciliation, Nixon's daughters invited Agnew to attend Nixon's funeral in 1994, and Agnew complied. In 1996, when Agnew died, Nixon's daughters returned the favor and attended Agnew's funeral.


Later life

After leaving politics, Agnew became an international trade executive with homes in Rancho Mirage, California; Arnold, Maryland; Bowie, Maryland; and Ocean City, Maryland. In 1976, he briefly re-entered the public spotlight and engendered controversy with anti-Zionist statements that called for the United States to withdraw its support for the state of Israel because of Israel's bad treatment of Christians, as well as what Gerald Ford publicly criticized as "unsavory" "remarks about Jews" [2][3][4]. [5] Rancho Mirage is a city located in Riverside County, California. ... Arnold is a census-designated place located in Anne Arundel County, Maryland. ... Motto: Growth, Unity and Progress Location of Bowie in the State of Maryland Coordinates: Country United States State Maryland County Prince Georges County Established 1916  - Mayor G. Frederick Robinson Area    - City 41. ... Nickname: Location in Maryland Coordinates: County Worcester County Founded 1875 Incorporated 1880 Government  - Mayor Rick Meehan Area  - City 94. ... A bilingual poster in Romanian and Hungarian promoting a film about Jewish settlement in Palestine, 1930s. ... This article is about the religous people known as Christians. ...


In 1980, Agnew published a memoir in which he implied that Nixon and Alexander Haig had planned to assassinate him if he refused to resign the Vice-Presidency, and that Haig told him "to go quietly … or else."[1] Also in 1980, he considered, then decided against, running for Congress from Maryland. (ref. ABC News) Agnew also wrote a novel, The Canfield Decision,[2] about a vice president who was "destroyed by his own ambition." Nixon reportedly made negative comments about Agnew. When John Erlichman, the President's counsel and assistant, asked him why he kept Agnew on the ticket in the 1972 election, Nixon replied that “No assassin in his right mind would kill me." As a literary genre, a memoir (from the Latin memoria, meaning memory) forms a subclass of autobiography, although it is an older form of writing. ... For other persons named Alexander Haig, see Alexander Haig (disambiguation). ...


Agnew died suddenly on September 17, 1996, at the age of 77 at Atlantic General Hospital, in Berlin, Maryland in Worcester County (near his Ocean City home) only a few hours after being hospitalized and diagnosed with an advanced, yet to that point undetected, form of leukemia. He is buried at Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens, a cemetery in Timonium, Maryland in Baltimore County. September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Berlin is a town in Worcester County, Maryland, United States. ... Leukemia or leukaemia (see spelling differences) is a cancer of the blood or bone marrow and is characterized by an abnormal proliferation (production by multiplication) of blood cells, usually white blood cells (leukocytes). ... Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens is a cemetery in Timonium, Maryland in Baltimore County. ... Castle Ashby Graveyard Northamptonshire A cemetery is a place in which dead bodies and cremated remains are buried. ... Lutherville-Timonium is a census-designated place located in Baltimore County, Maryland. ... Baltimore County is a suburban county located in the northern portion of U.S. state of Maryland. ...


Trivia and pop culture

  • In an edition of the radio show I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue, chairman Humphrey Lyttelton mentioned Richard Nixon appointed "Spiro T. Agnew to be his vice anagram".
  • Agnew's anti-discrimination ordinance led to the demise of Baltimore's Buddy Deane Show in 1964 when Deane refused to allow black and white teens to dance together. This event was the factual basis for John Waters' film Hairspray and the subsequent Broadway musical.
  • Agnew was granted a coat of arms by the short-lived American College of Heraldry and Arms in 1968.
  • A joke about Agnew ("What kind of watch does Mickey Mouse wear? A Spiro Agnew watch.") inspired companies to manufacture Spiro Agnew wristwatches. The watches were sold during the Nixon presidency. [6] Photo of a Spiro Agnew wristwatch When Agnew appeared as a guest on Monday Night Football, announcer Frank Gifford joked that the vice president was wearing "a Howard Cosell wristwatch."
  • In the book and film "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas", Hunter S. Thompson, while describing Las Vegas says "This was Bob Hope's turf. Frank Sinatra's. Spiro Agnew's."
  • A character in the Futurama series is referred to as "the headless body of Agnew". He figures as a sort of mindless slave of Richard Nixon's head (since the series is set in the year 3000 and all important people from the 20th and 21th century only remain as living heads preserved in jars) until he is given away to a professor as payment for solving the global warming problem.
  • A seventh-season Simpsons episode called "Mother Simpson" features a Spiro Agnew-themed alarm clock, which is used during the 60's by Homer's mother and her entourage of radical friends to sabotage and destroy Mr. Burns' germ laboratory (the alarm clock is used to time the release of poisonous gas within the lab).
  • According to the Season 3 episode of Angel ("Fredless") Spiro Agnew was a "Grothnar Demon".
  • In the animated Disney program Recess, Spiro T. Agnew lends his name to a middle school
  • In the play The Complete History of America: Abridged it is noted that rearranging the letters in Spiro Agnew gives the phrase: Grow A Penis.
  • Huey Long, the counterculture fugitive played by Dennis Hopper in the film Flashback, in on the run for disconnecting Agnew's train car during a stop in Spokane, Washington.
  • In an episode of "All in the Family", Gloria and Mike are playing a game in which they kiss to certain words and names. Mike suggests "Spiro Agnew" and Archie gets upset and tells them not to.

Im Sorry I Havent a Clue, sometimes abbreviated to ISIHAC or simply Clue, is a BBC radio comedy which has run since 11 April 1972. ... The Buddy Deane Show was a teen dance television show that aired on WJZ-TV in Baltimore, Maryland from 1957 until 1964, similar to Philadelphias American Bandstand. ... John Waters (born April 22, 1946) is an American filmmaker, writer, personality, visual artist and art collector, who rose to fame in the early 1970s for his transgressive cult films. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theater combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... Heraldry in its most general sense encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of officers of arms. ... A seal bearing the arms of The American College of Heraldry and Arms The American College of Heraldry and Arms, Inc. ... Russian Poljot Siberia model finished movement viewed through crystal back For other uses, see Watch (disambiguation). ... Monday Night Football (MNF) is a live television broadcast of the National Football League. ... Francis Newton Gifford (born August 16, 1930 in Santa Monica, California) was an American football player and one of the better-known American sports commentators in the latter part of the 20th century who made the transition from an athlete to broadcasting. ... Howard William Cosell, born Howard William Cohen (March 25, 1918 – April 23, 1995) was an American sports journalist on American television. ... Futurama is an Emmy Award-winning animated American sitcom created by Matt Groening, also the creator of The Simpsons, and developed by Groening and David X. Cohen for the Fox network. ... Futuramas recurring human characters: // In the episode A Big Piece of Garbage, Ron Popeil, his severed head floating in a large jar, mentions several of his inventions including the (fictional) technology to keep human heads alive in jars, implicitly arresting the aging process. ... Children can be found playing on playhouses such as this during recess. ... Dennis Lee Hopper (born May 17, 1936) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor and film-maker, known for his roles in Blue Velvet, 24 and Easy Rider. ... Flashback is a 1990 film starring Dennis Hopper and Kiefer Sutherland. ...

References

  1. ^ Agnew, Spiro T:: "Go quietly ... or else". Morrow, 1980. ISBN 0-688-03668-6.
  2. ^ Agnew, Spiro T:: "The Canfield Decision". Putnam Pub Group, 1976. ISBN 978-9997554871.

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Spiro Agnew
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Spiro Agnew
  • Spiro Agnew biography on U.S. Senate website
  • The 30th Anniversary of Agnew's Resignation As Vice President (University of Maryland)
  • Papers of Spiro T. Agnew at the University of Maryland Libraries
  • The Archives of Maryland collection of speeches, messages and other public papers during Agnews governorship 1967-69


Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

Preceded by
Christian H. Kahl
Baltimore County Executive
1962–1966
Succeeded by
Dale Anderson
Preceded by
J. Millard Tawes
Governor of Maryland
1967–1969
Succeeded by
Marvin Mandel
Preceded by
William E. Miller
Republican Party Vice Presidential candidate
1968 (won), 1972 (won)
Succeeded by
Bob Dole
Preceded by
Hubert Humphrey
Vice President of the United States
January 20, 1969 to October 10, 1973
Succeeded by
Gerald Ford

  Results from FactBites:
 
Spiro Agnew: Biography and Much More from Answers.com (2526 words)
Spiro Theodore Agnew (November 9, 1918 – September 17, 1996), born Spiros Anagnostopoulos in Towson, Maryland, was the thirty-ninth Vice President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1973 under President Richard M. Nixon.
Spiro Agnew was born to Theodore Spiros Anagnostopoulos and Margaret Akers.
Agnew's headless body, acting as a Frankestein-like creature (complete with evil growl and Boris Karloff-style arm-swipe), is the sidekick and transporter of Earth President Richard Nixon's disembodied head, in one episode of the cartoon Futurama.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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