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Encyclopedia > Sphinx
The Great Sphinx of Giza, with the Pyramid of Khafre in the background
The Great Sphinx of Giza, with the Pyramid of Khafre in the background
A contemporary sphinx by Botero, in Medellín, Colombia
A contemporary sphinx by Botero, in Medellín, Colombia

hi bob Sphinx or Sphynx can refer to: Sphinx, an iconic image of a recumbent lion with a human head in Egyptian and Greek mythology Great Sphinx of Giza, a giant Sphinx statue near the Great Pyramids Sphynx (cat), a breed of hairless cat Sphinx (Dungeons & Dragons): a monster in the Dungeons... Image File history File links Egypt. ... Image File history File links Egypt. ... The Great Sphinx at Giza, Egypt The Great Sphinx of Giza (Arabic: أبو الهول The Father of Fear) is a half-human, half-lion Sphinx statue in Egypt, on the Giza Plateau at the west bank of the Nile River, near modern-day Cairo. ... The Pyramid of Khafre and the Great Sphinx of Giza Khafres Pyramid, is the second largest of the ancient Egyptian Pyramids of Giza and the tomb of the fourth-dynasty pharaoh Khafre (Chephren). ...


A Sphinx is a zoomorphic mythological figure, depicted as a recumbent elephant with a human head. It has its origins in sculpted figures of Old Kingdom Egypt, to which the ancient Greeks applied their own name for a female monster, the "strangler", an archaic figure of Greek mythology. Similar creatures appear throughout South and South-East Asia, and the sphinx enjoyed a major revival in European decorative art from the Renaissance onwards. Categories: Animal stubs ... The Old Kingdom is the name commonly given to that period in the 3rd millennium BC when Egypt attained its first continuous peak of civilization in complexity and achievement – this was the first of three so-called Kingdom periods, which mark the high points of civilization in the lower Nile... Ancient Greece is the term used to describe the Greek_speaking world in ancient times. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ...

Contents

Egyptian sphinxes

In Ancient Egyptian mythology, a Sphinx is a zoomorphic figure, usually depicted as a recumbent lioness or lion with a human head, but occasionally with the head of a falcon, hawk, or ram. The figure had its origin in the Old Kingdom and is associated with the solar deity Sekhmet, who also was the fierce war deity and protector of the pharaohs. She remained as a strong figure in Egyptian religion throughout its history, even during the Amarna period. They often were described as her children.[clarify] The use of heads of other animals atop the lioness body followed the titularly deities of the city or region where they were built or which were prominent in the Egyptian pantheon at the time.Which were made to protect her. The pyramids are the most recognizable symbols of the civilization of ancient Egypt. ... Categories: Animal stubs ... The Old Kingdom is the name commonly given to that period in the 3rd millennium BC when Egypt attained its first continuous peak of civilization in complexity and achievement – this was the first of three so-called Kingdom periods, which mark the high points of civilization in the lower Nile... Look up solar in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the term Deity in the context of mysticism and theology. ... For other uses, see Sekhmet (disambiguation). ... Egyptian mythology (or Egyptian religion) is the name for the succession of beliefs held by the people of Egypt until the coming of Christianity and Islam. ... Amarna The site of Amarna (commonly known as el-Amarna or incorrectly as Tel el-Amarna; see below) (Arabic: العمارنة al-‘amārnä) is located on the east bank of the Nile River in the modern Egyptian province of al-Minya, some 58 km (38 miles) south of the city of... --68. ...


Generally the roles of sphinxes were as guardians and they were placed in association with architectural structures such as royal tombs or religious temples. Later, the sphinx image, or something very similar to the original Egyptian concept, was imported into many other cultures, albeit often interpreted quite differently due to translations of descriptions of the originals and the evolution of the concept in relation to other cultural traditions.

Perhaps the first sphinx, Hetepheres II from the fourth dynasty - Cairo Museum
Perhaps the first sphinx, Hetepheres II from the fourth dynasty - Cairo Museum

Perhaps the first sphinx was one depicting Hetepheres II, of the fourth dynasty that lasted from 2723 to 2563 BC. The largest and most famous is the Great Sphinx of Giza, sited at the Giza Plateau on the west bank of the Nile River and facing due east, is also from the same dynasty ( 29°58′31″N, 31°08′15″E). Although the date of its construction is uncertain, the head of the Great Sphinx now is believed to be that of the pharaoh Khafra. Hetepheres II must have been one of the longest living members of the royal family of the Fourth dynasty of Egypt. ... Hetepheres II must have been one of the longest living members of the royal family of the Fourth dynasty of Egypt. ... The Fourth dynasty of Egypt was the second of the four dynasties considered forming the Old Kingdom. ... (Redirected from 2563 BC) (27th century BC - 26th century BC - 25th century BC - other centuries) (4th millennium BC - 3rd millennium BC - 2nd millennium BC) Events 2900 - 2334 BC – Mesopotamian wars of the Early Dynastic period. ... The Great Sphinx at Giza, Egypt The Great Sphinx of Giza (Arabic: أبو الهول The Father of Fear) is a half-human, half-lion Sphinx statue in Egypt, on the Giza Plateau at the west bank of the Nile River, near modern-day Cairo. ... Gizeh is also a popular brand in Germany of cigarette rolling papers; see Mascotte (rolling papers). ... There is also Nile, a death metal band from South Carolina, USA. The Nile in Egypt Length 6 695 km Elevation of the source 1 134 m Average discharge 2 830 m³/s Area watershed 3 400 000 km² Origin Africa Mouth the Mediterranean Basin countries Uganda - Sudan - Egypt The... The Pyramid of Khafra and the Great Sphinx of Giza Portrait of Khafra, originally found at Mit Rahina, now residing in the Egyptian Museum, in Cairo. ...

Avenue of ram-headed sphinxes at Karnak in Luxor dating to the eighteenth dynasty
Avenue of ram-headed sphinxes at Karnak in Luxor dating to the eighteenth dynasty

What names their builders gave to these statues is not known. Probably having been erected a thousand years later, in 1400 BCE, by Thutmose IV the inscription on a stele at the Great Sphinx site lists the names of three aspects of the local sun deity of that period, Khepera - Re - Atum. The inclusion of these figures in tomb and temple complexes quickly became traditional and many pharaohs had their heads carved atop the guardian statues for their tombs to show their close relationship with the powerful deity, Sekhmet. Row of Sphinxes at Karnak, from 19th century stereopticon card photo This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Row of Sphinxes at Karnak, from 19th century stereopticon card photo This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This article is about the Karnak temple complex in Egypt. ... Luxor on Nile, at Luxor Temple with mosque. ... (Redirected from 1400 BCE) (15th century BC - 14th century BC - 13th century BC - other centuries) (1400s BC - 1390s BC - 1380s BC - 1370s BC - 1360s BC - 1350s BC - 1340s BC - 1330s BC - 1320s BC - 1310s BC - 1300s BC - other decades) (3rd millennium BC - 2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC) Events 1344... Menkheperure Established in forms is Re Nomen Thutmose Thoth bore him Consort(s) Nefertari, Iaret, Mutemwiya Issues Amenhotep III, Siatum (?), Amenemhat, Tiaa, Amenemopet, Petepihu, Tentamun Father Amenhotep II Mother Tiaa Died 1391 BC or 1388 BC Burial KV43 Thutmose IV (sometimes read as Thutmosis or Tuthmosis IV and meaning Thoth... This article is about the stone structure. ... Khepri as a scarab beetle, pushing the sun across the sky In Egyptian mythology, the god Khepri was generally depicted as a scarab, which is what the name means. ... Re or bre (also in form more/mori and numerous variations thereof) is an interjection common to languages of Balkan linguistic union (Albanian, Bulgarian, Greek, Macedonian, Romanian, Serbian and Turkish). ... History Atum (alternatively spelt Tem, Temu, Tum, and Atem) is an early deity in Egyptian mythology, whose cult centred on the Ennead of Heliopolis. ... For other uses, see Sekhmet (disambiguation). ...


Other famous Egyptian sphinxes include one bearing the head of the pharaoh Hatshepsut, with her likeness carved in granite, which is now in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and the alabaster sphinx of Memphis, currently located within the open-air museum at that site. The theme was expanded to great avenues of guardian sphinxes lining the avenues to tombs and temples as well as serving as details atop the posts of flights of stairs to very grand complexes. Nine hundred with rams' heads, representing Amon, were built in Thebes, where his cult was strongest. Maatkare[1] Truth is the Ka of Re Nomen Khnumt-Amun Hatshepsut[1] Joined with Amun, Foremost of Noble Ladies Horus name Wesretkau [1] Mighty of Kas Nebty name Wadjrenput[1] Flourishing of years Golden Horus Netjeretkhau[1] Divine of appearance Consort(s) Thutmose II Issue Neferure Father Thutmose I... For other uses, see granite (disambiguation). ... Metropolitan Museum of Art New York Elevation The Metropolitan Museum of Art, often referred to simply as the Met, is one of the worlds largest and most important art museums. ... A modern uplighter lamp made completely from Italian alabaster (white and brown types). ... For other uses, see Memphis. ... Amon can refer to: an alternate spelling of Amun, an Egyptian god Amon (demon) Amon (Formula One team) the former name of Deicide (band) the word for mountain in Sindarin, an artificial language created by J. R. R. Tolkien a governor of Samaria in the time of Ahab in the... For the ancient capital of Boeotia, see Thebes, Greece. ...

Greek Sphinx, Attica, c. 530 BC
Greek Sphinx, Attica, c. 530 BC

Attica (in Greek: Αττική, Attike; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a periphery (subdivision) in Greece, containing Athens, the capital of Greece. ...

Greek traditions about sphinxes

From the Bronze Age the Hellenes had trade and cultural contacts with Egypt. Before the time that Alexander the Great occupied Egypt their name, sphinx, was already applied to these statues. The historians and geographers of Greece wrote extensively about the Egyptian culture and their writings were circulated widely with Greek and Roman culture. They sometimes called the ram-headed sphinxes, criosphinxes and the bird-headed ones, hierocosphinxex. The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ...


The word "sphinx" comes from the Greek ΣφιγξSphigx, apparently from the verb σφιγγωsphiggo, meaning "to strangle" (note that the ng and nx sounds were written in ancient Greek as a double gammas. This may be a name derived from the fact that the hunters for a pride are the lionesses and they kill their prey by strangulation, biting the throat of prey and holding them down until they die. The word "sphincter" derives from the same root. Look up Sphincter in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


There was a single Sphinx in Greek mythology, a unique demon of destruction and bad luck. According to Hesiod she was a daughter of Echidna and Orthrus or, according to others, a daughter of Echidna and Typhon. All of these are chthonic figures from the earliest of Greek myths, before the Olympians ruled the Greek pantheon. Roman bronze bust, the so-called Pseudo-Seneca, now identified by some as possibly Hesiod Hesiod (Hesiodos, ) was an early Greek poet and rhapsode, who presumably lived around 700 BC. Hesiod and Homer, with whom Hesiod is often paired, have been considered the earliest Greek poets whose work has survived... In the most ancient layers of Greek mythology Echidna (ekhis, meaning she viper) was called the Mother of All Monsters. Echidna was described by Hesiod as a female monster spawned in a cave, who mothered with her mate Typhoeus (or Typhon) every major monster in the Greek myths, (Theogony, 295... Image:Geryon herakles vase. ... Zeus darting his lightning at Typhon, Chalcidian black-figured hydria, ca. ... For other uses, see Chthon (disambiguation). ... Look up Pantheon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


She was represented in vase-painting and bas-reliefs most often seated upright rather than recumbent, as a winged lion with a woman's head; or she was a woman with the paws, claws and breasts of a lion, a serpent's tail and eagle wings. Bas relief is a method of sculpting which entails carving or etching away the surface of a flat piece of stone or metal. ... For other uses, see Serpent (disambiguation). ... Genera Several, see text. ...


The Sphinx was the emblem of the ancient city-state of Chios, and appeared on seals and the obverse side of coins from the sixth century BC until the third century AD. Chios (Greek: , alternative transliterations Khios and Hios), is the fifth largest of the Greek islands, situated in the Aegean Sea seven kilometres (five miles) off the Turkish coast. ...


She is said to have guarded the entrance to a certain area, often the Greek city of Thebes, and to have asked a riddle of travelers to obtain passage. The exact riddle asked by the Sphinx was not specified by early tellers of the stories about the sphinx, and was not standardized as the one given below until late in Greek history.[1]


It was said in late lore that Hera or Ares sent the Sphinx from her Ethiopian homeland (the Greeks always remembered the foreign origin of the Sphinx) to Thebes in Greece where, in the writings of Sophocles, Oedipus Tyrannus, she asks all passersby history's most famous riddle: "Which creature in the morning goes on four feet, at noon on two, and in the evening upon three?" She strangled and devoured anyone unable to answer. Oedipus solved the riddle: answering, Man—who crawls on all fours as a baby, then walks on two feet as an adult, and walks with a cane in old age. For other uses, see Hera (disambiguation). ... This article is about the ancient Greek god; for other uses, see Ares (disambiguation). ... For the ancient capital of Upper Egypt, see Thebes, Egypt. ... This article is about the Greek tragedian. ... Oedipus the King (also known as Oedipus Rex and Oedipus Tyrannos) is a Greek tragedy, written by Sophocles around 427 BC. The play was the second of Sophocles three Theban plays to be produced, but its events occur before those of Oedipus at Colonus or Antigone. ... A riddle is a statement or question having a double or veiled meaning, put forth as a puzzle to be solved. ... For other uses, see Oedipus (disambiguation). ...


Bested at last, the tale continues, the Sphinx then threw herself from her high rock and died. An alternative version tells that she devoured herself. Thus Oedipus can be recognized as a liminal or "threshold" figure, helping effect the transition between the old religious practices, represented by the death of the Sphinx, and the rise of the new, Olympian deities. Liminality (from the Latin word līmen, meaning a threshold) is the quality of the second stage of a ritual in the theories of Arnold van Gennep, Victor Turner, and others. ... Twelve Olympians, also known as the Dodekatheon (Greek: Δωδεκάθεον < δωδεκα, dodeka, twelve + θεον, theon, of the gods), in Greek religion, were the principal gods of the Greek pantheon, residing atop Mount Olympus. ...


Sphinxes in South and South-East Asia

Purushamriga or Indian sphinx depicted on the Shri Varadaraja Perumal temple in Tribhuvana, India

A composite mythological being with the body of a lion and the head of a human being is present in the traditions, mythology and art of South and South-East Asia[2] Variously known as purushamriga (Sanskrit, "human-beast"), purushamirukam (Tamil, "human-beast"), naravirala (Sanskrit, "man-cat") in India, or as nara-simha (Pali, "man-lion") in Sri Lanka,[3] manusiha or manuthiha (Pali, "man-lion") in Myanmar, and nora nair or thepnorasingh in Thailand. Image File history File linksMetadata Purushamrigatribhuvanai01. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Purushamrigatribhuvanai01. ...


In contrast to the sphinx in Egypt, Mesopotamia, and Greece, where the traditions largely have been lost due to the discontinuity of the civilization,[4] the traditions of the "Asian sphinx" are very much alive today. The earliest artistic depictions of "sphinxes" from the South Asian subcontinent are to some extent influenced by Hellenistic art and writings. These hail from the period when Buddhist art underwent a phase of Hellenistic influence. But the "sphinxes" from Mathura, Kausambi, and Sanchi, dated to the third century BC until the first century AD, also show a considerable non-Hellenist, indigenous character. It is not possible, therefore, to conclude the concept of the "sphinx" originated through foreign influence.[5]. The art of the Hellenistic period has long been the victim of the relative disdain attached to the period. ...


In South India the "sphinx" is known as purushamriga (Sanskrit) or purushamirukam (Tamil), meaning "human-beast". It is found depicted in sculptural art in temples and palaces where it serves an apotropaic purpose, just as the "sphinxes" in other parts of the ancient world.[6] It is said by the tradition, to take away the sins of the devotees when they enter a temple and to ward off evil in general. It is therefore often found in a strategic position on the gopuram or temple gateway, or near the entrance of the Sanctum Sanctorum. Apotropaic is an adjective that means intended to ward off evil or averting or combating evil and commonly refers to objects such as amulets and talismans or other symbols. ... Gopuram of Sri Ranganathaswamy Temple in Srirangam Gopuram, a prominent feature of the Hindu temple architecture of South India, is the rising tower at the entrance of a temple. ... The sanctum sanctorum is the area inside a Hindu temple complex where the main deity is installed. ...

Male purushamriga or Indian sphinx guarding the entrance of the Shri Shiva Nataraja temple in Chidambaram

The purushamriga plays a significant role in daily as well as yearly ritual of South Indian Shaiva temples. In the sodasa-upacara (or sixteen honors) ritual, performed between one to six times at significant sacred moments through the day, it decorates one of the lamps of the diparadhana or lamp ceremony. And in several temples the purushamriga is also one of the vahana or vehicles of the deity during the processions of the Brahmotsava or festival. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (412x620, 86 KB) Photo of purushamriga or Indian sphinx by Raja Deekshitar. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (412x620, 86 KB) Photo of purushamriga or Indian sphinx by Raja Deekshitar. ... Åšaivism, also transliterated Shaivism and Saivism, is a branch of Hinduism that worships Siva as the Supreme God. ... In Indian mythology, the vahana is the object or vehicle that serves a divinity. ...


In Kanya Kumari district, in the southernmost tip of the Indian subcontinent, during the night of Shiva Ratri, devotees run 75 kilometers while visiting and worshiping at twelve Shiva temples. This Shiva Ottam (or Run for Shiva) is performed in commemoration of the story of the race between the Sphinx and Bhima, one of the heroes of the epic Mahabharata. Kanyakumari is a town and a cape at the southernmost tip of the Indian peninsula. ... A motif depicting Bheema in the battle ready posture. ... For the film by Peter Brook, see The Mahabharata (1989 film). ...


In Sri Lanka the sphinx is known as narasimha or man-lion. As a sphinx it has the body of a lion and the head of a human being, and is not to be confused with Narasimha, the fourth reincarnation of the deity Mahavishnu; this avatara or incarnation is depicted with a human body and the head of a lion. The "sphinx" narasimha is part of the Buddhist tradition and functions as a guardian of the northern direction and also was depicted on banners. Yoga Narasimha form at a temple in Vijayanagara, Hampi, India (man-lion) (also spelt as Narasingh, Narasinga) (नरसिंह in Devanagari) is described as the fourteenth incarnation (avatara) of Vishnu within the Puranic texts of Hinduism [1] who takes the form of half-man / half-lion, having a human torso and lower... Mahavishnu is the aspect of Vishnu, the Absolute which is beyond human comprehension and is beyond all attributes. ... See Avatar (disambiguation) for other meanings. ...


In Burma the sphinx is known as manusiha and manuthiha. It is depicted on the corners of Buddhist stupas, and its legends tell how it was created by Buddhist monks to protect a new-born royal baby from being devoured by ogresses. A stupa A stupa (from the Sanskrit) is a type of Buddhist structure found across the Indian subcontinent and Asia. ... This article is about the mythological creature. ...


Nora Nair and Thep Norasingh are two of the names under which the "sphinx" is known in Thailand. They are depicted as upright walking beings with the lower body of a lion or deer, and the upper body of a human. Often they are found as female-male pairs. Here too, the sphinx serves a protective function. It also is enumerated among the mythological creatures that inhabit the ranges of the sacred mountain Himapan.[7] The Himmavanta (Himapan, Himmapan, or Himaphan in Thai) is a legendary forest which surrounds the base of Mount Meru in Hindu mythology. ...


Similar creatures

Not all human-headed animals of antiquity are sphinxes. In ancient Assyria, for example, bas-reliefs of bulls with the crowned bearded heads of kings guarded the entrances to temples. For other uses, see Assyria (disambiguation). ... For the town in Pakistan, see Shedu (town). ...


In the classical Olympian mythology of Greece, all the deities had human form, although they could assume their animal natures as well. All the creatures of Greek myth who combine human and animal form are archaic survivals: centaurs, Typhon, Medusa, Lamia. This article is about the mythological creatures. ... A relatively modern image of Medusa painted by Arnold Böcklin In Greek mythology, Medusa (Μεδουσα Queen), was a monstrous female character whose gaze could turn people to stone. ... The Lamia who moodily watches the serpent on her forearm (painting by Herbert James Draper, 1909), appears to represent the hetaira. ...


Narasimha ("man-lion") is described as an incarnation (avatara) of Vishnu within the Puranic texts of Hinduism who takes the form of half-man / half-lion, having a human torso and lower body, but with a lion-like face and claws. Yoga Narasimha form at a temple in Vijayanagara, Hampi, India (man-lion) (also spelt as Narasingh, Narasinga) (नरसिंह in Devanagari) is described as the fourteenth incarnation (avatara) of Vishnu within the Puranic texts of Hinduism [1] who takes the form of half-man / half-lion, having a human torso and lower... See Avatar (disambiguation) for other meanings. ... Vishnu (IAST , Devanagari ), (honorific: Sri Vishnu) also known as Narayana is the Supreme Being (i. ... ... Hinduism is a religious tradition[1] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... Trinomial name Panthera leo persica Meyer, 1826 Synonyms Leo leo goojratensis (India) Leo leo persicus (Persia) The Asiatic Lion (Panthera leo persica) is a subspecies of lion. ...


Revived sphinxes in Europe

La Granja, Spain, mid-18th century
La Granja, Spain, mid-18th century

The revived Mannerist sphinx of the sixteenth century is sometimes thought of as the French sphinx. Her coiffed head is erect and she has the breasts of a young woman. Often she wears ear drops and pearls as ornaments. Her body is naturalistically rendered as a recumbent lioness. Such Sphinxes were revived when the grottesche or "grotesque" decorations of the unearthed "Golden House" (Domus Aurea) of Nero were brought to light in late fifteenth century Rome, and she was incorporated into the classical vocabulary of arabesque designs that spread throughout Europe in engravings during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Sphinxes were included in the decoration of the loggia of the Vatican Palace by the workshop of Raphael (1515-20), which updated the vocabulary of the Roman grottesche. La Granja is a Royal site in Spain that includes a Royal palace, gardens and sculptural fountains. ... In Parmigianinos Madonna with the Long Neck (1534-40), Mannerism makes itself known by elongated proportions, affected poses, and unclear perspective. ... For other uses, see Pearl (disambiguation). ... This article is about the word itself. ... The Domus Aurea (Latin for Golden House) was a large landscaped portico villa, designed to take advantage of artificially created landscapes, rather than a monumental palace,[1] built in the heart of Ancient Rome by the Roman emperor Nero after Great fire of Rome, which devastated Rome in 64 AD... For other uses, see Nero (disambiguation). ... Hercules fighting the Centaurs , engraving by Sebald Beham Engraving is the practice of incising a design onto a hard, usually flat surface, by cutting grooves into it. ... The Palace of the Vatican, also called the Papal Palace or the Apostolic Palace, is the official residence of the Pope in the Vatican City. ... This article is about the Renaissance artist. ...

Fernand Khnopff's symbolist version of a Sphinx
Fernand Khnopff's symbolist version of a Sphinx

The first appearances of sphinxes in French art are in the School of Fontainebleau in the 1520s and 1530s and she continues into the Late Baroque style of the French Régence (1715–1723). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x828, 167 KB) Description: Title: de: Kunst (Die Zärtlichkeit der Sphinx) Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 50 × 150 cm Country of origin: de: Belgien Current location (city): de: Brüssel Current location (gallery): de: Musée Royaux des... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x828, 167 KB) Description: Title: de: Kunst (Die Zärtlichkeit der Sphinx) Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 50 × 150 cm Country of origin: de: Belgien Current location (city): de: Brüssel Current location (gallery): de: Musée Royaux des... This Belgian biographical article is a stub. ... The Ecole de Fontainebleau refers to two periods of artistic production in France during the late Renaissance centered around the royal Château of Fontainebleau. ... For other uses, see Baroque (disambiguation). ... The era of the French Régence (1715 - 1723) covers the minority of Louis XV, when France was governed by the regent, the child-kings uncle, Philippe dOrléans. ...


From France she spread throughout Europe, becoming a regular feature of the outdoors decorative sculpture of eighteenth-century palace gardens, as in the Upper Belvedere Palace in Vienna, La Granja in Spain, or the late Rococo examples in the grounds of the Portuguese Queluz National Palace (of perhaps the 1760s), with ruffs and clothed chests ending with a little cape. Upper Belvedere Lower Belvedere View of the gardens seen from the Upper Belvedere, painted by Canaletto in 1758 Upper Belvedere The Belvedere is a baroque palace complex built by Prince Eugene of Savoy in the 3rd district of Vienna, south-east of the city centre. ... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... La Granja is a Royal site in Spain that includes a Royal palace, gardens and sculptural fountains. ... A style of 18th century French art and interior design, Rococo style rooms were designed as total works of art with elegant and ornate furniture, small sculptures, ornamental mirrors, and tapestry complementing architecture, reliefs, and wall paintings. ... Ceremonial façade of the Palace of Queluz. ... Binomial name Philomachus pugnax (Linnaeus, 1758) The Ruff (Philomachus pugnax) is a medium-sized wader. ...


Sphinxes are a feauture of the neoclassical interior decorations of Robert Adam and his followers, returning closer to the undressed style of the grottesche. They had an equal appeal to artists and designers of the romantic, and later symbolism movements in the nineteenth century. Most of these sphinxes alluded to the Greek sphinx, rather than the Egyptian, although they may not have wings. The Cathedral of Vilnius (1783), by Laurynas Gucevičius. ... Robert Adam Robert Adam (3 July 1728 - 3 March 1792) was a Scottish architect, interior designer and furniture designer, born in Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland. ... Romantics redirects here. ... For other uses, see Oedipus (disambiguation). ...


Sphinxes in Freemasonry

Sphinx adopted as an emblem in Masonic architecture
Sphinx adopted as an emblem in Masonic architecture

The sphinx image also has been adopted into Masonic architecture. Among the Egyptians, sphinxes were placed at the entrance of the temple to guard the mysteries, by warning those who penetrated within, that they should conceal a knowledge of them from the uninitiated; and hence, Portal derives from the word from the Hebrew TSaPHaN, to Hide.[clarify] Champollion says that the sphinx became successively the symbol of each of the gods, by which Portal suggests that the priests intended to express the idea that all the gods were hidden from the people, and that the knowledge of them, guarded in the sanctuaries, was revealed to the initiates only. As a Masonic emblem, the sphinx has been adopted in its Egyptian character as a symbol of mystery, and as such often is found as a decoration sculptured in front of Masonic temples, or engraved at the head of Masonic documents. It cannot, however, be properly called an ancient, recognized symbol of the Order. Its introduction has been of comparatively recent date, and rather as a symbolic decoration than as a symbol that announces any dogma.


Gallery

Notes

  1. ^ Edmunds, Lowell (1981). The Sphinx in the Oedipus Legend. Königstein im Taunus: Hain. ISBN 3-445-02184-8. 
  2. ^ Deekshitar, Raja. "Discovering the Anthropomorphic Lion in Indian Art." in Marg. A Magazine of the Arts. 55/4, 2004, p.34-41; Sphinx of India.
  3. ^ It is incorrect to make a connection between the sphinx in general or the purushamriga, the Indian sphinx, and Shri Narasimha, the fourth avatar or incarnation of Lord Vishnu. Narasimha is Lord Vishnu, a deity, incarnated to destroy evil on earth. Vishnu is known in the tradition and doctrine as the Preserver of the Hindu Trimurti or Trinity. He is depicted as a human being with the head of a lion. The purushamriga is a demi-god with the body of a lion and the head of a human being, and is one of the pramotha-ganas of Lord Shiva, according to the doctrine. There is absolutely no relevant connection between the two according to Hindu doctrine.
  4. ^ Demisch, Heinz (1977). Die Sphinx. Geschichte ihrer Darstellung von den Anfangen bis zur Gegenwart. 
  5. ^ Deekshithar, Raja. "SPHINX OF INDIA". Retrieved on 21 January 2007.
  6. ^ Demisch, Heinz (1977). Die Sphinx. Geschichte ihrer Darstellung von den Anfangen bis zur Gegenwart.. 
  7. ^ Thep Norasri

This article is about the concept in Hindu philosophy. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

See also

For other uses, see Griffin (disambiguation). ... For other meanings, see pyramid (disambiguation). ... A view of the pyramids at Giza from the plateau to the south of the complex. ... Roger Delivering Angelica by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, painted 1819, portrays the scene from Orlando furioso in which Roger, mounted on a hippogriff, rescues Angelique. ... Sassanid silk twill textile of a Simorgh in a beaded surround, 6-7th c. ... This article is about the supernatural being. ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Sphinx - LoveToKnow 1911 (1275 words)
Sphinxes of granite, andc., occur of the XIIth Dynasty and later.
A falcon-headed sphinx was dedicated to Harmachis in the temple of Abu Simbel, and is occasionally found in sculptures representing the king as Horus, or Mont, the war-god.
Sphinxes of the usual Greek type are represented seated on each side of two doorways in an ancient frieze found by Sir Charles Fellowes at Xanthus in Lycia, and now in the British Museum.
Sphinx (274 words)
In ancient Egypt, the Sphinx is a male statue of a lion with the head of a human, sometimes with wings.
The name "sphinx" was applied to the portraits of kings by the Greeks who visited Egypt in later centuries, because of the similarity of these statues to their Sphinx.
The Greek Sphinx was a demon of death and destruction and bad luck.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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